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Sample records for angiotensin system blockage

  1. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vinícius A.; Probst, Vanessa S.; Nogari, Bruna M.; Teixeira, Denilson C.; Felcar, Josiane M.; Santos, Denis C.; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group − individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength. PMID:27065543

  2. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  3. Blockage of angiotensin II type I receptor decreases the synthesis of growth factors and induces apoptosis in C6 cultured cells and C6 rat glioma

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, O; Guevara, P; Escobar, E; García-Navarrete, R; Pineda, B; Sotelo, J

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a main effector peptide in the renin–angiotensin system and participates in the regulation of vascular tone. It also has a role in the expression of growth factors that induce neovascularisation which is closely associated to the growth of malignant gliomas. We have shown that the selective blockage of the AT1 receptor of angiotensin inhibites tumour growth, cell proliferation and angiogenesis of C6 rat glioma. The aim of this study was to study the effects of the blockage of AT1 receptor on the synthesis of growth factors, and in the genesis of apoptosis in cultured C6 glioma cells and in rats with C6 glioma. Administration of losartan at doses of 40 or 80 mg kg−1 to rats with C6 glioma significantly decreased tumoral volume and production of platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. It also induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of Ang II increased cell proliferation of cultured C6 cells which decreased by the administration of losartan. Our results suggest that the selective blockage of AT1 diminishes tumoral growth through inhibition of growth factors and promotion of apoptosis. PMID:15785746

  4. Reproduction and the renin-angiotensin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    A unique aspect of the circulating renin-angiotensin system and the many independent tissue renin-angiotensin systems is their interactions at multiple levels with reproduction. These interactions, which have received relatively little attention, include effects of estrogens and possibly androgens on hepatic and renal angiotensinogen mRNA; effects of androgens on the Ren-2 gene and salivary renin in mice; the prorenin surge that occurs with but outlasts the LH surge during the menstrual cycle; the inhibitory effects of estrogens on thirst and water intake; the tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the brain, the anterior pituitary, and the ovaries and testes, that is, in all the components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis; the presence of some components of the renin-angiotensin system in the uterus and the fetoplacental unit; and the possible relation of renin and angiotensin to ovulation and fetal well-being. These interactions are described and their significance considered in this short review.

  5. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  6. Classical Renin-Angiotensin System in Kidney Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Matthew A.; Crowley, Steven D.; Gurley, Susan B.; Mirotsou, Maria; Coffman, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has powerful effects in control of the blood pressure and sodium homeostasis. These actions are coordinated through integrated actions in the kidney, cardio-vascular system and the central nervous system. Along with its impact on blood pressure, the renin-angiotensin system also influences a range of processes from inflammation and immune responses to longevity. Here, we review the actions of the “classical” renin-angiotensin system, whereby the substrate protein angiotensinogen is processed in a two-step reaction by renin and angiotensin converting enzyme, resulting in the sequential generation of angiotensin I and angiotensin II, the major biologically active renin-angiotensin system peptide, which exerts its actions via type 1 and type 2 angiotensin receptors. In recent years, several new enzymes, peptides, and receptors related to the renin-angiotensin system have been identified, manifesting a complexity that was previously unappreciated. While the functions of these alternative pathways will be reviewed elsewhere in this journal, our focus here is on the physiological role of components of the “classical” renin-angiotensin system, with an emphasis on new developments and modern concepts. PMID:24944035

  7. Renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction: Potential protective role of Angiotensin (1-7).

    PubMed

    Sigurta', Anna; Zambelli, Vanessa; Bellani, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction is a feared complication of mechanical ventilation that adversely affects the outcome of intensive care patients. Human and animal studies demonstrate atrophy and ultrastructural alteration of diaphragmatic muscular fibers attributable to increased oxidative stress, depression of the anabolic pathway regulated by Insulin-like growing factor 1 and increased proteolysis. The renin-angiotensin system, through its main peptide Angiotensin II, plays a major role in skeletal muscle diseases, mainly increasing oxidative stress and inducing insulin resistance, atrophy and fibrosis. Conversely, its counter-regulatory peptide Angiotensin (1-7) has a protective role in these processes. Recent data on rodent models show that renin-angiotensin system is activated after mechanical ventilation and that infusion of Angiotensin II induces diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy. Given: (A) common pathways shared by ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction and skeletal muscle pathology induced by renin-angiotensin system, (B) evidences of an involvement of renin-angiotensin system in diaphragm atrophy and dysfunction, we hypothesize that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction, while Angiotensin (1-7) can have a protective effect on this pathological process. The activation of renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be demonstrated by quantification of its main components in the diaphragm of ventilated humans or animals. The infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) in an established rodent model of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be used to test its potential protective role, that can be further confirmed with the infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) antagonists like A-779. Verifying this hypothesis can help in understanding the processes involved in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction pathophysiology and open new possibilities for its

  8. Angiotensin III: a physiological relevant peptide of the renin angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Yugandhar, Vudhya G; Clark, Michelle A

    2013-08-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) is a peptide hormone system that plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various diseases, including congestive heart failure, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and diabetic nephropathy. This has led researchers to focus extensively on this system, leading to the discovery of various peptides, peptidases, receptors and signal transduction mechanisms intrinsic to the RAS. Angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin (Ang) II, Ang III, Ang IV, and Ang-(1-7) are the main biologically active peptides of RAS. However, most of the available studies have focused on Ang II as the likely key peptide from the RAS that directly and indirectly regulates physiological functions leading to pathological conditions. However, data from recent studies suggest that Ang III may produce physiologically relevant effects that are similar to those produced by Ang II. Hence, this review focuses on Ang III and the myriad of physiological effects that it produces in the body. PMID:23692861

  9. Some Comparative Aspects of the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malvin, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) maintains salt and water balance. Discusses functions of the RAS as defined in mammalian species, considering how the system arose and what its original function was. Also discusses where some of the changes occurred in the system (and why) as well as other topics. (JN)

  10. Effect of renin-angiotensin system on sodium intake.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, E

    1976-01-01

    1. Water and saline intake was measured in rats depleted of Na by I.P. dialysis. Na intake was prevented 180 min but not 60-90 min after bilateral nephrectomy. Unilateral nephrectomy as well as ureteral ligature had no effect on Na intake. 2. Renin (3u.) injected I.P. re-established the Na appetite abolished by nephrectomy. 3. Angiotensin I (5 ng) or II (5-40 ng) injected into the 3rd ventricle, also restored the Na intake and this effect was dose-dependent. 4. The angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor Sq 20,881 (1 mg/kg) inhibited the effect of AI but not that of AII in restoring Na intake. 5. It is concluded that the kidneys might play a role in the regulation of Na intake through the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:1255521

  11. Recent Updates on the Proximal Tubule Renin-Angiotensin System in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao C; Zhuo, Jia L

    2016-08-01

    It is well recognized that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists not only as circulating, paracrine (cell to cell), but also intracrine (intracellular) system. In the kidney, however, it is difficult to dissect the respective contributions of circulating RAS versus intrarenal RAS to the physiological regulation of proximal tubular Na(+) reabsorption and hypertension. Here, we review recent studies to provide an update in this research field with a focus on the proximal tubular RAS in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Careful analysis of available evidence supports the hypothesis that both local synthesis or formation and AT1 (AT1a) receptor- and/or megalin-mediated uptake of angiotensinogen (AGT), ANG I and ANG II contribute to high levels of ANG II in the proximal tubules of the kidney. Under physiological conditions, nearly all major components of the RAS including AGT, prorenin, renin, ANG I, and ANG II would be filtered by the glomerulus and taken up by the proximal tubules. In ANG II-dependent hypertension, the expression of AGT, prorenin, and (pro)renin receptors, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is upregulated rather than downregulated in the kidney. Furthermore, hypertension damages the glomerular filtration barrier, which augments the filtration of circulating AGT, prorenin, renin, ANG I, and ANG II and their uptake in the proximal tubules. Together, increased local ANG II formation and augmented uptake of circulating ANG II in the proximal tubules, via activation of AT1 (AT1a) receptors and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3, may provide a powerful feedforward mechanism for promoting Na(+) retention and the development of ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:27372447

  12. Brain renin-angiotensin system and dopaminergic cell vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira-García, Jose L.; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Rodriguez-Pallares, Jannette; Valenzuela, Rita; Borrajo, Ana; Rodríguez-Perez, Ana I.

    2014-01-01

    Although the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was classically considered as a circulating system that regulates blood pressure, many tissues are now known to have a local RAS. Angiotensin, via type 1 receptors, is a major activator of the NADPH-oxidase complex, which mediates several key events in oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory processes involved in the pathogenesis of major aging-related diseases. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of RAS components in the basal ganglia, and particularly in the nigrostriatal system. In the nigrostriatal system, RAS hyperactivation, via NADPH-oxidase complex activation, exacerbates OS and the microglial inflammatory response and contributes to progression of dopaminergic degeneration, which is inhibited by angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Several factors may induce an increase in RAS activity in the dopaminergic system. A decrease in dopaminergic activity induces compensatory upregulation of local RAS function in both dopaminergic neurons and glia. In addition to its role as an essential neurotransmitter, dopamine may also modulate microglial inflammatory responses and neuronal OS via RAS. Important counterregulatory interactions between angiotensin and dopamine have also been observed in several peripheral tissues. Neurotoxins and proinflammatory factors may also act on astrocytes to induce an increase in RAS activity, either independently of or before the loss of dopamine. Consistent with a major role of RAS in dopaminergic vulnerability, increased RAS activity has been observed in the nigra of animal models of aging, menopause and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which also showed higher dopaminergic vulnerability. Manipulation of the brain RAS may constitute an effective neuroprotective strategy against dopaminergic vulnerability and progression of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25071471

  13. Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System Promotes Colitis Development

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yongyan; Liu, Tianjing; He, Lei; Dougherty, Urszula; Chen, Li; Adhikari, Sarbani; Alpert, Lindsay; Zhou, Guolin; Liu, Weicheng; Wang, Jiaolong; Deb, Dilip K.; Hart, John; Liu, Shu Q.; Kwon, John; Pekow, Joel; Rubin, David T.; Zhao, Qun; Bissonnette, Marc; Li, Yan Chun

    2016-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays pathogenic roles in renal and cardiovascular disorders, but whether it is involved in colitis is unclear. Here we show that RenTgMK mice that overexpress active renin from the liver developed more severe colitis than wild-type controls. More than 50% RenTgMK mice died whereas all wild-type mice recovered. RenTgMK mice exhibited more robust mucosal TH17 and TH1/TH17 responses and more profound colonic epithelial cell apoptosis compared to wild-type controls. Treatment with aliskiren (a renin inhibitor), but not hydralazine (a smooth muscle relaxant), ameliorated colitis in RenTgMK mice, although both drugs normalized blood pressure. Chronic infusion of angiotensin II into wild-type mice mimicked the severe colitic phenotype of RenTgMK mice, and treatment with losartan [an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)] ameliorated colitis in wild-type mice, confirming a colitogenic role for the endogenous RAS. In human biopsies, pro-inflammatory cytokines were suppressed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were on ARB therapy compared to patients not receiving ARB therapy. These observations demonstrate that activation of the RAS promotes colitis in a blood pressure independent manner. Angiotensin II appears to drive colonic mucosal inflammation by promoting intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and mucosal TH17 responses in colitis development. PMID:27271344

  14. Role of the Collecting Duct Renin Angiotensin System in Regulation of Blood Pressure and Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Kohan, Donald E

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the renal tubular renin angiotensin system regulates urinary Na(+) and water excretion and blood pressure. Three key components of the tubular renin angiotensin system, namely renin, prorenin receptor, and angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, are localized to the collecting duct. This system may modulate collecting duct Na(+) and water reabsorption via angiotensin-II-dependent and angiotensin-II-independent pathways. Further, the system may be of greatest relevance in hypertensive states and particularly those characterized by high circulating angiotensin-II. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the synthesis, regulation, and function of collecting duct-derived renin angiotensin system components and examine recent developments with regard to regulation of blood pressure and renal fluid and Na(+) excretion. PMID:26951246

  15. Wind-tunnel blockage and actuation systems test of a two-dimensional scramjet inlet unstart model at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1994-01-01

    The present study examines the wind-tunnel blockage and actuation systems effectiveness in starting and forcibly unstarting a two-dimensional scramjet inlet in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The intent of the overall test program is to study (both experimentally and computationally) the dynamics of the inlet unstart; however, prior to the design and fabrication of an expensive, instrumented wind-tunnel model, it was deemed necessary first to examine potential wind-tunnel blockage issues related to model sizing and to examine the adequacy of the actuation systems in accomplishing the start and unstart. The model is equipped with both a moveable cowl and aft plug. Windows in the inlet sidewalls allow limited optical access to the internal shock structure; schlieren video was used to identify inlet start and unstart. A chronology of each actuation sequence is provided in tabular form along with still frames from the schlieren video. A pitot probe monitored the freestream conditions throughout the start/unstart process to determine if there was a blockage effect due to the model start or unstart. Because the purpose of this report is to make the phase I (blockage and actuation systems) data rapidly available to the community, the data is presented largely without analysis of the internal shock interactions or the unstart process. This series of tests indicated that the model was appropriately sized for this facility and identified operability limits required first to allow the inlet to start and second to force the unstart.

  16. Nonclassical renin-angiotensin system and renal function.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Mark C

    2012-10-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) constitutes one of the most important hormonal systems in the physiological regulation of blood pressure through renal and nonrenal mechanisms. Indeed, dysregulation of the RAS is considered a major factor in the development of cardiovascular pathologies, including kidney injury, and blockade of this system by the inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) or blockade of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) by selective antagonists constitutes an effective therapeutic regimen. It is now apparent with the identification of multiple components of the RAS within the kidney and other tissues that the system is actually composed of different angiotensin peptides with diverse biological actions mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The classic RAS can be defined as the ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis that promotes vasoconstriction, water intake, sodium retention, and other mechanisms to maintain blood pressure, as well as increase oxidative stress, fibrosis, cellular growth, and inflammation in pathological conditions. In contrast, the nonclassical RAS composed primarily of the AngII/Ang III-AT2R pathway and the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-AT7R axis generally opposes the actions of a stimulated Ang II-AT1R axis through an increase in nitric oxide and prostaglandins and mediates vasodilation, natriuresis, diuresis, and reduced oxidative stress. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that these non-classical RAS components contribute to the therapeutic blockade of the classical system to reduce blood pressure and attenuate various indices of renal injury, as well as contribute to normal renal function. PMID:23720263

  17. Key fibrogenic mediators: old players. Renin–angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial fibrosis represents the final common pathway of any form of progressive renal disease. The severity of tubular interstitial damage is highly correlated to the degree of decline of renal function, even better than the glomerular lesions do. Angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector of the renin–angiotensin system, is a critical promoter of fibrogenesis. It represents a nexus among glomerular capillary hypertension, barrier dysfunction, and renal tubular injury caused by abnormally filtered proteins. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the key mediators of the pro-fibrotic effect of Ang II causing apoptosis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of the renal tubular epithelium. Recent studies link fibrosis to changes of microRNA (miRNA) modulated by Ang II through TGF-β1, unraveling that antifibrotic action of Ang II antagonism is attributable to epigenetic control of fibrosis-associated genes. Other mechanisms of Ang II-induced fibrosis include ROS-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1. Finally, Ang II via angiotensin type 1 receptor regulates the activation and transdifferentiation of pericytes and fibrocytes into scar-forming myofibroblasts. Detachment and phenotypic changes of the former can lead to the loss of peritubular capillaries and also contribute to hypoxia-dependent fibrosis. PMID:26312151

  18. The importance of the renin-angiotensin system in normal cardiovascular homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were carried out on adult mongrel dogs (20 to 30 kilograms) to investigate the importance of the renin-angiotensin system. Results indicate that the renin-angiotensin system plays a major role in the maintenance of circulatory homeostasis when extracellular fluid volume is depleted. It was also found that angiotensin II concentration, in addition to renal perfusion pressure, is a factor in the regulation of renin release.

  19. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system for lowering coronary artery disease risk.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Richard J; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system when activated exerts proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions and thereby contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, including that occurring in the coronary arteries. It thus contributes as well to coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have examined effects of renin-angiotensin system inhibition for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. These include important trials such as HOPE, EUROPA and PEACE using angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, VALIANT, OPTIMAAL and TRANSCEND using angiotensin receptor blockers, and the ongoing TOPCAT study in patients with preserved ejection fraction heart failure, many of who also have coronary artery disease. Data are unavailable as yet of effects of either direct renin inhibitors or the new angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor agents. Today, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is standard-of-care therapy for lowering cardiovascular risk in secondary prevention in high cardiovascular risk subjects. PMID:23523606

  20. Two-Dimensional Scramjet Inlet Unstart Model: Wind-Tunnel Blockage and Actuation Systems Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1994-01-01

    This supplement to NASA TM 109152 shows the Schlieren video (10 min. 52 sec., color, Beta and VHS) of the external flow field and a portion of the internal flow field of a two-dimensional scramjet inlet model in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The intent of the overall test program is to study (both experimentally and computationally) the dynamics of the inlet unstart; this (phase I) effort examines potential wind-tunnel blockage issues related to model sizing and the adequacy of the actuation systems in accomplishing the start and unstart. The model is equipped with both a moveable cowl and aft plug. Windows in the inlet sidewalls allow limited optical access to the internal shock structure. In the video, flow is from right to left, and the inlet is oriented inverted with respect to flight, i.e., with the cowl on top. The plug motion is obvious because the plug is visible in the aft window. The cowl motion, however, is not as obvious because the cowl is hidden from view by the inlet sidewall. The end of the cowl actuator arm, however, becomes visible above the inlet sidewalls between the windows when the cowl is up (see figure 1b of the primary document). The model is injected into the tunnel and observed though several actuation sequences with two plug configurations over a range of unit freestream Reynolds number at a nominal freestream Mach number of 6. The framing rate and shutter speed of the camera were too slow to fully capture the dynamics of the unstart but did prove sufficient to identify inlet start and unstart. This series of tests indicated that the model was appropriately sized for this facility and identified operability limits required first to allow the inlet to start and second to force the unstart.

  1. Renin-angiotensin system gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Kirsty G; Delforce, Sarah J; Wang, Yu; Ashton, Katie A; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Blackwell, C Caroline; Scott, Rodney J; Lumbers, Eugenie R

    2016-05-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynaecological malignancy and its incidence is increasing. Dysregulation of the endometrial renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could predispose to EC; therefore, we studied the prevalence of RAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Australian women with EC. SNPs assessed were AGT M235T (rs699); AGTR1 A1166C (rs5186); ACE A240T and T93C (rs4291, rs4292) and ATP6AP2 (rs2968915). They were identified using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The C allele of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) was more prevalent in women with EC (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.2-2.3), P=0.002). The CC genotype of this SNP is associated with upregulation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). The G allele of AGT rs699, which is associated with higher angiotensinogen (AGT) levels, was less prevalent in women with EC (OR 0.54, 95% CI (0.39-0.74), P<0.001) compared with controls. AGT and AGT formed by removal of angiotensin I (des(Ang I)AGT) are both anti-angiogenic. In women with EC who had had hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the prevalence of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) and the ACE SNPs (rs4291 and rs4292) was greater than in women who had no record of HRT; SNP rs4291 is associated with increased plasma ACE activity. These data suggest there is an interaction between genotype, oestrogen replacement therapy and EC. In conclusion, the prevalence of two SNPs that enhance RAS activity was different in women with EC compared with healthy controls. These genetic factors may interact with obesity and hyperoestrogenism, predisposing ageing, obese women to EC. PMID:27068935

  2. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kazim; Hernandez, Wilfredo; Ansari, Rais A; Ferder, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and its primary mediator Ang II, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang II receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in ApoE-deficient atherosclerotic mice. PMID:26322175

  3. Renin–angiotensin system gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Delforce, Sarah J; Wang, Yu; Ashton, Katie A; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Blackwell, C Caroline; Scott, Rodney J; Lumbers, Eugenie R

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynaecological malignancy and its incidence is increasing. Dysregulation of the endometrial renin–angiotensin system (RAS) could predispose to EC; therefore, we studied the prevalence of RAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Australian women with EC. SNPs assessed were AGT M235T (rs699); AGTR1 A1166C (rs5186); ACE A240T and T93C (rs4291, rs4292) and ATP6AP2 (rs2968915). They were identified using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The C allele of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) was more prevalent in women with EC (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.2–2.3), P=0.002). The CC genotype of this SNP is associated with upregulation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). The G allele of AGT rs699, which is associated with higher angiotensinogen (AGT) levels, was less prevalent in women with EC (OR 0.54, 95% CI (0.39–0.74), P<0.001) compared with controls. AGT and AGT formed by removal of angiotensin I (des(Ang I)AGT) are both anti-angiogenic. In women with EC who had had hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the prevalence of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) and the ACE SNPs (rs4291 and rs4292) was greater than in women who had no record of HRT; SNP rs4291 is associated with increased plasma ACE activity. These data suggest there is an interaction between genotype, oestrogen replacement therapy and EC. In conclusion, the prevalence of two SNPs that enhance RAS activity was different in women with EC compared with healthy controls. These genetic factors may interact with obesity and hyperoestrogenism, predisposing ageing, obese women to EC. PMID:27068935

  4. The adipose renin-angiotensin system modulates sysemic markers of insulin sensitivity activates the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suyeon; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; Massiera, Florence; Teboul, Michele; Ailhaud, Gerard; Kim, Jung; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Voy, Brynn H

    2006-07-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of data provides increasing evidence that the adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass. Beyond its paracrine actions within adipose tissue, adipocyte-derived angiotensin II (Ang II) may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a genetic approach to manipulate adipose RAS activity in mice and then study the consequences on metabolic parameters and on feedback regulation of the RAS. The models included deletion of the angiotensinogen (Agt) gene (Agt-KO), its expression solely in adipose tissue under the control of an adipocyte-specific promoter (aP2-Agt/ Agt-KO), and overexpression in adipose tissue of wild type mice (aP2-Agt). Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt-KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. Overexpression of Agt in adipose tissue resulted in increased adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also markedly elevated in kidney of aP2-Agt mice, suggesting that hypertension in these animals may be in part due to stimulation of the intrarenal RAS. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results from this study demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly alter both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.

  5. The Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Inflammatory Processes in Atherosclerosis: Evidence from Basic Research and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Pende, Aldo; Mach, François

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the renin-angiotensin system is a crucial player in atherosclerotic processes. The regulation of arterial blood pressure was considered from its first description of the main mechanism involved. Vasoconstriction (mediated by angiotensin II) and salt and water retention (mainly due to aldosterone) were classically considered as pivotal proatherosclerotic activities. However, basic research and animal studies strongly support angiotensin II as a proinflammatory mediator, which directly induces atherosclerotic plaque development and heart remodeling. Furthermore, angiotensin II induces proatherosclerotic cytokine and chemokine secretion and increases endothelial dysfunction. Accordingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system improves prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease even in settings of normal baseline blood pressure. In the present review, we focused on angiotensin-convertingenzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and renin inhibitors to update the direct activities of the renin-angiotensin system in inflammatory processes governing atherosclerosis. PMID:19390623

  6. The role of the renin–angiotensin system blocking in the management of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Brett; Younis, Naveed; Hama, Salam; Soran, Handrean

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review current available evidence for the role of renin–angiotensin system blockade in the management of atrial fibrillation. Method We conducted a PubMed and Medline literature search (January 1980 through July 2011) to identify all clinical trials published in English concerning the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers for primary and secondary prevention of atrial fibrillation. We also discussed renin–angiotensin system and its effects on cellular electrophysiology. Conclusion The evidence from the current studies discussed does not provide a firm definitive indication for the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers in the primary or secondary prevention of atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, modest benefits were observed in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. In view of the possible benefits and the low incidence of side-effects with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers, they can be given to patients with recurrent AF, specifically those with hypertension, heart failure and diabetes mellitus.

  7. The Adipose Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Systemic Markers of Insulin Sensitivity and Activates the Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Suyeon; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; Massiera, Florence; Teboul, Michele; Ailhaud, Gerard; Kim, Jung Han; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Voy, Brynn H.

    2006-01-01

    Background . The adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass and may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. Methods and results . A panel of mouse models including mice lacking angiotensinogen, Agt ( Agt -KO), mice expressing Agt solely in adipose tissue (aP2- Agt/Agt -KO), and mice overexpressing Agt in adipose tissue (aP2- Agt ) was studied. Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin, and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt -KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. aP2- Agt mice exhibited increased adipositymore » and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also elevated in kidney of aP2- Agt mice. Conclusion . These findings demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly impact both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.« less

  8. African Americans, hypertension and the renin angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sandra F; Nicholas, Susanne B; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Norris, Keith C

    2014-01-01

    African Americans have exceptionally high rates of hypertension and hypertension related complications. It is commonly reported that the blood pressure lowering efficacy of renin angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors is attenuated in African Americans due to a greater likelihood of having a low renin profile. Therefore these agents are often not recommended as initial therapy in African Americans with hypertension. However, the high prevalence of comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease makes treatment with RAS inhibitors more compelling. Despite lower circulating renin levels and a less significant fall in blood pressure in response to RAS inhibitors in African Americans, numerous clinical trials support the efficacy of RAS inhibitors to improve clinical outcomes in this population, especially in those with hypertension and risk factors for cardiovascular and related diseases. Here, we discuss the rationale of RAS blockade as part of a comprehensive approach to attenuate the high rates of premature morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension among African Americans. PMID:25276290

  9. Vascular inflammation and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Allan R; Recinos, Adrian; Eledrisi, Mohsen S

    2002-08-01

    It is now well established that vascular inflammation is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. In otherwise healthy patients, chronic elevations of circulating interleukin-6 or its biomarkers are predictors for increased risk in the development and progression of ischemic heart disease. Although multifactorial in etiology, vascular inflammation produces atherosclerosis by the continuous recruitment of circulating monocytes into the vessel wall and by contributing to an oxidant-rich inflammatory milieu that induces phenotypic changes in resident (noninflammatory) cells. In addition, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has important modulatory activities in the atherogenic process. Recent work has shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) has significant proinflammatory actions in the vascular wall, inducing the production of reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules. These latter effects on gene expression are mediated, at least in part, through the cytoplasmic nuclear factor-kappaB transcription factor. Through these actions, Ang II augments vascular inflammation, induces endothelial dysfunction, and, in so doing, enhances the atherogenic process. Our recent studies have defined a molecular mechanism for a biological positive-feedback loop that explains how vascular inflammation can be self-sustaining through upregulation of the vessel wall Ang II tone. Ang II produced locally by the inflamed vessel induces the synthesis and secretion of interleukin-6, a cytokine that induces synthesis of angiotensinogen in the liver through a janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 pathway. Enhanced angiotensinogen production, in turn, supplies more substrate to the activated vascular RAS, where locally produced Ang II synergizes with oxidized lipid to perpetuate atherosclerotic vascular inflammation. These observations suggest that one mechanism by which RAS antagonists prevent atherosclerosis

  10. Epochs in the depressor/pressor balance of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Colafella, Katrina M Mirabito; Hilliard, Lucinda M; Denton, Kate M

    2016-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a commanding role in the regulation of extracellular fluid homoeostasis. Tigerstadt and Bergman first identified the RAS more than two centuries ago. By the 1980s a voyage of research and discovery into the mechanisms and actions of this system led to the development of drugs that block the RAS, which have become the mainstay for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal disease. In the last 25 years new components of the RAS have come to light, including the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang(1-7)]/Mas receptor (MasR) axis. These have been shown to counter the classical actions of angiotensin II (AngII) at the predominant angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R). Our studies, and those of others, have demonstrated that targeting these depressor RAS pathways may be therapeutically beneficial. It is apparent that the evolution of both the pressor and depressor RAS pathways is distinct throughout life and that the depressor/pressor balance of the RAS vary between the sexes. These temporal patterns of expression suggest that therapies targeting the RAS could be optimized for discrete epochs in life. PMID:27128801

  11. Prenatal dehydration alters renin-angiotensin system associated with angiotensin-increased blood pressure in young offspring.

    PubMed

    Guan, Junchang; Mao, Caiping; Xu, Feichao; Geng, Chunsong; Zhu, Liyan; Wang, Aiqing; Xu, Zhice

    2009-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has an important role in cardiovascular homeostasis. This study determined the influence of water deprivation during pregnancy on the development of the RAS in rats, and examined blood pressure (BP) in the adolescent offspring. Pregnant rats were water deprived for 3 days at late gestation, and we examined fetal cardiac ultrastructure, as well as heart angiotensin (Ang) II receptor protein and mRNA, liver angiotensinogen and plasma Ang II concentrations. We also tested cardiovascular responses to i.v. Ang II in the young offspring. In utero exposure to maternal water deprivation significantly decreased fetal body and heart weight, and increased fetal plasma sodium and osmolality. Fetal liver angiotensinogen mRNA, plasma Ang I and Ang II concentrations were also increased. Although fetal AT(1a) and AT(1b) receptor mRNA and AT(1) protein were not changed, AT(2) receptor mRNA and protein levels in the heart were significantly increased following maternal dehydration. Prenatal exposure to maternal water deprivation had no effect on baseline BP; however, it significantly increased BP in response to i.v. Ang II infusion, and decreased baroreflex sensitivity in the offspring. In addition, the heart AT(2) receptor mRNA and protein were higher in the offspring exposed to prenatal dehydration. The results of this study demonstrate that prenatal dehydration affected the RAS development associated with an Ang II-increased BP in fetal origin. PMID:19779489

  12. Fetal sex affects expression of renin-angiotensin system components in term human decidua.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Pringle, Kirsty G; Sykes, Shane D; Marques, Francine Z; Morris, Brian J; Zakar, Tamas; Lumbers, Eugenie R

    2012-01-01

    The maternal decidua expresses the genes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Human decidua was collected at term either before labor (i.e. cesarean delivery) or after spontaneous labor. The mRNA for prorenin (REN), prorenin receptor (ATP6AP2), angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzymes 1 and 2 (ACE1 and ACE2), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1), and angiotensin 1-7 receptor (MAS1) were measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Decidual explants were cultured in duplicate for 24 and 48 h, and all RAS mRNA, and the secretion of prorenin, angiotensin II, and angiotensin 1-7 was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, ELISA, and radioimmunoassay, respectively. In the decidua collected before labor, REN mRNA levels were higher if the fetus was female. In addition, REN, ATP6AP2, AGT, and MAS1 mRNA abundance was greater in decidual explants collected from women carrying a female fetus, as was prorenin protein. After 24 h, ACE1 mRNA was higher in the decidual explants from women with a male fetus, whereas after 48 h, both ACE1 and ACE2 mRNA was higher in decidual explants from women with a female fetus. Angiotensin II was present in all explants, but angiotensin 1-7 levels often registered below the lower limits of sensitivity for the assay. After labor, decidua, when compared with nonlaboring decidua, demonstrated lower REN expression when the fetus was female. Therefore, the maternal decidual RAS is regulated in a sex-specific manner, suggesting that it may function differently when the fetus is male than when it is female. PMID:22045662

  13. Drug discovery in renin-angiotensin system intervention: past and future.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan

    2016-06-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a central role in the control of blood pressure in the body and the way this interacts with other systems is widely recognized. This has not always been the case and this review summarizes how our knowledge has evolved from the initial discovery of renin by Tigerstedt and Berman in 1898. This includes the identification of angiotensin in the 1950s to the proposed relationship between this system, hypertension and ultimately cardiovascular disease. While the RAS is far more complex than originally thought, much is now known about this system and the wide ranging effects of angiotensin in the body. This has enabled the development of therapies that target the various proteins in this pathway and hence are implicated in disease. The first of these treatments was the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), followed by the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and more recently the direct renin inhibitors (DRIs). Clinical outcome trials have shown these drugs to be effective, but as they act at contrasting points in the RAS, there are differences in their efficacy and safety profiles. RAS blockade is the foundation of modern combination therapy with a calcium channel blocker and/or a diuretic given to reduce blood pressure and limit the impact of RAS activation. Other options that complement these treatments may be available in the future and will offer more choice to clinicians. PMID:27126389

  14. Recent insights and therapeutic perspectives of angiotensin-(1-9) in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Ocaranza, Maria Paz; Michea, Luis; Chiong, Mario; Lagos, Carlos F; Lavandero, Sergio; Jalil, Jorge E

    2014-11-01

    Chronic RAS (renin-angiotensin system) activation by both AngII (angiotensin II) and aldosterone leads to hypertension and perpetuates a cascade of pro-hypertrophic, pro-inflammatory, pro-thrombotic and atherogenic effects associated with cardiovascular damage. In 2000, a new pathway consisting of ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme2), Ang-(1-9) [angiotensin-(1-9)], Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] and the Mas receptor was discovered. Activation of this novel pathway stimulates vasodilation, anti-hypertrophy and anti-hyperplasia. For some time, studies have focused mainly on ACE2, Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor, and their biological properties that counterbalance the ACE/AngII/AT1R (angiotensin type 1 receptor) axis. No previous information about Ang-(1-9) suggested that this peptide had biological properties. However, recent data suggest that Ang-(1-9) protects the heart and blood vessels (and possibly the kidney) from adverse cardiovascular remodelling in patients with hypertension and/or heart failure. These beneficial effects are not modified by the Mas receptor antagonist A779 [an Ang-(1-7) receptor blocker], but they are abolished by the AT2R (angiotensin type 2 receptor) antagonist PD123319. Current information suggests that the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-9) are mediated via the AT2R. In the present review, we summarize the biological effects of the novel vasoactive peptide Ang-(1-9), providing new evidence of its cardiovascular-protective activity. We also discuss the potential mechanism by which this peptide prevents and ameliorates the cardiovascular damage induced by RAS activation. PMID:25029123

  15. The impact of age-related dysregulation of the angiotensin system on mitochondrial redox balance

    PubMed Central

    Vajapey, Ramya; Rini, David; Walston, Jeremy; Abadir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with the accumulation of various deleterious changes in cells. According to the free radical and mitochondrial theory of aging, mitochondria initiate most of the deleterious changes in aging and govern life span. The failure of mitochondrial reduction-oxidation (redox) homeostasis and the formation of excessive free radicals are tightly linked to dysregulation in the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS). A main rate-controlling step in RAS is renin, an enzyme that hydrolyzes angiotensinogen to generate angiotensin I. Angiotensin I is further converted to Angiotensin II (Ang II) by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Ang II binds with equal affinity to two main angiotensin receptors—type 1 (AT1R) and type 2 (AT2R). The binding of Ang II to AT1R activates NADPH oxidase, which leads to increased generation of cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species (ROS). This Ang II-AT1R–NADPH-ROS signal triggers the opening of mitochondrial KATP channels and mitochondrial ROS production in a positive feedback loop. Furthermore, RAS has been implicated in the decrease of many of ROS scavenging enzymes, thereby leading to detrimental levels of free radicals in the cell. AT2R is less understood, but evidence supports an anti-oxidative and mitochondria-protective function for AT2R. The overlap between age related changes in RAS and mitochondria, and the consequences of this overlap on age-related diseases are quite complex. RAS dysregulation has been implicated in many pathological conditions due to its contribution to mitochondrial dysfunction. Decreased age-related, renal and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction was seen in patients treated with angiotensin receptor blockers. The aim of this review is to: (a) report the most recent information elucidating the role of RAS in mitochondrial redox hemostasis and (b) discuss the effect of age-related activation of RAS on generation of free radicals. PMID:25505418

  16. Pharmacological, immunological, and gene targeting of the renin-angiotensin system for treatment of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Igic, Rajko; Behnia, Rahim

    2007-01-01

    Effective blood pressure control with a large arsenal of conventional antihypertensive drugs, such as diuretics, beta-adrenergic blockers, and calcium channel blockers, significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure control with these drugs does not reduce cardiovascular disease risks to the levels in normotensive persons. Only two drug classes that inhibit or antagonize portions of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor type-1 (AT(1) receptor) blockers, have protective and beneficial effects unrelated to the degree of blood pressure reduction. These drugs may prevent the blood pressure related functional and structural abnormalities of the cardiovascular system and reduce the end organ-damage. The first part of this review presents the components of the RAS, biological actions of angiotensin peptides, and the functions of the enzymes that generate and metabolize angiotensins, including the likely effect of manipulating them. Special attention is devoted to renin, ACE, ACE2, chymase, and neprilysin. The second part of this review presents the rationale for targeting the RAS, based on clinical studies of the ACE inhibitors and AT(1) receptor blockers. Finally, we present the investigational agents acting on the RAS that have a potential for clinical usage, and give the perspective of pharmacological, immunological and gene targeting of the RAS for treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:17504230

  17. Renin angiotensin system: A novel target for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nandha, Ruchika; Singh, Harpal

    2012-03-01

    Migraine constitutes 16% of primary headaches affecting 10-20% of general population according to International Headache Society. Till now nonsteroidalanti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), opioids and triptans are the drugs being used for acute attack of migraine. Substances with proven efficacy for prevention include β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants. All the already available drugs have certain limitations. Either they are unable to produce complete relief or 30-40% patients are no responders or drugs produce adverse effects. This necessitates the search for more efficacious and well-tolerated drugs. A new class of drugs like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin II receptor antagonists have recently been studied for their off label use in prophylaxis of migraine. Studies, done so far, have shown results in favour of their clinical use because of the ability to reduce number of days with headache, number of days with migraine, hours with migraine, headache severity index, level of disability, improved Quality of life and decrease in consumption of specific or nonspecific analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of these drugs in prophylaxis of migraine and can give physician a direction to use these drugs for chronic migraineurs. Searches of pubmed, Cochrane database, Medscape, Google and clinicaltrial.org were made using terms like ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists and migraine. Relevant journal articles were chosen to provide necessary information. PMID:22529467

  18. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions. PMID:26857347

  19. The Relevance of the Renin-Angiotensin System in the Development of Drugs to Combat Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Satoru; Koya, Daisuke; Kanasaki, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder that occurs during pregnancy. It has an unknown etiology and affects approximately 5–8% of pregnancies worldwide. The pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not yet known, and preeclampsia has been called “a disease of theories.” The central symptom of preeclampsia is hypertension. However, the etiology of the hypertension is unknown. In this review, we analyze the molecular mechanisms of preeclampsia with a particular focus on the pathogenesis of the hypertension in preeclampsia and its association with the renin-angiotensin system. In addition, we propose potential alternative strategies to target the renin-angiotensin system, which is enhanced during pregnancy. PMID:26000015

  20. Inducing a Site Specific Replication Blockage in E. coli Using a Fluorescent Repressor Operator System.

    PubMed

    Mettrick, Karla A; Lawrence, Nikki; Mason, Claire; Weaver, Georgia M; Corocher, Tayla-Ann; Grainge, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Obstacles present on DNA, including tightly-bound proteins and various lesions, can severely inhibit the progression of the cell's replication machinery. The stalling of a replisome can lead to its dissociation from the chromosome, either in part or its entirety, leading to the collapse of the replication fork. The recovery from this collapse is a necessity for the cell to accurately complete chromosomal duplication and subsequently divide. Therefore, when the collapse occurs, the cell has evolved diverse mechanisms that take place to restore the DNA fork and allow replication to be completed with high fidelity. Previously, these replication repair pathways in bacteria have been studied using UV damage, which has the disadvantage of not being localized to a known site. This manuscript describes a system utilizing a Fluorescence Repressor Operator System (FROS) to create a site-specific protein block that can induce the stalling and collapse of replication forks in Escherichia coli. Protocols detail how the status of replication can be visualized in single living cells using fluorescence microscopy and DNA replication intermediates can be analyzed by 2-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis. Temperature sensitive mutants of replisome components (e.g. DnaBts) can be incorporated into the system to induce a synchronous collapse of the replication forks. Furthermore, the roles of the recombination proteins and helicases that are involved in these processes can be studied using genetic knockouts within this system. PMID:27583408

  1. Role of the renin–angiotensin system in age-related sarcopenia and diastolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Groban, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe how recent pharmacological and genetic studies have contributed to our understanding of the role of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in age-related sarcopenia and diastolic dysfunction. Treatment strategies are limited in the context of both of these conditions, although interventions, which include blockade of the RAS (using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers) are successful and lead to improvements in functional outcomes that are not necessarily mediated by hemodynamic effects of the drugs. Studies in animal models of sarcopenia and diastolic dysfunction point to ubiquitous effects of RAS blockade on multiple biological mechanisms, including inflammation, oxidative damage and metabolic dysregulation. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the use of these drugs in other conditions should be considered for maintaining functional independence in older individuals. PMID:20445808

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the renin-angiotensin system: Implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Paschalis; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest liver disease in Western countries. Treatment of NAFLD is currently based on lifestyle measures and no effective pharmacologic treatment is available so far. Emerging evidence, mainly from animal studies, suggests that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system may be of major importance in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) as a potentially useful therapeutic approach. However, data from human studies are limited and contradictory. In addition, there are few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of ACE-I or ARB in patients with NAFLD and most data are from retrospective studies, pilot prospective studies and post hoc analyses of clinical trials. Accordingly, more and larger RCTs are needed to directly assess the effectiveness of ACE-I and ARBs in NAFLD. PMID:23355909

  3. Effects of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Teresa; Lennon, Emily S; Akbar, Hina; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Oliphant, Carrie S; Khouzam, Rami N

    2016-03-01

    Blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are routinely used in patients with chronic kidney disease because of their cardiovascular (CV) and renoprotective effects. However, there are no uniform recommendations about RAAS blockers for CV protection in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population other than the preferred drug class for blood pressure control. This uncertainty stems from the fact that patients with ESRD were generally excluded from randomized controlled trials evaluating the cardioprotective benefits of RAAS blockers. It is important to weigh the potential harms associated with the use of RAAS blockers, such as electrolyte disturbances and worsening anemia, with their role in protection of residual kidney function, alleviation of thirst and potential CV benefits. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the use of RAAS blockers in patients with ESRD. PMID:26992264

  4. Blockages to Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, A.

    The paper examines the nature of creativity and blockages to its expression especially in home and school settings in South Africa. A definition of creativity is offered which stresses the production of an original outcome or achievement. The creative process is broken down into the steps of preparation, incubation, illumination, and verification.…

  5. Age-Associated Changes in the Vascular Renin-Angiotensin System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hye Eun; Kim, Eun Nim; Kim, Min Young; Lim, Ji Hee; Jang, In-Ae; Ban, Tae Hyun; Shin, Seok Joon; Park, Cheol Whee; Chang, Yoon Sik; Choi, Bum Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated whether the change in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is associated with arterial aging in mice. Methods. Histologic changes and expressions of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), collagen IV, fibronectin, angiotensin II (Ang II), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R), prorenin receptor (PRR), Mas receptor (MasR), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), NADPH oxidase 2 and oxidase 4 (Nox2 and Nox4), 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), 3-nitrotyrosine, and superoxide dismutase 1 and dismutase 2 (SOD1 and SOD2) were measured in the thoracic aortas from 2-month-old, 12-month-old, and 24-month-old C57/BL6 mice. Results. Twenty-four-month-old mice showed significantly increased aortic media thickness and expressions of TGF-β, collagen IV, and fibronectin, compared to 2-month-old and 12-month-old mice. The expressions of PRR, ACE, and Ang II, and AT1R-positive area significantly increased, whereas expressions of ACE2 and MasR and AT2R-positive area decreased with age. The expressions of phosphorylated serine1177-eNOS, SOD1, and SOD2 decreased, and the 8-OHdG-positive area and the 3-nitrotyrosine-positive area increased with age. The expression of Nox2 significantly increased with age, but that of Nox4 did not change. Conclusions. The enhanced PRR-ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis and reduced ACE2-MasR axis were associated with arterial aging in mice. PMID:27200147

  6. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1085 - Angiotensin I and renin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin I and renin test system. 862.1085 Section 862.1085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1085 - Angiotensin I and renin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin I and renin test system. 862.1085 Section 862.1085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1085 - Angiotensin I and renin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin I and renin test system. 862.1085 Section 862.1085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1085 - Angiotensin I and renin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin I and renin test system. 862.1085 Section 862.1085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1085 - Angiotensin I and renin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin I and renin test system. 862.1085 Section 862.1085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  16. The role of the renin-angiotensin and natriuretic peptide systems in the pulmonary vasculature.

    PubMed Central

    Cargill, R I; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. The role of vasoactive peptide systems in the pulmonary vasculature has been studied much less extensively than systemic vascular and endocrine effects. The current understanding of the role of the renin-angiotensin (RAS) and natriuretic peptide systems (NPS) in the pulmonary circulation is therefore reviewed. 2. Plasma concentrations of angiotensin II, the main vasoactive component of the RAS, are elevated in pulmonary hypertension and may interact with hypoxaemia to cause further pulmonary vasoconstriction. Pharmacological manipulation of angiotensin II can attenuate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction but larger studies are needed to establish the efficacy of this therapeutic strategy in established pulmonary hypertension. 3. Although all the known natriuretic peptides, ANP, BNP and CNP are elevated in cor pulmonale, only ANP and BNP appear to have pulmonary vasorelaxant activity in humans. ANP and BNP can also attenuate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, suggesting a possible counter-regulatory role for these peptides. Inhibition of ANP/BNP metabolism by neutral endopeptidase has been shown to attenuate development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension but this property has not been tested in humans. 4. It is also well established that there are potentially important endocrine and systemic circulatory interactions between the RAS and NPS. This also occurs in the pulmonary circulation and in humans, where at least BNP acts to attenuate angiotensin II induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. This interaction may be particularly relevant as a mechanism to counter-regulate overactivity of the RAS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8527262

  17. Novel concept in the mechanism of injury and protection of gastric mucosa: role of renin-angiotensin system and active metabolites of angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Ptak-Belowska, A; Kwiecien, S; Krzysiek-Maczka, G; Strzalka, M; Drozdowicz, D; Pajdo, R; Olszanecki, R; Korbut, R; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2012-01-01

    The term cytoprotection pioneered by Robert and colleagues has been introduced to describe the remarkable ability of endogenous and exogenous prostaglandins (PGs) to prevent acute gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by noxious stimuli such as ethanol, bile acids, hiperosmolar solutions and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin. Since that time many factors were implicated to possess gastroprotective properties such as growth factors including epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming factor alpha (TGFα), vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) as well as appetite gut hormones including gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK), leptin and recently ghrelin. This protective action of gut peptides has been attributed to the release of PG but question remains whether another peptide angiotensin, the classic component of the systemic and local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could be involved in the mechanism of gastric integrity and gastroprotection. After renin stimulation, the circulating angiotensin I is converted to angiotensin II (ANG II) by the activity of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). The ANG II acting via its binding to two major receptor subtypes the ANG type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) has been shown be activated during stress and to contribute to the pathogenesis of cold stress- and ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric lesions. All bioactive angiotensin peptides can be generated not only in systemic circulation, but also locally in several tissues and organs. Recently the new functional components of RAS, such as Ang-(1-7), Ang IV, Ang-(1-12) and novel pathways ACE2 have been described suggesting the gastroprotective role for the novel ANG II metabolite, Ang-(1-7). The fact that Ang-(1-7) is produced in excessive amounts in the gastric mucosa of rodents and that pretreatment by Ang-(1-7) exhibits a potent gastroprotective activity against the gastric lesions induced by cold

  18. Renin-angiotensin system: an old player with novel functions in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Morales, María Gabriela; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Cabrera, Daniel; Simon, Felipe

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle is a tissue that shows the most plasticity in the body; it can change in response to physiological and pathological stimuli. Among the diseases that affect skeletal muscle are myopathy-associated fibrosis, insulin resistance, and muscle atrophy. A common factor in these pathologies is the participation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). This system can be functionally separated into the classical and nonclassical RAS axis. The main components of the classical RAS pathway are angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang-II), and Ang-II receptors (AT receptors), whereas the nonclassical axis is composed of ACE2, angiotensin 1-7 [Ang (1-7)], and the Mas receptor. Hyperactivity of the classical axis in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance, atrophy, and fibrosis. In contrast, current evidence supports the action of the nonclassical RAS as a counter-regulator axis of the classical RAS pathway in skeletal muscle. In this review, we describe the mechanisms involved in the pathological effects of the classical RAS, advances in the use of pharmacological molecules to inhibit this axis, and the beneficial effects of stimulation of the nonclassical RAS pathway on insulin resistance, atrophy, and fibrosis in skeletal muscle. PMID:25764065

  19. Cholinergic signal activated renin angiotensin system associated with cardiovascular changes in the ovine fetus

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Chunsong; Mao, Caiping; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Yu; Liu, Rulu; Chen, Bingxin; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Lubo; Xu, Zhice

    2010-01-01

    Aim Cholinergic regulation is important in the control of cardiovascular and endocrine responses. The mechanisms behind cardiovascular responses induced by cholinergic activation are explored by studying hormonal systems, including renin-angiotensin and vasopressin (VP). Results In chronically prepared fetal sheep, intravenous infusion of the cholinergic agonist carbachol increased fetal systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure accompanied with bradycardia at near-term. Although intravenous administration of carbachol had no effect on plasma VP concentrations, this agonist increased angiotensin I and angiotensin II levels in fetal plasma. Fetal blood values, including sodium, osmolality, nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were unchanged by intravenous carbachol. Conclusion Cholinergic activation by carbachol controls fetal blood pressure and heart rate in utero. An over-activated fetal renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) is associated with changes in vascular pressure following intravenous administration of carbachol, indicating that the cholinergic stimulation-mediated hormonal mechanism in the fetus might play a critical role in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis. PMID:19921993

  20. The brain renin-angiotensin system: a diversity of functions and implications for CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Wright, John W; Harding, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    The classic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was initially described as a hormone system designed to mediate cardiovascular and body water regulation, with angiotensin II as its major effector. The discovery of an independent local brain RAS composed of the necessary functional components (angiotensinogen, peptidases, angiotensins, and specific receptor proteins) significantly expanded the possible physiological and pharmacological functions of this system. This review first describes the enzymatic pathways resulting in active angiotensin ligands and their interaction with AT(1), AT(2), and AT(4) receptor subtypes. Next, we discuss the classic physiologies and behaviors controlled by the RAS including cardiovascular, thirst, and sodium appetite. A final section summarizes non-classic functions and clinical conditions mediated by the brain RAS with focus on memory and Alzheimer's disease. There is no doubt that the brain RAS is an important component in the development of dementia. It also appears to play a role in normal memory consolidation and retrieval. The presently available anti-dementia drugs are proving to be reasonably ineffective, thus alternative treatment approaches must be developed. At the same time, presently available drugs must be tested for their efficacy to treat newly identified syndromes and diseases connected with the RAS. The list of non-classic physiologies and behaviors is ever increasing in both number and scope, attesting to the multidimensional influences of the RAS. Such diversity in function presents a dilemma for both researchers and clinicians. Namely, the blunting of RAS subsystems in the hopes of combating one constellation of underlying causes and disease symptoms may be counter-balanced by unanticipated and unwanted consequences to another RAS subsystem. For example, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and AT(1) and/or AT(2) receptor blockers have shown great promise in the treatment of cardiovascular related

  1. The role of local renin-angiotensin system in arterial chemoreceptors in sleep-breathing disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Man Lung

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays pivotal roles in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal functions to maintain the fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Experimental studies have demonstrated a locally expressed RAS in the carotid body, which is functional significant in the effect of angiotensin peptides on the regulation of the activity of peripheral chemoreceptors and the chemoreflex. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of the RAS in the carotid body have been proposed upon recent studies showing a significant upregulation of the RAS expression under hypoxic conditions relevant to altitude acclimation and sleep apnea and also in animal model of heart failure. Specifically, the increased expression of angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin AT1 receptors plays significant roles in the augmented carotid chemoreceptor activity and inflammation of the carotid body. This review aims to summarize these results with highlights on the pathophysiological function of the RAS under hypoxic conditions. It is concluded that the maladaptive changes of the RAS in the carotid body plays a pathogenic role in sleep apnea and heart failure, which could potentially be a therapeutic target for the treatment of the pathophysiological consequence of sleep apnea. PMID:25249981

  2. Azilsartan, aliskiren, and combination antihypertensives utilizing renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Gregg; Sankholkar, Kedar; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2014-01-01

    Health care providers managing hypertension (HTN) have a large selection of pharmacologic agents to choose from, including several different classes of drugs and many similar drugs within each class. Antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system has been shown to be very effective for HTN, especially in patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and heart failure. Within this group, there have been 2 new agents recently introduced to the US market and approved by the Food and Drug Administration. It is important for the HTN specialist to be familiar with the merits of these 2 drugs: the angiotensin receptor blocker Edarbi (azilsartan) and the renin inhibitor Tekturna (aliskiren). Additionally, there have been several new, fixed-dose combination antihypertensives introduced to the market since 2006 that use a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone antagonist. Seven of these combine 2 drugs together in a single pill: Edarbyclor (azilsartan/chlorthalidone), Exforge (amlodipine/valsartan), Azor (olmesartan/amlodipine), Twynsta (amlodipine/telmisartan), Tekturna HCT [aliskiren/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ)], Valturna (aliskiren/valsartan), Tekamlo (aliskiren/amlodipine). Three triple-drug combination medications have also been introduced recently: Exforge HCT (amlodipine/valsartan/HCTZ), Tribenzor (olmesartan/amlodipine/HCTZ), and Amturnide (aliskiren/amlodipine/hydrocholorothiazide). This review will summarize the trial data and important pharmacologic merits of these 2 new renin-angiotensin-aldosterone antagonists and the advantages of initiating treatment with one of the new fixed-dose, combination drugs approved over the last 5 years. PMID:22975662

  3. Targeting Cardiac Mast Cells: Pharmacological Modulation of the Local Renin-Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Alicia C.; Brazin, Jacqueline A.; Morrey, Christopher; Silver, Randi B.; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced production of angiotensin II and excessive release of norepinephrine in the ischemic heart are major causes of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Mast cell-dependent mechanisms are pivotal in the local formation of angiotensin II and modulation of norepinephrine release in cardiac pathophysiology. Cardiac mast cells increase in number in myocardial ischemia and are located in close proximity to sympathetic neurons expressing angiotensin AT1- and histamine H3-receptors. Once activated, cardiac mast cells release a host of potent pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines, chemokines, preformed mediators (e.g., histamine) and proteases (e.g., renin). In myocardial ischemia, angiotensin II (formed locally from mast cell-derived renin) and histamine (also released from local mast cells) respectively activate AT1- and H3-receptors on sympathetic nerve endings. Stimulation of angiotensin AT1-receptors is arrhythmogenic whereas H3-receptor activation is cardioprotective. It is likely that in ischemia/reperfusion the balance may be tipped toward the deleterious effects of mast cell renin, as demonstrated in mast cell-deficient mice, lacking mast cell renin and histamine in the heart. In these mice, no ventricular fibrillation occurs at reperfusion following ischemia, as opposed to wild-type hearts which all fibrillate. Preventing mast cell degranulation in the heart and inhibiting the activation of a local reninangiotensin system, hence abolishing its detrimental effects on cardiac rhythmicity, appears to be more significant than the loss of histamine-induced cardioprotection. This suggests that therapeutic targets in the treatment of myocardial ischemia, and potentially congestive heart failure and hypertension, should include prevention of mast cell degranulation, mast cell renin inhibition, local ACE inhibition, ANG II antagonism and H3-receptor activation. PMID:22103845

  4. Association between the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and renal injury in chronic kidney disease of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    The association of renin and angiotensin II, which are potent components of the renin-angiotensin system, with the severity of chronic renal disease was investigated immunohistochemically in dogs and cats. Immunoreactivities of renin and angiotensin II were evaluated quantitatively, and their correlations with the degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were statistically analyzed. Immunoreactivities for renin were detected in afferent arteries in both dogs and cats. The score of renin-positive signals showed no correlation with plasma creatinine concentration or any of the histopathological parameters, except for the diameter of glomeruli in dogs. Immunoreactivities for angiotensin II were detected in tubules (primarily proximal tubules) and interstitial mononuclear cells in both dogs and cats. The score of tubular angiotensin II correlated with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats but not in dogs. The score of interstitial angiotensin II correlated with plasma creatinine concentration, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration and fibrosis in dogs and with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that intrarenal renin-angiotensin system is correlated with the severity of kidney disease, with the underlying mechanism differing between dogs and cats. PMID:22986274

  5. Biomarkers of activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in heart failure: how useful, how feasible?

    PubMed

    Emdin, Michele; Fatini, Cinzia; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Poletti, Roberta; Borrelli, Chiara; Prontera, Concetta; Latini, Roberto; Passino, Claudio; Clerico, Aldo; Vergaro, Giuseppe

    2015-03-30

    Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), participated by kidney, liver, vascular endothelium, and adrenal cortex, and counter-regulated by cardiac endocrine function, is a complex endocrine system regulating systemic functions, such as body salt and water homeostasis and vasomotion, in order to allow the accomplishment of physiological tasks, such as orthostasis, physical and emotional stimuli, and to react towards the hemorrhagic insult, in tight conjunction with other neurohormonal axes, namely the sympathetic nervous system, the endothelin and vasopressin systems. The systemic as well as the tissue RAAS are also dedicated to promote tissue remodeling, particularly relevant after damage, when chronic activation may configure as a maladaptive response, leading to fibrosis, hypertrophy and apoptosis, and organ dysfunction. RAAS activation is a fingerprint of systemic arterial hypertension, kidney dysfunction, vascular atherosclerotic disease, and is definitely an hallmark of heart failure, which rapidly shifts from organ disease to a disorder of neurohormonal regulatory systems. Chronic RAAS activation is an indirect or direct target of most effective pharmacological treatments in heart failure, such as beta-blockers, inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme, angiotensin receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, and mineralocorticoid receptor blockers. Biomarkers of RAAS activation are available, with different feasibility and accuracy, such as plasma renin activity, renin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone, which all accompany the increasing clinical severity of heart failure disease, and are well recognized prognostic factors, even in patients with optimal therapy. Polymorphisms influencing the expression and activity of RAAS pathways have been recognized as clinically relevant biomarkers, likely influencing either the individual clinical phenotype, or the response to drugs. This solid, growing evidence strongly suggests the rationale for the use of

  6. Oxidative stress-mediated effects of angiotensin II in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hairuo; Gwathmey, Judith K; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), an endogenous peptide hormone, plays critical roles in the pathophysiological modulation of cardiovascular functions. Ang II is the principle effector of the renin-angiotensin system for maintaining homeostasis in the cardiovascular system, as well as a potent stimulator of NAD(P)H oxidase, which is the major source and primary trigger for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in various tissues. Recent accumulating evidence has demonstrated the importance of oxidative stress in Ang II-induced heart diseases. Here, we review the recent progress in the study on oxidative stress-mediated effects of Ang II in the cardiovascular system. In particular, the involvement of Ang II-induced ROS generation in arrhythmias, cell death/heart failure, ischemia/reperfusion injury, cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension are discussed. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is an important molecule linking Ang II, ROS and cardiovascular pathological conditions. PMID:24587981

  7. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan-Huan; Fu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease. Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use of monotherapy, without applying any language restrictions. Keywords for the searches included “diabetic nephropathy,” “chronic kidney disease,” “chronic renal insufficiency,” “diabetes mellitus,” “dual therapy,” “combined therapy,” “dual blockade,” “renin-angiotensin system,” “angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor,” “angiotensin-receptor blocker,” “aldosterone blockade,” “selective aldosterone blockade,” “renin inhibitor,” “direct renin inhibitor,” “mineralocorticoid receptor blocker,” etc. Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed. We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin II receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension. However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety. In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons. Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility. Further trials are warranted

  8. Systemic and uteroplacental renin–angiotensin system in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an increase in many of the different components of the circulating renin–angiotensin system [RAS]. However, the physiological mechanisms of stimulated RAS activity during pregnancy are unknown. Even less understood is how this system may be altered in pre-eclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. Additional studies have shown the presence of a local tissue specific RAS in the uteroplacental unit of normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. Differences in normal pregnant and pre-eclamptic RAS component regulation may provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for the clinical pathological features of pre-eclampsia. Specifically, this review summarizes the key findings in the circulating and uteroplacental RAS in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. PMID:19124433

  9. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis. PMID:26833491

  10. Tissue Renin–Angiotensin Systems: A Unifying Hypothesis of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Skov, Jeppe; Persson, Frederik; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2014-01-01

    The actions of angiotensin peptides are diverse and locally acting tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS) are present in almost all tissues of the body. An activated RAS strongly correlates to metabolic disease (e.g., diabetes) and its complications and blockers of RAS have been demonstrated to prevent diabetes in humans. Hyperglycemia, obesity, hypertension, and cortisol are well-known risk factors of metabolic disease and all stimulate tissue RAS whereas glucagon-like peptide-1, vitamin D, and aerobic exercise are inhibitors of tissue RAS and to some extent can prevent metabolic disease. Furthermore, an activated tissue RAS deteriorates the same risk factors creating a system with several positive feedback pathways. The primary effector hormone of the RAS, angiotensin II, stimulates reactive oxygen species, induces tissue damage, and can be associated to most diabetic complications. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that an activated tissue RAS is the principle cause of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and additionally is mediating the majority of the metabolic complications. The involvement of positive feedback pathways may create a self-reinforcing state and explain why metabolic disease initiate and progress. The hypothesis plausibly unifies the major predictors of metabolic disease and places tissue RAS regulation in the center of metabolic control. PMID:24592256

  11. Aliskiren inhibits the renin-angiotensin system in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Simão, Sónia; Santos, Daniela F; Silva, Gabriela A

    2016-09-20

    Observations of increased angiotensin II levels and activation of the (pro)renin receptor in retinopathies support the role of ocular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development of retinal diseases. While targeting RAS presents significant therapeutic potential, current RAS-based therapies are ineffective halting the progression of these diseases. A new class of drugs, the direct renin inhibitors such as aliskiren, is a potential therapeutic alternative. However, it is unclear how aliskiren acts in the retina, in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the structure responsible for the maintenance of retinal homeostasis whose role is deeply compromised in retinal diseases. We firstly analyzed the expression and activity of the main RAS components in RPE cells. Time- and concentration-dependent treatments with aliskiren were performed to modulate different pathways of the RAS in RPE cells. Our data demonstrate that RPE cells express the main RAS constituents. Exposure of RPE cells to aliskiren inhibited the activity of renin and consequently decreased the levels of angiotensin II. Additionally, aliskiren reduced the translocation of the (pro)renin receptor to the cellular membrane of RPE cells preventing the activation of ERK1/2. Our findings of the RPE well-defined RAS, together with the demonstration that aliskiren effectively blocks this system at different steps of the cascade, suggest that aliskiren might be an alternative and successful drug in preventing the deleterious effects derived from the overactivation of the RAS, known to contribute to the pathogenesis of different retinal diseases. PMID:27343695

  12. Increased methylglyoxal formation with upregulation of renin angiotensin system in fructose fed Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Indu; Dhar, Arti; Wu, Lingyun; Desai, Kaushik M

    2013-01-01

    The current epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes is attributed to a high carbohydrate diet, containing mainly high fructose corn syrup and sucrose. More than two thirds of diabetic patients have hypertension. Methylglyoxal is a highly reactive dicarbonyl generated during glucose and fructose metabolism, and a major precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Plasma methylglyoxal levels are increased in hypertensive rats and diabetic patients. Our aim was to examine the levels of methylglyoxal, mediators of the renin angiotensin system and blood pressure in male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with a high fructose diet (60% of total calories) for 4 months. The thoracic aorta and kidney were used for molecular studies, along with cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). HPLC, Western blotting and Q-PCR were used to measure methylglyoxal and reduced glutathione (GSH), proteins and mRNA, respectively. Fructose treated rats developed a significant increase in blood pressure. Methylglyoxal level and protein and mRNA for angiotensin II, AT1 receptor, adrenergic α1D receptor and renin were significantly increased, whereas GSH levels were decreased, in the aorta and/or kidney of fructose fed rats. The protein expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) and NF-κB were also significantly increased in the aorta of fructose fed rats. MG treated VSMCs showed increased protein for angiotensin II, AT1 receptor, and α1D receptor. The effects of methylglyoxal were attenuated by metformin, a methylglyoxal scavenger and AGEs inhibitor. In conclusion, we report a strong association between elevated levels of methylglyoxal, RAGE, NF-κB, mediators of the renin angiotensin system and blood pressure in high fructose diet fed rats. PMID:24040205

  13. Renin-angiotensin system gene polymorphisms as risk factors for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Živković, Maja; Kolaković, Ana; Stojković, Ljiljana; Dinčić, Evica; Kostić, Smiljana; Alavantić, Dragan; Stanković, Aleksandra

    2016-04-15

    The components of renin-angiotensin system, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II and angiotensin II receptor type 1 and 2 (AT1R and AT2R), are expressed in the central nervous system and leukocytes and proposed to be involved in the inflammation and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). ACE I/D, AT1R 1166A/C and AT2R -1332A/G are functional polymorphisms associated with phenotypes of diverse chronic inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ACE I/D, AT1R 1166A/C and AT2R -1332A/G gene polymorphisms and MS in Serbian population. A total of 470 MS patients and 478 controls participated in the study. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for genotyping of the ACE polymorphism. The AT1R and AT2R genotyping was done by duplex PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Both ACE homozygotes, II and DD, were significantly overrepresented in MS patients, compared to controls (χ(2) test p=0.03). Neither genotype nor allele frequencies of AT1R 1166A/C polymorphism were significantly different between patients and controls. Significant overrepresentation of AT2R -1332 AA genotype in female patients, compared to female controls, was detected (OR=1.67, 95%CI=1.13-2.49, χ(2) test p=0.01), suggesting that this genotype could be a gender-specific genetic risk factor for MS. PMID:27000216

  14. Effect of propranolol on the splanchnic and peripheral renin angiotensin system in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Walkíria Wingester; Jr, Antônio Ribeiro-Oliveira; da Cunha Ribeiro, Renata; Vieira, Renata Lúcia Pereira; Almeida, Jerusa; Nadu, Ana Paula; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões e; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of β-blockade on angiotensins in the splanchnic and peripheral circulation of cirrhotic patients and also to compare hemodynamic parameters during liver transplantation according to propranolol pre-treatment or not. METHODS: Patients were allocated into two groups: outpatients with advanced liver disease(LD) and during liver transplantation(LT). Both groups were subdivided according to treatment with propranolol or not. Plasma was collected through peripheral venipuncture to determine plasma renin activity(PRA), Angiotensin(Ang) I, Ang II, and Ang-(1-7) levels by radioimmunoassay in LD group. During liver transplantation, hemodynamic parameters were determined and blood samples were obtained from the portal vein to measure renin angiotensin system(RAS) components. RESULTS: PRA, Ang I, Ang II and Ang-(1-7) were significantly lower in the portal vein and periphery in all subgroups treated with propranolol as compared to non-treated. The relationships between Ang-(1-7) and Ang I levels and between Ang II and Ang I were significantly increased in LD group receiving propranolol. The ratio between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II remained unchanged in splanchnic and peripheral circulation in patients under β-blockade, whereas the relationship between Ang II and Ang I was significantly increased in splanchnic circulation of LT patients treated with propranolol. During liver transplantation, cardiac output and index as well systemic vascular resistance and index were reduced in propranolol-treated subgroup. CONCLUSION: In LD group, propranolol treatment reduced RAS mediators, but did not change the ratio between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II in splanchnic and peripheral circulation. Furthermore, the modification of hemodynamic parameters in propranolol treated patients was not associated with changes in the angiotensin ratio. PMID:19058308

  15. Transdermal contraception and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Cherney, David; Miller, Judith; Ahmed, Sofia B; Lai, Vesta; Dunn, Sheila; Pun, Nicole; Moineddin, Rahim; Hladunewich, Michelle A

    2015-03-15

    The oral contraceptive pill (OCP) activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) through first-pass hepatic metabolism. Although usually benign, RAAS activation may have detrimental effects on renal and hemodynamic function in some women. Since combined hormonal contraception with the transdermal patch (EVRA) does not undergo first-pass hepatic metabolism, we hypothesized that the RAAS response would be different from that of OCP subjects. Thirty-five nonsmoking, premenopausal women (15 control subjects, 10 OCP subjects, and 10 contraceptive patch subjects) without evidence of cardiovascular disease, renal disease, or diabetes were studied. Baseline angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and plasma renin activity were assessed along with hormonal and hemodynamic responses to simulated orthostatic stress using incremental lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -15, -25, and -40 mmHg). Baseline levels of angiotensinogen, angiotensin II, and plasma renin activity were significantly higher in OCP subjects compared with normotensive control and contraceptive patch subjects (P < 0.05), whereas aldosterone was significantly higher in OCP versus control subjects only (P < 0.05). Plasma renin levels were significantly lower at baseline in contraceptive patch subjects compared with normotensive control and OCP subjects (P < 0.05). In response to LBNP, increases in renin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone were attenuated in contraceptive patch subjects in conjunction with an exaggerated decline in mean arterial pressure (P < 0.05 vs. control and OCP subjects). The contraceptive patch in healthy premenopausal women is associated with an impaired ability to maintain blood pressure in response to LBNP, possibly due to insensitivity of the endogenous RAAS. Further evaluation may be beneficial in women with kidney disease. PMID:25587124

  16. New drug therapies interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Monge, Matthieu; Lorthioir, Aurélien; Bobrie, Guillaume; Azizi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    There is a persistent need for the development of new antihypertensive drugs, because the control of blood pressure is still not achievable in a significant proportion of hypertensive patients. Since the approval in 2007 of aliskiren, no other new antihypertensive based on new mechanism(s) of action have been approved. In fact, the development of promising novel drugs has been stopped for safety, efficacy or marketing reasons. Despite these difficulties, the pipeline is not dry and different new antihypertensive strategies targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway, are in clinical development stage. The dual angiotensin II receptor-neprilysin inhibitor LCZ696, a single molecule synthetized by cocrystallisation of valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug AHU377 is in development for resistant hypertension and for heart failure. Daglutril is a dual neprylisin-endothelin converting enzyme inhibitor which was shown to decrease BP in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Aldosterone synthase inhibitors and the third and fourth generation non-steroidal dihydropyridine based mineralocorticoid receptors blockers are new ways to target the multiple noxious effects of aldosterone in the kidney, vessels and heart. Centrally acting aminopeptidase A inhibitors block brain angiotensin III formation, one of the main effector peptides of the brain renin angiotensin system. However, a long time will be still necessary to evaluate extensively the efficacy and safety of these new approaches. In the mean time, using appropriate and personalized daily doses of available drugs, decreasing physician inertia, improving treatment adherence, improving access to healthcare and reducing treatment costs remain major objectives to reduce the incidence of resistant hypertension. PMID:24222656

  17. Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system mediates fatty acid-induced ER stress in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunling; Lin, Yu; Luo, Renfei; Chen, Shaoming; Wang, Feifei; Zheng, Peili; Levi, Moshe; Yang, Tianxin; Wang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity-related kidney disease is related to caloric excess promoting deleterious cellular responses. Accumulation of saturated free fatty acids in tubular cells produces lipotoxicity involving significant cellular dysfunction and injury. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation in saturated fatty acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cultured human proximal tubule epithelial cells (HK2) and in mice fed with a high-fat diet. Treatment with saturated fatty acid palmitic acid (PA; 0.8 mM) for 24 h induced ER stress in HK2, leading to an unfolded protein response as reflected by increased expressions of the ER chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and proapoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) protein as evaluated by immunoblotting. PA treatment also induced increased protein expression of inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-α (eIF2α), and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) as well as activation of caspase-3. PA treatment was associated with increased angiotensin II levels in cultured medium. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker valsartan or renin inhibitor aliskiren dramatically suppressed PA-induced upregulation of BiP, CHOP, IRE1α, p-eIF2α, and ATF4 in HK2 cells. In contrast, valsartan or aliskiren did not prevent ER stress induced by tunicamycin. C57BL/6 mice fed with a high-fat diet for 14 wk exhibited increased protein expressions of BiP and CHOP compared with control mice, which were significantly attenuated by the valsartan treatment. Increased angiotensin II levels in serum and urine were observed in mice fed with a high-fat diet when compared with controls. It is suggested that the intrarenal RAS activation may play an important role in diabetic kidney injury via mediating ER stress induced by saturated fatty acid. PMID:26672616

  18. Acute renal haemodynamic and renin-angiotensin system responses to graded renal artery stenosis in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, W P; Johnston, C I; Korner, P I

    1979-01-01

    1. The acute renal haemodynamic and renin-angiotensin system responses to graded renal artery stenosis were studied in chronically instrumented, unanaesthetized dogs. 2. Stenosis was induced over 30 sec by inflation of a cuff around the renal artery to lower distal pressure to 60, 40 or 20 mmHg, with stenosis maintained for 1 hr. This resulted in an immediate fall in renal vascular resistance, but over the next 5--30 min both resistance and renal artery pressure were restored back towards prestenosis values. Only transient increases in systemic arterial blood pressure and plasma renin and angiotensin levels were seen with the two milder stenoses. Despite restoration of renal artery pressure, renal blood flow remained reduced at all grades of stenosis. 3. Pre-treatment with angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor or sarosine1, isoleucone8 angiotensin II greatly attenuated or abolished the restoration of renal artery pressure and renal vascular resistance after stenosis, and plasma renin and angiotensin II levels remained high. Renal dilatation was indefinitely maintained, but the normal restoration of resistance and pressure could be simulated by infusing angiotensin II into the renal artery. 4. The effective resistance to blood flow by the stenosis did not remain constant but varied with changes in the renal vascular resistance. PMID:219182

  19. Polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system genes predict progression of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kretowski, Adam; McFann, Kim; Hokanson, John E; Maahs, David; Kinney, Gregory; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Wadwa, R Paul; Eckel, Robert H; Ogden, Lorraine; Garg, Satish; Li, Jia; Cheng, Suzanne; Erlich, Henry A; Rewers, Marian

    2007-03-01

    Premature coronary artery disease (CAD) in subjects with type 1 diabetes dramatically affects quality of life and morbidity and leads to premature death, but there is still little known about the mechanisms and predictors of this complication. In the present study, we explored the role of genetic variants of angiotensinogen (AGT, M235T), ACE (I/D), and angiotensin type 1 receptor (ATR1, A1166C) as predictors of rapid progression of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Five-hundred eighty-five type 1 diabetic patients and 592 similar age and sex control subjects were evaluated for progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC), a marker of subclinical CAD, before and after a 2.5-year follow-up. In logistic regression analysis, CAC progression was dramatically more likely in type 1 diabetic subjects not treated with ACE inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker who had the TT-ID-AA/AC genotype combination than in those with other genotypes (odds ratio 11.6 [95%CI 4.5-29.6], P < 0.0001) and was even stronger when adjusted for cardiovascular disease risk factors and the mean A1C (37.5 [3.6-388], P = 0.002). In conclusion, a combination of genotype variants of the renin-angiotensin system genes is a powerful determinant of subclinical progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetic patients and may partially explain accelerated CAD in type 1 diabetes. PMID:17327458

  20. Renin-angiotensin system genes polymorphism in Egyptians with premature coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Aziz, Tarek A; Hussein, Yousri M; Mohamed, Randa H; Shalaby, Sally M

    2012-05-01

    Genetics polymorphism of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) affects the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to investigate the association between the RAS genes and premature CAD (PCAD) in Egyptians. 116 patients with PCAD, 114 patients with late onset CAD and 119 controls were included in the study. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II receptor type 1 (ATR1) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found that ACE DD, AGT TT and ATR1 CC increased the risk of PCAD by 2.7, 2.8 and 2.86 respectively). Smoking, hypertension, diabetes, total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were independent risk factors for the development of PCAD. We conclude that the ACE DD, AGT TT and ATR1 CC genotypes may increase the susceptibility of an individual to have PCAD. The coexistence of CAD risk factors with these risky RAS genotypes may lead to the development of PCAD in Egyptian patients. PMID:22387727

  1. Characterization of the renin-angiotensin system in the turtle Pseudemys scripta.

    PubMed

    Cipolle, M D; Zehr, J E

    1984-07-01

    Studies were conducted in freshwater turtles Pseudemys scripta to define some characteristics of the renin-angiotensin system in this reptile. Dialyzed acid-treated kidney extract (1 g tissue per ml water) produced a prolonged pressor response in unanesthetized turtles, which was eliminated by boiling the extract or by pretreating the turtle with [Sar1, Ile8]angiotensin II. A rat pressor assay was employed because turtle angiotensin (ANG) was bound poorly by the anti-[Asp1, Ile5, His9]ANG I used in our radioimmunoassay. Kidney extract incubated with homologous plasma (pH 5.5 and 25 degrees C) produced a time-dependent pressor response in rats. The pressor activity of the product was eliminated by dialysis or by pretreating the rats with [Sar1, Ile8]ANG II. The pressor response in anesthetized turtles to ANG I was significantly reduced by captopril, whereas the ANG II response remained unchanged, thus demonstrating the presence of ANG-converting enzyme activity in these animals. We determined the velocity of turtle ANG formation at various dilutions of enzyme (kidney extract) or substrate (plasma). Turtle kidney extract incubated with homologous plasma displayed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Finally we conducted experiments to determine whether a portion of turtle plasma renin exists in an inactive form. Trypsinization caused a slight increase in plasma renin activity (PRA), whereas acidification to pH 3.3 yielded a fourfold increase in PRA. PMID:6377928

  2. Renin-Angiotensin System Gene Variants and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence of Angiotensinogen

    PubMed Central

    Joyce-Tan, Siew Mei; Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Abdul Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully used to call for variants associated with diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, some variants are not included in the GWAS to avoid penalty in multiple hypothetic testing. Thus, candidate gene approach is still useful even at GWAS era. This study attempted to assess whether genetic variations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and their gene interactions are associated with T2DM risk. We genotyped 290 T2DM patients and 267 controls using three genes of the RAS, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). There were significant differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls for AGT variants (P = 0.05) but not for ACE and AGTR1. Haplotype TCG of the AGT was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15–3.20, permuted P = 0.012); however, no evidence of significant gene-gene interactions was seen. Nonetheless, our analysis revealed that the associations of the AGT variants with T2DM were independently associated. Thus, this study suggests that genetic variants of the RAS can modestly influence the T2DM risk. PMID:26682227

  3. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade in chronic kidney disease: current strategies and a look ahead.

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Cappadona, Francesca; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of renal and cardiovascular organ damage, and has been the preferred therapeutic target for renal protection for over 30 years. Monotherapy with either an Angiotensin Converting Enzime Inhibitor (ACE-I) or an Angiotensin Receptor Blocker (ARB), together with optimal blood pressure control, remains the mainstay treatment for retarding the progression toward end-stage renal disease. Combining ACE-Is and ARBs, or either one with an Aldosterone Receptor Antagonist (ARA), has been shown to provide greater albuminuria reduction, and to possibly improve renal outcome, but at an increased risk of potentially severe side effects. Moreover, combination therapy has failed to provide additional cardiovascular protection, and large prospective trials on hard renal endpoints are lacking. Therefore this treatment should, at present, be limited to selected patients with residual proteinuria and high renal risk. Future studies with novel agents, which directly act on the RAAS at multiple levels or have a more favourable side effect profile, are greatly needed to further explore and define the potential for and the limitations of profound pharmacologic RAAS inhibition. PMID:26984204

  4. Combined neprilysin and renin-angiotensin system inhibition for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vardeny, Orly; Miller, Ryan; Solomon, Scott D

    2014-12-01

    Neprilysin is an enzyme that contributes to the breakdown of the biologically active natriuretic peptides and several other vasoactive compounds. Inhibiting neprilysin has been a therapeutic target for several compounds that have been tested in cardiovascular disease, including ecadotril, candoxatril, omapatrilat, and LCZ696. Although ecadotril, candoxatril, and omapatrilat were initially tested in hypertension and/or heart failure, lack of efficacy and side effects led to discontinuation of their development. LCZ696 (sacubitril valsartan) is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor that has been developed for use in heart failure. This compound is composed of 2 molecular moieties in a single crystalline complex-the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and a neprilysin inhibitor prodrug-and has now been tested in hypertension, in a phase 2 trial in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and has demonstrated greater efficacy than enalapril in a phase 3 trial in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Its ability to inhibit the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis and augment the endogenous natriuretic peptide system provides a distinctive mechanism of action in cardiovascular disease. PMID:25306450

  5. Antenatal maternal protein deprivation: sexually dimorphic programming of the pancreatic renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; Wong, Christine; Van Wickle, Jonathan; Longo, Lawrence D

    2013-06-01

    As an underlying mechanism of antenatal maternal malnutrition-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), alterations in the local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may play a significant role. We tested the hypothesis that antenatal maternal protein deprivation (AMPD) leads to increased activity of the local pancreatic RAS, with associated hyperglycemia in the adult progeny. Mice dams were fed either control or 50% protein restricted diet (AMPD) starting one week before conception and maintained during complete gestation. Our results demonstrate low birth weight (control 1.5 ± 0.03 and AMPD 1.3 ± 0.03) and sexually dimorphic programming of the pancreatic RAS, with development of hyperglycemia only in the female mice offspring as a consequence of AMPD. No significant difference in serum insulin concentration was observed; however, AMPD was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression of angiotensinogen, renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-1 in male and female offspring. Of importance, mRNA and protein expression of ACE 2 and angiotensin II receptors was up-regulated only in the male offspring, as a consequence of AMPD. We conclude that sexually dimorphic programming of the pancreatic RAS expression is associated with AMPD diet-mediated development of hyperglycemia. PMID:22898440

  6. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  7. Primary Systemic Amyloidosis and High Levels of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Praena-Segovia, J.; Sanchez-Gastaldo, A.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Ocete-Pérez, R.; Ávila-Polo, R.; Martino, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Infiltrative heart diseases are caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders; amyloidosis and sarcoidosis are two frequent causes of myocardial infiltration, which differ in clinical and biological outcome and treatment issues. The presence of high levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in a patient with infiltrative heart disease may increase suspicion of sarcoidosis. Nevertheless, no mention about increased ACE levels in extracerebral primary systemic amyloidosis is available. We present two cases of primary systemic amyloidosis, which are cardiac involvement and elevated ACE levels. PMID:24826302

  8. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  9. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-kinin system influences on diabetic vascular disease and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Flack, J M; Hamaty, M; Staffileno, B A

    1998-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an inordinately high risk of virtually all manifestations of cardiovascular-renal disease including atherosclerotic coronary and peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy unassociated with coronary heart disease. Abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-kinin (RAAK) cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis and clinical expression of these cardiovascular-renal sequelae. Thus, pharmacological modulation of the RAAK system is an attractive therapeutic target in diabetes mellitus. Indeed, emerging data from human clinical studies appear to confirm this thesis. PMID:9930381

  10. The past, present and future of renin–angiotensin aldosterone system inhibition☆

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Bakris, George L.; Waeber, Bernard; McMurray, John J.V.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ruilope, Luis M.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Swedberg, Karl; Piña, Ileana L.; Fiuzat, Mona; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    The renin–angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is central to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. RAAS inhibition can reduce blood pressure, prevent target organ damage in hypertension and diabetes, and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure and/or myocardial infarction. This review presents the history of RAAS inhibition including a summary of key heart failure, myocardial infarction, hypertension and atrial fibrillation trials. Recent developments in RAAS inhibition are discussed including implementation and optimization of current drug therapies. Finally, ongoing clinical trials, opportunities for future trials and issues related to the barriers and approvability of novel RAAS inhibitors are highlighted. PMID:23121914

  11. The strainer blockage assessment methodology used

    SciTech Connect

    Zigler, G.L.; Rao, D.V.

    1996-03-01

    On July 28, 1992 a spurious opening of a safety valve at Barseback Unit 2 in Sweden resulted in clogging of the Containment Vessel Spray System strainers in less than one hour. Instances of ECCS strainer clogging have occurred in U.S. BWRs. Given these precursors the USNRC staff initiated analyses to estimate the potential for loss of NPSH of the ECCS pumps in BWRs due to clogging of suction strainers by a combination of fibrous and particulate material. The BLOCKAGE code was developed in support of NUREG/CR-6224, a probabilistic scoping analysis of a BWR/4 with a Mark 1 containment. This paper addresses the key elements of the methodology used in the BLOCKAGE code to assess head loss across ECCS strainers. The debris generation model, the debris drywell transport, and the suppression pool models are discussed briefly. NUREG/CR-6224 provides in-depth discussions of the models used in BLOCKAGE. Additionally, user interface features of BLOCKAGE are discussed.

  12. Low Response of Renin-Angiotensin System to Sodium Intake Intervention in Chinese Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weijing; Cai, Qingqing; Yuan, Woliang; Liu, Yu; Bardeesi, Adham Sameer A; Wang, Jingfeng; Chen, Jie; Huang, Hui

    2016-02-01

    The interactions of sodium balance and response of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system are important for maintaining the hemodynamic stability in physiological conditions. However, the influence of short-term sodium intake intervention in the response of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on hypertensive patients is still unclear. Thus, we conducted a clinical trial to investigate the effects of short-term sodium intake intervention on the response of RAS in hypertensive patients.One hundred twenty-five primary Chinese hypertensive patients were divided into high, moderate, and low sodium groups by 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (UNa). All the patients received a 10-day dietary sodium intake intervention with standardized sodium (173.91mmol/day) and potassium (61.53mmol/day). Blood pressure, urinary sodium, urinary potassium, plasma sodium, potassium, creatinine, the levels of plasma renin activity, plasma angiotensin II concentrations (AT-II), and plasma aldosterone concentrations were detected before and after the intervention.Before the intervention, no differences were found in blood pressure and RAS among 3 groups. After standardized dietary sodium intake intervention, both UNa excretion and systolic pressure decreased in high-sodium group, while they increased in moderate and low-sodium groups. Intriguingly, there were no changes in the levels of plasma renin activity, AT-II, and plasma aldosterone concentrations among 3 groups during the intervention.The present study demonstrated that the influenced sodium excretion and blood pressure by short-term sodium intake intervention were independent of RAS quick response in Chinese hypertensive patients. PMID:26871780

  13. Low LBNP Tolerance in Men is Associated With Attenuated Activation of The Renin-Angiotensin System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Petersen, T. W.; Gabrielsen, A.; Pump, B.; Bie, P.; Christensen, N.-J.; Warberg, J.; Videbaeck, R.; Simonson, S. R.; Norsk, P.

    1999-01-01

    Vasoactive hormone concentrations [epinephrine (pE), norepinephrine (pNE), angiotensin II (pATII), vasopressin (pVP), endothelin 1 (pET1)] and plasma renin activity (pRA) were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of the renin-angiotensin system is related to LBNP tolerance. Healthy men (2,822 cal/day(exp -1), 2 mmol*kg(exp -1)*day(exp -1)) Na(+)) were exposed to 30 minutes of progressive LBNP to -50 mmHg. LBNP was uneventful for seven men (25 +/- 2 years, HiTol group), but eight men (26 +/- 3 years) reached pre-syncope after 11 +/- 1 minutes (P < 0.001, LoTol group). Mean arterial pressure was unchanged. Central venous pressure and left atrial diameter decreased in both groups (5-6 mmHg by approx. 30%, P < 0.05). Control [hormone] were similar but, pRA differed between groups (LoTol 0.6 +/- 0.1, HiTol 1.2 +/- 0.1 ng Ang1/(ml(exp -1)*h(exp -1)), P < 0.05). LBNP increased (P < 0.05) pRA and pATII more in HiTol (9.9 +/- 2.2 ng Ang1/(ml(exp -1)*h(exp -1)) and 58 +/- 12 pg/ml(exp -1)) than LoTol (4.3 +/- 0.9 ng Ang1/(ml*h) and 28 +/- 6 pg/ml(exp -1)). In contrast, pVP was higher (P < 0.05) in LoTol than in HiTol. The response of the renin-angiotensin system seems linked to the occurrence of pre-syncope, and measurement of resting pRA may be predictive.

  14. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme stimulates fracture healing and periosteal callus formation – role of a local renin-angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, P; Schwenzer, S; Slotta, JE; Scheuer, C; Tami, AE; Holstein, JH; Histing, T; Burkhardt, M; Pohlemann, T; Menger, MD

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) regulates blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. In addition, ‘local’ tissue-specific RAS have been identified, regulating regeneration, cell growth, apoptosis, inflammation and angiogenesis. Although components of the RAS are expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, a local RAS in bone has not yet been described and there is no information on whether the RAS is involved in fracture healing. Therefore, we studied the expression and function of the key RAS component, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), during fracture healing. Experimental approach: In a murine femur fracture model, animals were treated with the ACE inhibitor perindopril or vehicle only. Fracture healing was analysed after 2, 5 and 10 weeks using X-ray, micro-CT, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and biomechanical testing. Key results: ACE was expressed in osteoblasts and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the periosteal callus during fracture healing, accompanied by expression of the angiotensin type-1 and type-2 receptors. Perindopril treatment reduced blood pressure and bone mineral density in unfractured femora. However, it improved periosteal callus formation, bone bridging of the fracture gap and torsional stiffness. ACE inhibition did not affect cell proliferation, but reduced apoptotic cell death. After 10 week treatment, a smaller callus diameter and bone volume after perindopril treatment indicated an advanced stage of bone remodelling. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence for a local RAS in bone that influenced the process of fracture healing. We show for the first time that inhibition of ACE is capable of accelerating bone healing and remodelling. PMID:20233225

  15. Pipeline Blockage Unplugging and Locating Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    W. Thor Zollinger; Frank Carney

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the development of a pulsed hydraulic system, specifically designed to unblock plugged piping. It uses the differences between the resonant vibrations of the fluid column and pipe walls to separate the blockage from the pipe wall, break it up, and clear the line. Using resonant frequencies, the system can stay below the design pressure of the system, preventing pipe failures from occurring, which is a major concern with DOE radioactive waste transfer lines.

  16. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system improves cerebral microcirculatory perfusion in diabetic hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Estato, Vanessa; Obadia, Nathalie; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Freitas, Felipe Santos; Reis, Patrícia; Castro-Faria Neto, Hugo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    We examined the functional and structural microcirculatory alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium of non-diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and diabetic SHR (D-SHR), as well as the effects of long-term treatment with the angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonist olmesartan and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril. Diabetes was experimentally induced by a combination of a high-fat diet with a single low dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection). D-SHR were orally administered with olmesartan (5 mg/kg/day), enalapril (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 28 days, and compared with vehicle-treated non-diabetic SHR or normotensive non-diabetic Wistar-Kyoto rats. The cerebral and skeletal muscle functional capillary density of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats was assessed using intravital fluorescence videomicroscopy. Chronic treatment with olmesartan or enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure and reversed brain functional capillary rarefaction. Brain oxidative stress was reduced to non-diabetic control levels in animals treated with olmesartan or enalapril. Histochemical analysis of the structural capillary density showed that both olmesartan and enalapril increased the capillary-to-fiber ratio in skeletal muscle and the capillary-to-fiber volume density in the left ventricle. Olmesartan and enalapril also prevented collagen deposition and the increase in cardiomyocyte diameter in the left ventricle. Our results suggest that the association between hypertension and diabetes results in microvascular alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium that can be prevented by chronic blockade of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:23466285

  17. The association of renin-angiotensin system genes with the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guanxiong; Qin, Yong; Lu, Xianghong; Xu, Xiangdong; Xu, Shengqian; Wu, Chengjun; Wang, Xinmei; Wang, Shi; Pan, Debiao

    2015-03-27

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Angiogenesis is reported to play a pivotal role in the occurrence, development and metastasis of HCC. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in the regulation of angiogenesis. Here, based on the analysis of HCC datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we found that there was a negative correlation between the mRNA levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and CD34. To explore the association of RAS with the progression from fibrosis to cirrhosis to HCC, liver specimens and serum samples were collected from patients with hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis and HCC. Relative hepatic mRNA levels of CD34 and ACE2 were determined by real-time PCR, and the serum concentrations of Angiotensin II (Ang II), Ang (1-7) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were detected by ELISA. We found that ACE2 mRNA was gradually decreased, while CD34 mRNA was progressively increased with the increasing grade of disease severity. Concentrations of Ang II, Ang (1-7) and VEGF were higher in the sera of patients than in that of healthy volunteers. These proteins' concentrations were also progressively increased with the increasing grade of disease severity. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between VEGF and Ang II or Ang (1-7), while negative correlation was observed between mRNA levels of CD34 and ACE2. More importantly, patients with higher level of ACE2 expression had longer survival time than those with lower level of ACE2 expression. Taken together, our data suggests that the low expression of ACE2 may be a useful indicator of poor prognosis in HCC. The RAS may have a role in the progression of HCC. PMID:25701390

  18. Chronic Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Blockade May Not Induce Hypotension During Anaesthesia for Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Guido; Di Salvo, Claudio; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Abramo, Antonio; Fierabracci, Paola; Magno, Silvia; Piaggi, Paolo; Vitti, Paolo; Santini, Ferruccio

    2016-06-01

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) for the treatment of hypertensive obese patients is steadily increasing. Some studies have reported that the use of these drugs was associated with an increased risk of hypotensive episodes, during general anaesthesia. The number of bariatric procedures is also increasing worldwide, but there is a lack of studies investigating the hypotensive effect of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers in severely obese patients during general anaesthesia for bariatric surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate hemodynamic changes induced by general anaesthesia in obese patients chronically treated with ACE-I or ARB compared to a control group not treated with antihypertensive therapy. Fourteen obese subjects (mean body mass index (BMI) 47.5 kg/m(2)) treated with ACE-I or ARB and twelve obese (mean BMI 45.7 kg/m2) controls not treated with antihypertensive therapy underwent general anaesthesia to perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored continuously and registered at different time points: T0 before induction, then at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min after induction, and the last time point taken following recovery from anaesthesia. A progressive reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure values was observed without significant differences between the two groups. A similar trend of heart rate values was observed. In conclusion, our pilot study suggests that RAS blockers may be continued during the perioperative period in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, without increasing the risk of hypotensive episodes. PMID:26328531

  19. Local Fetal Lung Renin-Angiotensin System as a Target to Treat Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Carvalho-Dias, Emanuel; Piairo, Paulina; Nunes, Susana; Baptista, Maria J; Moura, Rute S; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Antenatal stimulation of lung growth is a reasonable approach to treat congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a disease characterized by pulmonary hypoplasia and hypertension. Several evidences from the literature demonstrated a possible involvement of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) during fetal lung development. Thus, the expression pattern of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, angiotensinogen, type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors of angiotensin II (ANGII) was assessed by immunohisto-chemistry throughout gestation, whereas the function of RAS in the fetal lung was evaluated using fetal rat lung explants. These were morphometrically analyzed and intracellular pathway alterations assessed by Western blot. In nitrofen-induced CDH model, pregnant rats were treated with saline or PD-123319. In pups, lung growth, protein/DNA ratio, radial saccular count, epithelial differentiation and lung maturation, vascular morphometry, right ventricular hypertrophy and overload molecular markers, gasometry and survival time were evaluated. Results demonstrated that all RAS components were constitutively expressed in the lung during gestation and that ANGII had a stimulatory effect on lung branching, mediated by AT1 receptor, through p44/42 and Akt phosphorylation. This stimulatory effect on lung growth was mimicked by AT2-antagonist (PD-123319) treatment. In vivo antenatal PD-123319 treatment increased lung growth, ameliorated indirect parameters of pulmonary hypertension, improved lung function and survival time in nonventilated CDH pups, without maternal or fetal deleterious effects. Therefore, this study demonstrated a local and physiologically active RAS during lung morphogenesis. Moreover, selective inhibition of AT2 receptor is presented as a putative antenatal therapy for CDH. PMID:22113494

  20. BLOCKAGE 2.5 reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, C.J.; Brideau, J.; Rao, D.V.; Bernahl, W.

    1996-12-01

    The BLOCKAGE 2.5 code was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a tool to evaluate license compliance regarding the design of suction strainers for emergency core cooling system (ECCS) pumps in boiling water reactors (BWR) as required by NRC Bulletin 96-03, ``Potential Plugging of Emergency Core Cooling Suction Strainers by Debris in Boiling Water Reactors``. Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA) and Software Edge, Inc. (SE) developed this PC-based code. The instructions to effectively use this code to evaluate the potential of debris to sufficiently block a pump suction strainer such that a pump could lose NPSH margin was documented in a User`s Manual (NRC, NUREG/CR-6370). The Reference Manual contains additional information that supports the use of BLOCKAGE 2.5. It contains descriptions of the analytical models contained in the code, programmer guides illustrating the structure of the code, and summaries of coding verification and model validation exercises that were performed to ensure that the analytical models were correctly coded and applicable to the evaluation of BWR pump suction strainers. The BLOCKAGE code was developed by SEA and programmed in FORTRAN as a code that can be executed from the DOS level on a PC. A graphical users interface (GUI) was then developed by SEA to make BLOCKAGE easier to use and to provide graphical output capability. The GUI was programmed in the C language. The user has the option of executing BLOCKAGE 2.5 with the GUI or from the DOS level and the Users Manual provides instruction for both methods of execution.

  1. Which patients should be on renin-angiotensin system blockers after coronary surgery?

    PubMed

    Alassar, Aiman; Bazerbashi, Samer; Easto, Rachel; Unsworth-White, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'which patients should be on renin-angiotensin system blockers after coronary surgery?' Using the reported search, 12 papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The 12 studies included 5 prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 1 meta-analysis. One RCT of 2553 stable patients post-coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction ≤40% showed that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) therapy can and probably should be delayed beyond 7 days due to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with immediate postoperative initiation of ACEI treatment. Another study showed that the cardioprotective benefits of ACEI following CABG are persistent with respect to an LV ejection fraction below or above 40% and whether percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or CABG was performed. A large multicentre international study of 4224 patients undergoing CABG looking at a composite outcome of rates of cardiac, cerebral and renal events and in-hospital mortality showed that continuous treatment with ACEI compared with no ACEI was associated with reductions of risks of non-fatal events (P = 0.009, odds ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.91). Addition of ACEI de novo following surgery was also associated with significant reduction in the risk of the composite outcome (P = 0.004) and of a cardiovascular event (P = 0.04). We conclude that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment plays an important role in minimizing ischaemic events after CABG even in low-risk patients. The cardioprotective benefits of these drugs are persistent at mid- and long-term follow-up, with respect to LV ejection fraction below or

  2. Nuclear Expression of Renin-Angiotensin System Components in NRK-52E Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alzayadneh, Ebaa M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Isolated nuclei of sheep proximal tubules express angiotensin receptors as well as angiotensinogen (AGT) and renin. The present study characterized the NRK-52E tubular epithelial cell line for the intracellular expression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components. Methods RAS components were visualized by immunofluorescent staining in intact cells and protein expression in isolate nuclei. Results An antibody to the Ang I sequence of AGT (AI-AGT) revealed only cytosolic staining, while an antibody to an internal epitope of AGT (Int-AGT) revealed primarily nuclear staining. Immunoblots of nuclear and cytosolic fractions confirmed the differential cell staining of AGT. Immunostaining for renin was present on nuclei of intact cells. Nuclear renin activity averaged 0.77 ± 0.05 nmol/mg protein/hr that was reduced by aliskiren (0.13 ± 0.01 nmol/mg/hr, n=3, p<0.01); trypsin activation increased activity 3-fold. Peptide staining localized Ang II and Ang-(1–7) to the nucleus and peptide content averaged 59 ± 2 and 57 ± 22 fmol/mg (n=4), respectively. Peptide metabolism in isolated nuclei revealed the processing of Ang I to Ang-(1–7) by thimet oligopeptidase. Conclusion We conclude that the NRK-52E cells express an intracellular RAS localized to the nucleus and may be an appropriate cell model to elucidate the functional relevance of this system. PMID:24961503

  3. Angiotensin II-triggered kinase signaling cascade in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have projected the renin-angiotensin system as a central component of the physiological and pathological processes of assorted neurological disorders. Its primary effector hormone, angiotensin II (Ang II), not only mediates the physiological effects of vasoconstriction and blood pressure regulation in cardiovascular disease but is also implicated in a much wider range of neuronal activities and diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, neuronal injury, and cognitive disorders. Ang II produces different actions by acting on its two subtypes of receptors (AT1 and AT2); however, the well-known physiological actions of Ang II are mainly mediated through AT1 receptors. Moreover, recent studies also suggest the important functional role of AT2 receptor in the brain. Ang II acts on AT1 receptors and conducts its functions via MAP kinases (ERK1/2, JNK, and p38MAPK), glycogen synthase kinase, Rho/ROCK kinase, receptor tyrosine kinases (PDGF and EGFR), and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Src, Pyk2, and JAK/STAT). AT1R-mediated NADPH oxidase activation also leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species, widely implicated in neuroinflammation. These signaling cascades lead to glutamate excitotoxicity, apoptosis, cerebral infarction, astrocyte proliferation, nociception, neuroinflammation, and progression of other neurological disorders. The present review focuses on the Ang II-triggered signal transduction pathways in central nervous system. PMID:26574890

  4. Hydroacoustic Blockage Calibration for Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P E; Matzel, E; Upton, Z; Pulli, J J

    2003-07-11

    The core focus of this hydroacoustic research is to develop a better understanding of hydroacoustic blockage to better predict those stations that can be used in discrimination analysis for any particular event. The research involves two approaches: (1) model-based assessment of blockage and (2) ground-truth data-based assessment of blockage. The goal is to reliably determine all hydroacoustic stations that can be brought to bear on a discrimination analysis from any event location in the world s oceans. An important aspect of this capability is to include reflected T-phases where they reliably occur since reflected T-phases can allow station utilization when the direct path is otherwise completely blocked. We have conceptually designed an approach to automate assessment procedures that will allow both model-based and data-based methodologies to be utilized and in the future, integrated. We have modified the HydroCAM model-based network assessment code to include variable density bathymetry grids. This will improve the reliability of model-based blockage assessment as dense bathymetry grids are added to the bathymetry database where available and needed. We are also running the HydroCAM code to produce blockage grids in the Indian Ocean for many different blockage criteria. We have been building the database necessary to begin the data driven assessment of blockage. At present, the database is accumulating earthquake events within the Indian Ocean basin as recorded at Diego Garcia and Cape Leeuwin. Over 130 events from 2001 and 2002 have been loaded. Now earthquake event data is automatically loaded into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory database at 1-hour record lengths to accommodate future reflection phase analysis. Future work will focus on the utilization of reflected T-phases, the automated use of model-based blockage grids, and the enhancement and use of the data-based method for blockage assessment in the Indian Ocean. The analysis methodology will

  5. [Inhibition of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in heart failure, or from CONSENSUS to PARADIGM-HF].

    PubMed

    Vítovec, Jiří; Špinar, Jindřich; Špinarová, Lenka

    2015-05-01

    An historical survey is presented of mortality trials on angiotensin-aldosteron system inhibition in patients with chronic heart failure. From the CONSENSUS trial up to the PARADIGM-HF trial, ACE inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AT1-blockers, ARBs, sartans), along with mineralocorticoid receptor blockers, have been the gold standard of treatment. Both direct renin blocker aliskiren and dual blocker enalapril + neprilysin proved ineffective; on the other hand, the new dual inhibitor valsartan + neprilysin LCZ 696 is a new and promising therapeutic agent for future treatment of chronic heart failure. PMID:26075858

  6. Associations between circulating components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and left ventricular mass.

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, H.; Hense, H. W.; Muscholl, M.; Luchner, A.; Kürzinger, S.; Danser, A. H.; Riegger, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiac growth may be modulated in part by the trophic effects of neurohormones. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between the basal activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and left ventricular mass. DESIGN: A population based sample of 615 middle-age subjects was studied by standardised echocardiography; anthropometric measurements; and biochemical quantification of renin, pro-renin, angiotensinogen, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), and aldosterone. RESULTS: Echocardiographic left ventricular mass index correlated significantly with arterial blood pressure, age, and body mass index. In addition, in men ACE activity was significantly related to left ventricular mass index in univariate (P = 0.0007) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.008). Men with left ventricular hypertrophy presented with significantly higher serum ACE concentrations than those with normal left ventricular mass index (P = 0.002). In both men and women serum aldosterone was strongly related to septal and posterior wall thickness. Furthermore, in women serum aldosterone was positively and independently associated with left ventricular mass index (P = 0.0001). This effect was most prominent in hypertensive women. Finally, women with left ventricular hypertrophy presented with significantly higher serum aldosterone (P = 0.01). No significant associations with left ventricular mass index were observed for angiotensinogen, renin, or pro-renin. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that the variability of serum ACE or aldosterone, as occurred in this large population based sample, may contribute to the modulation of left ventricular mass. Images PMID:9038690

  7. [INTERACTION OF BETA-BLOCKER PROPRANOLOL WITH RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM INHIBITORS IN RAT KIDNEY].

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, O B; Buchneva, N V; Landar, L N

    2016-01-01

    Propranolol injection (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) in anesthetized rats increases diuresis 1.60 times (p < 0.05) with simultaneous 1.54- and 1.62-fold increase (p < 0.05) in sodium and potassium excretion, respectively. Preliminary inhibition of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity using ACE inhibitor enalapril (1 mg/kg, orally, 7 days) increases the sensitivity of rat kidney to drug, increasing its diuretic effect 2.33 times, natriuresis 2.49 times, and urine potassium excretion 1.80 times (p < 0.05). After the preliminary insertion of AT1 angiotensin receptor antagonist losartan (1 mg/kg, orally, 7 days), propranolol causes 1.8-fold increase in diuresis, 2.48-fold decrease in urine sodium, and 1.71-fold decrease in kaliuresis (p < 0.05). Preliminary administration of direct renin inhibitor aliskiren (4 mg/kg, orally, 7 days) is accompanied by 2.30-fold increase in the diuretic effect of propranolol, 2.56-fold increase in natriuresis, and 2.27-fold increase in urine potassium excretion (p < 0.05). It is concluded that the renal tissue RAS is involved in the mechanism of propranolol action in the kidney, acting as modulator preventing excessive loss of water and electrolytes with urine. PMID:27455575

  8. Activation of calpain by renin-angiotensin system in pleural mesothelial cells mediates tuberculous pleural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Xiang, Fei; Cai, Peng-Cheng; Lu, Yu-Zhi; Xu, Xiao-Xiao; Yu, Fan; Li, Feng-Zhi; Greer, Peter A; Shi, Huan-Zhong; Zhou, Qiong; Xin, Jian-Bao; Ye, Hong; Su, Yunchao; Ma, Wan-Li

    2016-07-01

    Pleural fibrosis is defined as an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components that results in destruction of the normal pleural tissue architecture. It can result from diverse inflammatory conditions, especially tuberculous pleurisy. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) play a pivotal role in pleural fibrosis. Calpain is a family of calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which plays an important role in ECM remodeling. However, the role of calpain in pleural fibrosis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) induced calpain activation in PMCs and that inhibition of calpain prevented TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and cell proliferation of PMCs. Moreover, our data revealed that the levels of angiotensin (ANG)-converting enzyme (ACE) were significantly higher in pleural fluid of patients with TPE than those with malignant pleural effusion, and ACE-ANG II in TPE resulted in activation of calpain and subsequent triggering of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway in PMCs. Finally, calpain activation in PMCs and collagen depositions were confirmed in pleural biopsy specimens from patients with tuberculous pleurisy. Together, these studies demonstrated that calpain is activated by renin-angiotensin system in pleural fibrosis and mediates TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and proliferation of PMCs via the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Calpain in PMCs might be a novel target for intervention in tuberculous pleural fibrosis. PMID:27261452

  9. Dietary Sodium Suppresses Digestive Efficiency via the Renin-Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Voong, Susan; Morales-Santiago, Fabiola I.; Kahn, Michael Z.; Ni, Jonathan; Littlejohn, Nicole K.; Claflin, Kristin E.; Burnett, Colin M.L.; Pearson, Nicole A.; Lutter, Michael L.; Grobe, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fats and sodium are both palatable and are hypothesized to synergistically contribute to ingestive behavior and thereby obesity. Contrary to this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice fed a 45% high fat diet exhibited weight gain that was inhibited by increased dietary sodium content. This suppressive effect of dietary sodium upon weight gain was mediated specifically through a reduction in digestive efficiency, with no effects on food intake behavior, physical activity, or resting metabolism. Replacement of circulating angiotensin II levels reversed the effects of high dietary sodium to suppress digestive efficiency. While the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan had no effect in mice fed low sodium, the AT2 receptor antagonist PD-123,319 suppressed digestive efficiency. Correspondingly, genetic deletion of the AT2 receptor in FVB/NCrl mice resulted in suppressed digestive efficiency even on a standard chow diet. Together these data underscore the importance of digestive efficiency in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implicate dietary sodium, the renin-angiotensin system, and the AT2 receptor in the control of digestive efficiency regardless of mouse strain or macronutrient composition of the diet. These findings highlight the need for greater understanding of nutrient absorption control physiology, and prompt more uniform assessment of digestive efficiency in animal studies of energy balance. PMID:26068176

  10. Involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Rateri, Debra L; Bruemmer, Dennis; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-11-01

    Aortic aneurysms are relatively common maladies that may lead to the devastating consequence of aortic rupture. AAAs (abdominal aortic aneurysms) and TAAs (thoracic aortic aneurysms) are two common forms of aneurysmal diseases in humans that appear to have distinct pathologies and mechanisms. Despite this divergence, there are numerous and consistent demonstrations that overactivation of the RAS (renin-angiotensin system) promotes both AAAs and TAAs in animal models. For example, in mice, both AAAs and TAAs are formed during infusion of AngII (angiotensin II), the major bioactive peptide in the RAS. There are many proposed mechanisms by which the RAS initiates and perpetuates aortic aneurysms, including effects of AngII on a diverse array of cell types and mediators. These experimental findings are complemented in humans by genetic association studies and retrospective analyses of clinical data that generally support a role of the RAS in both AAAs and TAAs. Given the lack of a validated pharmacological therapy for any form of aortic aneurysm, there is a pressing need to determine whether the consistent findings on the role of the RAS in animal models are translatable to humans afflicted with these diseases. The present review compiles the recent literature that has shown the RAS as a critical component in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms. PMID:22788237

  11. Novel potential treatment modalities for ocular hypertension: focus on angiotensin and bradykinin system axes.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Najam A

    2015-04-01

    Despite the availability of modern surgical procedures, new drug delivery techniques, health authority-approved single topical ocular drugs, and combination products thereof, there continues to be an unmet medical need for novel treatment modalities for preserving vision. This is especially true for the treatment of glaucoma and the high risk factor often associated with this ocular disease, elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Undesirable local or systemic side effects, frequency of dosing, lack of sustained IOP lowering, and lack of prevention of diurnal IOP spikes are among the greatest challenges. The very recent discovery, characterization, and publication of 2 novel IOP-lowering agents that pertain to the renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin axes potentially offer novel means to treat and control ocular hypertension (OHT). Here, some contextual introductory information is provided first, followed by more detailed discussion of the properties and actions of diminazene aceturate (DIZE; a novel angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 activator) and FR-190997 (a nonpeptide bradykinin receptor-2 agonist) in relation to their anti-OHT activities in rodent and cynomolgus monkey eyes, respectively. It is anticipated that these compounds will pave the way for future discovery, development, and marketing of novel drugs to treat glaucoma and thus help save sight for millions of people afflicted with this slow progressive optic neuropathy. PMID:25599263

  12. Soya protein attenuates abnormalities of the renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue from obese rats.

    PubMed

    Frigolet, María E; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R

    2012-01-01

    Several metabolic disturbances during obesity are associated with adipose tissue-altered functions. Adipocytes contain the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates signalling pathways that control angiogenesis via Akt in an autocrine fashion. Soya protein (Soy) consumption modifies the gene expression pattern in adipose tissue, resulting in an improved adipocyte function. Therefore, the aim of the present work is to study whether dietary Soy regulates the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes and its association with the phosphorylated state of Akt in the adipose tissue of obese rats. Animals were fed a 30 % Soy or casein (Cas) diet containing 5 or 25 % fat for 160 d. mRNA abundance was studied in the adipose tissue, and Akt phosphorylation and hormone release were measured in the primary adipocyte culture. The present results show that Soy treatment in comparison with Cas consumption induces lower angiotensin release and increased insulin-stimulated Akt activation in adipocytes. Furthermore, Soy consumption varies the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes, which maintain cell size and vascularity in the adipose tissue of rats fed a high-fat diet. Thus, adipocyte hypertrophy and impaired angiogenesis, which are frequently observed in dysfunctional adipose tissue, were avoided by consuming dietary Soy. Taken together, these findings suggest that Soy can be used as a dietary strategy to preserve adipocyte functionality and to prevent obesity abnormalities. PMID:21736766

  13. Dietary Sodium Suppresses Digestive Efficiency via the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Benjamin J; Voong, Susan; Morales-Santiago, Fabiola I; Kahn, Michael Z; Ni, Jonathan; Littlejohn, Nicole K; Claflin, Kristin E; Burnett, Colin M L; Pearson, Nicole A; Lutter, Michael L; Grobe, Justin L

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fats and sodium are both palatable and are hypothesized to synergistically contribute to ingestive behavior and thereby obesity. Contrary to this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice fed a 45% high fat diet exhibited weight gain that was inhibited by increased dietary sodium content. This suppressive effect of dietary sodium upon weight gain was mediated specifically through a reduction in digestive efficiency, with no effects on food intake behavior, physical activity, or resting metabolism. Replacement of circulating angiotensin II levels reversed the effects of high dietary sodium to suppress digestive efficiency. While the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan had no effect in mice fed low sodium, the AT2 receptor antagonist PD-123,319 suppressed digestive efficiency. Correspondingly, genetic deletion of the AT2 receptor in FVB/NCrl mice resulted in suppressed digestive efficiency even on a standard chow diet. Together these data underscore the importance of digestive efficiency in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implicate dietary sodium, the renin-angiotensin system, and the AT2 receptor in the control of digestive efficiency regardless of mouse strain or macronutrient composition of the diet. These findings highlight the need for greater understanding of nutrient absorption control physiology, and prompt more uniform assessment of digestive efficiency in animal studies of energy balance. PMID:26068176

  14. Activation of calpain by renin-angiotensin system in pleural mesothelial cells mediates tuberculous pleural fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Xiang, Fei; Cai, Peng-Cheng; Lu, Yu-Zhi; Xu, Xiao-Xiao; Yu, Fan; Li, Feng-Zhi; Greer, Peter A.; Shi, Huan-Zhong; Zhou, Qiong; Xin, Jian-Bao; Ye, Hong; Su, Yunchao

    2016-01-01

    Pleural fibrosis is defined as an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components that results in destruction of the normal pleural tissue architecture. It can result from diverse inflammatory conditions, especially tuberculous pleurisy. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) play a pivotal role in pleural fibrosis. Calpain is a family of calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which plays an important role in ECM remodeling. However, the role of calpain in pleural fibrosis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) induced calpain activation in PMCs and that inhibition of calpain prevented TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and cell proliferation of PMCs. Moreover, our data revealed that the levels of angiotensin (ANG)-converting enzyme (ACE) were significantly higher in pleural fluid of patients with TPE than those with malignant pleural effusion, and ACE-ANG II in TPE resulted in activation of calpain and subsequent triggering of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway in PMCs. Finally, calpain activation in PMCs and collagen depositions were confirmed in pleural biopsy specimens from patients with tuberculous pleurisy. Together, these studies demonstrated that calpain is activated by renin-angiotensin system in pleural fibrosis and mediates TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and proliferation of PMCs via the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Calpain in PMCs might be a novel target for intervention in tuberculous pleural fibrosis. PMID:27261452

  15. Angiotensin type 1a receptor-deficient mice develop diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction, which is prevented by renin-angiotensin system inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes-induced organ damage is significantly associated with the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Recently, several studies have demonstrated a change in the RAS from an extracellular to an intracellular system, in several cell types, in response to high ambient glucose levels. In cardiac myocytes, intracellular angiotensin (ANG) II synthesis and actions are ACE and AT1 independent, respectively. However, a role of this system in diabetes-induced organ damage is not clear. Methods To determine a role of the intracellular ANG II in diabetic cardiomyopathy, we induced diabetes using streptozotocin in AT1a receptor deficient (AT1a-KO) mice to exclude any effects of extracellular ANG II. Further, diabetic animals were treated with a renin inhibitor aliskiren, an ACE inhibitor benazeprilat, and an AT1 receptor blocker valsartan. Results AT1a-KO mice developed significant diastolic and systolic dysfunction following 10 wks of diabetes, as determined by echocardiography. All three drugs prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction in these animals, without affecting blood pressure or glucose levels. A significant down regulation of components of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) was observed in diabetic animals, which was largely prevented by benazeprilat and valsartan, while aliskiren normalized kininogen expression. Conclusions These data indicated that the AT1a receptor, thus extracellular ANG II, are not required for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The KKS might contribute to the beneficial effects of benazeprilat and valsartan in diabetic cardiomyopathy. A role of intracellular ANG II is suggested by the inhibitory effects of aliskiren, which needs confirmation in future studies. PMID:24215514

  16. Characterization of a local renin-angiotensin system in rat gingival tissue

    PubMed Central

    Santos, C.F.; Akashi, A.E.; Dionísio, T.J.; Sipert, C.R.; Didier, D.N.; Greene, A.S.; Oliveira, S.H.P.; Pereira, H.J.; Becari, C.; Oliveira, E.B.; Salgado, M.C.O.

    2009-01-01

    Background Systemic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) promotes plasmatic production of angiotensin (Ang) II, which acts through interaction with specific receptors. There is growing evidence that local systems in various tissues and organs are capable of generating angiotensins independently of circulating RAS. The aims of this work were to: 1) study the expression and localization of RAS components in rat gingival tissue and 2) evaluate the in vitro production of Ang II and other peptides catalyzed by rat gingival tissue homogenates incubated with different Ang II precursors. Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assessed mRNA expression. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis aimed to detect and localize renin. Standardized fluorimetric method with tripeptide Hippuryl-Histidyl-Leucine (Hip-His-Leu) was used to measure tissue ACE activity, while high performance liquid chromatography (HLPC) showed products formed after incubation of tissue homogenates with Ang I or tetradecapeptide renin substrate (TDP). Results mRNA for renin, angiotensinogen, ACE and Ang II receptors (AT1a, AT1b and AT2) was detected in gingival tissue; cultured gingival fibroblasts expressed renin, angiotensinogen and AT1a receptor. Renin was present in the vascular endothelium and intensely expressed in the epithelial basal layer of periodontally affected gingival tissue. ACE activity was detected (4.95±0.89 nmol His-Leu/g.min). When Ang I was used as substrate, Ang 1-9 (0.576±0.128 nmol/mg.min), Ang II (0.066±0.008 nmol/mg.min) and Ang 1-7 (0.111±0.017 nmol/mg.min) were formed, whereas these same peptides (0.139±0.031; 0.206±0.046 and 0.039±0.007 nmol/mg.min, respectively) and Ang I (0.973±0.139 nmol/mg.min) were formed when TDP was the substrate. Conclusion Results presented here clearly show existence of a local RAS in rat gingival tissue, which is capable of generating Ang II and other vasoactive peptides in vitro. PMID:19228099

  17. Effect of angiotensin II on uterine and systemic vasculature in pregnant sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Naden, R P; Rosenfeld, C R

    1981-01-01

    The response of uteroplacental blood flow (UBF) to angiotensin II is controversial. Moreover, the relationship of the uterine and systemic responses to infused angiotensin II is not well understood. Thus, in eight chronically instrumented, near-term pregnant sheep, we have determined the relationships between the dose and duration of constant systemic infusions of angiotensin II ([Val5] ANG II) and changes in UBF, uterine vascular resistance (UVR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and systemic vascular resistance (SVR). [Val5] ANG II caused dose-dependent increases in UVR and MAP at all doses studied (P less than 0.05). The response in UBF was bidirectional, with increases at doses less than or equal to 1.15 microgram/min and decreases at greater than or equal to 2.29 micrograms/min (P less than 0.05). Increases in UBP occurred when the relative rise (delta) in MAP greater than delta UVR, whereas UBF was unchanged when delta MAP = delta UVR and decreased when delta MAP less than delta UVR. SVR also rose in a dose-dependent fashion (P less than 0.05); delta SVR was greater than delta UVR at doses less than or equal to 2.29 micrograms [Val5] ANG II/min (P less than 0.01). In studies of the effect of duration of [Val5] ANG II infusions, UBF increased at all doses during the 1st min, followed by stabilization at 4--5 min, with eventual decreases at doses greater than or equal to 2.29 micrograms/min and increases at doses less than 2.29 micrograms/min. The relationship between the changes in MAP and UVR to the response of UBF was as noted above. It is evident that (a) [Val5] NAG II is uterine vasoconstrictor, (b) changes in UBF are dependent upon relative changes in perfusion pressure and UVR, which in turn are dependent upon both the dose and duration of a [Val5] ANG II infusion, and (c) the uteroplacental vasculature is relatively refractory to the vasoconstricting effects of low doses of [Val5] ANG II. PMID:7263862

  18. Severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes: impact of the renin-angiotensin system and other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2009-11-01

    Hypoglycaemia is an unavoidable side effect to insulin therapy of diabetes. In daily life some hypoglycaemic episodes are recognised by the patients and corrected by ingestion of glucose, but occasionally unrecognised episodes progress into severe hypoglycaemia with cognitive impairment and the need for assistance from other persons in order to manage the situation. Such episodes represent the most feared side effect to insulin treatment and are regarded as the major limiting factor for achievement of recommended glycaemic targets in type 1 diabetes. The series of studies that constitute this thesis was conducted to assess the significance of severe hypoglycaemia as a clinical problem in the type 1 diabetic population, to evaluate the impact of known risk factors on occurrence of severe hypoglycaemia, and to identify new markers that could contribute to improved prediction of, and inspire to novel preventive measures of, severe hypoglycaemia. Our studies confirm that severe hypoglycaemia is still a major clinical problem in type 1 diabetes. The individual susceptibility to severe hypoglycaemia is highly varying and conventional risk factors - with major contribution from hypoglycaemia unawareness - only account for a limited part of this variation. Results from a case-series suggest that the use of psychoactive substances may be as significant as alcohol for promotion of risk of severe hypoglycaemia - a finding which needs to be confirmed by case-control studies. We identified elevated renin-angiotensin system activity as a novel predictor of risk of severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes with potential clinical significance. Thus, three sequential renin-angiotensin system-related risk factors were associated with severe hypoglycaemia, and by including these factors in a common model both subjects at low and at high risk within a one-year period were identified. Preliminary data suggest that this is explained by impaired capability of subjects with high renin-angiotensin

  19. Role of GLUT4 on angiotensin 2-induced systemic and renal hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Igbe, Ighodaro; Omogbai, Eric Kelly; Oyekan, Adebayo O

    2013-01-01

    Cross-talk between insulin and the renin angiotensin system signaling system shows that angiotensin 2 (A2) negatively modulates insulin signaling by stimulating multiple serine phosphorylation events in the early stages of the insulin-signaling cascade; however, the biological actions of A2 on insulin sensitivity remain controversial. Preservation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) expression during hypertension has been shown to prevent the increased vascular reactivity associated with hypertension. This study tested the hypothesis that GLUT4 contributes to the renal actions of A2. In the euvolemic anesthetized rat, acute infusion of the GLUT4 antagonist, indinavir (1 mg/kg/minute), enhanced an A2-induced increase in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) (P < 0.01), but attenuated an A2-induced increase in medullary blood flow (MBF) and glomerular filtration rate (P < 0.01). Insulin, a GLUT4 activator (20 mU/kg/minute and 40 mU/kg/minute), decreased basal MABP and urine volume (P < 0.05), but it increased MBF, and these effects were reversed and blunted by indinavir. Subchronic indinavir treatment (80 mg/kg/day orally for 15 days) did not affect A2-induced changes in MABP, cortical blood flow, and MBF, but significantly decreased basal MBF (P < 0.01) and global kidney perfusion (P < 0.05). We concluded that acute but not subchronic inhibition of GLUT4 alters A2-induced changes in systemic and renal hemodynamics by attenuating A2-induced increase in MBF and glomerular filtration rate.

  20. Sex differences in hypertension: contribution of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Maric-Bilkan, Christine; Manigrasso, Michaele B

    2012-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that female human beings exhibit lower blood pressure levels over much of their life span compared with their age-matched counterparts. This sexual dimorphism is apparent in human beings as well as most, if not all, mammals. However, after the onset of menopause blood pressure levels in women increase and become similar to those in men, suggesting an important role of sex hormones in the regulation of blood pressure. The lower blood pressure levels in premenopausal women are associated with a lower risk of development and progression of cardiovascular disease and hypertension compared with age-matched men. This clear female advantage with respect to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease no longer exists after menopause, again highlighting the importance of sex hormones in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease in both men and women. In fact, both estrogens and androgens have been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease and hypertension, with estrogens, in general, being protective and androgens being detrimental. Although the exact mechanisms by which sex hormones contribute to the regulation of cardiovascular function and blood pressure are still being investigated, there is increasing evidence that modulating the activity of locally active hormonal systems is one of the major mechanisms of sex hormone actions in target organs, including the vasculature and kidneys. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the importance of the interaction between sex hormones and the renin-angiotensin system in regulating cardiovascular function and blood pressure. Furthermore, the differential effects of estrogens and androgens on the expression and activity of the components of the renin-angiotensin system could possibly explain the sex differences in blood pressure levels and the development and progression of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. PMID:22795464

  1. Renin-angiotensin system in thyroidectomized rats at different periods of development.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Ruiz, M; Montiel, M; Narvaez, J A; Dieguez, J L; Morell, M

    1991-12-01

    The relationship between the renal function and some components of the renin-angiotensin system has been studied in hypothyroid rats thyroidectomized surgically at different periods of their life. Changes in plasma renin concentration (PRC) depending on the period hypothyroidism were induced. Results showed that the renin release control could result from an equilibrium between the reduced beta-adrenergic activity and the marked natriuresis observed in hypothyroidism. A reduction in plasma angiotensinogen concentration (PAC), due to a decrease in its hepatic production, was observed in thyroidectomized animals. PAC reduction was independent of the hypothyroidism induction period. Alterations in plasma renin activity (PRA) were a consequence of PRC and PAC changes in thyroidectomized animals, as an increase in fractional sodium excretion (FENa) time course dependent, was found in these rats. PMID:1725739

  2. Development of fetal brain renin–angiotensin system and hypertension programmed in fetal origins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Caiping; Shi, Lijun; Xu, Feichao; Zhang, Lubo; Xu, Zhice

    2010-01-01

    Since the concept of fetal origins of adult diseases was introduced in 1980s, the development of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in normal and abnormal patterns has attracted attention. Recent studies have shown the importance of the fetal RAS in both prenatal and postnatal development. This review focuses on the functional development of the fetal brain RAS, and ontogeny of local brain RAS components in utero. The central RAS plays an important role in the control of fetal cardiovascular responses, body fluid balance, and neuroendocrine regulation. Recent progress has been made in demonstrating that altered fetal RAS development as a consequence of environmental insults may impact on “programming” of hypertension later in life. Given that the central RAS is of equal importance to the peripheral RAS in cardiovascular regulation, studies on the fetal brain RAS development in normal and abnormal patterns could shed light on “programming” mechanisms of adult cardiovascular diseases in fetal origins. PMID:19428956

  3. Renin-angiotensin system and its role in hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P X; Han, C H; Zhou, F J; Li, L; Zhang, H M; Liu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is essential to sustain life, but at a high partial pressure oxygen may cause toxicity to the human body. These injuries to the lung are known as hyperoxic acute lung injury [HALI]). To date, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the pathogenesis of HALI, for which some hypotheses have been proposed. Accumulating evidence indicates that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of some lung diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and HALI. In this review, we briefly introduce the classic RAS, local (tissue) RAS and intracellular RAS, and we summarize findings on the relationship between local/classic RAS and HALI. The importance--and ambiguity--of the results of these studies indicate a need for further investigations of the RAS and its role in the patho- genesis of HALI. PMID:27416692

  4. Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System and Aldosterone on Cardiometabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, P.; Vallejo-Vaz, A. J.; García Morillo, S.; Villar, J.

    2011-01-01

    Aldosterone facilitates cardiovascular damage by increasing blood pressure and through different mechanisms that are independent of its effects on blood pressure. In this respect, recent evidence involves aldosterone in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Although this relationship is complex, there is some evidence suggesting that different factors may play an important role, such as insulin resistance, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress, sodium retention, increased sympathetic activity, levels of free fatty acids, or inflammatory cytokines and adipokines. In addition to the classical pathway by which aldosterone acts through the mineralocorticoid receptors leading to sodium retention, aldosterone also has other mechanisms that influence cardiovascular tissue remodelling. Finally, overweight and obesity promote the adrenal secretion of aldosterone, increasing the predisposition to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further studies are needed to better establish therapeutic strategies that act on the blockade of mineralocorticoid receptor in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases related to the excess of aldosterone and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:21785705

  5. The role of renin-angiotensin aldosterone system related micro-ribonucleic acids in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Bo; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are small (21-25 nucleotide) single-stranded, evolutionarily conserved non-protein-coding RNAs, which control diverse cellular functions by interacting with the 3’ untranslated region of specific target messenger RNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Research shows that an aberrant expression profile of miRNAs has been linked to a series of diseases, including hypertension. In the past few decades, it has been demonstrated that excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) involves in the pathogenesis of hypertension. This article reviews the latest insights in the identification of RAAS-correlative miRNAs and the potential mechanisms for their roles in hypertension. PMID:26446323

  6. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G M; Prieto, Minolfa C; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9-12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 +/- 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 +/- 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05). AT(1)R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 +/- 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 +/- 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 +/- 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 +/- 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT(1)R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT(1)R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  7. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C.; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G. M.; Prieto, Minolfa C.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9–12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 ± 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 ± 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 ± 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 ± 0.07, P < 0.05). AT1R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 ± 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 ± 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 ± 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 ± 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT1R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT1R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  8. Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade Associated with Statin Improves Endothelial Function in Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg; Bedirian, Ricardo; Pozzobon, Cesar Romaro; Ladeira, Márcia Cristina; Oigman, Wille; Neves, Mário Fritsch

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that statins have pleiotropic effects, such as reduction in blood pressure, and improvement in endothelial function and vascular stiffness. Objective To analyze if prior statin use influences the effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors on blood pressure, endothelial function, and vascular stiffness. Methods Patients with diabetes and hypertension with office systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 80 mmHg had their antihypertensive medications replaced by amlodipine during 6 weeks. They were then randomized to either benazepril or losartan for 12 additional weeks while continuing on amlodipine. Blood pressure (assessed with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring), endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation), and vascular stiffness (pulse wave velocity) were evaluated before and after the combined treatment. In this study, a post hoc analysis was performed to compare patients who were or were not on statins (SU and NSU groups, respectively). Results The SU group presented a greater reduction in the 24-hour systolic blood pressure (from 134 to 122 mmHg, p = 0.007), and in the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (from 6.5 to 10.9%, p = 0.003) when compared with the NSU group (from 137 to 128 mmHg, p = 0.362, and from 7.5 to 8.3%, p = 0.820). There was no statistically significant difference in pulse wave velocity (SU group: from 9.95 to 9.90 m/s, p = 0.650; NSU group: from 10.65 to 11.05 m/s, p = 0.586). Conclusion Combined use of statins, amlodipine, and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors improves the antihypertensive response and endothelial function in patients with hypertension and diabetes. PMID:26465872

  9. Involvement of Spinal Angiotensin II System in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshiki; Nemoto, Wataru; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yamagata, Ryota; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity increases under hyperglycemic states, and is thought to be involved in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that angiotensin (Ang) II, a main bioactive component of the RAS, might act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the transmission of nociceptive information in the spinal cord. Here, we examined whether the spinal Ang II system is responsible for diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Tactile allodynia was observed concurrently with an increase in blood glucose levels the day after mice received STZ (200 mg/kg, i.v.) injections. Tactile allodynia on day 14 was dose-dependently inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. In the lumbar dorsal spinal cord, the expression of Ang II, Ang converting enzyme (ACE), and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased on day 14 after STZ injection compared with vehicle-treated controls, whereas no differences were observed among AT1 receptors or angiotensinogen levels. Moreover, the increase in phospho-p38 MAPK was significantly inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan. These results indicate that the expression of spinal ACE increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice, which in turn led to an increase in Ang II levels and tactile allodynia. This increase in spinal Ang II was accompanied by the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was shown to be mediated by AT1 receptors. PMID:27401876

  10. Low LBNP Tolerance in Men is Associated With Attenuated Activation of Renin-Angiotensin System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Petersen, T. W.; Gabrielsen, A.; Pump, B.; Bie, P.; Christensen, N.-J.; Warberg, J.; Videbaeck, R.; Simonson, S. R.; Norsk, P.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Vasoactive hormone concentrations (epinephrine (pE), norepinephrine (pNE), angiotensin II (pATII), vasopressin (pVP), endothelin 1 (pET1)] and plasma renin activity (pRA) were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of the reninangiotensin system is related to LBNP tolerance. Healthy men (2,822 cal per day, 2 mmol per kilogram per day Na (+)) were exposed to 30 min of progressive LBNP to -50mmHg. LBNP was uneventful for 7 men (2512 yr, HiTol group), but 8 men (26 plus or minus 3 yr) reached pre-syncope after 11 plus or minus 1 min (P less than 0.001, LoTol group). Mean arterial pressure was unchanged. Central venous pressure and left atrial diameter decreased in both groups (5-6 mmHg by 30%, P less than 0.05). Control [hormone] were similar but, pRA differed between groups (LoTol 0.6 plus or minus 0.1, HiTol 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 ng Ang1 per milliliter per hour, per hour, P less than 0.05). LBNP increased (P less than 0.05) pRA and pATII more in HiTol (9.9 plus or minus 2.2 ng Ang1 per milliliter per hour and 58 plus or minus 12 pg per milliliter) than LoTol (4.3 plus or minus 0.9 ng Angl per milliliter per hour and 28 plus or minus 6 pg per milliliter). In contrast, pVP was higher (P less than 0.05) in LoTol than in HiTol. The response of the renin-angiotensin system seems linked to the occurrence of pre-syncope, and measurement of resting pRA may be predictive.

  11. Addition of hydrochlorothiazide to angiotensin receptor blocker therapy can achieve a lower sodium balance with no acceleration of intrarenal renin angiotensin system in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuwa, Daisuke; Fukuda, Michio; Ogiyama, Yoshiaki; Sato, Ryo; Mizuno, Masashi; Miura, Toshiyuki; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Michikawa, Makoto; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce a lower sodium (Na) balance, and the natriuretic effect is enhanced under Na deprivation, despite falls in blood pressure (BP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods The effect of additional hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ; 12.5 mg/day) to ARB treatment (valsartan; 80 mg/day) on glomerulotubular Na balance was evaluated in 23 patients with chronic kidney disease. Results Add-on HCTZ decreased GFR, tubular Na load, and tubular Na reabsorption (tNa), although 24-hour urinary Na excretion (UNaV) remained constant. Daily urinary angiotensinogen excretion (UAGTV, 152±10→82±17 μg/g Cre) reduced (p=0.02). Changes in tubular Na load (r2=0.26) and tNa (r2=0.25) correlated with baseline 24-hour UAGTV. Changes in filtered Na load correlated with changes in nighttime systolic BP (r2=0.17), but not with changes in daytime systolic BP. The change in the tNa to filtered Na load ratio was influenced by the change in daytime UNaV (β=−0.67, F=16.8), rather than the change in nighttime UNaV. Conclusions Lower Na balance was produced by add-on HCTZ to ARB treatment without an increase of intra-renal renin-angiotensin system activity, leading to restoration of nocturnal hypertension. A further study is needed to demonstrate that the reduction of UAGTV by additional diuretics to ARBs prevents the progression of nephropathy or cardiovascular events. PMID:27283968

  12. Role of the renin-angiotensin system in the regulation of intestinal blood flow and sympathetic neurotransmission

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.

    1988-01-01

    The aims of the present studies were (1) to determine if endogenous angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a role in the local control of mesenteric blood flow (MBF) following volume depletion in anesthetized dogs, and (2) to investigate the mechanism(s) of actions of Ang II on the facilitation of sympathetic neurotransmission in the rate jejunum. To investigate the role of endogenous Ang II in the control of MBF, a dose of an antagonist of Ang II, saralasin, that has effects mainly localized to the mesenteric circulation was determined. The data demonstrated that blockage of actions of Ang II in the mesenteric circulation resulted in a decrease in intestinal vasoconstriction which occurred following acute hypotensive hemorrhage. The effect of Ang II on the uptake and release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings in the rat jejunum was investigated. The uptake of norepinephrine in rat jejunum was determined by incubating jejunal slices in Krebs buffer containing 0.01 {mu}M {sup 3}H-norepinephrine. The accumulation of label in the tissue after 10 min incubation was determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Intracellular uptake of {sup 3}H-norepinephrine was calculated and shown to be an active process.

  13. Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-system in murine polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Takamitsu; Dang, Yujing; Bunni, Marlene A; Amria, May Y; Steele, Stacy L; Fitzgibbon, Wayne R; Bell, P Darwin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism for early hypertension in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) has not been elucidated. One potential pathway that may contribute to the elevation in blood pressure in PKD is the activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-system (RAS). For example, it has been shown that kidney cyst and cystic fluid contains renin, angiotensin II (AngII), and angiotensinogen (Agt). Numerous studies suggest that ciliary dysfunction plays an important role in PKD pathogenesis. However, it is unknown whether the primary cilium affects the intrarenal RAS in PKD. The purpose of this study was to determine whether loss of cilia or polycystin 1 (PC1) increases intrarenal RAS in mouse model of PKD. Adult Ift88 and Pkd1 conditional floxed allele mice with or without cre were administered tamoxifen to induce global knockout of the gene. Three months after tamoxifen injection, kidney tissues were examined by histology, immunofluorescence, western blot, and mRNA to assess intrarenal RAS components. SV40 immortalized collecting duct cell lines from hypomorphic Ift88 mouse were used to assess intrarenal RAS components in collecting duct cells. Mice without cilia and PC1 demonstrated increased kidney cyst formation, systolic blood pressure, prorenin, and kidney and urinary angiotensinogen levels. Interestingly immunofluorescence study of the kidney revealed that the prorenin receptor was localized to the basolateral membrane of principal cells in cilia (−) but not in cilia (+) kidneys. Collecting duct cAMP responses to AngII administration was greater in cilia (−) vs. cilia (+) cells indicating enhanced intrarenal RAS activity in the absence of cilia. These data suggest that in the absence of cilia or PC1, there is an upregulation of intrarenal RAS components and activity, which may contribute to elevated blood pressure in PKD. PMID:25999403

  14. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  15. Long-Term Regulation of the Local Renin-Angiotensin System in the Myocardium of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats by Feeding Bioactive Peptides Derived from Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huanglei; She, Xingxing; Wu, Hongli; Ma, Jun; Ren, Difeng; Lu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the long-term (8 weeks) anti-hypertensive effects of 10 mg/kg tripeptides isolated from Spirulina platensis, Ile-Gln-Pro (IQP) and Val-Glu-Pro (VEP), and S. platensis hydrolysates (SH) on spontaneously hypertensive rats. The treatment period was 6 weeks, and observation continued for another 2 weeks. After treatment, weighted systolic blood pressure, weighted diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular mass index, and right ventricular mass index of groups treated with IQP, VEP, and SH were significantly lower than those of the group treated with distilled water, even when the treatments had been withdrawn for 2 weeks. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting showed the mRNA expression levels and protein/peptide concentrations of the main components of the renin angiotensin system in myocardium were significantly affected by treatment: angiotensin converting enzyme, angiotensin II, and angiotensin type 1 receptor were down-regulated, whereas angiotensin type 2 receptor, angiotensin converting enzyme 2, angiotensin-(1-7), and Mas receptor were up-regulated. PMID:26245714

  16. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory hormones.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, A; Brown, J M; Williams, J S

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence of a clinically relevant interplay between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory systems. Classically, the former is considered a key regulator of sodium and volume homeostasis, while the latter is most often associated with skeletal health. However, emerging evidence suggests an overlap in regulatory control. Hyperaldosteronism and hyperparathyroidism represent pathophysiologic conditions that may contribute to or perpetuate each other; aldosterone regulates parathyroid hormone and associates with adverse skeletal complications, and parathyroid hormone regulates aldosterone and associates with adverse cardiovascular complications. As dysregulation in both systems is linked to poor cardiovascular and skeletal health, it is increasingly important to fully characterize how they interact to more precisely understand their impact on human health and potential therapies to modulate these interactions. This review describes the known clinical interactions between these two systems including observational and interventional studies. Specifically, we review studies describing the inhibition of renin activity by calcium and vitamin D, and a potentially bidirectional and stimulatory relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone. Deciphering these relationships might clarify variability in outcomes research, inform the design of future intervention studies and provide insight into the results of prior and ongoing intervention studies. However, before these opportunities can be addressed, more effort must be placed on shifting observational data to the proof of concept phase. This will require reallocation of resources to conduct interventional studies and secure the necessary talent. PMID:25631218

  17. Obstructive nephropathy in the rat: possible roles for the renin-angiotensin system, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes in postobstructive renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Yarger, W E; Schocken, D D; Harris, R H

    1980-01-01

    Relief of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) of 24 h duration in rats is followed by severe renal vasoconstriction in the postobstructive kidney (POK). The present study examined possible roles of renal prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxanes (TX), as well as the renin-angiotensin system, in this vasoconstriction. Administration of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, which blocks both PG and TX production, failed to improve POK hemodynamics in UUO rats. To explore the possible role of the TX compounds, which include the potent vasoconstrictor thromboxane A2 (TXA2), UUO rats were infused with imidazole, an agent that blocks synthesis of TX, but not of PG. Imidiazole led to two- to threefold increases in the clearance of both inulin and rho-aminohippuric acid by the POK. This effect of imidazole was abolished by indomethacin, suggesting that the amelioration of POK vasoconstriction by imidazole was a result of inhibition of vasoconstrictor TX synthesis (e.g. TXA2), with PG vasodilators (e.g. PGE2 or PG12) still active. Urea, infused in a solution whose osmolality and volume were identical to the imidazole infusion, failed to improve hemodynamics in the POK, making it unlikely that nonspecific effects of volume expansion or osmotic diuresis mediated the beneficial effect of imidazole. Further studies examined the possible role of the renin-angiotensin systems in the vasoconstriction of the POK. UUO rats infused with the angiotensin II antagonist, Saralasin, exhibited no significant improvement in POK function, a finding that might be at least partly attributable to agonist/vasoconstrictor properties of Saralasin. In other experiments, treatment of UUO rats with the angiotensin-converting enzyme blocker SQ 14225 (Captopril), in order to inhibit angiotensin II formation, led to at least twofold increases in the clearance of both inulin and rho-aminohippuric acid in the POK. It is unlikely that Captopril exerted this beneficial effect by potentiating the

  18. Pharmacological interventions into the renin-angiotensin system with ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists: effects beyond blood pressure lowering.

    PubMed

    Düsing, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Lowering of blood pressure has been shown to minimize the risk of cardiovascular events, with the majority of antihypertensives demonstrating a similar ability to reduce coronary events and stroke for a given reduction in blood pressure. Agents that modify the activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) have been proposed to exhibit additional effects that might go beyond simple blood pressure lowering. The RAS is a crucial system that regulates extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. Proposed potential benefits of RAS blockade that go beyond blood pressure lowering include a reduction in platelet aggregation and thrombosis, blunting of cardiac and vascular remodeling, favorable metabolic effects and reno- and cerebro-protection. However, factors such as treatment adherence, duration of action of antihypertensive agents and differences in effects on central versus brachial blood pressure may also result in apparent differences in efficacy of different antihypertensives. The aim of this review article is to examine the available data from clinical studies of antihypertensive drugs for evidence of effects that might legitimately be claimed to go beyond simple blood pressure lowering. PMID:27122491

  19. [Role of rennin-angiotensin system in cholinergic agonist carbachol-induced cardiovascular responses in ovine fetus].

    PubMed

    Geng, Chun-Song; Wan, Zhen; Feng, Ya-Hong; Fan, Yi-Sun

    2012-06-25

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying the cholinergic agonist carbachol-induced cardiovascular responses, changes of renin-angiotensin system were examined in fetal hormonal systems. In the ovine fetal model under stressless condition, the cardiovascular function was recorded. Blood samples were collected before (during baseline period) and after the intravenous administration of carbachol. Simultaneously, the levels of angiotensin I (Ang I), angiotensin II (Ang II) and vasopressin in the fetal plasma were detected by immunoradiological method. Also, blood gas, plasma osmolality and electrolyte concentrations were analyzed in blood samples. Results showed that in chronically prepared ovine fetus, intravenous infusion of carbachol led to a significant decrease of heart rate (P < 0.05), and a transient decrease followed by an increase of blood pressure (P < 0.05) within 30 min. After the intravenous infusion of carbachol, blood concentrations of Ang I and Ang II in near-term ovine fetus were both significantly increased (P < 0.05); however, blood concentration of vasopressin, values of blood gas, electrolytes and plasma osmolality in near-term ovine fetus were not significantly changed (P > 0.05). Blood levels of Ang I and Ang II in the atropine (M receptor antagonist) + carbachol intravenous administration group was lower than those in the carbachol group without atropine administration (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study indicates that the near-term changes of cardiovascular system induced by intravenous administration of carbachol in ovine fetus, such as blood pressure and heart rate, are associated with the changes of hormones of circulatory renin-angiotensin system. PMID:22717634

  20. Atlas of tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in human: A transcriptomic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nehme, Ali; Cerutti, Catherine; Dhaouadi, Nedra; Gustin, Marie Paule; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Zibara, Kazem; Bricca, Giampiero

    2015-01-01

    Tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has attracted much attention because of its physiological and pharmacological implications; however, a clear definition of tissue RAAS is still missing. We aimed to establish a preliminary atlas for the organization of RAAS across 23 different normal human tissues. A set of 37 genes encoding classical and novel RAAS participants including gluco- and mineralo-corticoids were defined as extended RAAS (extRAAS) system. Microarray data sets containing more than 10 normal tissues were downloaded from the GEO database. R software was used to extract expression levels and construct dendrograms of extRAAS genes within each data set. Tissue co-expression modules were then extracted from reproducible gene clusters across data sets. An atlas of the maps of tissue-specific organization of extRAAS was constructed from gene expression and coordination data. Our analysis included 143 data sets containing 4933 samples representing 23 different tissues. Expression data provided an insight on the favored pathways in a given tissue. Gene coordination indicated the existence of tissue-specific modules organized or not around conserved core groups of transcripts. The atlas of tissue-specific organization of extRAAS will help better understand tissue-specific effects of RAAS. This will provide a frame for developing more effective and selective pharmaceuticals targeting extRAAS. PMID:25992767

  1. Atlas of tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in human: A transcriptomic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nehme, Ali; Cerutti, Catherine; Dhaouadi, Nedra; Gustin, Marie Paule; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Zibara, Kazem; Bricca, Giampiero

    2015-01-01

    Tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has attracted much attention because of its physiological and pharmacological implications; however, a clear definition of tissue RAAS is still missing. We aimed to establish a preliminary atlas for the organization of RAAS across 23 different normal human tissues. A set of 37 genes encoding classical and novel RAAS participants including gluco- and mineralo-corticoids were defined as extended RAAS (extRAAS) system. Microarray data sets containing more than 10 normal tissues were downloaded from the GEO database. R software was used to extract expression levels and construct dendrograms of extRAAS genes within each data set. Tissue co-expression modules were then extracted from reproducible gene clusters across data sets. An atlas of the maps of tissue-specific organization of extRAAS was constructed from gene expression and coordination data. Our analysis included 143 data sets containing 4933 samples representing 23 different tissues. Expression data provided an insight on the favored pathways in a given tissue. Gene coordination indicated the existence of tissue-specific modules organized or not around conserved core groups of transcripts. The atlas of tissue-specific organization of extRAAS will help better understand tissue-specific effects of RAAS. This will provide a frame for developing more effective and selective pharmaceuticals targeting extRAAS. PMID:25992767

  2. Interaction of the renin angiotensin and cox systems in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Syed S; Culver, Silas A; Li, Caixia; Siragy, Helmy M

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in mediating actions of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). This review sheds light on the recent developments regarding the complex interactions between components of RAS and COX-2; and their implications on renal function and disease. COX-2 is believed to counter regulate the effects of RAS activation and therefore counter balance the vasoconstriction effect of Ang II. In kidney, under normal conditions, these systems are essential for maintaining a balance between vasodilation and vasoconstriction. However, recent studies suggested a pivotal role for this interplay in pathology. COX-2 increases the renin release and Ang II formation leading to increase in blood pressure. COX-2 is also associated with diabetic nephropathy, where its upregulation in the kidney contributes to glomerular injury and albuminuria. Selective inhibition of COX-2 retards the progression of renal injury. COX-2 also mediates the pathologic effects of the (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) in the kidney. In summary, this review discusses the interaction between the RAS and COX-2 in health and disease. PMID:27100703

  3. Impact of The Protective Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) on The Vasoreparative Function of CD34+ CACs in Diabetic Retinopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Yaqian; Moldovan, Leni; Miller, Rehae C.; Beli, Eleni; Salazar, Tatiana; Hazra, Sugata; Al-Sabah, Jude; Chalam, KV; Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Grant, Maria B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In diabetes, the impaired vasoreparative function of Circulating Angiogenic Cells (CACs) is believed to contribute to the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Accumulating evidence suggests that the protective arm of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) ACE2 Angiotensin-(1-7) Mas plays an important role in restoring the function of diabetic CACs. We examined the protective RAS in CACs in diabetic individuals with different stages of retinopathy. Methods: Study subjects (n43) were recruited as controls or diabetics with either no DR, mild non-proliferative DR (NPDR), moderate NPDR, severe NPDR or proliferative DR (PDR). Fundus photography and fluorescein angiograms were analyzed using Vessel Generation Analysis (VESGEN) software in a cohort of subjects. CD34+ CACs were isolated from peripheral blood of diabetics and control subjects. RAS gene expressions in CACs were measured by qPCR. The vasoreparative function of CACs was assessed by migration ability toward CXCL12 using the QCM 5M 96-well chemotaxis cell migration assay. Results: ACE2 gene is a key enzyme converting the deleterious Angiotensin II to the beneficial Angiotensin-(1-7). ACE2 expression in CACs from diabetic subjects without DR was increased compared to controls, suggestive of compensation (p0.0437). The expression of Mas (Angiotensin-(1-7) receptor) in CACs was also increased in diabetics without DR, while was reduced in NPDR compared to controls (p0.0002), indicating a possible loss of compensation of the protective RAS at this stage of DR. The presence of even mild NPDR was associated with CD34+ CAC migratory dysfunction. When pretreating CACs of DR subjects with Angiotensin-(1-7), migratory ability to a chemoattractant CXCL12 was restored (p0.0008). By VESGEN analysis, an increase in small vessel density was observed in NPDR subjects when compared with the controls. Conclusions: These data suggest the protective RAS axis within diabetic CACs may help maintain their vasoreparative potential

  4. Optimal antagonism of the Renin-Angiotensin-aldosterone system: do we need dual or triple therapy?

    PubMed

    Werner, Christian; Pöss, Janine; Böhm, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The cardiovascular and cardiorenal disease continuum comprises the transition from cardiovascular risk factors to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, to clinical complications such as myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, to the development of persistent target-organ damage and, ultimately, to chronic congestive heart failure (CHF), end-stage renal disease or premature death. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is involved in all steps along this pathway, and RAAS blockade with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT(1)-receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers; ARBs) has turned out to be beneficial for patient outcomes throughout the disease continuum. Both ACE inhibitors and ARBs can prevent or reverse endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. These drugs have further been shown to reduce end-organ damage in the heart, kidneys and brain. Aldosterone antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly recognized as a third class of RAAS inhibitor with potent risk-reducing properties, especially but not solely with respect to the inhibition of cardiac remodelling and the possible prevention of heart failure. In secondary prevention, head-to-head comparisons of ACE inhibitors and ARBs, such as the recent ONTARGET study, provided evidence that, in addition to better tolerability, ARBs are non-inferior to ACE inhibitors in the prevention of clinical endpoints such as MI and stroke in cardiovascular high-risk patients. However, the combination of both ramipril and telmisartan at the maximally tolerated dosage achieved no further benefits and was associated with more adverse events such as symptomatic hypotension and renal dysfunction. In acute MI complicated by heart failure, the VALIANT trial has shown similar effects of ACE inhibition with captopril and ARB treatment with valsartan, but dual RAAS blockade did not further reduce events. In CHF, meta-analyses of RESOLVD, Val

  5. Vascular hypothesis revisited: Role of stimulating antibodies against angiotensin and endothelin receptors in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Marques, Otavio; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of multiple autoantibodies, including those against angiotensin and endothelin receptors. Patients with SSc can develop heterogeneous clinical manifestations including microvascular damage, the dysregulation of innate and adaptive immunity, and generalized fibrosis of multiple organs. Autoantibodies against angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) and endothelin-1 type A receptor (ETAR) play important roles in the pathogenesis of SSc. These autoantibodies regulate physiological processes ranging from production of collagen by skin fibroblasts to angiogenesis modulation. Understanding the mechanisms behind autoantibodies against AT1R and ETAR could provide insight to future novel therapies for SSc patients. In this review, we focus on elucidating the immunopathological mechanisms triggered by anti-AT1R and anti-ETAR autoantibodies to summarize current knowledge about vascular abnormalities resulting in progressive damage of organs seen in patients with SSc. PMID:26970493

  6. Experimental evaluation of blockage ratio and plenum evacuation system flow effects on pressure distribution for bodies of revolution in 0.1 scale model test section of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the slotted test section of the 0.1-scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate wall interference effects at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.95 on bodies of revolution with blockage rates of 0.43, 3, 6, and 12 percent. The amount of flow that had to be removed from the plenum chamber (which surrounded the slotted test section) by the plenum evacuation system (PES) to eliminate wall interference effects was determined. The effectiveness of tunnel reentry flaps in removing flow from the plenum chamber was examined. The 0.43-percent blockage model was the only one free of wall interference effects with no PES flow. Surface pressures on the forward part of the other models were greater than interference-free results and were not influenced by PES flow. Interference-free results were achieved on the aft part of the 3- and 6-percent blockage models with the proper amount of PES flow. The required PES flow was substantially reduced by opening the reentry flaps.

  7. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a negative endocrine regulator of the renin-angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Chun; Kong, Juan; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Liu, Shu Q.; Cao, Li-Ping

    2002-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin system, which plays a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte, and volume homeostasis, may represent a major risk factor for hypertension, heart attack, and stroke. Mounting evidence from clinical studies has demonstrated an inverse relationship between circulating vitamin D levels and the blood pressure and/or plasma renin activity, but the mechanism is not understood. We show here that renin expression and plasma angiotensin II production were increased severalfold in vitamin D receptor–null (VDR-null) mice, leading to hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and increased water intake. However, the salt- and volume-sensing mechanisms that control renin synthesis are still intact in the mutant mice. In wild-type mice, inhibition of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] synthesis also led to an increase in renin expression, whereas 1,25(OH)2D3 injection led to renin suppression. We found that vitamin D regulation of renin expression was independent of calcium metabolism and that 1,25(OH)2D3 markedly suppressed renin transcription by a VDR-mediated mechanism in cell cultures. Hence, 1,25(OH)2D3 is a novel negative endocrine regulator of the renin-angiotensin system. Its apparent critical role in electrolytes, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis suggests that vitamin D analogues could help prevent or ameliorate hypertension. PMID:12122115

  8. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qing; Qin, Da-Nian; Wang, Fu-Xin; Ren, Jun; Li, Hong-Bao; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Qing; Miao, Yu-Wang; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jie; Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Aims: To explore whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger (tempol) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and proinflammatory cytokines (PICs), and decreases the blood pressure and sympathetic activity in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Methods and results: Male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused intravenously with ANG II (10 ng/kg per min) or normal saline (NS) for 4 weeks. These rats were treated with bilateral PVN infusion of oxygen free radical scavenger tempol (TEMP, 20 μg/h) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid, aCSF) for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). These ANG II-infused rats also had higher levels of gp91{sup phox} (a subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the PVN than the control animals. Treatment with PVN infusion of TEMP attenuated the overexpression of gp91{sup phox}, ACE and IL-1β within the PVN, and decreased sympathetic activity and MAP in ANG II-infused rats. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces elevated PICs and oxidative stress in the PVN, which contribute to the sympathoexcitation in hypertension. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in ANG II-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • The effect of chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide on hypertension was investigated. • ANG II infusion induced increased proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in PVN. • ANG II infusion resulted in oxidative stress, sympathoexcitation and hypertension. • Chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide attenuates RAS and cytokines in hypertension.

  9. Use of renin angiotensin system inhibitors in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Adam, W R; Wright, J R

    2016-05-01

    Current guidelines recommend renin angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) as key components of treatment of hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), because of their effect on reducing the future rate of loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A common risk of RASI in CKD is a haemodynamically mediated, and reversible, fall in GFR of varying severity and duration, any time after commencement of the Inhibitors. A benefit of the acute reduction in filtration rate with RASI may be a reduction in the future rate of loss in GFR: the greatest benefit likely to be in those patients with a greater rate of loss of GFR prior to, and a lesser acute loss of GFR after, introduction of RASI; and in those patients with significant proteinuria. An acute loss of GFR of >25% following the introduction of RASI is an indication to cease the RASI. An acute loss of GFR < 25% requires consideration of the likely risks of the lower GFR and benefits of any future reduced rate of loss of GFR. A fall in GFR in patients while on RASI is usually associated with a remediable cause. When the cause for the fall in GFR is not revealed, and the fall is less than 25%, hopeful expectancy is recommended. Hyperkalaemia in patients with CKD on RASI is more common with more severe disease, potassium retaining diuretics and hypoaldosteronism. Treatment should be modified to maintain a plasma potassium <6 mmol/L. PMID:27170242

  10. The renin-angiotensin system in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H

    2012-01-01

    Increased activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been related to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Most randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that RAS blockade reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes, which has been explained by improved insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. In this review, an overview of the mechanisms that may underlie the association between the RAS and type 2 diabetes will be provided, with focus on skeletal muscle and adipose tissue function. This will include discussion of several human studies performed in our laboratory to investigate the metabolic and hemodynamic effects of the RAS, combining in vivo measurements of whole-body and tissue metabolism with molecular and immunohistochemical approaches. Available data suggest that the detrimental effects of the RAS on insulin secretion are mediated by a reduction in pancreatic blood flow and induction of islet fibrosis, oxidative stress as well as inflammation, whereas both impaired skeletal muscle function and adipose tissue dysfunction may underlie RAS-induced insulin resistance. Thus, although future studies in humans are warranted, current evidence supports that targeting the RAS in intervention studies may improve metabolic and cardiovascular function in conditions of insulin resistance like obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22986649

  11. Stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Taugner, F M

    2001-01-01

    Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the ventricular myocardium, which may cause sudden death in cats, but neither the aetiology nor the effect on the circulation are well understood. Fourteen cats of either sex with naturally occurring HCM were studied post mortem. Their ages ranged from 9 months to 10 years with an average age of 4.9 years. Heart weights and heart weight expressed as a percentage of body weight were elevated (27.9 g and 0.65%, respectively) as compared with normal values obtained in previous studies. Myocardial disarray was evident in nine of the 14 cats and moderate to severe fibrosis was present in six animals. To evaluate the renal renin-angiotensin system, semiquantitative morphometric data were obtained by means of renin immunohistochemistry and compared with results from an earlier study of 10 healthy cats by the author. The juxtaglomerular index was 36.8% in the cats with HCM as compared with 30.6% in healthy cats. The renin-positive portion of the afferent arteriole was increased in cats affected by HCM to 86.0 microm as compared with 49.9 microm in normal cats. The increase in kidney renin values in cats with HCM may have been due to decreased blood pressure and reduced renal perfusion resulting from impaired cardiac output. PMID:11578127

  12. [Protective effect and mechanism of β-CM7 on renin angiotensin system & diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Han, Dongning; Zhang, Yujuan; Rong, Chao; Zhang, Yuanshu

    2016-02-01

    This article aimed at exploring the effects and protective mechanism of β-CM7 on renin angiotensin system (RAS) in diabetic rats myocardial tissue. We divided 32 male SD rats into 4 groups: control group, diabetic model control group, insulin (3.7x10(-8) mol/d) treatment group and β-CM7 (7.5x10(-8) mol/d) treatment group. After 30 days, all rats were decapitated and myocardical tissues were collected immediately. After injection, β-CM7 could decrease the content of Ang II, increase the content of Angl-7. And β-CM7 could improve the mRNA of AT1 receptor and Mas receptor. β-CM7 also could improve the mRNA of ACE and ACE2, enhance the activity of ACE and ACE2. These data confirmed tli β-CM7 could activate ACE2-Angl-7-Mas axis, negative passage in RAS, to inhibit the expression ACE mnRiJA and protein in rat myocardium, alleviate the myocardial tissue damage induced by Ang II. The effect of β-CM7 on inhibiting myocardium damage might be related to ACE/ACE2 passageway. PMID:27382769

  13. Role of mineralocorticoid receptor and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in adipocyte dysfunction and obesity.

    PubMed

    Feraco, Alessandra; Armani, Andrea; Mammi, Caterina; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Caprio, Massimiliano

    2013-09-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) classically mediates aldosterone effects on salt homeostasis and blood pressure regulation in epithelial target tissues. In recent years, functional MRs have been identified in non classical targets of aldosterone actions, in particular in adipose tissue, where they mediate the effects of aldosterone and glucocorticoids in the control of adipogenesis, adipose expansion and its pro-inflammatory capacity. In this context, inappropriate MR activation has been demonstrated to be a causal factor in several pathologic conditions such as vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and obesity. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest developments in this rapidly developing field, and will focus on the role of MR and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) as potential leading characters in the early steps of adipocyte dysfunction and obesity. Indeed modulation of MR activity in adipose tissue has promise as a novel therapeutic approach to treat obesity and its related metabolic complications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'. PMID:23454117

  14. Renin-angiotensin system blockers regulate the metabolism of isolated fat cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Caminhotto, R de O; Sertié, R A L; Andreotti, S; Campaãa, A B; Lima, F B

    2016-07-28

    Due to the presence of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in tissues and its specific influence on white adipose tissue, fat cells are possible targets of pharmacological RAS blockers commonly used as anti-hypertensive drugs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of different RAS blockers on fat cell metabolism, more specifically on lipolysis, lipogenesis and oxidation of energy substrates. Isolated primary adipocytes were incubated with different RAS blockers (aliskiren, captopril and losartan) in vitro for 24 h and lipolysis, lipogenesis and glucose oxidation capacities were determined in dose-response assays to a β-adrenergic agonist and to insulin. Although no change was found in lipolytic capacity, the RAS blockers modulated lipogenesis and glucose oxidation in a different way. While captopril decreased insulin-stimulated lipogenesis (-19% of maximal response and -60% of insulin responsiveness) due to reduced glucose derived glycerol synthesis (-19% of maximal response and 64% of insulin responsiveness), aliskiren increased insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation (+49% of maximal response and +292% of insulin responsiveness) in fat cells. Our experiments demonstrate that RAS blockers can differentially induce metabolic alterations in adipocyte metabolism, characterized by a reduction in lipogenic responsiveness or an increase in glucose oxidation. The impact of RAS blockers on adipocyte metabolism may have beneficial implications on metabolic disorders during their therapeutic use in hypertensive patients. PMID:27487419

  15. Renin-angiotensin system blockers regulate the metabolism of isolated fat cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caminhotto, R de O.; Sertié, R.A.L.; Andreotti, S.; Campaãa, A.B.; Lima, F.B.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in tissues and its specific influence on white adipose tissue, fat cells are possible targets of pharmacological RAS blockers commonly used as anti-hypertensive drugs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of different RAS blockers on fat cell metabolism, more specifically on lipolysis, lipogenesis and oxidation of energy substrates. Isolated primary adipocytes were incubated with different RAS blockers (aliskiren, captopril and losartan) in vitro for 24 h and lipolysis, lipogenesis and glucose oxidation capacities were determined in dose-response assays to a β-adrenergic agonist and to insulin. Although no change was found in lipolytic capacity, the RAS blockers modulated lipogenesis and glucose oxidation in a different way. While captopril decreased insulin-stimulated lipogenesis (−19% of maximal response and −60% of insulin responsiveness) due to reduced glucose derived glycerol synthesis (−19% of maximal response and 64% of insulin responsiveness), aliskiren increased insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation (+49% of maximal response and +292% of insulin responsiveness) in fat cells. Our experiments demonstrate that RAS blockers can differentially induce metabolic alterations in adipocyte metabolism, characterized by a reduction in lipogenic responsiveness or an increase in glucose oxidation. The impact of RAS blockers on adipocyte metabolism may have beneficial implications on metabolic disorders during their therapeutic use in hypertensive patients. PMID:27487419

  16. Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade in Diabetic Nephropathy. Present Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Maneiro, Luz; Puente-García, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD) is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries and its prevalence has increased dramatically in the past few decades. These patients are at an increased risk for premature death, cardiovascular disease, and other severe illnesses that result in frequent hospitalizations and increased health-care utilization. Although much progress has been made in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy, renal dysfunction and the development of end-stage renal disease remain major concerns in diabetes. Dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) results in progressive renal damage. RAAS blockade is the cornerstone of treatment of DKD, with proven efficacy in many arenas. The theoretically-attractive option of combining these medications that target different points in the pathway, potentially offering a more complete RAAS blockade, has also been tested in clinical trials, but long-term outcomes were disappointing. This review examines the “state of play” for RAAS blockade in DKD, dual blockade of various combinations, and a perspective on its benefits and potential risks. PMID:26569322

  17. A systematic review of the role of renin angiotensin aldosterone system genes in diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: The renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a vital role in regulating glucose metabolism and blood pressure, electrolyte and fluid homeostasis. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the association of the RAAS genes with diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications of retinopathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Materials and Methods: The relevant English-language studies were identified using the key words of DM, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), T2DM, renin angiotensin aldosterone polymorphisms or genotypes and RAAS from the search engines of MEDLINE/PubMed, and Scopus from January 1, 1995 to July 30, 2014. Inclusion criteria for selecting relevant studies were reporting the role of RAAS gene variants in the pathogenesis of T1DM or T2DM, diabetic retinopathy (DR), diabetic neuropathy and cardiovascular complication of DM. Results: The reviewers identified 204 studies of which 73 were eligible for inclusion in the present systematic review. The review indicates the angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T polymorphism might not affect the risk of DM. The role of angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene (AT1R) A1166C polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of DM could not be established. Studies indicate the absence of an association between three polymorphisms of AGT M235T, ACE I/D and AT1R A1166C and DR in DM patients. A protective role for ACE II genotype against diabetic peripheral neuropathy has been suggested. Also, the ACE I/D polymorphism might be associated with the risk of CVD in DM patients. Conclusion: More studies with adequate sample size that investigate the influence of all RAAS gene variants together on the risk of DM and its complications are necessary to provide a more clear picture of the RAAS genes polymorphisms involvement in the pathogenesis of DM and its complications. PMID:25657757

  18. Exercise Training Improves the Altered Renin-Angiotensin System in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla of Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chang-zhen; Yang, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jia-cen; Wu, Zhao-Tang; Zhang, Ru-Wen; Shen, Du; Wang, Yang-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between angiotensin II (Ang II) and angiotensin 1–7 (Ang 1–7) in the brain has been reported to contribute to cardiovascular dysfunction in hypertension. Exercise training (ExT) is beneficial to hypertension and the mechanism is unclear. This study was aimed to determine if ExT improves hypertension via adjusting renin angiotensin system in cardiovascular centers including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, 8 weeks old) were subjected to low-intensity ExT or kept sedentary (Sed) for 12 weeks. Blood pressure elevation coupled with increase in age was significantly decreased in SHR received ExT compared with Sed. The results in vivo showed that ExT significantly reduced or increased the cardiovascular responses to central application of sarthran (antagonist of Ang II) or A779 (antagonist of Ang 1–7), respectively. The protein expression of the Ang II acting receptor AT1R and the Ang 1–7 acting receptor Mas in the RVLM was significantly reduced and elevated in SHR following ExT, respectively. Moreover, production of reactive oxygen species in the RVLM was significantly decreased in SHR following ExT. The current data suggest that ExT improves hypertension via improving the balance of Ang II and Ang 1–7 and antioxidative stress at the level of RVLM. PMID:26881037

  19. Klotho Ameliorates Kidney Injury and Fibrosis and Normalizes Blood Pressure by Targeting the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lili; Mo, Hongyan; Miao, Jinhua; Zhou, Dong; Tan, Roderick J; Hou, Fan Fan; Liu, Youhua

    2015-12-01

    Loss of Klotho and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are common pathological findings in chronic kidney diseases. However, whether these two events are intricately connected is poorly understood. We hypothesized that Klotho might protect kidneys by targeted inhibition of RAS activation in diseased kidneys. To test this hypothesis, mouse models of remnant kidney, as well as adriamycin nephropathy and unilateral ureteral obstruction, were utilized. At 6 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy, kidney injury was evident, characterized by elevated albuminuria and serum creatinine levels, and excessive deposition of interstitial matrix proteins. These lesions were accompanied by loss of renal Klotho expression, up-regulation of RAS components, and development of hypertension. In vivo expression of exogenous Klotho through hydrodynamic-based gene delivery abolished the induction of multiple RAS proteins, including angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor, and normalized blood pressure. Klotho also inhibited β-catenin activation and ameliorated renal fibrotic lesions. Similar results were obtained in mouse models of adriamycin and obstructive nephropathy. In cultured kidney tubular epithelial cells, Klotho dose-dependently blocked Wnt1-triggered RAS activation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Klotho exerts its renal protection by targeted inhibition of RAS, a pathogenic pathway known to play a key role in the evolution and progression of hypertension and chronic kidney disorders. PMID:26475416

  20. Dual renin-angiotensin system inhibition for prevention of renal and cardiovascular events: do the latest trials challenge existing evidence?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Circulatory and tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) play a central role in cardiovascular (CV) and renal pathophysiology, making RAS inhibition a logical therapeutic approach in the prevention of CV and renal disease in patients with hypertension. The cardio- and renoprotective effects observed with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) monotherapy, together with the availability of a direct renin inhibitor (DRI), led to the investigation of the potential benefits of dual RAS inhibition. In small studies, ARB and ACE inhibitor combinations were shown to be beneficial in patients with CV or renal disease, with improvement in surrogate markers. However, in larger outcome trials, involving combinations of ACE inhibitors, ARBs or DRIs, dual RAS inhibition did not show reduction in mortality in patients with diabetes, heart failure, coronary heart disease or after myocardial infarction, and was in fact, associated with increased harm. A recent meta-analysis of all major trials conducted over the past 22 years involving dual RAS inhibition has clearly shown that the risk-benefit ratio argues against the use of dual RAS inhibition. Hence, the recent evidence clearly advocates against the use of dual RAS inhibition, and single RAS inhibition appears to be the most suitable approach to controlling blood pressure and improving patient outcomes. PMID:23866091

  1. A Salt-Induced Reno-Cerebral Reflex Activates Renin-Angiotensin Systems and Promotes CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Li, Aiqing; Wang, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanmei; Su, Zhengxiu; Bin, Wei; Wilcox, Christopher S; Hou, Fan Fan

    2015-07-01

    Salt intake promotes progression of CKD by uncertain mechanisms. We hypothesized that a salt-induced reno-cerebral reflex activates a renin-angiotensin axis to promote CKD. Sham-operated and 5/6-nephrectomized rats received a normal-salt (0.4%), low-salt (0.02%), or high-salt (4%) diet for 2 weeks. High salt in 5/6-nephrectomized rats increased renal NADPH oxidase, inflammation, BP, and albuminuria. Furthermore, high salt activated the intrarenal and cerebral, but not the systemic, renin-angiotensin axes and increased the activity of renal sympathetic nerves and neurons in the forebrain of these rats. Renal fibrosis was increased 2.2-fold by high versus low salt, but intracerebroventricular tempol, losartan, or clonidine reduced this fibrosis by 65%, 69%, or 59%, respectively, and renal denervation or deafferentation reduced this fibrosis by 43% or 38%, respectively (all P<0.05). Salt-induced fibrosis persisted after normalization of BP with hydralazine. These data suggest that the renal and cerebral renin-angiotensin axes are interlinked by a reno-cerebral reflex that is activated by salt and promotes oxidative stress, fibrosis, and progression of CKD independent of BP. PMID:25635129

  2. Chronobiology and Pharmacologic Modulation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Dogs: What Have We Learned?

    PubMed

    Mochel, Jonathan P; Danhof, Meindert

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality with an increasing prevalence in human and canine populations. Recognition of the role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) overactivation in the pathophysiology of CHF has led to significant medical advances. By decreasing systemic vascular resistance and angiotensin II (AII) production, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril improve cardiac hemodynamics and reduce mortality in human and dog CHF patients. Although several experiments have pointed out that efficacy of ACE inhibitors depends on the time of administration, little attention is paid to the optimum time of dosing of these medications. A thorough characterization of the chronobiology of the renin cascade has the potential to streamline the therapeutic management of RAAS-related diseases and to help determining the optimal time of drug administration that maximizes efficacy of ACE inhibitors, while minimizing the occurrence of adverse effects. We have developed an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model that adequately captures the disposition kinetics of the paradigm drug benazeprilat, as well as the time-varying changes of systemic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone biomarkers, without and with ACE inhibition therapy. Based on these chronobiological investigations, the optimal efficacy of ACE inhibitors is expected with bedtime dosing. The data further show that benazepril influences the dynamics of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone cascade, resulting in a profound decrease in AII and aldosterone (ALD), while increasing renin activity for about 24 h. From the results of recent investigations in human, it is hypothesized that reduction of AII and ALD is one of the drivers of increased survival and improved quality of life in dogs receiving ACE inhibitors. To support and consolidate this hypothesis, additional efforts should be directed toward the collection of circulating RAAS peptides

  3. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Smokers and Non-Smokers of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Graciela E; Siekmeier, Rüdiger; Krämer, Bernhard K; Grübler, Martin; Tomaschitz, Andreas; März, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E

    2016-01-01

    High concentrations of renin and aldosterone are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) which are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Enhanced activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by cigarette smoking has been reported. The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of cigarette smoking on parameters of the RAAS in active smokers (AS) and life-time non-smokers (NS) of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) Study as well as the utility of RAAS parameter for risk prediction. We determined the concentration of aldosterone, renin, angiotensin-I and angiotensin-II in participants of the LURIC study. Smoking status was assessed by a questionnaire and the measurement of plasma cotinine concentration. Parameters were log transformed before entering analyses, where appropriate. We used a multivariate Cox regression analysis to assess the effect of parameters on mortality. From the 3316 LURIC participants 777 were AS and 1178 NS. Within a median observation period of 10 years 221 (28.4 %) AS and 302 (25.6 %) NS died. After adjustment for age, gender, and the use of anti-hypertensive medication, only angiotensin-I was significantly different in AS compared to NS with an estimated marginal mean (95 % CI) of 1607 (1541-1673) ng/L and 1719 (1667-1772) ng/L, respectively. For both NS and AS renin and angiotensin-II were directly associated with mortality in the multivariate Cox regression analysis. Angiotensin-I was only associated with increased risk for mortality in NS (HR (95 % CI) of 0.69 (0.53-0.89)). We conclude that increased renin and angiotensin-II are independent predictors of mortality in AS and NS, while angiotensin-I was associated with reduced risk of death in NS only. PMID:27334735

  4. Uric acid induces oxidative stress via an activation of the renin-angiotensin system in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-xia; Zhang, Yu-ping; Wu, Qi-nan; Chen, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Hyperuricemia is recently reported involving in various obesity-related cardiovascular disorders, especially hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated whether uric acid upregulates renin-angiotensin system (RAS) expression in adipocytes. We also examined whether RAS activation plays a role in uric acid-induced oxidative stress in adipocytes. The adipocytes of different phenotypes were incubated with uric acid for 48 h, respectively. Losartan (10(-4) M) or captopril (10(-4) M) was used to block adipose tissue RAS activation. mRNA expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1), renin, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), and angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) were evaluated with real-time PCR. Angiotensin II concentrations in supernatant were measured by ELISA. Intracellular reactive species (ROS) levels were measured by fluorescent probe DCFH-DA, DHR, or NBT assay. The uric acid upregulated both RAS (AGT, ACE1, renin, AT1R, and AT2R) mRNA expressions and angiotensin II protein secretion and caused a significant increase in ROS production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects could be prevented by RAS inhibitors, either losartan or captopril. RAS activation has been causally implicated in oxidative stress induced by uric acid in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting a plausible mechanism through which hyperuricemia contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671741

  5. Angiotensin II and vasopressin are involved in the defense system against anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mofei; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Kuda, Yuhichi; Sun, Lingling; Tanida, Mamoru; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2014-05-15

    Anaphylactic shock is sometimes life-threatening, but the defense system against this circulatory failure was not fully understood. Ameliorating roles of angiotensin (ANG) II and vasopressin in anaphylactic hypotension were investigated in anesthetized ovalbumin-sensitized Sprague-Dawley rats. The sensitized rats were randomly allocated to the following pretreatment groups (n=7/group): (1) control (non-pretreatment), (2) ANG II synthesis inhibitor captopril, (3) ANG II receptor antagonist losartan, and (4) V1a vasopressin receptor antagonist. Anaphylactic shock was induced by an intravenous injection of the antigen. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), central venous pressure (CVP), portal venous pressure (PVP) and portal venous blood flow (PBF) were measured, and splanchnic vascular resistance (Rspl: (SAP-PVP)/PBF) was determined. In the control group, SAP markedly decreased, followed by a gradual recovery toward baseline. Rspl transiently decreased immediately after antigen, and then increased 1.5-fold at 15 min and thereafter. The pretreatment with either losartan, captopril or V1a receptor antagonist augmented the initial fall of SAP and attenuated the SAP recovery along with augmentation of the late increase in Rspl. The 2-h survival rate was significantly smaller in either pretreatment group than in the control group (100%). Plasma levels of ANG II and vasopressin increased to 3.8- and 9.8-fold, respectively, at 30 min after antigen in the control group, whereas captopril pretreatment inhibited the increase in ANG II. In conclusion, inhibition of ANG II or vasopressin exacerbates anaphylaxis-induced hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:24650734

  6. Functional Local Renin-Angiotensin System in Human and Rat Periodontal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carlos F.; Morandini, Ana C.; Dionísio, Thiago J.; Faria, Flávio A.; Lima, Marta C.; Figueiredo, Caio M.; Colombini-Ishikiriama, Bella L.; Sipert, Carla R.; Maciel, Rubens P.; Akashi, Ana P.; Souza, Gabriela P.; Garlet, Gustavo P.; Rodini, Camila O.; Amaral, Sandra L.; Becari, Christiane; Salgado, Maria C.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Matus, Isaac; Didier, Daniela N.; Greene, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    The initiation or progression of periodontitis might involve a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in periodontal tissue. The aim of this study was to further characterize the local RAS in human and rat periodontal tissues between healthy and periodontally-affected tissue. Components of the RAS were investigated using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments involving both human and Wistar rat periodontium. Although not upregulated when challenged with P. gingivalis-lipopolysaccharide, human gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts expressed RAS components. Likewise, healthy and inflamed human gingiva expressed RAS components, some of which were shown to be functional, yet no differences in expression were found between healthy and diseased gingiva. However, in inflamed tissue the immunoreactivity was greater for the AT1R compared to AT2R in fibroblasts. When compared to healthy tissue, ACE activity was increased in human gingiva from volunteers with gingivitis. Human-gingiva homogenates generated Ang II, Ang 1-9 and Ang 1-7 when incubated with precursors. In gingiva homogenates, Ang II formation from Ang I was nearly abolished only when captopril and chymostatin were combined. Ang 1-7 formation was significantly greater when human gingiva homogenates were incubated with chymostatin alone compared to incubation without any inhibitor, only captopril, or captopril and chymostatin. In rat gingiva, RAS components were also found; their expression was not different between healthy and experimentally induced periodontitis (EP) groups. However, renin inhibition (aliskiren) and an AT1R antagonist (losartan) significantly blocked EP-alveolar-bone loss in rats. Collectively, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that a local RAS system is not only present but is also functional in both human and rat periodontal tissue. Furthermore, blocking AT1R and renin can significantly prevent periodontal bone loss induced by EP in rats. PMID:26244896

  7. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D status, arterial stiffness and the renin-angiotensin system in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Abdi-Ali, Ahmed; Nicholl, David D M; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; MacRae, Jennifer M; Sola, Darlene Y; Ahmed, Sofia B

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness. We sought to clarify the influence of vitamin D in modulating angiotensin II-dependent arterial stiffness. Thirty-six healthy subjects (33 ± 2 years, 67% female, mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D 69 ± 4 nmol/L) were studied in high salt balance. Arterial stiffness, expressed as brachial pulse wave velocity (bPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx), was measured by tonometry at baseline and in response to angiotensin II infusion (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min then 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min). The primary outcome was change in bPWV after an angiotensin II challenge. Results were analyzed according to plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D status: deficient (<50 nmol/L) and sufficient (≥ 50 nmol/L). There were no differences in baseline arterial stiffness between vitamin D deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D 40 ± 2 nmol/L) and sufficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D 80 ± 4 nmol/L) groups. Compared with sufficient vitamin D status, vitamin D deficiency was associated with a decreased arterial response to angiotensin II challenge (Δbrachial pulse wave velocity: 0.48 ± 0.44 m/s versus 1.95 ± 0.22 m/s, p=0.004; Δaortic augmentation index: 9.4 ± 3.4% versus 14.2 ± 2.7%, p=0.3), which persisted for brachial pulse wave velocity response after adjustment for covariates (p=0.03). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness in healthy humans, possibly through an angiotensin II-dependent mechanism. PMID:24164282

  8. The renin angiotensin system regulates Kupffer cells in colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Neo, Jaclyn; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    Blockade of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) can inhibit tumor growth and this may be mediated via undefined immunomodulatory actions. This study investigated the effects of RAS blockade on liver macrophages (Kupffer cells; KCs) in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Here we showed that pharmacological targeting of the RAS [ANG II (31.25 µg/kg/h i.p.), ANG-(1-7) (24 µg/kg/h i.p.) or the ACE inhibitor; captopril (750 mg/kg/d i.p.)] altered endogenous KC numbers in the tumor-bearing liver throughout metastatic growth. Captopril, and to a lesser extent ANG-(1-7), increased KC numbers in the liver but not tumor. KCs were found to express the key RAS components: ACE and AT1R. Treatment with captopril and ANG II increased the number of AT1R-expressing KCs, although total KC numbers were not affected by ANG II. Captopril (0.1 µM) also increased macrophage invasion in vitro. Additionally, captopril was administered with KC depletion before tumor induction (day 0) or at established metastatic growth (day 18) using gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3; 20 mg/kg). Livers were collected at day 21 and quantitative stereology used as a measure of tumor burden. Captopril reduced growth of CRC liver metastases. However, when captopril was combined with early KC depletion (day 0) tumor growth was significantly increased compared with captopril alone. In contrast, late KC depletion (day 18) failed to influence the anti-tumor effects of captopril. The result of these studies suggests that manipulation of the RAS can alter KC numbers and may subsequently influence progression of CRC liver metastases. PMID:23792575

  9. Decongestion Strategies and Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Activation in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Stevens, Susanna R.; DeVore, Adam D.; Lala, Anuradha; Vader, Justin M.; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F.; Khazanie, Prateeti; Redfield, Margaret M.; Stevenson, Lynne W.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Braunwald, Eugene; Felker, G. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background High dose diuretics in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) are thought to activate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and alternative decongestion strategies, such as ultrafiltration (UF), have been proposed to mitigate this RAAS activation. Methods We analyzed 427 AHF patients enrolled in the DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF trials. We assessed the relationship between two markers of RAAS activation (plasma renin activity [PRA] and aldosterone) from baseline to 72-96h and decongestion strategy; high vs. low-dose and continuous infusion vs. bolus furosemide for DOSE-AHF and UF vs. stepped pharmacologic care for CARRESS-HF. We determined the relationship between RAAS biomarkers and 60-day outcomes. Results Patients with greater RAAS activation at baseline had lower blood pressures, lower serum sodium, and higher BUN. Continuous infusion furosemide and UF were associated with greater PRA increases (median +1.66 vs. +0.66 ng/mL/h with continuous vs. bolus, P=0.021; +4.05 vs. +0.56 ng/mL/h with UF vs. stepped care, P=0.014). There was no significant difference in RAAS biomarker change with high vs. low-dose diuretics (both P>0.5). Neither baseline log PRA nor log aldosterone was associated with increased death/HF hospitalization (HR for a doubling 1.05; 95% CI: 0.98-1.13, P=0.18 and HR 1.13; 95% CI: 0.99-1.28, P=0.069, respectively). The change in RAAS biomarkers from baseline to 72-96 h was not associated with outcomes (both P>0.5). Conclusions High-dose loop diuretics did not result in greater RAAS activation than low-dose diuretics. UF resulted in greater PRA increase than stepped pharmacologic care. Neither PRA nor aldosterone was significantly associated with short-term outcomes in this cohort. PMID:25543972

  10. Effects of dapagliflozin on blood pressure in hypertensive diabetic patients on renin-angiotensin system blockade.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael A; Mansfield, Traci A; Alessi, Federica; Iqbal, Nayyar; Parikh, Shamik; Ptaszynska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dapagliflozin improves glycemic control and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in T2DM patients. This double-blind phase III study evaluated the effects of dapagliflozin on glycemic control and blood pressure in patients with inadequately controlled T2DM and hypertension, despite ongoing therapy with a renin-angiotensin system blocker. Patients were randomized to receive dapagliflozin 10 mg (n = 302) or placebo (n = 311) once daily for 12 weeks. Endpoints were change from baseline to week 12 in seated SBP and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c); longitudinal repeated-measures analysis was performed. Additional endpoints included other hemodynamic measures, serum uric acid, fasting plasma glucose, body weight, blood lipids and heart rate. After 12 weeks, dapagliflozin-treated versus placebo-treated patients showed significant reductions in HbA1c (-0.6% vs -0.1%, p < 0.0001), mean seated SBP (-10.4 vs -7.3 mmHg, p = 0.0010) and mean 24 h ambulatory SBP (-9.6 vs -6.7 mmHg, p = 0.0043). Dapagliflozin also reduced body weight compared with placebo (-1.0 vs -0.3 kg). Dapagliflozin was well tolerated, with adverse events consistent with previous studies. Dapagliflozin improved glycemic control, and reduced SBP as well as body weight in patients with poorly controlled T2DM and hypertension. PMID:26623980

  11. Role of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity-related Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kamide, K

    2014-08-12

    Several recent clinical trials show that blocking agents of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) reduce cardiovascular events in patients with metabolic syndrome based on insulin resistance and obesity, especially accumulated visceral fat. Our laboratory has focused on the relationship between the vascular RAAS and the action of insulin on the vasculature. We first revealed that the addition of insulin to cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) markedly increases angiotensinogen and angiotensin II (Ang II) expression and production. Insulin addition also induces VSMC growth that is inhibited by the blockade of the RAAS by either ACEI or ARB which suggests a role for the RAAS in insulin-mediated growth. Insulin has a quite different effect on cultured vascular endothelial cells (EC) as it reduces angiotensinogen and renin expression. However, insulin added to EC induces a marked activation of ACE and the activated ACE promotes the conversion of Ang I to Ang II and cell growth under conditions of high insulin concentration. Ang II induces the progression of atherosclerosis through the production of oxidative stress that blocks insulin signaling and accelerates atherosclerosis. In this paper, we attempt to clarify the relationship between insulin resistance, the RAAS, and oxidative stress in vascular tissues to mimic in vivo conditions found in patients with metabolic syndrome and obesity-related hypertension as previously I reviewed in "Current Hypertension Reviews" in 2010 [1]. In addition, I update the relationships between vascular RAAS and insulin resistance for the last 4 years. JSH-2014 [2] states that the target goals of blood pressure (BP) for diabetes patients is lower than 130/80 mmHg, whereas updated JNC 8 [3] and ESH-ESC 2013 [4] recommends the target BP was changed to <140/90 mmHg for hypertensive patients with diabetes. Patients with diabetes and hypertension have reduced mortality as well as improved cardiovascular and cerebrovascular

  12. Dual inhibition of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and endothelin-1 in treatment of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Komers, Radko; Plotkin, Horacio

    2016-05-15

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a pivotal role in treatment of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). However, reversal of the course of CKD or at least long-term stabilization of renal function are often difficult to achieve, and many patients still progress to end-stage renal disease. New treatments are needed to enhance protective actions of RAAS inhibitors (RAASis), such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and improve prognosis in CKD patients. Inhibition of endothelin (ET) system in combination with established RAASis may represent such an approach. There are complex interactions between both systems and similarities in their renal physiological and pathophysiological actions that provide theoretical rationale for combined inhibition. This view is supported by some experimental studies in models of both diabetic and nondiabetic CKD showing that a combination of RAASis with ET receptor antagonists (ERAs) ameliorate proteinuria, renal structural changes, and molecular markers of glomerulosclerosis, renal fibrosis, or inflammation more effectively than RAASis or ERAs alone. Practically all clinical studies exploring the effects of RAASis and ERAs combination in nephroprotection have thus far applied add-on designs, in which an ERA is added to baseline treatment with ACEIs or ARBs. These studies, conducted mostly in patients with diabetic nephropathy, have shown that ERAs effectively reduce residual proteinuria in patients with baseline RAASis treatment. Long-term studies are currently being conducted to determine whether promising antiproteinuric effects of the dual blockade will be translated in long-term nephroprotection with acceptable safety profile. PMID:27009050

  13. Dual inhibition of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and endothelin-1 in treatment of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a pivotal role in treatment of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). However, reversal of the course of CKD or at least long-term stabilization of renal function are often difficult to achieve, and many patients still progress to end-stage renal disease. New treatments are needed to enhance protective actions of RAAS inhibitors (RAASis), such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and improve prognosis in CKD patients. Inhibition of endothelin (ET) system in combination with established RAASis may represent such an approach. There are complex interactions between both systems and similarities in their renal physiological and pathophysiological actions that provide theoretical rationale for combined inhibition. This view is supported by some experimental studies in models of both diabetic and nondiabetic CKD showing that a combination of RAASis with ET receptor antagonists (ERAs) ameliorate proteinuria, renal structural changes, and molecular markers of glomerulosclerosis, renal fibrosis, or inflammation more effectively than RAASis or ERAs alone. Practically all clinical studies exploring the effects of RAASis and ERAs combination in nephroprotection have thus far applied add-on designs, in which an ERA is added to baseline treatment with ACEIs or ARBs. These studies, conducted mostly in patients with diabetic nephropathy, have shown that ERAs effectively reduce residual proteinuria in patients with baseline RAASis treatment. Long-term studies are currently being conducted to determine whether promising antiproteinuric effects of the dual blockade will be translated in long-term nephroprotection with acceptable safety profile. PMID:27009050

  14. Maternal Dexamethasone Treatment Alters Tissue and Circulating Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System in the Pregnant Ewe and Fetus.

    PubMed

    Forhead, Alison J; Jellyman, Juanita K; De Blasio, Miles J; Johnson, Emma; Giussani, Dino A; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Fowden, Abigail L

    2015-08-01

    Antenatal synthetic glucocorticoids promote fetal maturation in pregnant women at risk of preterm delivery and their mechanism of action may involve other endocrine systems. This study investigated the effect of maternal dexamethasone treatment, at clinically relevant doses, on components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pregnant ewe and fetus. From 125 days of gestation (term, 145 ± 2 d), 10 ewes carrying single fetuses of mixed sex (3 female, 7 male) were injected twice im, at 10-11 pm, with dexamethasone (2 × 12 mg, n = 5) or saline (n = 5) at 24-hour intervals. At 10 hours after the second injection, maternal dexamethasone treatment increased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the fetal lungs, kidneys, and heart and ACE concentration in the circulation and lungs, but not kidneys, of the fetuses. Fetal cardiac mRNA abundance of angiotensin II (AII) type 2 receptor decreased after maternal dexamethasone treatment. Between the two groups of fetuses, there were no significant differences in plasma angiotensinogen or renin concentrations; in transcript levels of renal renin, or AII type 1 or 2 receptors in the lungs and kidneys; or in pulmonary, renal or cardiac protein content of the AII receptors. In the pregnant ewes, dexamethasone administration increased pulmonary ACE and plasma angiotensinogen, and decreased plasma renin, concentrations. Some of the effects of dexamethasone treatment on the maternal and fetal RAS were associated with altered insulin and thyroid hormone activity. Changes in the local and circulating RAS induced by dexamethasone exposure in utero may contribute to the maturational and tissue-specific actions of antenatal glucocorticoid treatment. PMID:26039155

  15. Maternal Dexamethasone Treatment Alters Tissue and Circulating Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System in the Pregnant Ewe and Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Jellyman, Juanita K.; De Blasio, Miles J.; Johnson, Emma; Giussani, Dino A.; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Fowden, Abigail L.

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal synthetic glucocorticoids promote fetal maturation in pregnant women at risk of preterm delivery and their mechanism of action may involve other endocrine systems. This study investigated the effect of maternal dexamethasone treatment, at clinically relevant doses, on components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pregnant ewe and fetus. From 125 days of gestation (term, 145 ± 2 d), 10 ewes carrying single fetuses of mixed sex (3 female, 7 male) were injected twice im, at 10–11 pm, with dexamethasone (2 × 12 mg, n = 5) or saline (n = 5) at 24-hour intervals. At 10 hours after the second injection, maternal dexamethasone treatment increased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the fetal lungs, kidneys, and heart and ACE concentration in the circulation and lungs, but not kidneys, of the fetuses. Fetal cardiac mRNA abundance of angiotensin II (AII) type 2 receptor decreased after maternal dexamethasone treatment. Between the two groups of fetuses, there were no significant differences in plasma angiotensinogen or renin concentrations; in transcript levels of renal renin, or AII type 1 or 2 receptors in the lungs and kidneys; or in pulmonary, renal or cardiac protein content of the AII receptors. In the pregnant ewes, dexamethasone administration increased pulmonary ACE and plasma angiotensinogen, and decreased plasma renin, concentrations. Some of the effects of dexamethasone treatment on the maternal and fetal RAS were associated with altered insulin and thyroid hormone activity. Changes in the local and circulating RAS induced by dexamethasone exposure in utero may contribute to the maturational and tissue-specific actions of antenatal glucocorticoid treatment. PMID:26039155

  16. Renin, angiotensins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme in neuroblastoma cells: evidence for intracellular formation of angiotensins.

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, T; Clemens, D L; Inagami, T

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of various peptide hormones in neuronal cells in the brain is not clear. The question of whether brain angiotensin II is formed by an extracellular mechanism as in the peripheral system or by an intracellular mechanism can be answered by using cloned cells in culture. We have screened several neuroblastoma cell lines of rat and mouse origin and found at least three cell lines that contain renin (EC 3.4.99.19), angiotensin-converting enzyme (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase; peptidyldipeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1), and angiotensins I and II. This finding was interpreted to indicate that in these cells angiotensin formation takes place by an intracellular mechanism, in contrast to the extracellular mechanism well known to occur in plasma. This study also demonstrates the existence of viable and cloned cell lines that produce renin. PMID:6273896

  17. Retarding the progression of chronic kidney disease with renin angiotensin system blockade.

    PubMed

    Limesh, M; Annigeri, R A; Mani, M K; Kowdle, P C; Rao, B Subba; Balasubramanian, S; Seshadri, R

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the effect of renin angiotensin system blockade (RASB) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) of diverse etiology. Two hundred and sixty-five consecutive CKD patients attending our renal clinic, with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 20-70 ml/min/1.73m(2) at baseline and a minimal follow-up of 1 year, were studied retrospectively. We devised a scoring system to quantify RASB, wherein the maximum dose of an agent recommended for control of hypertension was scored as 1. The renal endpoints studied were the rate of change in eGFR (ΔeGFR) and decline of eGFR>50%. The mean age was 48 ± 11.2 years and 69% were male. The mean duration of follow-up was 4 ± 2.7 years. The rate of ΔeGFR was -1.5 ± 5.0 ml/min/1.73 m(2) per year in patients who received RASB (N=168) and -6.0 ± 5.4 in those who did not (N=97) (P<0.001). The incidence of decline of eGFR >50% was 11.3% with RASB and 24.7% without (P=0.003). In a subgroup of patients who received RASB, the incidence of decline of eGFR >50% was 17.8% in the low-dose RASB group (N=84, RASB score 0.63 ± 0.38) and 4.8% in the high-dose group (N=84, RASB score 2.5 ± 0.7) (P=0.001). RASB was associated with significantly better renoprotection in CKD of diverse etiology, even in nonproteinuric diseases. This effect appeared to be dose-dependent, with higher supramaximal doses exhibiting better renoprotection than the lower conventional doses. Our results make a strong case for use of aggressive RASB in all CKD patients to postpone end-stage renal disease. PMID:22787312

  18. Aldosterone response to angiotensin II during hypoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Colice, G.L.; Ramirez, G.

    1986-07-01

    Exercise stimulates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). However, increases in plasma aldosterone concentrations (PAC) are suppressed when exercise is performed at high altitude or under hypoxemic conditions. As the angiotensin-II response to high-altitude exercise is normal, it is speculated that an inhibitor, discharged during hypoxemia, acted to suppress angiotensin-II-mediated aldosterone release. A study was conducted to test this hypothesis, taking into account the measurement of the aldosterone response to exogenous angiotensin II during normoxemia and hypoxemia. It was found that the dose-response curve of PAC to angiotensin II was not significantly inhibited by the considered model of hypoxemia. The hypoxemia-mediated release of an angiotensin II inhibitor does, therefore, not explain the previous observations of PAC suppression during hypoxemic exercise. 28 references.

  19. H2S Inhibits Hyperglycemia-Induced Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System Activation via Attenuation of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jun; Li, Chen; Shao, Decui; Liu, Jia; Shen, Yang; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yu; Yu, Chen; Wang, Rui; Lu, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Decrease in endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was reported to participate in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study is aimed at exploring the relationship between the abnormalities in H2S metabolism, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and the activation of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Cultured renal mesangial cells (MCs) and streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats were used for the studies. The expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type I receptor (AT1), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen IV were measured by real time PCR and Western blot. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed by fluorescent probe assays. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assay. Ang II concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. AGT, ACE and AT1 receptor mRNA levels and Ang II concentration were increased in high glucose (HG) -treated MCs, the cell proliferation rate and the production of TGF-β1 and of collagen IV productions were also increased. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylenechloride iodonium (DPI) was able to reverse the HG-induced RAS activation and the changes in cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Supplementation of H2S attenuated HG-induced elevations in ROS and RAS activation. Blockade on H2S biosynthesis from cystathione-γ-lyase (CSE) by DL-propargylglycine (PPG) resulted in effects similar to that of HG treatment. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, the changes in RAS were also reversed by H2S supplementation without affecting blood glucose concentration. These data suggested that the decrease in H2S under hyperglycemic condition leads to an imbalance between oxidative and reductive species. The increased oxidative species results in intrarenal RAS activation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. PMID:24058553

  20. Saga of renin-angiotensin system and calcium channels in hypertensive diabetics: does it have a therapeutic edge?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun H S; Ramarao, P

    2005-01-01

    Current understanding of the genesis of diabetic vascular disease suggests that vascular complications, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are associated with changes in structural and functional parameters. Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays an important role in the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. Most of the negative cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II are mediated through AT1 receptors, whereas the AT2 receptors mediate largely beneficial effects. Hence, compared to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), selective AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) should provide additional end organ protection via AT2 receptors activation. Although ACEIs are useful therapeutically, they are being currently displaced by ARBs. Enhanced calcium ion channel activity is reported in vascular smooth muscles from diabetic animal models. Clinical benefits of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) in diabetic hypertensive patients are controversial, but there is increasing experimental evidence for the beneficial effects of dihydropyridine-type CCBs. Although the treatment of hypertension in diabetics reduces cardiovascular and microvascular complications, the ideal strategy for treating hypertension in diabetics has not been well defined and warrants a combination approach. Only limited clinical data regarding the use of ARBs in combination with CCBs in diabetics are available. The experimental data suggest that combination of a CCB and an AT1 receptor blocker, or a hypothetical dual blocker of AT1 receptors as well as of calcium channels would be an ideal regimen. There is, however, no conclusive clinical evidence to support the combined use of these drugs. This review highlights the available experimental data that support the therapeutic benefits of this combination. PMID:16007228

  1. Impaired Glutathione Redox System Paradoxically Suppresses Angiotensin II-Induced Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Kazuma; Okada, Motoi; Sumitomo, Kazuhiro; Nakagawa, Naoki; Aizawa, Yoshiaki; Kawabe, Junichi; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II (AII) plays a central role in vascular remodeling via oxidative stress. However, the interaction between AII and reduced glutathione (GSH) redox status in cardiovascular remodeling remains unknown. Methods In vivo: The cuff-induced vascular injury model was applied to Sprague Dawley rats. Then we administered saline or a GSH inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, 30 mmol/L in drinking water) for a week, subsequently administered 4 more weeks by osmotic pump with saline or AII (200 ng/kg/minute) to the rats. In vitro: Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was measured to determine DNA synthesis in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Results BSO reduced whole blood GSH levels. Systolic blood pressure was increased up to 215±4 mmHg by AII at 4 weeks (p<0.01), which was not affected by BSO. Superoxide production in vascular wall was increased by AII and BSO alone, and was markedly enhanced by AII+BSO. The left ventricular weight to body weight ratio was significantly increased in AII and AII+BSO as compared to controls (2.52±0.08, 2.50±0.09 and 2.10±0.07 mg/g respectively, p<0.05). Surprisingly, the co-treatment of BSO totally abolished these morphological changes. Although the vascular circumferential wall stress was well compensated in AII, significantly increased in AII+BSO. The anti-single-stranded DNA staining revealed increasing apoptotic cells in the neointima of injured arteries in BSO groups. BrdU incorporation in cultured VSMCs with AII was increased dose-dependently. Furthermore it was totally abolished by BSO and was reversed by GSH monoethyl ester. Conclusions We demonstrated that a vast oxidative stress in impaired GSH redox system totally abolished AII-induced vascular, not cardiac remodeling via enhancement of apoptosis in the neointima and suppression of cell growth in the media. The drastic suppression of remodeling may result in fragile vasculature intolerable to mechanical stress by AII. PMID

  2. Meta-analysis of effects of obstructive sleep apnea on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ze-Ning; Wei, Yong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common cause of resistant hypertension, which has been proposed to result from activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). We meta-analyzed the effects of OSA on plasma levels of RAAS components. Methods Full-text studies published on MEDLINE and EMBASE analyzing fasting plasma levels of at least one RAAS component in adults with OSA with or without hypertension. OSA was diagnosed as an apnea-hypopnea index or respiratory disturbance index ≥ 5. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Results from individual studies were synthesized using inverse variance and pooled using a random-effects model. Subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression were performed, and risk of publication bias was assessed. Results The meta-analysis included 13 studies, of which 10 reported results on renin (n = 470 cases and controls), 7 on angiotensin II (AngII, n = 384), and 9 on aldosterone (n = 439). AngII levels were significantly higher in OSA than in controls [mean differences = 3.39 ng/L, 95% CI: 2.00–4.79, P < 0.00001], while aldosterone levels were significantly higher in OSA with hypertension than OSA but not with hypertension (mean differences = 1.32 ng/dL, 95% CI: 0.58–2.07, P = 0.0005). Meta-analysis of all studies suggested no significant differences in aldosterone between OSA and controls, but a significant pooled mean difference of 1.35 ng/mL (95% CI: 0.88–1.82, P < 0.00001) emerged after excluding one small-sample study. No significant risk of publication bias was detected among all included studies. Conclusions OSA is associated with higher AngII and aldosterone levels, especially in hypertensive patients. OSA may cause hypertension, at least in part, by stimulating RAAS activity. PMID:27403143

  3. Polymorphisms of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Gene in Chinese Han Patients with Nonfamilial Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-qun; Wen, Zu-jia; Wei, Yong; Xu, Juan; Chen, Zheng; Qi, Bao-zhen; Wang, Zhi-ming; Shi, Yong-yong; Liu, Shao-wen

    2015-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation(AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the adult population. The activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nonfamilial AF and polymorphisms in RAS gene. Methods A total of 931 patients with nonfamilial AF, 663 non-AF heart disease patients and 727 healthy subjects were selected. 10 tagSNPs (tSNPs) (ACE gene rs8066114, AGT gene rs7539020, rs3789678, rs2478544, rs11568023, rs2478523, rs4762, rs699 and CYP11B2 rs3802230, rs3097) were chosen and genotyped in our study. Single-locus analysis and haplotype analysis were used in this study. Results In single-locus analysis, we found rs11568023 and rs3789678 in AGT gene were associated with nonfamilial AF in Chinese Han population. AF risk was associated with rs3789678 between the AF group and control groups. Under dominant model, the significant AF risk was observed in rs3789678 between the AF group and non AF heart control group; And the protective effect was found in rs11568023, compared with the non-AF heart disease control group. In multilocus haplotype analysis, the association between frequencies of the haplotypes and AF risk was showed in AGT gene (rs7539020-rs3789678), compared ‘TT’ haplotype with the common ‘TC’ haplotype, adjusted for age, gender, LVEF, LVEDD, LAD and frequency of hypertension and diabetes. The diplotype with ‘TC’, carrying rs3789678-C-allele, was associated with reduced risk of AF between the AF group and the healthy control group. The diplotype with ‘TT’ haplotype in the same block, carrying rs3789678-T-allele, was associated with increased risk of AF. Conclusions Via a large-scale case-control study, we found that rs3789678 site was potential susceptible locus of AF whereas rs11568023 was protective factor. PMID:25723521

  4. Low LBNP tolerance in men is associated with attenuated activation of the renin-angiotensin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Petersen, T. W.; Gabrielsen, A.; Pump, B.; Bie, P.; Christensen, N. J.; Warberg, J.; Videbaek, R.; Simonson, S. R.; Norsk, P.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma vasoactive hormone concentrations [epinephrine (p(Epi)), norepinephrine (p(NE)), ANG II (p(ANG II)), vasopressin (p(VP)), endothelin-1 (p(ET-1))] and plasma renin activity (p(RA)) were measured periodically and compared during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of the renin-angiotensin system, the latter being one of the most powerful vasoconstrictors in the body, is of major importance for LBNP tolerance. Healthy men on a controlled diet (2,822 cal/day, 2 mmol. kg(-1). day(-1) Na(+)) were exposed to 30 min of LBNP from -15 to -50 mmHg. LBNP was uneventful for seven men [25 +/- 2 yr, high-tolerance (HiTol) group], but eight men (26 +/- 3 yr) reached presyncope after 11 +/- 1 min [P < 0.001, low-tolerance (LoTol) group]. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) did not change measurably, but central venous pressure and left atrial diameter decreased similarly in both groups (5-6 mmHg, by approximately 30%, P < 0.05). Control (0 mmHg LBNP) hormone concentrations were similar between groups, however, p(RA) differed between them (LoTol 0.6 +/- 0.1, HiTol 1.2 +/- 0.1 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1), P < 0.05). LBNP increased (P < 0. 05) p(RA) and p(ANG II), respectively, more in the HiTol group (9.9 +/- 2.2 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1) and 58 +/- 12 pg/ml) than in LoTol subjects (4.3 +/- 0.9 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1) and 28 +/- 6 pg/ml). In contrast, the increase in p(VP) was higher (P < 0.05) in the LoTol than in the HiTol group. The increases (P < 0.05) for p(NE) were nonsignificant between groups, and p(ET-1) remained unchanged. Thus there may be a causal relationship between attenuated activation of p(RA) and p(ANG II) and presyncope, with p(VP) being a possible cofactor. Measurement of resting p(RA) may be of predictive value for those with lower hypotensive tolerance.

  5. Expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system in proliferating infantile haemangioma may account for the propranolol-induced accelerated involution.

    PubMed

    Itinteang, Tinte; Brasch, Helen D; Tan, Swee T; Day, Darren J

    2011-06-01

    Infantile haemangioma is a benign tumour of the microvasculature characterised by excessive proliferation of immature endothelial cells. It typically undergoes rapid proliferation during infancy followed by spontaneous slow involution during childhood often leaving a fibro-fatty residuum. In 2008, propranolol, a non-selective β-blocker, was serendipitously discovered to induce accelerated involution of a proliferating infantile haemangioma. However, the mechanism by which propranolol causes this dramatic effect is unclear. Using immunohistochemical staining, we show that the CD34+ endothelial progenitor cells of the microvessels in proliferating infantile haemangioma express angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptor-2, but not angiotensin II receptor-1. We have also shown using our in vitro explant model that the cells emanating from proliferating haemangioma biopsies form blast-like structures that proliferate in the presence of angiotensin II. We present here a plausible model involving the renin-angiotensin system that may account for the propranolol-induced accelerated involution of proliferating infantile haemangioma. PMID:20870476

  6. Cognitive-enhancing effects of angiotensin IV

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Angiotensin IV is a derivative of the potent vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and it has been shown to enhance acquisition, consolidation and recall in animal models of learning and memory when administered centrally or peripherally. Whether changes in angiotensin IV activity underlie the cognitive effects of those cardiovascular drugs designed to disrupt the peripheral renin-angiotensin system in humans remains undetermined, but angiotensin IV appears to be a worthy candidate for consideration in drug development programmes. The mechanism of action of angiotensin IV is still debated, although its AT4 receptor has been convincingly identified as being insulin-regulated amino peptidase, which is also known as oxytocinase and placental leucine aminopeptidase. It is speculated that angiotensin IV may interact with insulin-regulated amino peptidase to enhance neuronal glucose uptake, prevent metabolism of other neuroactive peptides, induce changes in extracellular matrix molecules, or induce release of acetylcholine and/or dopamine. All of these things may be responsible for the beneficial effects on cognition, but none of them are yet proven. Importantly, strain differences in murine responses to angiotensin IV suggest that some individuals may benefit from drugs targeted to the AT4 receptor whilst others may be refractory. At present it thus appears that those individuals with the poorest baseline cognition may receive greatest benefit, but possible genetic differences in responses to angiotensin IV cannot be ruled-out. PMID:19090988

  7. Time to retrieve the best benefits from renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction: lessons from randomized controlled trials and registries.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram

    2014-12-20

    Numerous registries, including the most recent ESC Euro-observational registry, have reported a large and persistent gap between real-life practice in the use of life-saving evidence-based therapies (such as renin angiotensin antagonists, beta-blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists) and recommended practices in international guidelines. Although the use of multiple renin angiotensin aldosterone system-inhibitors is associated with the development of worsening renal function and hyperkalemia in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, increased efforts should be expended to initiate and maintain target doses of these agents so as to provide their benefits on mortality and hospitalizations for heart failure. PMID:25465821

  8. Pipeline blockage location by strain measurement using an ROV

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes an ROV based inspection method for locating a blockage in a marine pipeline. The method measures changes in the hoop strain in the pipe corresponding to changes in the internal fluid pressure. The device (patent applied for), converts radial extension or compression of the pipe into axial compression or tension respectively of a load cell. It allows the use of a high sensitivity axial strain sensing element to measure the hoop strain in the pipe. By pressurizing the pipe at positions upstream and downstream of the blockage and measuring the resulting hoop strain, the boundaries of the blockage can be accurately defined. The device can be installed and recovered by ROV, the signals being relayed to the surface via the ROV`s umbilical. The method has been used successfully to locate and define the extent of a blockage in a deepwater oil flowline running from a satellite well system to a production platform, allowing the planning of effective remedial action. The results of the strain measurements were found to be fully consistent with the contents of the pipe determined by subsequent sectioning. Key features of the hoop strain device include rugged design, high sensitivity, ease of attachment and recovery by ROV with the need for minimal cleaning and for access only to a sector of the pipe, typically {1/4} the circumference.

  9. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and its blockade in diabetic nephropathy: main focus on the role of aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Schjoedt, Katrine Jordan

    2011-04-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the western world. Despite major improvements in both prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy, there is a continuous need to improve identification and treatment of "non-responders". In recent years, several experimental studies have shown that aldosterone plays a role in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, independent of angiotensin II and blood pressure levels. Blocking the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with an ACE-inhibitor (ACEI) and/or ambulatory blood pressure should theoretically inhibit the secretion of aldosterone. However, an increase in aldosterone during long-term treatment with ACEIs, so-called aldosterone escape or aldosterone breakthrough, has been described. In the present thesis, our studies evaluating the incidence and clinical impact (i.e. a faster rate of decline in kidney function) of aldosterone escape in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy, possible mechanisms of aldosterone escape, and finally the beneficial effect of blocking aldosterone on albuminuria, blood pressure and renal autoregulation is being reviewed, together with some aspects of the existing treatment recommendations. PMID:21466768

  10. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhijian; Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-07-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  11. The effect of the renin—angiotensin system on mucosal water and sodium transfer in everted sacs of rat jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Ann D.; Munday, Kenneth A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Mucosal water and sodium transfer were measured in everted sacs of rat jejunum. 2. Rats maintained on a high sodium diet did not show consistently reduced mucosal water transfer and aldosterone also failed to stimulate transfer unless the control untreated values were low. 3. Adrenalectomy produced little reduction in mucosal water transfer and aldosterone was without effect on water transfer in sacs from adrenalectomized rats. 4. Vasopressin had no effect on mucosal transfer. 5. Levels of water transfer were not reduced after hypophysectomy nor did aldosterone injection increase transfer. 6. Mucosal water transfer in sacs from adrenalectomized—nephrectomized rats was low and was significantly increased by aldosterone injection or by injection of crude kidney extract. 7. A significant increased mucosal water and sodium transfer was observed when sacs from adrenalectomized—nephrectomized rats were incubated with angiotensin at a concentration of 10-10g/ml. 8. It is suggested that the renin—angiotensin system may be involved in the maintenance of sodium homoeostasis by a direct action on sodium transporting mechanisms. PMID:4322443

  12. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  13. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training on Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in an Obese Zucker Rat Strain

    PubMed Central

    Barretti, Diego Lopes Mendes; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Fernandes, Tiago; do Carmo, Everton Crivoi; Rosa, Kaleizu Teodoro; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity and renin angiotensin system (RAS) hyperactivity are profoundly involved in cardiovascular diseases, however aerobic exercise training (EXT) can prevent obesity and cardiac RAS activation. The study hypothesis was to investigate whether obesity and its association with EXT alter the systemic and cardiac RAS components in an obese Zucker rat strain. Methods The rats were divided into the following groups: Lean Zucker rats (LZR); lean Zucker rats plus EXT (LZR+EXT); obese Zucker rats (OZR) and obese Zucker rats plus EXT (OZR+EXT). EXT consisted of 10 weeks of 60-min swimming sessions, 5 days/week. At the end of the training protocol heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), cardiac hypertrophy (CH) and function, local and systemic components of RAS were evaluated. Also, systemic glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and its LDL and HDL fractions were measured. Results The resting HR decreased (∼12%) for both LZR+EXT and OZR+EXT. However, only the LZR+EXT reached significance (p<0.05), while a tendency was found for OZR versus OZR+EXT (p = 0.07). In addition, exercise reduced (57%) triglycerides and (61%) LDL in the OZR+EXT. The systemic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity did not differ regardless of obesity and EXT, however, the OZR and OZR+EXT showed (66%) and (42%), respectively, less angiotensin II (Ang II) plasma concentration when compared with LZR. Furthermore, the results showed that EXT in the OZR prevented increase in CH, cardiac ACE activity, Ang II and AT2 receptor caused by obesity. In addition, exercise augmented cardiac ACE2 in both training groups. Conclusion Despite the unchanged ACE and lower systemic Ang II levels in obesity, the cardiac RAS was increased in OZR and EXT in obese Zucker rats reduced some of the cardiac RAS components and prevented obesity-related CH. These results show that EXT prevented the heart RAS hyperactivity and cardiac maladaptive morphological alterations in obese Zucker rats

  14. A database and model to support proactive management of sediment-related sewer blockages.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; McIntyre, Neil; Díaz-Granados, Mario; Maksimović, Cedo

    2012-10-01

    Due to increasing customer and political pressures, and more stringent environmental regulations, sediment and other blockage issues are now a high priority when assessing sewer system operational performance. Blockages caused by sediment deposits reduce sewer system reliability and demand remedial action at considerable operational cost. Consequently, procedures are required for identifying which parts of the sewer system are in most need of proactive removal of sediments. This paper presents an exceptionally long (7.5 years) and spatially detailed (9658 grid squares--0.03 km² each--covering a population of nearly 7.5 million) data set obtained from a customer complaints database in Bogotá (Colombia). The sediment-related blockage data are modelled using homogeneous and non-homogeneous Poisson process models. In most of the analysed areas the inter-arrival time between blockages can be represented by the homogeneous process, but there are a considerable number of areas (up to 34%) for which there is strong evidence of non-stationarity. In most of these cases, the mean blockage rate increases over time, signifying a continual deterioration of the system despite repairs, this being particularly marked for pipe and gully pot related blockages. The physical properties of the system (mean pipe slope, diameter and pipe length) have a clear but weak influence on observed blockage rates. The Bogotá case study illustrates the potential value of customer complaints databases and formal analysis frameworks for proactive sewerage maintenance scheduling in large cities. PMID:22794800

  15. Acoustic propagation in rigid ducts with blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation has been suggested for moving nonmagnetic material in furnaces for heat processing in space experiments. Basically, acoustic standing waves under resonant conditions are excited in the cavity of the furnace while the material blockage is located at a pressure node and thus at a maximum gradient. The position of the blockage is controlled by displacing the node as a result of frequency change. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of blockage on the longitudinal and transverse resonances of a cylindrical cavity, taking into account the results of a one-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) analysis. Based on a Green's function surface element method, 3-D analysis is tested experimentally and proved to be accurate over a wide range of geometric parameters and boundary shapes. The shift in resonance depends on the change in pressure gradient and duct shortening caused by the blockage.

  16. The utilization of an infrared imaging system as a cooling slot blockage detector in the inspection of a transpiration cooled nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Stephen E.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.; Alderfer, David W.; Whipple, Janet C.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of the 8 foot temperature tunnel's transpiration cooled nozzle was completed using an infrared imaging radiometer to locate regions of cooling flow irregularities caused by obstruction of three or more adjacent cooling slots. Restrictions in the cooling flow were found and cataloged. Blockages found were due primarily to the presence of residual phosphoric acid being discharged from some of the cooling slots. This acid was used during construction of the nozzle components and was to have been purged prior to its delivery to the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In addition, a radial displacement of one selection of discs located in the spool piece was inspected and cataloged for future reference. There did not seem to be a serious restriction of flow in this defect, but evidence from the infrared images indicated reduced slot activity within the gouge. The radiometer survey uncovered regions where closer inspection is recommended but did not cover the entire surface area of the three nozzle subsections due to equipment limitations. A list of areas with suspected problems is included in Appendix A.

  17. Synthesis of angiotensins by cultured granuloma macrophages in murine schistosomiasis mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstock, J.V.; Blum, A.M.

    1986-03-01

    Components of the angiotensin system are present in granulomas of murine schistosomiasis mansoni. Angiotensins may have immunoregulatory function. Granuloma macrophages cultured for up to 3 days generated substantial angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII) which appeared in the culture supernatants. Macrophage monolayers were incubated with (/sup 3/H) amino acids, and culture supernatants were extracted with acetone and analyzed by HPLC. Radiolabeled products eluded at times corresponding to those of authentic angiotensins. Immunoadsorption of angiotensins with angiotensin antisera removed reputed radiolabeled angiotensins from the supernatants. Treatment of the elution fraction corresponding to that of authentic AI with angiotensin converting enzyme resulted in the generation of radiolabeled polypeptides which co-eluted with authentic AII and His-Leu. Similar experiments conducted with nonadherent granuloma cells devoid of macrophages failed to demonstrate angiotensin production. These results suggest that granuloma macrophages can synthesize angiotensin.

  18. [The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system during the extraction, concentration and reinfusion of ascitic fluid in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Giorcelli, V; Fossale, P G

    1983-01-01

    The course of hepatic cirrhosis involves alterations to the sodium-water balance, the aetiopathogenetic causes of which are still not entirely known. At first major importance was assigned to the role of secondary hyperaldosteronism which develops during the ascitic phase. This was subsequently recognised to have only a permissive rather than determinant function. Changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) system and variations in hydrosaline balance as the extracellular volume (ECV) expands during the reinfusion of concentrated ascitic fluid have been studied. The data reported show that ECV expansion causes increased diuresis, natriuresis and osmolar clearance. The RAA system is suppressed and at the same time kaliuresis increases. The latter factor points up the role played by increased solute flow to the distal tube in the diuretico-metabolic response, where aldosterone plays a purely permissive part. PMID:6675585

  19. Renin-angiotensin system as a potential therapeutic target in stroke and retinopathy: experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Fouda, Abdelrahman Y; Artham, Sandeep; El-Remessy, Azza B; Fagan, Susan C

    2016-02-01

    As our knowledge expands, it is now clear that the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system (RAS) mediates functions other than regulating blood pressure (BP). The RAS plays a central role in the pathophysiology of different neurovascular unit disorders including stroke and retinopathy. Moreover, the beneficial actions of RAS modulation in brain and retina have been documented in experimental research, but not yet exploited clinically. The RAS is a complex system with distinct yet interconnected components. Understanding the different RAS components and their functions under brain and retinal pathological conditions is crucial to reap their benefits. The aim of the present review is to provide an experimental and clinical update on the role of RAS in the pathophysiology and treatment of stroke and retinopathy. Combining the evidence from both these disorders allows a unique opportunity to move both fields forward. PMID:26769658

  20. Renin-Angiotensin System Blockers May Prolong Survival of Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Erlotinib

    PubMed Central

    Aydiner, Adnan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Sen, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to determine whether renin-angiotensin system blockers (RASBs), which include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin-2 receptor 1 blockers (ARBs), improve the overall survival (OS) of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The medical charts of 117 patients with metastatic NSCLC were retrospectively assessed. Thirty-seven patients (RASB group) using RASBs during systemic treatment were compared with 80 controls (control group) who did not use RASBs following the diagnosis of NSCLC. The histological tumor subtype, performance status, age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, other medications, chemotherapeutics (CT), and erlotinib that were received in any line of treatment were recorded. We compared the OS of the patients in the RASB and control groups. The median (±SD) age of the patients was 61 (±1) years and all patients were administered systemic treatment (CT or erlotinib). The patients in RASB group were more likely to be smokers, have hypertension and ischemic heart disease, and use erlotinib, thiazides, beta-blockers, and calcium-channel blockers (P < 0.05 for all) compared with the control group. The median follow-up time was 18.9 months (range 1–102 months) for the entire group. The median follow-up period was longer for RASB group than control group (17 vs 11 months, P = 0.033). The most commonly prescribed RASB agent was valsartan (n = 12/37). At the time of the analysis, 98 (83.7%) of all patients had died. In the univariate analysis, the median OS was longer in the RASB group compared with the control group (17 [±4.1] vs 12 [±1.4] months, P = 0.016). Interestingly, further analyses revealed that RASBs significantly improved OS only if used with erlotinib concurrently (34 [±13.8] vs 25 [±5] months, P = 0.002) and the OS benefit was more attributable to ARBs because only 4 patients received ACEI and erlotinib concurrently. However, the benefit of

  1. Renin-Angiotensin system blockers may prolong survival of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Adnan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Sen, Fatma

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether renin-angiotensin system blockers (RASBs), which include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin-2 receptor 1 blockers (ARBs), improve the overall survival (OS) of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).The medical charts of 117 patients with metastatic NSCLC were retrospectively assessed. Thirty-seven patients (RASB group) using RASBs during systemic treatment were compared with 80 controls (control group) who did not use RASBs following the diagnosis of NSCLC. The histological tumor subtype, performance status, age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, other medications, chemotherapeutics (CT), and erlotinib that were received in any line of treatment were recorded. We compared the OS of the patients in the RASB and control groups.The median (±SD) age of the patients was 61 (±1) years and all patients were administered systemic treatment (CT or erlotinib). The patients in RASB group were more likely to be smokers, have hypertension and ischemic heart disease, and use erlotinib, thiazides, beta-blockers, and calcium-channel blockers (P < 0.05 for all) compared with the control group. The median follow-up time was 18.9 months (range 1-102 months) for the entire group. The median follow-up period was longer for RASB group than control group (17 vs 11 months, P = 0.033). The most commonly prescribed RASB agent was valsartan (n = 12/37). At the time of the analysis, 98 (83.7%) of all patients had died. In the univariate analysis, the median OS was longer in the RASB group compared with the control group (17 [±4.1] vs 12 [±1.4] months, P = 0.016). Interestingly, further analyses revealed that RASBs significantly improved OS only if used with erlotinib concurrently (34 [±13.8] vs 25 [±5] months, P = 0.002) and the OS benefit was more attributable to ARBs because only 4 patients received ACEI and erlotinib concurrently. However, the benefit of ARBs on OS

  2. Blockage of vibrissae afferents: I. Motor effects.

    PubMed

    Prchal, A; Albarracín, A L; Décima, E E

    2004-02-01

    In the past, it has been proposed that the rat vibrissae play an important role in other hand, postural abnormalities, muscle tone decreases and hypomotility after sensory organ destructions were proposed as evidence supporting the "level setting" or "tonic" hypothesis. This hypothesis postulates that afferent activity, besides its well know transductive functions, sets the excitability state of the central nervous system. We thought the vibrissal system to be a good model to dissect these two postulated roles because vibrissae trimming would annul the transductive function without affecting the integrity of nerve activity. Thus we compare the effects of trimming the whiskers with blocking the vibrissal afferent nerves on two types of motor behavior: activity in an open field and walking over a rope connecting two elevated platforms. We found that only vibrissal afferent blockage (both nerve section and local anaesthesia) produced severe failures in the motor performances studied. These effects could not be fully explained by the abolition of the vibrissae as a sensory modality because cutting the whiskers did not significantly affect the motor performance. These data are discussed in reference to a tonic or general excitatory function of sensory inputs upon the central nervous system. PMID:15143620

  3. Autoantibodies to angiotensin and endothelin receptors in systemic sclerosis induce cellular and systemic events associated with disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vasculopathy, inflammatory fibrosis and functional autoantibodies (Abs) are major manifestations of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Abs directed against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and endothelin-1 type A receptor (ETAR) are associated with characteristic disease features including vascular, inflammatory, and fibrotic complications indicating their role in SSc pathogenesis. Therefore, the impact of anti-AT1R and anti-ETAR Abs on initiation of inflammation and fibrosis was analyzed. Methods Anti-AT1R and anti-ETAR Ab-positive immunoglobulin G (IgG) from SSc patients (SSc-IgG) was used for experiments. Healthy donor IgG served as a normal control, and AT1R and ETAR activation was inhibited by antagonists. Protein expression was measured with ELISA, mRNA expression with real time-PCR, endothelial repair with a scratch assay, and collagen expression with immunocytochemistry. Transendothelial neutrophil migration was measured with a culture insert system, and neutrophil ROS activation with immunofluorescence. Neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were analyzed microscopically after passive transfer of SSc-IgG or NC-IgG into naïve C57BL/6J mice. KC plasma levels were quantified by a suspension array system. Histologic analyses were performed by using light microscopy. Results Anti-AT1R and anti-ETAR Ab-positive SSc-IgG induced activation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Elevated protein and mRNA levels of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) and elevated mRNA levels of the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were induced in HMEC-1. Furthermore, activation of HMEC-1 with SSc-IgG increased neutrophil migration through an endothelial cell layer and activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). SSc-IgG decreased HMEC-1 wound repair and induced type I collagen production in healthy donor skin fibroblasts. Effects of migration, wound repair, and collagen expression were dependent on the Ab

  4. The renin-angiotensin system and advanced glycation end-products in diabetic retinopathy: impacts and synergies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Antonia G; Zhu, Tong; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of vision impairment and blindness and represents a significant health burden throughout the world. There is considerable interest in developing new treatments that retard the progression of diabetic retinopathy from its early to proliferative stages. It could be argued that the absence of an ideal therapy for diabetic retinopathy comes from an incomplete understanding about the biochemical mechanisms that underlie this disease, and their precise impact on specific retinal cell populations. Findings from pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that both the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) influence various aspects of diabetic retinopathy. Of interest is growing evidence of cross-talk between the RAS and AGEs pathways. This review will discuss the role of both the RAS and AGEs in diabetic retinopathy, and how the identification of interactions between the two pathways may have implications for the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:23173957

  5. Fixed-Dose Combinations of Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibitors and Calcium Channel Blockers in the Treatment of Hypertension: A Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fu-Chih; Tung, Ying-Chang; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of different regimens are recommended in guidelines for the treatment of hypertension. However, clinical studies comparing FDCs of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker (CCB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitor)/CCB in hypertensive patients are lacking.Using a propensity score matching of 4:1 ratio, this retrospective claims database study compared 2 FDC regimens, ARB/CCB and ACE inhibitor/CCB, in treating hypertensive patients with no known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. All patients were followed for at least 3 years or until the development of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) during the study period. In addition, the effect of medication adherence on clinical outcomes was evaluated in subgroup analysis based on different portions of days covered.There was no significant difference in MACE-free survival (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.50; P = 0.08) and survival free from hospitalization for heart failure (HR: 1.15; 95% CI: 082-1.61; P = 0.431), new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 071-1.36; P = 0.906), and initiation of dialysis (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 050-1.92; P = 0.965) between the 2 study groups. The results remained the same within each subgroup of patients with different adherence statuses.ARBs in FDC regimens with CCBs in the present study were shown to be as effective as ACE inhibitors at reducing the risks of MACEs, hospitalization for heart failure, new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease, and new initiation of dialysis in hypertensive patients, regardless of the medication adherence status. PMID:26705234

  6. Effect of post-myocardial infarction exercise training on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenhan; Powers, Anthony S; Li, Ji; Ji, Lisa; Erikson, John M; Zhang, John Q

    2007-10-01

    After a myocardial infarction (MI), the injured heart undergoes intensive remodeling characterized by activation of the circulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), left ventricular (LV) dilation, and contractile dysfunction. Exercise training may attenuate activation of the RAAS and improve myocardial remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether starting exercise training early or late after MI would have different effect on circulating RAAS and LV dilation and function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) underwent surgically induced MI. After surgery, rats were matched for similar infarct sizes and assigned into two major groups, based on the designated starting time of exercise training. Exercise groups started exercise at either 1 or 6 weeks after MI and exercised on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Groups starting exercise 1 week after MI included sham-operated control (1Wk-Sham), MI-ksedentary (1Wk-MI-Sed), and MI-exercise (1Wk-MI-Ex). Groups starting exercise 6 weeks after MI included sham-operated control (6Wk-Sham), MI-sedentary (6Wk-MI-Sed), and MI-exercise (6Wk-MI-Ex). An echocardiogram was performed before and after exercise training. Blood samples were obtained at the end of experiments. The results showed that compared with sedentary rats with MI, exercise training significantly attenuated circulating renin, angiotensin converting enzyme, angiotensin II, and aldosterone. Rats in exercise groups had similar LV end-diastolic diameters compared with their sedentary counterparts and tended to have smaller LV end-systolic diameters, and percent fractional shortening in exercise rats was significantly higher than in sedentary rats. These findings suggest that exercise training does not cause LV dilation and preserves LV function. Post-MI exercise training also normalizes the circulating RAAS, and this effect is independent of timing of post-MI exercise. Exercise starting early or late after MI affects myocardial remodeling and function

  7. Inflammatory markers in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and the protective role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    ROŞIANU, ŞTEFAN HORIA; ROŞIANU, ADELA-NICOLETA; ALDICA, MIHAI; CĂPÂLNEANU, RADU; BUZOIANU, ANCA DANA

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental and clinical studies have shown the importance of inflammation in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF). The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AF in correlation with the inflammatory process. RAAS inhibition may have important therapeutic value in limiting AF. The aim of this study was the correlation between inflammatory markers and recurrent episodes of AF in patients with known paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, with and without treatment with RAAS inhibitors. Methods and results We studied 82 patients with paroxysmal AF recorded at “Niculae Stancioiu” Heart Institute Cluj-Napoca, divided into two groups: group A treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and group B without this medication. All patients underwent clinical examination, ECG, echocardiography and determination of plasma levels of inflammatory markers represented by high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In the group treated with ACE inhibitors/ARBs, AF burden was significantly lower than in patients without treatment. We obtained a strong positive correlation between blood levels of high-sensitivity CRP and those of IL-6 (r=0.64, p<0.001), the number of yearly AF episodes (r=0.570, p<0.001), LA diameter (r=0.5, p<0.001) and LA volume (r=0.5, p<0.001). We found moderate positive correlations between blood levels of IL-6 and LA diameter (r=0.305, p=0.01), LA volume (r=0.314, p=0.01), the number of yearly AF episodes (r=0.489, p<0.001), the total number of AF episodes (r=0.304, p<0.001), BMI (r=0.473, p<0.001), LA area (r=0.458, p<0.001), LA area index (r=0.334, p=0.007) and LA volume index (r=0.304, p=0.01). The number of yearly AF episodes and BMI values influenced IL-6 blood levels (t=3.46, p=0.001, respectively t=2.17, p=0.03). Conclusions Inflammation is present in patients with AF, with or without treatment with

  8. Correlation of renin angiotensin system (RAS) candidate gene polymorphisms with response to Ramipril in patients with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Chattopadhyaya, I; Agrawal, BK; Sehajpal, PK; Goel, RK

    2015-01-01

    Background: The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important facet of blood pressure regulation physiology. Treatment of essential hypertension targets the RAS using Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEIs). However, ACEIs are not uniformly effective and show inter-individual pharmacodynamic variations. Aim: To assess the correlation between genetic polymorphisms in the genes coding for RAS components (angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE I/D), α-adducin (ADD1) and β1-adrenoreceptor (β1-ADR)) and response to Ramipril. Materials and Methods: We recruited 120 patients with essential hypertension who were administered Ramipril monotherapy initially, followed by combination therapy, if needed, based on their responses. Relationship between genotypes of the three candidate genes and decrease in the blood pressure (BP) was analyzed. Results: One hundred and six patients were evaluable at the end of the study period and 21 different genotypes were observed among them. Seven of them were classified as responders after 8 weeks and at the end of 12 weeks, an additional 77 (72.64%) were deemed responders. 19/22 non-responders were treated with combination therapy and 7/19 (36.84%) showed a response to the same. There was a significant difference between the proportions of responders and non-responders among the genotypes of the ADD1 and β1-ADR genes (P = 0.005 and 0.003, respectively). The best predictors of response to Ramipril 5 mg daily were the II/GG/SS, II/TG/SS, II/GG/SG, ID/GG/SS, ID/GG/SG and ID/TT/SS and DD/GG/SS; II/GG/GG, II/TT/SG, ID/TG/SG, ID/TT/SG, DD/GG/SG and DD/GG/GG were moderately predictive and II/TT/SS, II/TG/GG, ID/TG/GG, DD/TG/SG and DD/TG/GG were poorly predictive of response. Discussion: Variable responses to Ramipril may be the result of genetic factors. Conclusion: Pre-prescription genotyping may help individualize treatment. PMID:25511213

  9. Cardiac angiotensin-(1-12) expression and systemic hypertension in rats expressing the human angiotensinogen gene.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M; VonCannon, Jessica; Jiao, Yan; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Bader, Michael; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Groban, Leanne; Varagic, Jasmina

    2016-04-15

    Angiotensin-(1-12) [ANG-(1-12)] is processed into ANG II by chymase in rodent and human heart tissue. Differences in the amino acid sequence of rat and human ANG-(1-12) render the human angiotensinogen (hAGT) protein refractory to cleavage by renin. We used transgenic rats harboring the hAGT gene [TGR(hAGT)L1623] to assess the non-renin-dependent effects of increased hAGT expression on heart function and arterial pressure. Compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) control rats (n= 11), male homozygous TGR(hAGT)L1623 (n= 9) demonstrated sustained daytime and nighttime hypertension associated with no changes in heart rate but increased heart rate lability. Increased heart weight/tibial length ratio and echocardiographic indexes of cardiac hypertrophy were associated with modest reduction of systolic function in hAGT rats. Robust human ANG-(1-12) immunofluorescence within myocytes of TGR(hAGT)L1623 rats was associated with a fourfold increase in cardiac ANG II content. Chymase enzymatic activity, using the rat or human ANG-(1-12) as a substrate, was not different in the cardiac tissue of SD and hAGT rats. Since both cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities were not different among the two strains, the changes in cardiac structure and function, blood pressure, and left ventricular ANG II content might be a product of an increased cardiac expression of ANG II generated through a non-renin-dependent mechanism. The data also underscore the existence in the rat of alternate enzymes capable of acting on hAGT protein. Homozygous transgenic rats expressing the hAGT gene represent a novel tool to investigate the contribution of human relevant renin-independent cardiac ANG II formation and function. PMID:26873967

  10. Antihypertensive agents acting on the renin–angiotensin system and the risk of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Dial, Sandra; Nessim, Sharon J; Kezouh, Abbas; Benisty, Jacques; Suissa, Samy

    2014-01-01

    Aims In response to safety concerns from two large randomized controlled trials, we investigated whether the use of telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), ARBs as a class and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) increase the risk of sepsis, sepsis-associated mortality and renal failure in hypertensive patients. Methods We performed a nested case–control study from a retrospective cohort of adults with hypertension from the UK General Practice Research Database diagnosed between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2009. All subjects hospitalized with sepsis during follow-up were matched for age, sex, practice and duration of follow-up with 10 control subjects. Exposure was defined as current use of antihypertensive drugs. Results From the cohort of 550 436 hypertensive patients, 1965 were hospitalized with sepsis during follow-up (rate 6.9 per 10 000 per year), of whom 824 died and 346 developed acute renal failure within 30 days. Compared with use of β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers or diuretics, use of ARBs, including telmisartan, was not associated with an elevated risk of sepsis (relative risk 1.09; 95% confidence interval 0.83–1.43); but use ACEIs was (relative risk 1.65; 95% confidence interval 1.42–1.93). Users of ARBs, β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers or diuretics, but not users of ACEIs, had lower rates of hospitalization for sepsis compared with untreated hypertensive patients. Findings were similar for sepsis-related 30 day mortality and renal failure. Conclusions Hypertensive patients treated with ARBs, including telmisartan, do not appear to be at increased risk of sepsis or sepsis-related 30 day mortality or renal failure. On the contrary, users of ACEIs may have an increased risk. PMID:24803383

  11. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system, specifically in the subfornical organ is sufficient to induce fluid intake

    PubMed Central

    Coble, Jeffrey P.; Cassell, Martin D.; Davis, Deborah R.; Grobe, Justin L.

    2014-01-01

    Increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system within the brain elevates fluid intake, blood pressure, and resting metabolic rate. Renin and angiotensinogen are coexpressed within the same cells of the subfornical organ, and the production and action of ANG II through the ANG II type 1 receptor in the subfornical organ (SFO) are necessary for fluid intake due to increased activity of the brain renin-angiotensin system. We generated an inducible model of ANG II production by breeding transgenic mice expressing human renin in neurons controlled by the synapsin promoter with transgenic mice containing a Cre-recombinase-inducible human angiotensinogen construct. Adenoviral delivery of Cre-recombinase causes SFO-selective induction of human angiotensinogen expression. Selective production of ANG II in the SFO results in increased water intake but did not change blood pressure or resting metabolic rate. The increase in water intake was ANG II type 1 receptor-dependent. When given a choice between water and 0.15 M NaCl, these mice increased total fluid and sodium, but not water, because of an increased preference for NaCl. When provided a choice between water and 0.3 M NaCl, the mice exhibited increased fluid, water, and sodium intake, but no change in preference for NaCl. The increase in fluid intake was blocked by an inhibitor of PKC, but not ERK, and was correlated with increased phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein in the subfornical organ. Thus, increased production and action of ANG II specifically in the subfornical organ are sufficient on their own to mediate an increase in drinking through PKC. PMID:24965793

  12. KCNQ1 A340E impairs electrolyte homeostasis independently of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Q; Sang, Y; Sun, C; Li, G; Wang, Y

    2016-01-01

    KCNQ1 (KvLQT1) is the pore-forming a-subunit of the potassium channel. To uncover its role in electrolyte metabolism, we investigated the effects of KCNQ1 A340E, a loss-of-function mutant, on J343 mice. Compared with the normal controls (C57BL/6J mice) bearing the wild-type KCNQ1 gene, J343 mice bearing KCNQ1 A340E demonstrated a much higher 24-h intake of electrolytes (potassium, sodium, and chloride). However, they suffered from significant electrolyte loss through both the feces and urine during a period of 24 h. Unbalance in electrolyte metabolism disrupted the electrolyte homeostasis in the J343 mice, which was characterized by the comparatively lower level of serum potassium (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 12.06 ± 1.47 vs 14.44 ± 3.58 mM, P = 0.01) and higher levels of serum sodium (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 148.05 ± 4.47 vs 115.15 ± 17.25 mM, P = 4.20 x 10(-4)) and chloride (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 118.0 ± 4.47 vs 85.21 ± 11.90 mM, P = 2.47 x 10(-5)). Between the J343 and C57BL/6J mice, there was no statistically significant difference in KCNQ1 expression in the gastrointestinal tract and kidney. Normal concentrations of plasma renin, angiotensin I, and aldosterone were also detected in both lines of mice. KCNQ1, therefore, is suggested to play a central role in electrolyte metabolism. KCNQ1 A340E, with the loss-of-function phenotype, may dysregulate electrolyte homeostasis in mice independently of the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. PMID:27525866

  13. Concomitant inhibition of renin angiotensin system and Toll-like receptor 2 attenuates renal injury in unilateral ureteral obstructed mice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sarah; Jeong, Jin Young; Chang, Yoon Kyung; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki Ryang; Lim, Beom Jin; Lee, Kang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: There has been controversy about the role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in renal injury following ureteric obstruction. Although inhibition of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) reduces TLR2 expression in mice, the exact relationship between TLR2 and RAS is not known. The aim of this study was to determine whether the RAS modulates TLR2. Methods: We used 8-week-old male wild type (WT) and TLR2-knockout (KO) mice on a C57Bl/6 background. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was induced by complete ligation of the left ureter. Angiotensin (Ang) II (1,000 ng/kg/min) and the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren (25 mg/kg/day) were administrated to mice using an osmotic minipump. Molecular and histologic evaluations were performed. Results: Ang II infusion increased mRNA expression of TLR2 in WT mouse kidneys (p < 0.05). The expression of renin mRNA in TLR2-KO UUO kidneys was significantly higher than that in WT UUO kidneys (p < 0.05). There were no differences in tissue injury score or mRNA expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), osteopontin (OPN), or transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) between TLR2-KO UUO and WT UUO kidneys. However, aliskiren decreased the tissue injury score and mRNA expression of TLR2, MCP-1, OPN, and TGF-β in WT UUO kidneys (p < 0.05). Aliskiren-treated TLR2-KO UUO kidneys showed less kidney injury than aliskiren-treated WT UUO kidneys. Conclusions: TLR2 deletion induced activation of the RAS in UUO kidneys. Moreover, inhibition of both RAS and TLR2 had an additive ameliorative effect on UUO injury of the kidney. PMID:26932402

  14. [Does a genetic predisposition for infarction expansion exist? Evaluation of genetic polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system].

    PubMed

    Zedda, N; Onnis, E; Angius, A; Balata, F; Cherchi, P A; Sole, G; Olla, N; Poddie, D; Cao, A; Cherchi, A; Pirastu, M

    1997-03-01

    Aim of this study is to carry out a genetic analysis of polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system in a genetically homogeneous population, in patients with and without myocardial infarction (AMI) expansion and to evaluate the influence of non genetic, mechanical factors. The study was conducted on 299 patients with first AMI. Ecocardiography studies were performed on all patients on day 1 and 3 from the onset of AMI and before discharge. Eighty-four patients were excluded because of inadequate quality of echocardiograms and 215 (163 males, 52 females) were admitted. Of these, 157 had no evidence of AMI expansion (EXP-) while 58 had expansion (EXP+). DNA was extracted by standard methods from blood samples. Age and gender had no influence on AMI expansion. Anterior infarction (p < 0.000001) and Q-wave infarction (p < 0.00002) were found more frequently in EXP+. Peak of creatine phosphokinase was higher in EXP+ than in EXP- (p < 0.00001). The percent of patients treated with thrombolysis or with hypertension and/or left ventricular hypertrophy was not significantly different in the two groups. AGT MT235 polymorphism of angiotensinogen gene, I/D polymorphism of ACE gene and AT1 A1166C of AT1 receptor of angiotensin II were not significantly different in two groups. Stratified analysis showed that in patients with anterior AMI (n = 87), with a higher risk of AMI expansion, there is a significant difference (p < 0.02) in ACE genotype between EXP- and EXP+. Odds ratio assuming the dominant effect of I allele (II+ ID < DD) was 3.35 (confidence interval 1.41-7.56) with increased risk of expansion. More extension studies are need to verify if these results can contribute to early identification of patients at higher risk and to optimize therapeutic approach. PMID:9172934

  15. A systematic review on randomized control trials on rennin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitors role in managing hypertension among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Raja Ahsan; Khan, Amer Hayat; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Jannah, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    Randomized control trials (RCTs) are considered as most rigors way of determining the cause-effect relationship of a treatment and outcome. Activation of rennin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is an important contributor to hypertension in hemodialysis patients. The prevalence of hypertension in hemodialysis patients varies from 60% to 80% and hypertension management alone with conventional hemodialysis is insufficient. Hence, the current review was aimed to investigate the effect of RAAS inhibitors in managing hypertension among hemodialysis patients in a randomized control trial. Using PUBMED and EMBASE databases, randomized control trial with primary or secondary outcomes related to the effect of RAAS inhibitors on blood pressure among hemodialysis patients were included for analysis. The current review also assessed the quality of reporting of RCT. A total of eight RCT met inclusion criteria for current review. According to modified jaded scale, one (12.5%) study scored four points for quality reporting, whereas two (25%) studies scored one point that was the least score. The mean score for all included studies was 2.25. Six (75%) of the eight RCT included, involved ARB in hypertension management among hemodialysis patients, whereas two (25%) studies involved angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Of the siz RCT involving ARB, two (33.3%) RCT also included ACE inhibitors comparison group. Altogether six (75%) studies report a reduction in blood pressure with the use of RAAS inhibitors compared to control group; however, of the six studies, two (33.3%) reported that the reduction in blood pressure was not significant. Whereas, two (25%) studies reported no reduction in blood pressure compared to the control group. The findings from current review do not indicate a clear pattern for a role of RAAS inhibitors for hypertension control among hemodialysis patients. PMID:26853680

  16. Low birth weight activates the renin–angiotensin system, but limits cardiac angiogenesis in early postnatal life

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Brooks, Doug A; Summers-Pearce, Brooke; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Tosh, Darran N; Duffield, Jaime A; Botting, Kimberley J; Zhang, Song; Caroline McMillen, I; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-01-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with increased risk of adult cardiovascular disease and this association may be partly a consequence of early programming of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS). We investigated the effects of LBW on expression of molecules in the RAS and cardiac tissue remodeling. Left ventricular samples were collected from the hearts of 21 days old lambs that were born average birth weight (ABW) and LBW. Cardiac mRNA expression was quantified using real-time RT-PCR and protein expression was quantified using Western blotting. DNA methylation and histone acetylation were assessed by combined bisulfite restriction analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation, respectively. There were increased plasma renin activity, angiotensin I (ANGI), and ANGII concentrations in LBW compared to ABW lambs at day 20. In LBW lambs, there was increased expression of cardiac ACE2 mRNA, decreased ANGII receptor type 1 (AT1R) protein, and acetylation of histone H3K9 of the AT1R promoter but no changes in AT1R mRNA expression and AT1R promoter DNA methylation. There was no difference in the abundance of proteins involved in autophagy or fibrosis. BIRC5 and VEGF mRNA expression was increased; however, the total length of the capillaries was decreased in the hearts of LBW lambs. Activation of the circulating and local cardiac RAS in neonatal LBW lambs may be expected to increase cardiac fibrosis, autophagy, and capillary length. However, we observed only a decrease in total capillary length, suggesting a dysregulation of the RAS in the heart of LBW lambs and this may have significant implications for heart health in later life. PMID:25649246

  17. Low birth weight activates the renin-angiotensin system, but limits cardiac angiogenesis in early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Brooks, Doug A; Summers-Pearce, Brooke; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Tosh, Darran N; Duffield, Jaime A; Botting, Kimberley J; Zhang, Song; Caroline McMillen, I; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-02-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with increased risk of adult cardiovascular disease and this association may be partly a consequence of early programming of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We investigated the effects of LBW on expression of molecules in the RAS and cardiac tissue remodeling. Left ventricular samples were collected from the hearts of 21 days old lambs that were born average birth weight (ABW) and LBW. Cardiac mRNA expression was quantified using real-time RT-PCR and protein expression was quantified using Western blotting. DNA methylation and histone acetylation were assessed by combined bisulfite restriction analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation, respectively. There were increased plasma renin activity, angiotensin I (ANGI), and ANGII concentrations in LBW compared to ABW lambs at day 20. In LBW lambs, there was increased expression of cardiac ACE2 mRNA, decreased ANGII receptor type 1 (AT1R) protein, and acetylation of histone H3K9 of the AT1R promoter but no changes in AT1R mRNA expression and AT1R promoter DNA methylation. There was no difference in the abundance of proteins involved in autophagy or fibrosis. BIRC5 and VEGF mRNA expression was increased; however, the total length of the capillaries was decreased in the hearts of LBW lambs. Activation of the circulating and local cardiac RAS in neonatal LBW lambs may be expected to increase cardiac fibrosis, autophagy, and capillary length. However, we observed only a decrease in total capillary length, suggesting a dysregulation of the RAS in the heart of LBW lambs and this may have significant implications for heart health in later life. PMID:25649246

  18. Sequential activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system in the progression of hypertensive nephropathy in Goldblatt rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Gyun; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Se-Yun; Lee, Arah; Moon, Ju Young; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Lim, Sung Jig; Sohn, Il Suk; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2016-07-01

    The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has an important role in generating and maintaining hypertension in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) rats. This study evaluated how various intrarenal RAS components contributed to hypertension not only in the maintenance period (5w; 5 wk after operation) but also earlier (2w; 2 wk after operation). We inserted a 2.5-mm clip into the left renal artery of Sprague-Dawley rats and euthanized them at 2w and 5w following the operation. Systolic blood pressure increased within 1 wk after the operation, and left ventricular hypertrophy occurred in 2K1C rats. At 2w, juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) and collecting duct (CD) renin increased in clipped kidney (CK) of 2K1C rats. The tubular angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was not changed, but peritubular ACE2 decreased in nonclipped kidney (NCK) and CK of 2K1C rats. At 5w, ACE and CD renin were enhanced, and ACE2 was still lessened in both kidneys of 2K1C rats. However, plasma renin activity (PRA) was not different from that in sham rats. In proximal tubules of CK, the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was not suppressed, but the Mas receptor (MasR) was reduced; thus the AT1R/MasR ratio was elevated. Although hypoxic change in CK could not be excluded, the JGA renin of CK and CD renin in both kidneys was highly expressed independent of time. Peritubular ACE2 changed in the earlier period, and uninhibited AT1R in proximal tubules of CK was presented in the maintenance period. In 2K1C rats, attenuated ACE2 seems to contribute to initiating hypertension while upregulated ACE in combination with unsuppressed AT1R may have a key role in maintaining hypertension. PMID:26823279

  19. Living high training low induces physiological cardiac hypertrophy accompanied by down-regulation and redistribution of the renin-angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Meszaros, J Gary; Zeng, Shao-ju; Sun, Ying-yu; Zuo, Ming-xue

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Living high training low” (LHTL) is an exercise-training protocol that refers living in hypoxia stress and training at normal level of O2. In this study, we investigated whether LHTL caused physiological heart hypertrophy accompanied by changes of biomarkers in renin-angiotensin system in rats. Methods: Adult male SD rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups, and trained on living low-sedentary (LLS, control), living low-training low (LLTL), living high-sedentary (LHS) and living high-training low (LHTL) protocols, respectively, for 4 weeks. Hematological parameters, hemodynamic measurement, heart hypertrophy and plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) level of the rats were measured. The gene and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT) and angiotensin II receptor I (AT1) in heart tissue was assessed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: LLTL, LHS and LHTL significantly improved cardiac function, increased hemoglobin concentration and RBC. At the molecular level, LLTL, LHS and LHTL significantly decreased the expression of ACE, AGT and AT1 genes, but increased the expression of ACE and AT1 proteins in heart tissue. Moreover, ACE and AT1 protein expression was significantly increased in the endocardium, but unchanged in the epicardium. Conclusion: LHTL training protocol suppresses ACE, AGT and AT1 gene expression in heart tissue, but increases ACE and AT1 protein expression specifically in the endocardium, suggesting that the physiological heart hypertrophy induced by LHTL is regulated by region-specific expression of renin-angiotensin system components. PMID:23377552

  20. Angiotensin II Vascular Receptors: Their Avidity in Relationship to Sodium Balance, the Autonomic Nervous System, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Hans R.; Chang, Paul; Wallach, Ronald; Sealey, Jean E.; Laragh, John H.

    1972-01-01

    During intravenous administration of varying doses of angiotensin II antibody to anesthetized rats, apparently specific vascular receptors were characterized. These receptors compete with administered antibody to bind circulating angiotensin. This competitive phenomenon was used to evaluate the affinity of these receptors for angiotensin. Apparent vascular receptor affinity was defined by the amount of antibody required to block the blood pressure response to exogenous angiotensin. It was found that this receptor affinity varies directly with sodium intake so that the amount of antibody required to block was eightfold greater in normal animals on a high sodium intake, as compared with those on a low sodium intake. Sodium dependence of receptors was also demonstrated in nephrectomized animals, in desoxycorticosterone (DOC)-treated rats, and in chronic renal hypertension. Thus the observed changes in receptor affinity were usually inversely related to measured endogenous angiotensin II levels. Ganglionic blockade increased antibody requirement eightfold. All of these changes were consistent, with no overlap observed in response of individual animals from different groups. These results may explain the variation in pressor activity of angiotensin associated with changes in salt balance and ganglionic blockade. In general, when sufficient antibody was injected to block the effect of exogenous angiotensin a blood pressure lowering effect was also observed. Two exceptions were the nephrectomized and the one-kidney renal hypertensive animals, in both of which antibody administration had no effect on blood pressure. Additional results suggest that changes in receptor affinity are involved in the pathogenesis of various types of experimental hypertensions because the amount of antibody required to block angiotensin was enhanced in renal (twofold), DOC (fourfold), and genetic (fourfold) hypertension. Accordingly, changes in the affinity of these receptors could be critically

  1. The renin-angiotensin system: a target of and contributor to dyslipidemias, altered glucose homeostasis, and hypertension of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Cassis, Lisa A

    2012-03-15

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension. Obesity has emerged as a primary contributor to essential hypertension in the United States and clusters with other metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol) defined within the metabolic syndrome. In addition to hypertension, RAS blockade may also serve as an effective treatment strategy to control impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and dyslipidemias in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or specific cholesterol metabolites have been demonstrated to activate components required for the synthesis [angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)], degradation (ACE2), or responsiveness (angiotensin II type 1 receptors, Mas receptors) to angiotensin peptides in cell types (e.g., pancreatic islet cells, adipocytes, macrophages) that mediate specific disorders of the metabolic syndrome. An activated local RAS in these cell types may contribute to dysregulated function by promoting oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. This review will discuss data demonstrating the regulation of components of the RAS by cholesterol and its metabolites, glucose, and/or insulin in cell types implicated in disorders of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss data supporting a role for an activated local RAS in dyslipidemias and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance and the development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome. Identification of an activated RAS as a common thread contributing to several disorders of the metabolic syndrome makes the use of angiotensin receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors an intriguing and novel option for multisymptom treatment. PMID:22227126

  2. Transcription Blockage Leads to New Beginnings

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Lima, Leonardo C.; Veloso, Artur; Ljungman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Environmental agents are constantly challenging cells by damaging DNA, leading to the blockage of transcription elongation. How do cells deal with transcription-blockage and how is transcription restarted after the blocking lesions are removed? Here we review the processes responsible for the removal of transcription-blocking lesions, as well as mechanisms of transcription restart. We also discuss recent data suggesting that blocked RNA polymerases may not resume transcription from the site of the lesion following its removal but, rather, are forced to start over from the beginning of genes. PMID:26197343

  3. Phenotype Standardization of Angioedema in the Head and Neck Region Caused by Agents Acting on the Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Wadelius, M; Marshall, S E; Islander, G; Nordang, L; Karawajczyk, M; Yue, Q-Y; Terreehorst, I; Baranova, E V; Hugosson, S; Sköldefors, K; Pirmohamed, M; Maitland-van der Zee, A-H; Alfirevic, A; Hallberg, P; Palmer, C N A

    2014-01-01

    Angioedema is a potentially life-threatening adverse reaction to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers. To study the genetic etiology of this rare adverse event, international consortia and multicenter recruitment of patients are needed. To reduce patient heterogeneity, we have standardized the phenotype. In brief, it comprises swelling in the head and neck region that first occurs during treatment. It should not coincide with urticaria or have another likely cause such as hereditary angioedema. PMID:24960520

  4. Role of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System beyond Blood Pressure Regulation: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in End-Organ Damage during Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Fuentes, Cristóbal A; Castillo, Andrés E; González-Gómez, Luis Martín; Vecchiola, Andrea; Fardella, Carlos E; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common condition worldwide and an important predictor of several complicated diseases. Arterial hypertension can be triggered by many factors, including physiological, genetic, and lifestyle causes. Specifically, molecules of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system not only play important roles in the control of blood pressure, but they are also associated with the genesis of arterial hypertension, thus constituting a need for pharmacological interventions. Chronic high pressure generates mechanical damage along the vascular system, heart, and kidneys, which are the principal organs affected in this condition. In addition to mechanical stress, hypertension-induced oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and the activation of reparative mechanisms lead to end-organ damage, mainly due to fibrosis. Clinical trials have demonstrated that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system intervention in hypertensive patients lowers morbidity/mortality and inflammatory marker levels as compared to placebo patients, evidencing that this system controls more than blood pressure. This review emphasizes the detrimental effects that a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) imbalance has on health considerations above and beyond high blood pressure, such as fibrotic end-organ damage. PMID:27347925

  5. Role of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System beyond Blood Pressure Regulation: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in End-Organ Damage during Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Fuentes, Cristóbal A.; Castillo, Andrés E.; González-Gómez, Luis Martín; Vecchiola, Andrea; Fardella, Carlos E.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common condition worldwide and an important predictor of several complicated diseases. Arterial hypertension can be triggered by many factors, including physiological, genetic, and lifestyle causes. Specifically, molecules of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system not only play important roles in the control of blood pressure, but they are also associated with the genesis of arterial hypertension, thus constituting a need for pharmacological interventions. Chronic high pressure generates mechanical damage along the vascular system, heart, and kidneys, which are the principal organs affected in this condition. In addition to mechanical stress, hypertension-induced oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and the activation of reparative mechanisms lead to end-organ damage, mainly due to fibrosis. Clinical trials have demonstrated that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system intervention in hypertensive patients lowers morbidity/mortality and inflammatory marker levels as compared to placebo patients, evidencing that this system controls more than blood pressure. This review emphasizes the detrimental effects that a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) imbalance has on health considerations above and beyond high blood pressure, such as fibrotic end-organ damage. PMID:27347925

  6. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  7. Regulation of hypothalamic renin-angiotensin system and oxidative stress by aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bing S; Zheng, Hong; Tan, Junhui; Patel, Kaushik P; Leenen, Frans HH

    2011-01-01

    In rats with salt-induced hypertension or post myocardial infarction (MI), AT1 receptor (AT1R) densities and oxidative stress increase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) levels decrease in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The present study was designed to determine whether these changes may depend on activation of the aldosterone – “ouabain” neuromodulatory pathway. After intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of aldosterone (20ng/h) for 14 days, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded in conscious Wistar rats, and mRNA and protein for nNOS, endothelial NOS (eNOS), AT1R and NADPH oxidase subunits were assessed in brain tissue. BP and HR were significantly increased by aldosterone. Aldosterone significantly increased mRNA and protein of AT1R, P22phox, P47phox, P67phox and Nox2, and decreased nNOS but not eNOS mRNA and protein in the PVN, and increased angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and AT1R binding densities in the PVN and SON. The increases in BP and HR as well as changes in mRNA, proteins and ACE and AT1R binding densities were all largely prevented by concomitant icv infusion of Digibind (to bind “ouabain”) or benzamil (to block presumably epithelial sodium channels). These data indicate that aldosterone via “ouabain” increases in the PVN ACE, AT1R and oxidative stress but decreases nNOS, and suggest that endogenous aldosterone may cause this similar pattern of changes observed in salt sensitive hypertension and heart failure post MI. PMID:21824999

  8. Angiotensin and insulin resistance: conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R

    2003-04-01

    Resistance to the metabolic effects of insulin is a contender for the short list of major cardiovascular risk factors. Since the elements of the syndrome of insulin resistance were first articulated together in 1988, numerous epidemiologic investigations and treatment endeavors have established a relationship between the metabolic disarray of impaired insulin action and cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II, the primary effector of the renin-angiotensin system, has also achieved a place in the chronicles of cardiovascular risk factors. Conspiracy mechanisms by which angiotensin II and insulin resistance interact in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease are reviewed, with particular attention to recent developments in this engaging area of human research. PMID:12642009

  9. Acute Total and Chronic Partial Sleep Deprivation: Effects on Neurobehavioral Functions, Waking EEG and Renin-Angiotensin System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan

    1999-01-01

    protocol of the Quantitative EEG and Waking Neurobehavioral Function project. This will allow us to investigate two additional specific aims: 1) Test the hypothesis that chronic partial sleep deprivation during a 17 day bed rest experiment results in deterioration of neurobehavioral function during waking and increases in EEG power density in the theta frequencies, especially in frontal areas of the brain, as well as the nonREM- REM cycle dependent modulation of heart-rate variability. 2) Test the hypothesis that acute total sleep deprivation modifies the circadian rhythm of the renin-angiotensin system, changes the acute responsiveness of this system to posture beyond what a microgravity environment alone does and affects the nonREM-REM cycle dependent modulation of heart-rate variability.

  10. Reversal of cardiac fibrosis in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats by inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Duce, B; Miric, G; Sernia, C

    1999-01-01

    Fibrosis impairs cardiac function. This project has determined the expression and deposition of collagens and fibronectin and cardiac function in the deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rat after inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. DOCA-salt hypertension was induced in 8-wk-old male Wistar rats by uninephrectomy and administration of DOCA (25 mg every fourth day, subcutaneously) and 1% NaCl in the drinking water for 4 wk. Starting 2 wk after surgery, rats were given either oral captopril (100 mg/kg), oral candesartan cilexetil (2 mg/kg), or subcutaneous spironolactone (50 mg/kg) daily for 2 wk (reversal protocol). DOCA-salt rats failed to gain weight with markedly increased water intake and decreased food intake; drug treatment did not alter these parameters. Systolic BP increased from 116+/-5 mmHg in uninephrectomized rats to 179+/-7 mmHg in DOCA-salt rats and was not decreased by treatment (captopril 172+/-1 mmHg; candesartan 187+/-2 mmHg; spironolactone 178+/-3 mmHg). Captopril, candesartan, and spironolactone reversed the increased collagen I mRNA in DOCA-salt rats; only candesartan reversed the increased collagen III mRNA. Collagen IV mRNA was unchanged in DOCA-salt rats and following treatment. Total fibronectin mRNA increased without changing the proportion of fibronectin mRNA as the fetal isoforms EIIIA and EIIIB. Captopril, candesartan, and spironolactone reversed the increased deposition of perivascular and interstitial collagen in DOCA-salt rats; the increased cardiac fibronectin deposition was reversed by candesartan and spironolactone. Captopril, candesartan, and spironolactone also attenuated or reversed the increased diastolic stiffness and the increased dP/dt but not the increased rate-pressure products in DOCA-salt rat hearts. Thus, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system reverses cardiac fibrosis in DOCA-salt rats and returns some indices of myocardial function to normal. PMID:9892155

  11. High fat diet exacerbates neuroinflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis by activation of the Renin Angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Silke; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Vanmierlo, Tim; Lütjohann, Dieter; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2014-03-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a positive correlation between the incidence and severity of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the intake of fatty acids. It remains to be clarified whether high fat diet (HFD) indeed can exacerbate the disease pathology associated with MS and what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we determined the influence of HFD on the severity and pathology of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Mice were fed either normal diet (ND) or HFD and subsequently induced with EAE. Immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR were used to determine immune cell infiltration and inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system (CNS). Our data show that HFD increases immune cell infiltration and inflammatory mediator production in the CNS and thereby aggravates EAE. Moreover, our data demonstrate that activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) is associated with the HFD-mediated effects on EAE severity. These results show that HFD exacerbates an autoreactive immune response within the CNS. This indicates that diets containing excess fat have a significant influence on neuroinflammation in EAE, which may have important implications for the treatment and prevention of neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:24068577

  12. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  13. Common angiotensin receptor blockers may directly modulate the immune system via VDR, PPAR and CCR2b

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Trevor G; Lee, Robert E; Marshall, Frances E

    2006-01-01

    Background There have been indications that common Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) may be exerting anti-inflammatory actions by directly modulating the immune system. We decided to use molecular modelling to rapidly assess which of the potential targets might justify the expense of detailed laboratory validation. We first studied the VDR nuclear receptor, which is activated by the secosteroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. This receptor mediates the expression of regulators as ubiquitous as GnRH (Gonadatrophin hormone releasing hormone) and the Parathyroid Hormone (PTH). Additionally we examined Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARgamma), which affects the function of phagocytic cells, and the C-CChemokine Receptor, type 2b, (CCR2b), which recruits monocytes to the site of inflammatory immune challenge. Results Telmisartan was predicted to strongly antagonize (Ki≈0.04nmol) the VDR. The ARBs Olmesartan, Irbesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈10 nmol) are likely to be useful VDR antagonists at typical in-vivo concentrations. Candesartan (Ki≈30 nmol) and Losartan (Ki≈70 nmol) may also usefully inhibit the VDR. Telmisartan is a strong modulator of PPARgamma (Ki≈0.3 nmol), while Losartan (Ki≈3 nmol), Irbesartan (Ki≈6 nmol), Olmesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈12 nmol) also seem likely to have significant PPAR modulatory activity. Olmesartan andIrbesartan (Ki≈9 nmol) additionally act as antagonists of a theoretical modelof CCR2b. Initial validation of this CCR2b model was performed, and a proposed model for the AngiotensinII Type1 receptor (AT2R1) has been presented. Conclusion Molecular modeling has proven valuable to generate testable hypotheses concerning receptor/ligand binding and is an important tool in drug design. ARBs were designed to act as antagonists for AT2R1, and it was not surprising to discover their affinity for the structurally similar CCR2b. However, this study also found evidence that ARBs modulate the activation of two key

  14. Proopiomelanocortin but not vasopressin or renin-angiotensin system induces resuscitative effects of central 5-HT1A activation in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Sowa, P; Adamczyk-Sowa, M; Zwirska-Korczala, K; Pierzchala, K; Adamczyk, D; Paluch, Z; Misiolek, M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectory mechanisms: vasopressin, renin-angiotensin system and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides (POMC), partaking in the effects of serotonin through central serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) receptors in haemorrhagic shock in rats. The study was conducted on male Wistar rats. All experimental procedures were carried out under full anaesthesia. The principal experiment included a 2 hour observation period in haemorrhagic shock. Drugs used - a selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (5 μg/5 μl); V1a receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β, β-cyclo-pentamethylenepropionyl(1),O-me-Tyr(2),Arg(8)]AVP (10 μg/kg); angiotensin type I receptor antagonist (AT1) ZD7155 (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.); angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril (30 mg/kg, i.v.); melanocortin type 4 (MC4) receptor antagonist HS014 (5 μg, i.c.v.). There was no influence of ZD715, captopril or blocking of the V1a receptors on changes in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), peripheral blood flow or resistance caused by the central stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors (P≥0.05). However, selective blocking of central MC4 receptors caused a slight, but significant decrease in HR and MAP (P<0.05). POMC derivatives acting via the central MC4 receptor participate in the resuscitative effects of 8-OH-DPAT. The angiotensin and vasopressin systems do not participate in these actions. PMID:25371525

  15. Infant Emotional and Cortisol Responses to Goal Blockage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael; Ramsay, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relation of infant emotional responses of anger and sadness to cortisol response in 2 goal blockage situations. One goal blockage with 4-month-old infants (N=56) involved a contingency learning procedure where infants' learned response was no longer effective in reinstating an event. The other goal blockage with 6-month-old…

  16. Study of prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves

    PubMed Central

    Bhadoo, Divya; Bajpai, M.; Abid, Ali; Sukanya, Gayan; Agarwala, Sandeep; Srinivas, M.; Deka, Deepika; Agarwal, Nutan; Agarwal, Ramesh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Study on prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves. Materials and Methods: Antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis patients were included. Postnatally, they were divided into two groups, posterior urethral valve (PUV) and non-PUV. The studied parameters were: Gestational age at detection, surgical intervention, ultrasound findings, cord blood and follow up plasma renin activity (PRA) values, vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR), renal scars, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Results: A total of 25 patients were included, 10 PUV and 15 non-PUV. All infants with PUV underwent primary valve incision. GFR was less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 body surface area in 4 patients at last follow-up. Keyhole sign, oligoamnios, absent bladder cycling, and cortical cysts were not consistent findings on antenatal ultrasound in PUV. Cord blood PRA was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in PUV compared to non-PUV patients. Gestational age at detection of hydronephrosis, cortical cysts, bladder wall thickness, and amniotic fluid index were not significantly correlated with GFR while PRA could differentiate between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV. Conclusions: Ultrasound was neither uniformly useful in diagnosing PUV antenatally, nor differentiating it from cases with non-PUV hydronephrosis. In congenital hydronephrosis, cord blood PRA was significantly higher in cases with PUV compared to non-PUV cases and fell significantly after valve ablation. Cord blood PRA could distinguish between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV. PMID:25829668

  17. The Beneficial Effect of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade in Marfan Syndrome Patients after Aortic Root Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Oh, Jaewon; Ko, Young-Guk; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung-Chul; Lee, Do Yun; Kwak, Young-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we evaluated the long term beneficial effect of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) blockade therapy in treatment of Marfan aortopathy. Materials and Methods We reviewed Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients who underwent aortic root replacement (ARR) between January 1996 and January 2011. All patients were prescribed β-blockers indefinitely. We compared major aortic events including mortality, aortic dissection, and reoperation in patients without RAAS blockade (group 1, n=27) to those with (group 2, n=63). The aortic growth rate was calculated by dividing the diameter change on CT scans taken immediately post-operatively and the latest scan available. Results There were no differences in clinical parameters except for age which was higher in patients with RAAS blockade. In group 1, 2 (7%) deaths, 5 (19%) aortic dissections, and 7 (26%) reoperations occurred. In group 2, 3 (5%) deaths, 2 (3%) aortic dissections, and 3 (5%) reoperations occurred. A Kaplan-Meier plot demonstrated improved survival free from major aortic events in group 2. On multivariate Cox, RAAS blockade was an independent negative predictor of major aortic events (hazard ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.30-0.43, p=0.002). Mean diameter change in descending thoracic and supra-renal abdominal aorta was significantly higher in patients without RAAS blockade (p<0.05). Conclusion In MFS patients who underwent ARR, the addition of RAAS blockade to β-blocker was associated with reduction of aortic dilatation and clinical events. PMID:26632386

  18. Molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation of the renin-angiotensin system genes in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858): differential gene regulation by salinity.

    PubMed

    Armesto, Paula; Cousin, Xavier; Salas-Leiton, Emilio; Asensio, Esther; Manchado, Manuel; Infante, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the complete cDNA sequence encoding angiotensinogen (agt) in the euryhaline flatfish Senegalese sole was obtained. Additionally, putative coding sequences belonging to other renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genes including renin (ren), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ace), angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ace2), as well as angiotensin II receptor type I (agtr1) and type II (agtr2), were also identified. In juvenile tissues, agt transcripts were mainly detected in liver, ren in kidney, ace and ace2 in intestine, agtr1 in kidney and brain, and agtr2 in liver and kidney. Expression analysis of the six RAS genes after a salinity shift revealed a clear increase of agt mRNA abundance in liver just after transferring soles to high salinity water (60 ppt) with a peak at 48 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis in gills showed transcriptional regulation of ace and agtr1 at 48 h and agtr2 at 96 h after transferring soles to 60 ppt. Incubation of larvae before mouth opening (until 3 days post hatch; dph) at low salinity (10 ppt) resulted in a coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of RAS genes. Nevertheless, no differences in mRNA abundance between salinities were observed when larvae were cultivated to low salinity after mouth opening. Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) signal for agt and ace in 3 dph larvae incubated at 10 ppt and 35 ppt confirmed that the former gene was mainly expressed in liver whereas the later gene was mainly located in pharynx and posterior gut, without pronounced differences in intensity between salinities. Possible physiological significance of all these results is discussed. PMID:25645294

  19. Role of chymase in the local renin-angiotensin system in keloids: inhibition of chymase may be an effective therapeutic approach to treat keloids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ru; Chen, Junjie; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background Histologically, keloids contain excess fibroblasts and an overabundance of dermal collagen. Recently, it was reported that chymase induced a profibrotic response via transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/Smad activation in keloid fibroblasts (KFs). However, the role of chymase in the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in keloids has not been elucidated. This study aims to determine whether chymase plays an important role in the local RAS in keloids. Methods We compared the expression and activity of chymase in keloids and normal skin tissues using Western blotting and radioimmunoassay, and studied the expression of TGF-β1, interleukin-1β, collagen I, hydroxyproline, and angiotensin II in KFs after chymase and inhibitors’ treatment. Results The results revealed an increased activity of chymase in keloid tissues, and that chymase enhanced the expression of angiotensin II, collagen I, TGF-β1, and interleukin-1β in KFs. Blockade of the chymase pathway involved in the local RAS lowered the expression of these signaling factors. Conclusion This research suggests that inhibition of chymase might be an effective therapeutic approach to improve the clinical treatment of keloids. PMID:26357464

  20. Combination use of medicines from two classes of renin–angiotensin system blocking agents: risk of hyperkalemia, hypotension, and impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Esteras, Raquel; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; Rodriguez-Osorio, Laura; Ortiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    European and United States regulatory agencies recently issued warnings against the use of dual renin–angiotensin system (RAS) blockade therapy through the combined use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) or aliskiren in any patient, based on absence of benefit for most patients and increased risk of hyperkalemia, hypotension, and renal failure. Special emphasis was made not to use these combinations in patients with diabetic nephropathy. The door was left open to therapy individualization, especially for patients with heart failure, when the combined use of an ARB and ACEI is considered absolutely essential, although renal function, electrolytes and blood pressure should be closely monitored. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists were not affected by this warning despite increased risk of hyperkalemia. We now critically review the risks associated with dual RAS blockade and answer the following questions: What safety issues are associated with dual RAS blockade? Can the safety record of dual RAS blockade be improved? Is it worth trying to improve the safety record of dual RAS blockade based on the potential benefits of the combination? Is dual RAS blockade dead? What is the role of mineralocorticoid antagonists in combination with other RAS blocking agents: RAAS blockade? PMID:26301070

  1. Angiotensin 2 directly increases rabbit renal brush-border membrane sodium transport: Presence of local signal transduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Morduchowicz, G.A.; Sheikh-Hamad, D.; Dwyer, B.E.; Stern, N.; Jo, O.D.; Yanagawa, N. )

    1991-05-01

    In the present study, the authors have examined the direct actions of angiotensin II (AII) in rabbit renal brush border membrane (BBM) where binding sites for AII exist. Addition of AII (10(-11)-10(-7) M) was found to stimulate 22Na+ uptake by the isolated BBM vesicles directly. All did not affect the Na(+)-dependent BBM glucose uptake, and the effect of AII on BBM 22Na+ uptake was inhibited by amiloride, suggesting the involvement of Na+/H+ exchange mechanism. BBM proton permeability as assessed by acridine orange quenching was not affected by AII, indicating the direct effect of AII on Na+/H+ antiport system. In search of the signal transduction mechanism, it was found that AII activated BBM phospholipase A2 (PLA) and that BBM contains a 42-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G-protein) that underwent pertussis toxin (PTX)-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Addition of GTP potentiated, while GDP-beta S or PTX abolished, the effects of AII on BBM PLA and 22Na+ uptake, suggesting the involvement of G-protein in AII's actions. On the other hand, inhibition of PLA by mepacrine prevented AII's effect on BBM 22Na+ uptake, and activation of PLA by mellitin or addition of arachidonic acid similarly enhanced BBM 22Na+ uptake, suggesting the role of PLA activation in mediating AII's effect on BBM 22Na+ uptake. In summary, results of the present study show a direct stimulatory effect of AII on BBM Na+/H+ antiport system, and suggest the presence of a local signal transduction system involving G-protein mediated PLA activation.

  2. Glial high-affinity binding site with specificity for angiotensin II not angiotensin III: a possible N-terminal-specific converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Printz, M.P.; Jennings, C.; Healy, D.P.; Kalter, V.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous binding properties of angiotensin II to fetal rat brain primary cultures suggested a possible contribution from contaminating glia. To investigate this possibility, cultures of C6 glioma, a clonal rat cell line, were examined for the presence of angiotensin II receptors. A specific high-affinity site for (/sup 125/I)angiotensin II was measured both by traditional methodology using whole cells and by autoradiography. This site shared properties similar to that found with the brain cells, namely low ligand internalization and markedly decreased affinity for N-terminal sarcosine or arginine-angiotensin analogs. The competition rank order was angiotensin II much greater than (Sar1,Ile8)angiotensin II greater than or equal to des(Asp1,Arg2)angiotensin II. Angiotensin III did not compete for binding to the site. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the ligand either in the incubation or bound to the site was stable at 15 degrees C, but there was very rapid and extensive degradation by the C6 glioma cells at 37 degrees C. It is concluded that the site exhibits unusual N-terminal specificity for angiotensin with nanomolar affinity for angiotensin II. If angiotensin III is an active ligand in the brain, the site may have a converting enzyme function. Alternatively, it may form the des-Asp derivatives of angiotensin for subsequent degradation by other enzymatic pathways. Either way, it is proposed that the site may modulate the brain-angiotensin system.

  3. Activation of systemic, but not local, renin-angiotensin system is associated with upregulation of TNF-α during prolonged fasting in northern elephant seal pups.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-09-01

    Northern elephant seal pups naturally endure a 2-3 month post-weaning fast that is associated with activation of systemic renin-angiotensin system (RAS), a decrease in plasma adiponectin (Acrp30), and insulin resistance (IR)-like conditions. Angiotensin II (Ang II) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are potential causal factors of IR, while Acrp30 may improve insulin signaling. However, the effects of fasting-induced activation of RAS on IR-like conditions in seals are not well described. To assess the effects of prolonged food deprivation on systemic and local RAS, and their potential contribution to TNF-α as they relate to an IR condition, the mRNA expressions of adipose and muscle RAS components and immuno-relevant molecules were measured along with plasma RAS components. Mean plasma renin activity and Ang II concentrations increased by 89 and 1658%, respectively, while plasma angiotensinogen (AGT) decreased by 49% over the fast, indicative of systemic RAS activation. Prolonged fasting was associated with decreases in adipose and muscle AGT mRNA expressions of 69 and 68%, respectively, corresponding with decreases in tissue protein content, suggesting suppression of local AGT production. Muscle TNF-α mRNA and protein increased by 239 and 314%, whereas those of adipose Acrp30 decreased by 32 and 98%, respectively. Collectively, this study suggests that prolonged fasting activates a systemic RAS, which contributes to an increase in muscle TNF-α and suppression of adipose Acrp30. This targeted and tissue-specific regulation of TNF-α and Acrp30 is likely coordinated to synergistically contribute to the development of an IR-like condition, independent of local RAS activity. These data enhance our understanding of the adaptive mechanisms evolved by elephant seals to tolerate potentially detrimental conditions. PMID:23685967

  4. Physiological regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines expression in rat cardiovascular tissues by sympathetic nervous system and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Dab, Houcine; Hachani, Rafik; Sakly, Mohsen; Bricca, Giampiero; Kacem, Kamel

    2013-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines regulation by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) was widely described in cardiovascular system, but the role of such neuro-humoral interaction needs further investigation in this context. We tested SNS-ANG II interaction on IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in left ventricle and aorta from normotensive rats by sympathectomy with guanethidine and blockade of the ANG II AT1 receptors (AT1R) antagonist with losartan. mRNA synthesis of IL-6 and TNF-α were performed by Q-RT-PCR. In the left ventricle, IL-6 mRNA increased by 63% (p < 0.01) after sympathectomy, still unchanged after losartan treatment and decreased by 38% (p < 0.05) after combined treatment. TNF-α mRNA decreased by 44% (p < 0.01), only after combined treatment. In the aorta, IL-6 mRNA increased equally by 65% (p < 0.05) after sympathectomy or losartan treatment. TNF-α mRNA decreased by 28, 41, and 42% (p < 0.05) after sympathectomy, losartan and combined treatments, respectively. Our data suggest that ANG II stimulates directly (via AT1R) and indirectly (via SNS) IL-6 mRNA synthesis in left ventricle and aorta and TNF-α mRNA in left ventricle. ANG II seems unable to influence directly TNF-α mRNA synthesis in the aorta but can stimulate this cytokine via SNS. The results are relevant to prevent or reduce proinflammatory cytokines overexpression seen in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23846262

  5. The role of renin-angiotensin system in cellular differentiation: implications in pancreatic islet cell development and islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Leung, Po Sing

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the well-characterized circulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS), local RAS has been identified recently in diverse tissues and organs. The presence of key components of the RAS in local tissues is important for our understanding of the patho-physiological mechanism(s) of several metabolic diseases, and may serve as a major therapeutic target for cardiometabolic syndromes. Locally generated and physiologically active RAS components have functions that are distinct from the classical vasoconstriction and fluid homeostasis actions of systemic RAS and cater specifically for local tissues. Local RAS can affect islet-cell function and structure in the adult pancreas as well as proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells during development. Differentiation of stem/progenitor cells into insulin-expressing cells suitable for therapeutic transplantation offers a desperately needed new approach for replacement of glucose-responsive insulin producing cells in diabetic patients. Given that the generation of functional and transplantable islet cells has proven to be difficult, elucidation of RAS involvement in cellular regeneration and differentiation may propel pancreatic stem/progenitor cell development and thus β-cell regeneration forward. This review provides a critical appraisal of current research progress on the role of the RAS, including the newly characterized ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells. It is thus plausible to propose that the AT1 stimulation could be a repair mechanism involving the AT2R as well as the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in directing β-cell development in diabetic patients using genetic and pharmaceutical manipulation of the RAS. PMID:23994025

  6. Mechanisms responsible for postmenopausal hypertension in a rat model: Roles of the renal sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Maranon, Rodrigo O; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in postmenopausal women is less well controlled than in age-matched men. The aging female SHR is a model of postmenopausal hypertension that is mediated in part by activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and by the renal sympathetic nervous system. In this study, the hypothesis was tested that renal denervation would lower the blood pressure in old female SHR and would attenuate the antihypertensive effects of AT1 receptor antagonism. Retired breeder female SHR were subjected to right uninephrectomy (UNX) and left renal denervation (RD) or UNX and sham, and 2 weeks later, baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP; radiotelemetry) was measured for 4 days, and then rats were treated with angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonist, losartan (40 mg/kg/day po) for 6 days. Renal denervation reduced MAP in old females compared to sham (172 ± 6 vs. 193 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05). Losartan reduced MAP in both sham and RD rats similarly (numerically and by percentage) (142 ± 10 vs. 161 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05 vs. RD, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). However, female SHR rats remained significantly hypertensive despite both pharmacological intervention and RD. The data suggest that both the renal sympathetic nervous system and the RAS have independent effects to control the blood pressure in old female SHR. Since the denervated rats treated with losartan remained hypertensive, the data also suggest that other mechanisms than the RAS and renal sympathetic nervous system contribute to the hypertension in old female SHR. The data also suggest that multiple mechanisms may mediate the elevated blood pressure in postmenopausal women. PMID:26811052

  7. Aldosterone, Parathyroid Hormone, and the Use of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Inhibitors: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer; de Boer, Ian H.; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Siscovick, David S.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Allison, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Context: Aldosterone and PTH are implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and skeletal diseases. An expanding body of evidence supports a bidirectional and positive physiologic relationship between aldosterone and PTH. Large population-based studies confirming this relationship, and whether it may be targeted as a potential method to mitigate the clinical consequences associated with excess aldosterone and PTH, are needed. Objective: We hypothesized that higher aldosterone levels would associate with higher PTH, and that the use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors would predict lower PTH in a large, multi-ethnic, community-based cohort. Design, Setting, Participants: We conducted cross-sectional analyses of participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis without apparent primary hyperparathyroidism or chronic kidney disease (n = 5668). We evaluated associations of RAAS inhibitor use with PTH concentration among 1888 treated hypertensive participants. We also tested associations of serum aldosterone concentration with PTH concentration among 1547 participants with these measurements. Outcome: Serum PTH concentration. Results: Higher aldosterone associated with higher PTH (β = 0.19 pg/ml per 1 ng/dl of aldosterone, P < .0001), and this finding was most pronounced among those with a primary hyperaldosteronism-like phenotype. There was a stepwise increment in PTH when comparing untreated normotensives, hypertensives using RAAS inhibitors, untreated hypertensives, and treated hypertensives using non-RAAS inhibitors (40.8, 45.0, 46.2, 47.1 pg/ml, respectively). The use of any RAAS inhibitor independently associated with lower PTH (β = −2.327 pg/ml per use of RAAS inhibitor, P = .006), when compared with the use of any non-RAAS inhibitor medication. Conclusions: Higher serum aldosterone concentration is associated with higher serum PTH concentration, and the use of RAAS inhibitors is associated with lower PTH concentration

  8. The Effect of Renin-angiotensin System Inhibitors on Kidney Allograft Survival: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Mao, Michael A.; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Sathick, Insara J. J.; Erickson, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors in patients with chronic kidney disease, and especially in diabetic kidney disease, has been shown to provide renoprotective effects and slow progression to end-stage renal disease. However, this protective effect in kidney transplant patient populations is unclear. Aim: The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of RAS inhibitors on kidney allograft survival. Materials and Methods: A literature search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed from inception through February 2016. Studies that reported relative risks or hazard ratios comparing the risks of renal graft loss in renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors vs. controls were included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Results: Five studies (3 RCTs and 2 cohort studies) with 20024 kidney transplant patients were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled RR of allograft failure in recipients who received RAS inhibitors was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.45–1.21). When meta-analysis was limited only to RCTs, the pooled RR of allograft failure in patients using RAS inhibitors was 0.59 (95%: CI 0.20–1.69). The risk for mortality (RR: 1.13 [95% CI: 0.62–2.07]) in patients using RAS inhibitors compared to controls was not significantly reduced. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated insignificant reduced risks of renal graft loss among renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors. Future studies assessing the potential benefits of RAS inhibitors on allograft survival in specific kidney transplant patient populations are needed. PMID:27583237

  9. Targeting the Renin–Angiotensin System Combined With an Antioxidant Is Highly Effective in Mitigating Radiation-Induced Lung Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Javed; Jelveh, Salomeh; Zaidi, Asif; Doctrow, Susan R.; Medhora, Meetha; Hill, Richard P.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome of suppression of the renin angiotensin system using captopril combined with an antioxidant (Eukarion [EUK]-207) for mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Methods and Materials: The thoracic cavity of female Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated with a single dose of 11 Gy. Treatment with captopril at a dose of 40 mg/kg/d in drinking water and EUK-207 given by subcutaneous injection (8 mg/kg daily) was started 1 week after irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 weeks PI. Breathing rate was monitored until the rats were killed at 32 weeks PI, when lung fibrosis was assessed by lung hydroxyproline content. Lung levels of the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 and macrophage activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels, and lipid peroxidation was measured by a T-BARS assay. Results: The increase in breathing rate in the irradiated rats was significantly reduced by the drug treatments. The drug treatment also significantly decreased the hydroxyproline content, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde levels, and levels of activated macrophages and the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 at 32 weeks. Almost complete mitigation of these radiation effects was observed by combining captopril and EUK-207. Conclusion: Captopril and EUK-207 can provide mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 32 weeks PI after treatment given 1-14 weeks PI. Overall the combination of captopril and EUK-207 was more effective than the individual drugs used alone.

  10. Exacerbation of acute kidney injury by bone marrow stromal cells from rats with persistent renin-angiotensin system activation.

    PubMed

    Kankuri, Esko; Mervaala, Elina E; Storvik, Markus; Ahola, Aija M J; Levijoki, Jouko; Müller, Dominik N; Finckenberg, Piet; Mervaala, Eero M

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension and persistent activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are predisposing factors for the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). Although bone-marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown therapeutic promise in treatment of AKI, the impact of pathological RAS on BMSC functionality has remained unresolved. RAS and its local components in the bone marrow are involved in several key steps of cell maturation processes. This may also render the BMSC population vulnerable to alterations even in the early phases of RAS pathology. We isolated transgenic BMSCs (TG-BMSCs) from young end-organ-disease-free rats with increased RAS activation [human angiotensinogen/renin double transgenic rats (dTGRs)] that eventually develop hypertension and die of end-organ damage and kidney failure at 8 weeks of age. Control cells (SD-BMSCs) were isolated from wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats. Cell phenotype, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and respiration were assessed, and gene expression profiling was carried out using microarrays. Cells' therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in a rat model of acute ischaemia/reperfusion-induced AKI. Serum urea and creatinine were measured at 24 h and 48 h. Acute tubular damage was scored and immunohistochemistry was used for evaluation for markers of inflammation [monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), ED-1], and kidney injury [kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)]. TG-BMSCs showed distinct mitochondrial morphology, decreased cell respiration and increased production of ROS. Gene expression profiling revealed a pronounced pro-inflammatory phenotype. In contrast with the therapeutic effect of SD-BMSCs, administration of TG-BMSCs in the AKI model resulted in exacerbation of kidney injury and high mortality. Our results demonstrate that early persistent RAS activation can dramatically compromise therapeutic potential of BMSCs by causing a shift into a pro