Science.gov

Sample records for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-enhanced

  1. Angiotensin converting enzyme of Thalassophryne nattereri venom.

    PubMed

    da Costa Marques, Maria Elizabeth; de Araújo Tenório, Humberto; Dos Santos, Claudio Wilian Victor; Dos Santos, Daniel Moreira; de Lima, Maria Elena; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Animal venoms are complex mixtures, including peptides, proteins (i.e., enzymes), and other compounds produced by animals in predation, digestion, and defense. These molecules have been investigated regarding their molecular mechanisms associated with physiological action and possible pharmacological applications. Recently, we have described the presence of a type of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri. It is a zinc-dependent peptidase with a wide range of effects. By removing dipeptide His-Leu from terminal C, the ACE converts angiotensinI (AngI) into angiotensin II (AngII) and inactivates bradykinin, there by regulating blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. The fractionation of T. nattereri venom in CM-Sepharose indicated a peak (CM2) with angiotensin-converting activity, converting AngI into Ang II. Electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel (12%) revealed one band with 30kDa for CM2 similar in size to natterins, which are toxins with proteolytic activity found in T. nattereri venom. Mass spectrometry indicated that the protein sequence of the ACE purified from T. nattereri venom corresponds to natterin 1. The isolated protein has also demonstrated inhibition through captopril and EDTA and is characterized as a classic ACE. Thus, the isolated enzyme purified from T. nattereri venom is the first ACE isolated from fish venom. PMID:27327905

  2. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and the kidney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces a marked reduction in renal blood flow at doses well below those required to induce a pressor response, and as blood flow falls there is a decline in glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion. This striking sensitivity of the renal blood supply led many workers to consider the possibility that angiotensin functions as a local renal hormone. As angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was found in particular abundance in the lung, it seemed reasonable to suspect that most of the conversion occurred there, and that the function of Ang II would be primarily systemic, rather than intrarenal. In this review, I will explore the evidence that has accumulated on these two possibilities, since they have important implications for our current understanding of normal kidney function and derangements of kidney function in disease.

  3. Transdermal delivery of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Helal, Fouad; Lane, Majella E

    2014-09-01

    The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitor class of drugs has been in clinical use since the 1970s for the management of all grades of heart failure, hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and prophylaxis of cardiovascular events. Because of the advantages associated with transdermal delivery compared with oral delivery many researchers have investigated the skin as a portal for administration of ACE inhibitors. This review summarises the various studies reported in the literature describing the development and evaluation of transdermal formulations of ACE inhibitors. Captopril, enalapril maleate, lisinopril dihydrate, perindopril erbumine and trandolapril are the most studied in connection with transdermal preparations. The methodologies reported are considered critically and the limitations of the various skin models used are also highlighted. Finally, opportunities for novel transdermal preparations of ACE inhibitor drugs are discussed with an emphasis on rational formulation design. PMID:24657822

  4. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Activity in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Handjani, Farhad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Kalafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. The exact pathogenesis of AA remains unknown, although recent studies support a T-cell mediated autoimmune process. On the other hand, some studies have proposed that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a role in autoimmunity. Therefore, we assessed serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a component of this system, in AA. Methods. ACE activity was measured in the sera of 19 patients with AA and 16 healthy control subjects. In addition, the relationship between severity and duration of the disease and ACE activity was evaluated. Results. Serum ACE activity was higher in the patient group (55.81 U/L) compared to the control group (46.41 U/L), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.085). Also, there was no correlation between ACE activity and severity (P = 0.13) and duration of disease (P = 0.25) in the patient group. Conclusion. The increased serum ACE activity found in this study may demonstrate local involvement of the RAAS in the pathogenesis of AA. Assessment of ACE in a study with a larger sample size as well as in tissue samples is recommended in order to further evaluate the possible role of RAAS in AA. PMID:25349723

  5. [Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as neutralizers of hydroxyl radical].

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queirós, M J; Manso, C

    1992-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are utilized in the treatment of essential hypertension and of chronic cardiac failure. They are also employed in the treatment of the myocardial lesion of ischemia-reperfusion, which involves oxygen free radicals. In the present study we investigated the possibility of three angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril, lisinopril) to act as hydroxyl radical scavengers. The rate constants for reactions of those compounds with .OH were determined using the deoxyribose method. All there compounds proved to be good scavengers of .OH with rate constants of about 10(10)M-1s-1 and are iron chelators specially enalapril. The fact that captopril possesses a thiol group does not confer an higher antioxidative capacity. These results suggest that scavenging of oxygen free radicals may be a possible mechanism contributing to the therapeutic effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:1325814

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by Brazilian plants.

    PubMed

    Braga, Fernão C; Serra, Carla P; Viana, Nilton S; Oliveira, Alaíde B; Côrtes, Steyner F; Lombardi, Júlio A

    2007-07-01

    The potential antihypertensive activity of Brazilian plants was evaluated in vitro by its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Forty-four plants belonging to 30 families were investigated. Plants were selected based on their popular use as antihypertensive and/or diuretics. The following plants presented significant ACE inhibition rates: Calophyllum brasiliense, Combretum fruticosum, Leea rubra, Phoenix roebelinii and Terminalia catappa. PMID:17513067

  7. Assay for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-hour experiment designed to introduce students to chemistry of the angiotensis-converting enzyme, illustrate design of a quenched fluorescence substrate, and examine considerations necessary in designing a clinical assay. Includes background information on the biochemistry of hypertension, reagents/materials needed, procedures…

  8. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors as oxygen free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queiroz, M J; Manso, C F

    1993-01-01

    The authors have compared the ability of two non-SH-containing angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (enalaprilat and lisinopril) with an -SH containing ACE inhibitor (captopril) to scavenge the hydroxyl radical (.OH). All three compounds were able to scavenge .OH radicals generated in free solution at approximately diffusion-controlled rates (10(10) M-1 s-1) as established by the deoxyribose assay in the presence of EDTA. The compounds also inhibited deoxyribose degradation in reaction mixtures which did not contain EDTA but not so effectively. This later findings also suggests that they have some degree of metal-binding capability. Chemiluminescence assays of oxidation of hypoxanthine by xanthine oxidase in the presence of luminol, confirm that the three ACE inhibitors are oxygen free radical scavengers. Our results indicate that the presence of a sulphydryl group in the chemical structure of ACE inhibitors is not relevant for their oxygen free radical scavenging ability. PMID:8244086

  9. Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibition in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are effective in reducing the risk of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and death from cardiovascular causes in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction or heart failure. ACE inhibitors have also been shown to reduce atherosclerotic complications in patients who have vascular disease without heart failure. METHODS In the Prevention of Events with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition (PEACE) Trial, we tested the hypothesis that patients with stable coronary artery disease and normal or slightly reduced left ventricular function derive therapeutic benefit from the addition of ACE inhibitors to modern conventional therapy. The trial was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which 8290 patients were randomly assigned to receive either trandolapril at a target dose of 4 mg per day (4158 patients) or matching placebo (4132 patients). RESULTS The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 64±8 years, the mean blood pressure 133±17/78±10 mm Hg, and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction 58±9 percent. The patients received intensive treatment, with 72 percent having previously undergone coronary revascularization and 70 percent receiving lipid-lowering drugs. The incidence of the primary end point — death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization — was 21.9 percent in the trandolapril group, as compared with 22.5 percent in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the trandolapril group, 0.96; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.06; P=0.43) over a median follow-up period of 4.8 years. CONCLUSIONS In patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function who are receiving “current standard” therapy and in whom the rate of cardiovascular events is lower than in previous trials of ACE inhibitors in patients with vascular disease, there is no evidence that the addition of an ACE inhibitor provides further benefit in

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, H P; Brown, S A; Chetboul, V; King, J N; Pouchelon, J-L; Toutain, P L

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors represent one of the most commonly used categories of drugs in canine and feline medicine. ACE inhibitors currently approved for use in veterinary medicine are benazepril, enalapril, imidapril and ramipril. They are all pro-drugs administered by oral route. A physiologically based model taking into account the saturable binding to ACE has been developed for pharmacokinetic analysis. The bioavailability of the active compounds from their respective pro-drug is low. The active metabolites are eliminated by renal, hepatorenal or biliary excretion, according to the drug. The elimination half-life of the free fraction of the active compounds is very short (ranging from approximately 10 min to 2 h). ACE inhibitors are generally well tolerated. Benazepril, enalapril, imidapril and ramipril are approved for dogs with chronic heart failure (CHF). The efficacy of ACE inhibitors has been convincingly demonstrated in dogs with CHF, especially in those with chronic valvular disease. In such clinical settings, ACE inhibitors improve hemodynamics and clinical signs, and increase survival time. In cats with cardiovascular disease, little information is available except for reports of some benefit in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in two non-controlled investigations. ACE inhibitors have also a mild to moderate hypotensive effect. There is also evidence to recommend ACE inhibitors in dogs and cats with chronic renal failure (CRF). They decrease the glomerular capillary pressure, have antiproteinuric effects, tend to delay the progression of CRF and to limit the extent of renal lesions. PMID:17506720

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin-angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect-plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid-plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  12. Localization of angiotensin converting enzyme in rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Fabris, B.; Allen, A.M.; Jackson, B.; Johnston, C.I.; Mendelsohn, A.O. )

    1991-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was localized in rat heart by quantitative in vitro autoradiography with 125I-351A as the radioligand. The binding association constant (KA) of the radioligand was measured in membrane-rich fractions of atrium, ventricle, and lung by a radioinhibitor binding assay. A single class of high-affinity binding sites was detected in each tissue, and a significant difference was found between KA values for atria and ventricles with a rank order of atria greater than lungs greater than ventricles. For autoradiography, coronal sections (10 micron) of the frozen heart were incubated with 125I-351A and exposed to x-ray film. The autoradiographs were quantitated by computerized image analysis. The highest density of ACE in the heart was found on valve leaflets (aortic, pulmonary, mitral, and tricuspid), which contrasted markedly with very low ACE labeling in the endocardium. The coronary arteries also showed dense labeling of ACE. The right atrium had a moderate density of ACE, which was higher than the left atrium and the ventricles. Both the endothelial and adventitial layers of the aorta and pulmonary artery displayed high densities of ACE, with very low density in the media. ACE was not detected in either the sinoatrial node or atrioventricular node. These results reveal a markedly nonuniform localization of ACE in the rat heart and suggest possible sites for local angiotensin II generation and bradykinin or other peptide metabolism.

  13. Inhibition of tissue angiotensin converting enzyme. Quantitation by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, K.; Chai, S.Y.; Jackson, B.; Johnston, C.I.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1988-03-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in serum and tissues of rats was studied after administration of lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor. Tissue ACE was assessed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography using the ACE inhibitor (/sup 125/I)351A, as a ligand, and serum ACE was measured by a fluorimetric method. Following oral administration of lisinopril (10 mg/kg), serum ACE activity was acutely reduced but recovered gradually over 24 hours. Four hours after lisinopril administration, ACE activity was markedly inhibited in kidney (11% of control level), adrenal (8%), duodenum (8%), and lung (33%; p less than 0.05). In contrast, ACE in testis was little altered by lisinopril (96%). In brain, ACE activity was markedly reduced 4 hours after lisinopril administration in the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ (16-22%) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (7%; p less than 0.05). In other areas of the brain, including the choroid plexus and caudate putamen, ACE activity was unchanged. Twenty-four hours after administration, ACE activity in peripheral tissues and the circumventricular organs of the brain had only partially recovered toward control levels, as it was still below 50% of control activity levels. These results establish that lisinopril has differential effects on inhibiting ACE in different tissues and suggest that the prolonged tissue ACE inhibition after a single oral dose of lisinopril may reflect targets involved in the hypotensive action of ACE inhibitors.

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid–plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin–angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect–plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid–plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  15. Observation of high and low molecular weight inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Brecher, A S; Thevananther, S; Wilson, S

    1996-01-01

    Fractionation of the rat lung yielded a 54,000 g supernate, and DOC-solubilized 775 g, 3100 g and 54,000 g sediments, each of these preparations displaying an increasing angiotensin-converting enzyme activity with increasing dilution, suggesting the presence of freely reversible angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The solubilized 775 g sediment was applied to an immobilized captopril column, eluted successively with 20 mM Pi(K+), pH 7.8 buffer, buffer/0.5 M NaCl, and buffer/0.01M cysteine to obtain four major protein bands, two of which appeared with the cysteine eluant. The first two protein peaks were each pooled and subjected to ultrafiltration with 10,000 molecular weight cutoff filters. The pooled peaks, retentates and ultrafiltrates each inhibited the angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, suggesting the presence of large and small molecular weight reversible angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in association with the solubilized (membranous) particulate angiotensin-converting enzyme fraction. These results expand upon earlier observations on the existence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in mammalian serum by observing an increasing angiotensin-converting enzyme activity with increasing dilution. This activity was eluted in multiple peaks, including elution with the cysteine eluate, suggesting that the angiotensin-converting enzyme, as well as other proteins, may react covalently with the sulfhydryl functional group of the immobilized captopril in a transsulfhydration reaction cleaving the disulfide bonds in proteins. Subsequent elution with cysteine affects an additional transsulfhydration reaction, releasing the proteins from the column. It is further postulated that air oxidation of the proteins permits reformation of disulfide bonds, yielding some active angiotensin-converting enzyme. Having in mind the possibility of lipophilic angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors crossing the blood-brain barrier as a means of treatment of

  16. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  17. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  18. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  19. Icatibant in the Treatment of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Neil H.; Patel, Jaimin; Diwakar, Lavanya; Smith, Fang Gao

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who presented with massive tongue and lip swelling secondary to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema. An awake fibre-optic intubation was performed because of impending airway obstruction. As there was no improvement in symptoms after 72 hours, the selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant (Firazyr) was administered and the patient's trachea was successfully extubated 36 hours later. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of icatibant being used for the treatment of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema in the United Kingdom and represents a novel therapeutic option in its management. PMID:25328718

  20. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. Postanesthetic Severe Oral Angioedema in Patient's Taking Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Acílio; Retroz-Marques, Carla; Mota, Sara; Cabral, Raquel; Campos, Matos

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are the leading cause of a drug-induced angioedema. This occurrence is frequently underdiagnosed, but its relapse can be life-threatening. The authors' intention in reporting this clinical case is to sound a warning about reviewing attitudes and surveillance to try to improve patient perioperative safety. PMID:25431681

  6. Renal angiotensin-converting enzyme localization in diabetic rats and the effect of low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Kobayashi, M; Nakanishi, T; Yoshikawa, H; Miyagi, M; Tanegashima, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Fushimi, T; Hasegawa, A

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy. The effect of diabetes and low protein diet on renal immunohistochemical ACE localization was studied in streptozotocin-induced DM rats. Immunohistochemical ACE localization was reduced in DM rats, and a low protein diet partially resolved this abnormality while inhibiting the progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:9200410

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genetic polymorphism: its impact on cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Felipe Neves; Brandão, Andréa Araujo; da Silva, Dayse Aparecida; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Duque, Gustavo Salgado; Gondar, Alyne Freitas Pereira; Neves, Luiza Maceira de Almeida; Bittencourt, Marcelo Imbroinise; Pozzan, Roberto; de Albuquerque, Denilson Campos

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme genetic polymorphisms as a predictor of echocardiographic outcomes on heart failure is yet to be established. The local profile should be identified so that the impact of those genotypes on the Brazilian population could be identified. This is the first study on exclusively non-ischemic heart failure over a follow-up longer than 5 years. Objective To determine the distribution of angiotensin-converting enzyme genetic polymorphism variants and their relation with echocardiographic outcome of patients with non-ischemic heart failure. Methods Secondary analysis of the medical records of 111 patients and identification of the angiotensin-converting enzyme genetic polymorphism variants, classified as DD (Deletion/Deletion), DI (Deletion/Insertion) or II (Insertion/Insertion). Results The cohort means were as follows: follow-up, 64.9 months; age, 59.5 years; male sex, 60.4%; white skin color, 51.4%; use of beta-blockers, 98.2%; and use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocker, 89.2%. The angiotensin-converting enzyme genetic polymorphism distribution was as follows: DD, 51.4%; DI, 44.1%; and II, 4.5%. No difference regarding the clinical characteristics or treatment was observed between the groups. The final left ventricular systolic diameter was the only isolated echocardiographic variable that significantly differed between the angiotensin-converting enzyme genetic polymorphisms: 59.2 ± 1.8 for DD versus 52.3 ± 1.9 for DI versus 59.2 ± 5.2 for II (p = 0.029). Considering the evolutionary behavior, all echocardiographic variables (difference between the left ventricular ejection fraction at the last and first consultation; difference between the left ventricular systolic diameter at the last and first consultation; and difference between the left ventricular diastolic diameter at the last and first consultation) differed between the genotypes (p = 0.024; p = 0.002; and p = 0

  8. SALT SENSITIVITY IN RESPONSE TO RENAL INJURY REQUIRES RENAL ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME

    PubMed Central

    Giani, Jorge F.; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Janjulia, Tea; Han, Jiyang; Toblli, Jorge E.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; McDonough, Alicia A.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that salt-sensitive hypertension can result from a subclinical injury that impairs the kidneys’ capacity to properly respond to a high salt diet. However, how this occurs is not well understood. Here, we showed that while previously salt resistant wild-type mice became salt-sensitive after the induction of renal injury with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME); mice lacking renal angiotensin-converting enzyme, exposed to the same insult, did not become hypertensive when faced with a sodium load. This is because the activity of renal angiotensin-converting enzyme plays a critical role in: 1) augmenting the local pool of angiotensin II and, 2) the establishment of the anti-natriuretic state via modulation of glomerular filtration rate and sodium tubular transport. Thus, this study demonstrates that the presence of renal angiotensin-converting enzyme plays a pivotal role in the development of salt sensitivity in response to renal injury. PMID:26150439

  9. The variable effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia in chronic stable angina.

    PubMed

    Simon, J; Gibbs, R; Crean, P A; Mockus, L; Wright, C; Sutton, G C; Fox, K M

    1989-08-01

    The effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia was studied in 12 normotensive patients with chronic stable angina and exercise induced ST segment depression. The study was randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, and crossover with treatment periods of two weeks. Enalapril was used to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme. Assessment was by angina diaries and maximum symptom limited treadmill exercise tests. The results for the whole group showed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure at rest and at peak exercise. Mean total exercise duration was 466 s (95% confidence interval 406 to 525) when the patients were taking placebo and 509 s (436 to 583) when they were taking enalapril. Four patients prolonged their total exercise time (mean 450 to mean 591 s) by more than 20%. Two patients, however, developed ischaemia earlier on exercise and reduced their total exercise duration (mean 490 to mean 390 s). Although angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition tended to reduce myocardial ischaemia in the group as a whole, some patients improved while others deteriorated. Thus the effects of enalapril are variable and this may have important implications when enalapril is used to treat heart failure in patients with underlying severe ischaemic heart disease. PMID:2548548

  10. The variable effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia in chronic stable angina.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J; Gibbs, R; Crean, P A; Mockus, L; Wright, C; Sutton, G C; Fox, K M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia was studied in 12 normotensive patients with chronic stable angina and exercise induced ST segment depression. The study was randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, and crossover with treatment periods of two weeks. Enalapril was used to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme. Assessment was by angina diaries and maximum symptom limited treadmill exercise tests. The results for the whole group showed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure at rest and at peak exercise. Mean total exercise duration was 466 s (95% confidence interval 406 to 525) when the patients were taking placebo and 509 s (436 to 583) when they were taking enalapril. Four patients prolonged their total exercise time (mean 450 to mean 591 s) by more than 20%. Two patients, however, developed ischaemia earlier on exercise and reduced their total exercise duration (mean 490 to mean 390 s). Although angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition tended to reduce myocardial ischaemia in the group as a whole, some patients improved while others deteriorated. Thus the effects of enalapril are variable and this may have important implications when enalapril is used to treat heart failure in patients with underlying severe ischaemic heart disease. PMID:2548548

  11. Identification of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins from mycelium of Pleurotus pulmonarius (oyster mushroom).

    PubMed

    Ibadallah, Badjie Xietaqieuallah; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza

    2015-01-01

    Pleurotus pulmonarius (grey oyster mushroom) has been acknowledged as a recuperative agent for many diseases in addition to its recognition as a nutritious provision. We performed a study on P. pulmonarius mycelium for an antihypertensive effect via the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity. The preliminary assay on the mycelial water extract demonstrated that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity had an IC50 value of 720 µg/mL. Further protein purifications via ammonium sulphate precipitation and RP-HPLC resulted in 60× stronger angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity than that of the mycelial water extract (IC50 = 12 µg/mL). Protein identification and characterisation by MALDI-TOF/TOF, later corroborated by LC-MS/MS, indicated three proteins that are responsible for the blood pressure lowering effects via different mechanisms: serine proteinase inhibitor-like protein, nitrite reductase-like protein, and DEAD/DEAH box RNA helicase-like protein. PMID:25590365

  12. Angiotensin converting enzyme and memory: preclinical and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Sudilovsky, A; Turnbull, B; Croog, S H; Crook, T

    Results from both preclinical and clinical studies described here suggest that ACE may have a role in the modulation of cognitive memory processes in the rat and in humans. The finding of improved cognitive performance among patients treated with captopril relative to those treated with propranolol or methyldopa is consistent with other clinical and prec-clinical data. Clinical data derive primarily from quality of life measures based on interviews with patients in the same clinical trial from which our other cognitive data are drawn. For example, mental acuity in the workplace was reported to have improved significantly from baseline to week 24 in patients on captopril (p less than 0.05), although it did not change in patients treated with propranolol and worsened in those receiving methyldopa (Croog et al, 1987). The difference between captopril and methyldopa was significant (p less than 0.01). Pre-clinical data come primarily from studies demonstrating that inhibitors of ACE delay CAE in rats when compared not only with methyldopa, but also with saline (Sudilovsky et al, 1984, 1986). A fundamental question is how could inhibition of ACE improve cognitive functioning independent of blood pressure control. It is known that captopril exerts its antihypertensive effects primarily through inhibition of the ACE and that this is present in the brain as well as in non-neuronal tissues elsewhere (Ganten et al, 1982; Strittmatter et al, 1983, 1984). The activity of the enzyme has been found to be significantly increased in the caudate nucleus, the frontal cortex, parahyppocampal gyrus, and medial hippocampus of patients dying with Alzheimer's disease when compared to age-matched controls (Arregui et al, 1982). In addition, AII has been shown to impair performance on various learning and memory paradigms in animals (Melo and Graeff, 1975; Morgan and Routtenberg, 1977). Raising the level of endogenous AII by intravenous administration of its precursor renin has similar

  13. Development and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Rule for Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor-induced Cough

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Takeshi; Gandhi, Tejal K; Fiskio, Julie M; Seger, Andrew C; So, Joseph W; Cook, E Francis; Fukui, Tsuguya; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are effective for many cardiovascular diseases and are widely prescribed, but cough sometimes necessitates their withdrawal. OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a model that predicts, by using information available at first prescription, whether a patient will develop cough within 6 months. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study with derivation and validation sets. SETTING Outpatient clinics affiliated with an urban tertiary care hospital. PATIENTS Clinical data were collected from electronic charts. The derivation set included 1,125 patients and the validation set included 567 patients. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitorinduced cough assessed by predetermined criteria. RESULTS In the total cohort, 12% of patients developed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced cough. Independent multivariate predictors of cough were older age, female gender, non-African American (with East Asian having highest risk), no history of previous angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, and history of cough due to another angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. Patients with a history of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced cough were 29 times more likely to develop a cough than those without this history. These factors were used to develop a model stratifying patients into 4 risk groups. In the derivation set, low-risk, average-risk, intermediate-risk, and highrisk groups had a 6%, 9%, 22%, and 55% probability of cough, respectively. In the validation set, 4%, 14%, 20%, and 60% of patients in these 4 groups developed cough, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This model may help clinicians predict the likelihood of a particular patient developing cough from an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor at the time of prescribing, and may also assist with subsequent clinical decisions. PMID:15209608

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) polymorphism frequency in Brazilian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel Barbosa; Pimenta, Eduardo; Rosse, Izinara Cruz; Veneroso, Christiano; Pussieldi, Guilherme; Becker, Lenice Kapes; Carvalho, Maria-Raquel; Silami-Garcia, Emerson

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) allelic and genotypic frequencies in Brazilian soccer players of different ages. The study group comprised 353 players from first-division clubs in the under (U)-14, U-15, U-17, U-20, and professional categories. The allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ significantly in any of the categories between the group of players and the control group. This was the first study of ACE-I/D polymorphism in Brazilian soccer players. PMID:27232187

  15. Renal scintigraphy following angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension (captopril scintigraphy)

    SciTech Connect

    Sfakianakis, G.N. )

    1989-09-01

    This article describes the pathophysiology and primary causes of renovascular hypertension (RVH). No historical or physical finding is specific in the diagnosis of RVH, although onset of hypertension before the age of 30 years may suggest the possible presence of RVH. The physiology of the kidney is described along with the biochemistry of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The main thrust of the article is nuclear medicine techniques useful in the diagnosis of this disease. Several diagnositic methods are described but captopril scintigraphy is presented as a method that may give more optimal results in the diagnosis of RVH.

  16. Primary Systemic Amyloidosis and High Levels of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Praena-Segovia, J.; Sanchez-Gastaldo, A.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Ocete-Pérez, R.; Ávila-Polo, R.; Martino, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Infiltrative heart diseases are caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders; amyloidosis and sarcoidosis are two frequent causes of myocardial infiltration, which differ in clinical and biological outcome and treatment issues. The presence of high levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in a patient with infiltrative heart disease may increase suspicion of sarcoidosis. Nevertheless, no mention about increased ACE levels in extracerebral primary systemic amyloidosis is available. We present two cases of primary systemic amyloidosis, which are cardiac involvement and elevated ACE levels. PMID:24826302

  17. Bronchoalveolar lavage, serum angiotensin-converting enzyme, and /sup 67/Ga scanning in extrathoracic sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaert, B.; Ramon, P.; Fournier, E.; Tonnel, A.B.; Voisin, C.

    1982-11-01

    Results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), 67Ga scanning, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (SACE) assay are compared in the assessment of pulmonary involvement in ten cases of extrathoracic sarcoidosis. Standard clinical, radiologic, and pulmonary function tests detected no pulmonary changes in these patients, but BAL demonstrated an increased alveolar lymphocytosis in eight of ten cases. SACE levels were increased in two cases, and the thoracic gallium uptake was normal in all cases. BAL appears to be the best technique for diagnosing latent pulmonary involvement in extrathoracic sarcoidosis.

  18. Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme in myelomonocytic cells enhances the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Khan, Zakir; Giani, Jorge F.; Zhao, Tuantuan; Eriguchi, Masahiro; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and thereby plays an important role in blood pressure control. However, ACE is relatively non-specific in its substrate specificity and cleaves many other peptides. Recent analysis of mice overexpressing ACE in monocytes, macrophages, and other myelomonocytic cells shows that these animals have a marked increase in resistance to experimental melanoma and to infection by Listeria monocytogenes or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Several other measures of immune responsiveness, including antibody production, are enhanced in these animals. These studies complement a variety of studies indicating an important role of ACE in the immune response. PMID:27018193

  19. Effects of altered ventilatory patterns of rabbit pulmonary endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme function, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.J.; Catravas, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Because alveolar pressure can influence pulmonary blood flow, volume and surface area, the authors have studied the effects of airway pressure on endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) function in rabbit lungs in vivo, utilizing indicator dilution techniques with /sup 3/H-Benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro (BPAP) as substate. Static inclation of the lungs to a pressure of 0 or 5 mmHg did not change percent transpulmonary metabolism and Amax/Km ratio in comparison to control measurements during conventional mechanical ventilation. When the inflation pressure was increased to 10 mmHg, percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP remained unaltered but Amax/Km decreased over 40% from control. This decrease was in close relation to the reduction in pulmonary blood flow. Addition of 5 cm H/sub 2/O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the mechanical ventilation also decreased Amax/Km values and pulmonary blood flow but did not influence percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP. These results suggest that the detected alterations in ACE kinetics were more likely due to hemodynamic changes than enzyme dysfunction. The authors propose that high static alveolar pressures as well as PEEP did not affect angiotensin converting enzyme function, but reduced the fraction of perfused microvessels reflected in changes in Amax/Km ratios.

  20. Intrarenal distributions and changes of Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in feline and canine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Sawa, Mariko; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ACE2 is a newly identified member of the RAS. The present immunohistochemical study focused on changes in intrarenal ACE and ACE2 immunoreactivity in feline and canine chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACE immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the brush border of the proximal tubules in dogs and cats. ACE immunoreactivity was lower in CKD kidneys than in normal kidneys, and quantitative analysis demonstrated negative correlations between ACE and renal tissue damage in dogs. ACE2 immunoreactivity was also detected in the proximal tubules; it increased or decreased with CKD in dogs, depending on the renal region assessed. The changes in ACE and ACE2 in CKD were associated with the plasma creatinine concentration in dogs. Findings from dogs with glomerulonephritis were similar to those from dogs with non-glomerulonephritis. The present study suggests that changes in the intrarenal expression of ACE and ACE2 contribute to the pathological mechanisms of canine CKD, but not to the mechanisms of feline CKD. PMID:24004970

  1. A quantitative peptidomics approach to unravel immunological functions of angiotensin converting enzyme in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Duressa, Tewodros Firdissa; Boonen, Kurt; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-09-01

    Locusta migratoria angiotensin converting enzyme (LmACE) is encoded by multiple exons displaying variable number of genomic duplications. Treatments of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as peptidoglycan but not β-1-3 glucan resulted in enhanced expression of angiotensin converting enzyme in hemocytes of Locusta migratoria. No such effect was observed in fat body cells. Differential peptidomics using locust plasma samples post infection with LPS in combination with both an LmACE transcript knockdown by RNAi and a functional knockdown using captopril allowed the identification of 5 circulating LPS induced peptides which only appear in the hemolymph of locust having full LmACE functionality. As these peptides originate from larger precursor proteins such as locust hemocyanin-like protein, having known antimicrobial properties, the obtained results suggest a possible direct or indirect role of LmACE in the release of these peptides from their precursors. Additionally, this experimental setup confirmed the role of LmACE in the clearance of multiple peptides from the hemolymph. PMID:27320038

  2. In vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in sarcoid lymph nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.K.; Chai, S.Y.; Dunbar, M.S.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-09-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was localized in sarcoid lymph nodes by an in vitro autoradiographic technique using a synthetic ACE inhibitor of high affinity, /sup 125/I-labelled 351A. The lymph nodes were from seven patients with active sarcoidosis who underwent mediastinoscopy and from six control subjects who had nodes resected at either mediastinoscopy or laparotomy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme was localized in the epithelioid cells of sarcoid granulomata in markedly increased amounts compared with control nodes, where it was restricted to vessels and some histiocytes. In sarcoid lymph nodes, there was little ACE present in lymphocytes or fibrous tissue. Sarcoid nodes with considerable fibrosis had much less intense ACE activity than the nonfibrotic nodes. The specific activity of ACE measured by an enzymatic assay in both the control and sarcoid lymph nodes closely reflected the ACE activity demonstrated by autoradiography. Sarcoid lymph nodes with fibrosis had an ACE specific activity of half that of nonfibrotic nodes (p less than 0.05). There was a 15-fold increase in specific ACE activity in sarcoid nodes (p less than 0.05) compared to normal. Serum ACE was significantly higher in those sarcoid patients whose lymph nodes were not fibrosed compared with those with fibrosis (p less than 0.01). This technique offers many advantages over the use of polyclonal antibodies. The 351A is a highly specific ACE inhibitor, chemically defined and in limitless supply. This method enables the quantitation of results, and autoradiographs may be stored indefinitely for later comparison.

  3. Enzyme Hydrolysates from Stichopus horrens as a New Source for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, Bita; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Jamilah; Abdul Hamid, Azizah; Hassan, Zaiton; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    Stichopus horrens flesh was explored as a potential source for generating peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacity using 6 proteases, namely alcalase, flavourzyme, trypsin, papain, bromelain, and protamex. Degree of hydrolysis (DH) and peptide profiling (SDS-PAGE) of Stichopus horrens hydrolysates (SHHs) was also assessed. Alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest DH value (39.8%) followed by flavourzyme hydrolysate (32.7%). Overall, alcalase hydrolysate exhibited the highest ACE inhibitory activity (IC50 value of 0.41 mg/mL) followed by flavourzyme hydrolysate (IC50 value of 2.24 mg/mL), trypsin hydrolysate (IC50 value of 2.28 mg/mL), papain hydrolysate (IC50 value of 2.48 mg/mL), bromelain hydrolysate (IC50 value of 4.21 mg/mL), and protamex hydrolysate (IC50 value of 6.38 mg/mL). The SDS-PAGE results showed that alcalase hydrolysate represented a unique pattern compared to others, which yielded potent ACE inhibitory peptides with molecular weight distribution lower than 20 kDa. The evaluation of the relationship between DH and IC50 values of alcalase and flavourzyme hydrolysates revealed that the trend between those parameters was related to the type of the protease used. We concluded that the tested SHHs would be used as a potential source of functional ACE inhibitory peptides for physiological benefits. PMID:22927875

  4. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 inhibits lung injury induced by respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongjing; Xie, Zhengde; Li, Tieling; Zhang, Shaogeng; Lai, Chengcai; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Keyu; Han, Lina; Duan, Yueqiang; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Yang, Xiaolan; Xing, Li; Zhang, Peirui; Wang, Zhouhai; Li, Ruisheng; Yu, Jane J.; Wang, Xiliang; Yang, Penghui

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a major cause of severe lower respiratory illness in infants and young children, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for viral pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated. To date, no drugs or vaccines have been employed to improve clinical outcomes for RSV-infected patients. In this paper, we report that angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) protected against severe lung injury induced by RSV infection in an experimental mouse model and in pediatric patients. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency aggravated RSV-associated disease pathogenesis, mainly by its action on the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). Furthermore, administration of a recombinant ACE2 protein alleviated the severity of RSV-induced lung injury. These findings demonstrate that ACE2 plays a critical role in preventing RSV-induced lung injury, and suggest that ACE2 is a promising potential therapeutic target in the management of RSV-induced lung disease. PMID:26813885

  5. Distribution of angiotensin converting enzyme in sheep hypothalamus and medulla oblongata visualized by in vitro autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; McKinley, M.J.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic mapping of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in sheep brain using the specific ACE inhibitor, /sup 125/I-351A, revealed very high densities of binding in large blood vessels and choroid plexus. In the a very high density of labelling occurred in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median eminence and a high density in the subfornical organ and moderate density in supraoptic, suprachiasmatic, arcuate and paraventricular nuclei. All fiber tracts were unlabelled. In the medulla oblongata, a very high density of binding was detected in the area postrema and a high density in the nucleus of the solitary tract and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus; a moderate density was found in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal tract and the inferior olivary nucleus.

  6. Preparation of lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for molecular imaging of angiotensin-converting enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Baeta, Cesar; Aras, Omer; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2009-05-01

    Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been associated with the pathophysiology of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, the prescription of ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, has shown a favorable effect on patient outcome for patients with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE would be of crucial importance for monitoring tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-coated gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. The preparation involved non-modified lisinopril, using its primary amine group as the anchoring function on the gold nanoparticles surface. The stable lisinopril-coated gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their zeta potential was also measured in order to assess the charge density on the modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs).

  7. Renin, angiotensins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme in neuroblastoma cells: evidence for intracellular formation of angiotensins.

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, T; Clemens, D L; Inagami, T

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of various peptide hormones in neuronal cells in the brain is not clear. The question of whether brain angiotensin II is formed by an extracellular mechanism as in the peripheral system or by an intracellular mechanism can be answered by using cloned cells in culture. We have screened several neuroblastoma cell lines of rat and mouse origin and found at least three cell lines that contain renin (EC 3.4.99.19), angiotensin-converting enzyme (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase; peptidyldipeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1), and angiotensins I and II. This finding was interpreted to indicate that in these cells angiotensin formation takes place by an intracellular mechanism, in contrast to the extracellular mechanism well known to occur in plasma. This study also demonstrates the existence of viable and cloned cell lines that produce renin. PMID:6273896

  8. Renal hemodynamic changes induced by captopril and angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Hemmi, H; Inoue, A; Takano, M; Kadomatsu, S; Tanimoto, H; Tanegashima, M; Hayashi, I; Fushimi, T; Hasegawa, A

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relationship between renal hemodynamic changes induced by a single acute administration of captopril (50 mg p.o.) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in 27 healthy human volunteers, 7 with DD genotype, 10 with ID, and 10 with II genotype. The increase in effective renal plasma flow (p < 0.02) and the fall in renal vascular resistance (p < 0.01) in response to captopril were significantly less in subjects with the DD genotype than in subjects with the other genotypes. These data suggest that intrarenal ACE inhibition by captopril differs according to ACE gene ID polymorphism in healthy humans. PMID:9069453

  9. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 as a Therapeutic Target for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.R.; Shao, Zhili; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disorders. Angiotensin II (Ang-II), the final product of this pathway, is known for its vasoconstrictive and proliferative effects. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a newly discovered homolog of ACE, plays a key role as the central negative regulator of the RAS. It diverts the generation of vasoactive Ang-II into the vasodilatory and growth inhibiting peptide angiotensin(1-7) [Ang(1-7)], thereby providing counter-regulatory responses to neurohormonal activation. There is substantial experimental evidence evaluating the role of ACE2/Ang(1-7) in hypertension, heart failure, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we aim to focus on the conceptual facts of the ACE2-Ang(1-7) axis with regards to clinical implications and therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disorders, with emphasis on the potential therapeutic role in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24293035

  10. Prophylactic treatment of migraine with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril): randomised, placebo controlled, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Harald; Stovner, Lars Jacob; Helde, Grethe; Sand, Trond; Bovim, Gunnar

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor in the prophylaxis of migraine. Design Double blind, placebo controlled, crossover study. Setting Neurological outpatient clinic. Participants Sixty patients aged 19-59 years with migraine with two to six episodes a month. Interventions Treatment period of 12 weeks with one 10 mg lisinopril tablet once daily for one week then two 10 mg lisinopril tablets once daily for 11 weeks, followed by a two week wash out period. Second treatment period of one placebo tablet once daily for one week and then two placebo tablets for 11 weeks. Thirty participants followed this schedule, and 30 received placebo followed by lisinopril. Main outcome measures Primary end points: number of hours with headache, number of days with headache, number of days with migraine. Secondary end points: headache severity index, use of drugs for symptomatic relief, quality of life and number of days taken as sick leave, acceptability of treatment. Results In the 47 participants with complete data, hours with headache, days with headache, days with migraine, and headache severity index were significantly reduced by 20% (95% confidence interval 5% to 36%), 17% (5% to 30%), 21% (9% to 34%), and 20% (3% to 37%), respectively, with lisinopril compared with placebo. Days with migraine were reduced by at least 50% in 14 participants for active treatment versus placebo and 17 patients for active treatment versus run-in period. Days with migraine were fewer by at least 50% in 14 participants for active treatment versus placebo. Intention to treat analysis of data from 55 patients supported the differences in favour of lisinopril for the primary end points. Conclusion The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril, has a clinically important prophylactic effect in migraine. PMID:11141144

  11. Essential residues in angiotensin converting enzyme: Modification with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Bunning, P.; Kleemann, S.G.; Riordan, J.F. )

    1990-11-01

    The peptidase and esterase activities of rabbit pulmonary angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) are rapidly abolished on reaction with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (Dnp-F). Inactivation follows first-order kinetics with respect to the reagent and is accompanied by stoichiometric incorporation of 3,5-({sup 3}H)Dnp, indicating that the effect is due to a specific modification of the enzyme. Thin-layer chromatography of an acid hydrolysate of the modifed enzyme indicates that most of the radioactive label is present as O-Dnp-tyrosine (65 to >95{percent}) and the rest at N{epsilon}-Dnp-lysine. The pH dependence of the reaction is consistent with modification of either tyrosine or lysine. The presence of a competitive inhibitor effectively protects the enzyme against inactivation by Dnp-F. Acetylation of ACE with N-acetylimidazole also protects the enzyme against modification with Dnp-F. The results indicate the presence of catalytically essential tyrosine and lysine residues at the active site of ACE.

  12. Effect of zinc concentration on the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme in human plasma and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, P.G.; Carl, G.F.; Smith, D.K.; O'Dell, B.L.

    1986-03-05

    The activity of angiotensin converting enzyme is measured clinically to assist in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and to monitor therapy with steroids, and with antihypertensive drugs that inhibit the enzyme. Even though it has been known for some time that ACE is a zinc dependent enzyme, it was discovered only recently that zinc, in addition to endogenous levels in the assay mixture, is required for maximal activity of rat serum ACE. The present experiment was designed to determine if additional zinc is required for maximal activation of ACE in plasma and serum of human subjects. Plasma or serum samples were incubated at 37/sup 0/ in a zinc-free medium, pH 7.4, containing hippurylglyclglycine as the substrate. The addition of 20 ..mu..M zinc significantly increased ACE activity in plasma (95.4 +/- 11.9 vs 192.8 +/- 24.3 U/L) and in serum (89.9 +/- 5.6 vs 195.7 +/- 9.3 U/L) compared to samples without added zinc. Enzyme activity was increased 2.4-fold when zinc was added to plasma from a patient with low plasma zinc. These data suggest that the endogenous level of zinc in the assay mixture resulting from the addition of an aliquot of plasma or serum is insufficient to obtain maximal activity of ACE. The addition of zinc to zinc deficient plasma increased ACE activity even more.

  13. Evaluating molecular mechanism of hypotensive peptides interactions with renin and angiotensin converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E; Ju, Xing-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that three rapeseed protein-derived peptides (TF, LY and RALP) inhibited the in vitro activities of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin. Oral administration of these peptides to spontaneously hypertensive rats led to reductions in systolic blood pressure. In the present work, we examined the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the ACE- and renin-inhibitory activities of these peptides. Enzyme inhibition kinetics showed competitive, non-competitive and mixed-type peptide-dependent inhibition of renin and ACE activities. Intrinsic fluorescence intensity data showed that LY and RALP have stronger binding effects on ACE molecule compared to that of TF. LY and RALP showed the highest inhibition of ACE and renin activities, respectively. Circular dichroism data showed that the inhibitory mechanism involved extensive peptide-dependent reductions in α-helix and β-sheet fractions of ACE and renin protein conformations. Molecular docking studies confirmed that the higher renin-inhibitory activity of RALP may be due to formation of several hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with the enzyme's active site residues. The rapeseed peptides inhibited renin and ACE activities mostly through binding to enzyme active site or non-active sites and forming extensive H-bonds that distorted the normal configuration required for catalysis. Data presented from this work could enhance development of highly potent antihypertensive natural peptides or peptidomimetics. PMID:24603692

  14. Angiotensin II regulation of angiotensin-converting enzymes in spontaneously hypertensive rat primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Gowrisankar, Yugandhar V; Clark, Michelle A

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays a critical role in cardiovascular and blood pressure regulation. Ang II is produced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and it interacts with the Ang AT1 receptor to cause much of its well-known cardiovascular effects. Ang-(1-7) is another active peptide produced by the rennin-angiotensin system. This peptide is produced from Ang I or Ang II by the catalytic activity of ACE2. Ang-(1-7) interacts with the Mas receptor to counteract many of the effects of Ang II. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis acts opposite of the ACE/Ang II/AT1 axis. In this study we investigated how Ang II regulates the key enzymes of these axes, ACE and its homolog ACE2, and determined whether they are dysregulated in the hypertensive condition. Brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes isolated from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) were used in these studies. Ang II effect on the enzymes' mRNA and protein levels was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting techniques, respectively. Results from this study showed that Ang II up-regulated ACE protein levels, but down-regulated ACE mRNA levels in brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes in both models. Ang II also reduced ACE2 mRNA expression in SHR and Wistar astrocytes isolated from both brain regions. Ang II effects on ACE2 protein were biphasic. In SHR astrocytes, Ang II-mediated ACE2 protein initially increased then decreased at later time points. In contrast, in Wistar astrocytes, Ang II initially decreased ACE2 protein expression, but up-regulated the protein at later time points. The findings of these studies suggest that Ang II has a differential effect on ACE and ACE2 expression. Furthermore, in the SHR model there may be alteration in the ACE/ACE2 balance in a manner that favors increased Ang II generation and decreased Ang-(1-7) production contributing to the hypertensive phenotype observed in this model. The levels of angiotensin (Ang) II depend on the actions of angiotensin-converting enzyme

  15. Angiotensin converting enzyme in the brain, testis, epididymis, pituitary gland and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)Captopril binds to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in rat tissue homogenates. The pharmacology, regional distribution and copurification of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding with enzymatic activity demonstrate the selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril labeling of ACE. (/sup 3/H)Captopril binding to purified ACE reveals differences in cationic dependence and anionic regulation between substrate catalysis and inhibitor recognition. (/sup 3/H)Captopril association with ACE is entropically driven. The selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding permits autoradiographic localization of the ACE in the brain, male reproductive system, pituitary gland and adrenal gland. In the brain, ACE is visualized in a striatonigral neuronal pathway which develops between 1 and 7 d after birth. In the male reproductive system, (/sup 3/H)captopril associated silver grains are found over spermatid heads and in the lumen of seminiferous tubules in stages I-VIII and XII-XIV. In the pituitary gland, ACE is localized to the posterior lobe and patches of the anterior lobe. The adrenal medulla contains moderate ACE levels while low levels are found in the adrenal cortex. Adrenal medullary ACE is increased after hypophysectomy and after reserpine treatment. The general of ligand binding techniques for the study of enzymes is demonstrated by the specific labeling of another enzyme, enkephaline convertase, in crude tissue homogenates by the inhibitor (/sup 3/H)GEMSA.

  16. Primacy of cardiac chymase over angiotensin converting enzyme as an angiotensin-(1-12) metabolizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Varagic, Jasmina; VonCannon, Jessica L; Groban, Leanne; Collawn, James F; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-09-16

    We showed previously that rat angiotensin-(1-12) [Ang-(1-12)] is metabolized by chymase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate Angiotensin II (Ang II). Here, we investigated the affinity of cardiac chymase and ACE enzymes for Ang-(1-12) and Angiotensin I (Ang I) substrates. Native plasma membranes (PMs) isolated from heart and lung tissues of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were incubated with radiolabeled (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, in the absence or presence of a chymase or ACE inhibitor (chymostatin and lisinopril, respectively). Products were quantitated by HPLC connected to an in-line flow-through gamma detector. The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation from (125)I-Ang-(1-12) by chymase was significantly higher (heart: 7.0 ± 0.6 fmol/min/mg; lung: 33 ± 1.2 fmol/min/mg, P < 0.001) when compared to (125)I-Ang I substrate (heart: 0.8 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg; lung: 2.1 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg). Substrate affinity of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) for rat cardiac chymase was also confirmed using excess unlabeled Ang-(1-12) or Ang I (0-250 μM). The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation was significantly lower using unlabeled Ang-(1-12) compared to unlabeled Ang I substrate. Kinetic data showed that rat chymase has a lower Km (64 ± 6.3 μM vs 142 ± 17 μM), higher Vmax (13.2 ± 1.3 μM/min/mg vs 1.9 ± 0.2 μM/min/mg) and more than 15-fold higher catalytic efficiency (ratio of Vmax/Km) for Ang-(1-12) compared to Ang I substrate, respectively. We also investigated ACE mediated hydrolysis of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) and (125)I-Ang I in solubilized membrane fractions of the SHR heart and lung. Interestingly, no significant difference in (125)I-Ang II formation by ACE was detected using either substrate, (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, both in the heart (1.8 ± 0.2 fmol/min/mg and 1.8 ± 0.3 fmol/min/mg, respectively) and in the lungs (239 ± 25 fmol/min/mg and 248 ± 34 fmol/min/mg, respectively). Compared to chymase, ACE

  17. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in chronic stable angina: effects on myocardial ischaemia and comparison with nifedipine.

    PubMed Central

    Ikram, H.; Low, C. J.; Shirlaw, T. M.; Foy, S. G.; Crozier, I. G.; Richards, A. M.; Khurmi, N. S.; Horsburgh, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the anti-ischaemic effects of a new angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, benazepril, compared with nifedipine, alone and in combination, in chronic stable angina caused by coronary artery disease. DESIGN--Placebo controlled, double blind, latin square design. SETTING--Regional cardiology service for a mixed urban and rural population. SUBJECTS--40 patients with stable exertional angina producing at least 1 mm ST segment depression on exercise test with the Bruce protocol. 34 patients completed all four phases of the trial. INTERVENTIONS--Each patient was treated with placebo, benazepril (10 mg twice daily), nifedipine retard (20 mg twice daily), and a combination of benazepril and nifedipine in the same doses, in random order for periods of two weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES AND RESULTS--Total duration of exercise was not increased by any treatment. Exercise time to the development of 1 mm ST segment depression was not significantly changed with benazepril alone or in combination with nifedipine but was increased with nifedipine from 4.18 (1.8) min to 4.99 (1.6) min (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.28 to 1.34; p < 0.05). There was a significant relation between increase in duration of exercise and resting renin concentration (r = 0.498; p < 0.01). Myocardial ischaemia during daily activity, as assessed by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, was reduced by benazepril and by the benazepril and nifedipine combination. This was significant for total ischaemic burden (451(628) min v 231(408) min; 95% CI -398 to -41 min; p < 0.05) and maximal depth of ST segment depression (-2.47(1.2) mm v -2.16 mm; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.57; p < 0.05) for the combination and for maximal ST segment depth for benazepril monotherapy (-2.47 (1.2) mm v -1.96(1.2) mm; 95% CI 0.18 to 0.91; p < 0.05). Benazepril significantly altered the circadian rhythm of cardiac ischaemia, abolishing the peak ischaemic periods at 0700 to 1200 and 1700 to 2300 (p < 0

  18. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  19. Contributions of Leukocytic Angiotensin-converting Enzyme to Development of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Mingming; Tashiro, Katsuya; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study determined the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) on the development of angiotensin I (AngI)-induced atherosclerosis and the contribution of leukocyte-specific expression of this enzyme. Approach and Results To define the contribution of ACE-dependent activity to AngII synthesis in atherosclerotic development, male LDL receptor -/- mice were fed a fat-enriched diet and infused with either AngI or AngII. The same infusion rate of these peptides had equivalent effects on atherosclerotic development. Co-infusion of an ACE inhibitor, enalapril, ablated AngI augmented atherosclerosis, but had no effect on AngII-induced lesion development. ACE protein was detected in several cell types in atherosclerotic lesions, with a predominance in macrophages. This cell type secreted AngII, which was ablated by ACE inhibition. To study whether leukocyte ACE contributed to atherosclerosis, irradiated male LDL receptor -/- mice were repopulated with bone marrow-derived cells from either ACE +/+ or -/- mice and fed the fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks. Chimeric mice with ACE deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had modestly reduced atherosclerotic lesions in aortic arches, but had no effects in aortic roots. Conclusions ACE mediates AngI-induced atherosclerosis, and ACE expression in leukocytes modestly contributes to atherosclerotic development in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:23846498

  20. Serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 is decreased in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Douglas M; Rosado, Christian A; Haltigan, Emily A; Regenhardt, Robert W; Sumners, Colin; Waters, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a cardio and neuro-protective carboxypeptidase, are dynamically altered after stroke in preclinical models. We sought to characterize the previously unexplored changes in serum ACE2 activity of stroke patients and the mechanism of these changes. Serum samples were obtained from patients during acute ischemic stroke (n=39), conditions mimicking stroke (stroke-alert, n=23), or from control participants (n=20). Enzyme activity levels were analyzed by fluorometric assay and correlated with clinical variables by regression analyses. Serum ACE2 activity was significantly lower in acute ischemic stroke as compared to both control and stroke-alert patients, followed by an increase to control levels at three days. Serum ACE2 activity significantly correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke after controlling for other factors (P=0.01). Additional associations with ACE2 activity included a positive correlation with systolic blood pressure at presentation in stroke-alert (R(2)=0.24, P=0.03), while stroke levels showed no correlation (R(2)=0.01, P=0.50). ACE2 sheddase activity was unchanged between groups. These dynamic changes in serum ACE2 activity in stroke, which concur with preclinical studies, are not likely to be driven primarily by acute changes in blood pressure or sheddase activity. These findings provide new insight for developing therapies targeting this protective system in ischemic stroke. PMID:27488276

  1. Serum Levels of Copper, Ceruloplasmin and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme among Silicotic and Non-Silicotic Workers

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Safia; Aziz, Hisham; Shaheen, Weam; Eltahlawy, Eman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Silicosis is the most frequently occurring pneumoconiosis. AIM: Measurement of serum levels of Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), Copper (Cu) and Ceruloplasmin (Cp) in cement workers occupationally exposed to silica dust as biomarkers of exposure rather than biomarkers of effect for silicosis. METHODS: Plain chest X-ray & pulmonary functions were done for 30 silicotic and 42 non-silicotic workers and 42 controls. CT scan was done for the exposed groups. Serum levels of Cu, Cp and ACE were estimated. RESULTS: The results showed a higher significant difference between the exposed groups and controls, and between the two exposed groups regarding the mean levels of all measured biochemical parameters. The pulmonary functions were significantly lower among silicotic workers than controls and non-silicotic groups. There was a significant positive correlation between duration of employment and serum ACE and Cu. CONCLUSION: Since respirable dust exposure-linked lung fibrosis disease is non-curable, the biochemical parameters (Cu, ACE and Cp) can be used as exposure biomarkers to silica dust, providing a better way for early diagnosis of this deadly disease. Down regulating the inflammatory responses could potentially reduce the adverse clinical pulmonary effects of air pollution. PMID:27275272

  2. Impact of disease states on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jaclyn M; Dasta, Joseph F; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Schentag, Jerome J

    2006-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE) in elderly patients and patients with renal and hepatic impairment were examined, and a role for an AUC/EC50 ratio to guide dosing was evaluated. A Medline and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts search was used to identify human studies and abstracts. Relevant data were evaluated and summarized. Dosing regimens were compared using an AUC/EC50 ratio. Most studies evaluating ACE inhibitors in renal impairment report a strong linear correlation between creatine clearance and drug elimination. AUC and EC50 values for these drugs in elderly subjects appear similar to younger and hypertensive patients. There is increased AUC in some patients with hepatic impairment. Pharmacodynamic data are conflicting. Prolonged ACE inhibition is evident in renal impairment but not necessarily other disease states. ACE inhibitor dosing for hypertension is reasonable based on pharmacokinetics and EC50 values. Further individualization of therapy may improve outcomes, and using the threshold AUC/EC50 ratio may help guide appropriate dosing. PMID:16920891

  3. Treatment of Hypertension in Black Patients With Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Neil B.

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension and the incidence of complications from uncontrolled elevated blood pressure in blacks is much greater than in the white population. In general, blacks have underlying differences in the factors relating to blood pressure level, including low plasma renin, and, in certain instances, a decreased ability to excrete sodium. The stepped-care approach in the management of the black hypertensive patient is similar to that taken with white patients, but racial differences in response to antihypertensive drugs exist that require careful consideration when choosing a treatment regimen. Thiazide diuretics are effective in blacks and are often used as initial therapy. Blacks tend to respond less well to β-blockers, but when combined with a diuretic, they are also effective. Encouraging data are available on the use of calcium channel blockers in blacks. When combined with a diuretic, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors also provide an alternative to therapy for black patients. The use of low doses of ACE inhibitors has reduced the high incidence of adverse effects associated with this group of drugs in earlier studies. PMID:3280812

  4. Chinese medicinal formula Fufang Xueshuantong capsule could inhibit the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Shujing; Wang, Yonggang; Long, Chaofeng; Su, Weiwei; Rong, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Fufang Xueshuantong (FXST) capsule, a Chinese medicinal formula composed of four herbals – Panax notoginseng, Radix Astragali, Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae and Radix Scrophulariaceae, has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases for many years, but the pharmacological mechanisms underlying its effects has not been clarified. This study investigates if a connection between FXST and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) might be an explanation for its pharmacological effects. ACE inhibition assay was performed on FXST capsule, 50% ethanol extracts from the four herbals and three selected saponins most abundant in P. notoginseng (Ginsenoside Rg1, Ginsenoside Rb1 and Notoginsenoside R1) using a biochemical test. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of liberated hippuric acid from the ACE assay was conducted to determine the inhibitory effect. As a result, FXST and extracts from P. notoginseng showed a significant and dose-dependent inhibition on ACE activity with the IC50 values of 115 μg/ml and 179 μg/ml, respectively. But extracts from the other three herbals and the three selected saponins had no significant effect on ACE inhibition. Compared to other reported plant extracts, FXST could be considered as an effective ACE inhibitor. The inhibition of ACE activity supports the traditional use of FXST on blood circulation and the inhibitory property of FXST is mainly caused by P. notoginseng. PMID:26019516

  5. Radiation injury in rat lung: II. Angiotensin-converting enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Solliday, N.H.; Molteni, A.; Port, C.D.

    1983-11-01

    To determine the role of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced pulmonary injury, lung angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, arterial perfusion, and ultrastructure were examined from 1 to 150 days after a single exposure of 25 Gy of /sup 60/Co gamma rays to the right hemithorax of rats. Arterial perfusion to the irradiated right lung increased during the first 2 weeks, then decreased to approximately 80% of the left lung value at 30 days postirradiation. Perfusion of the irradiated lung continued to decline, and by 90 to 150 days was only 40% of that of the shielded lung. ACE activity in the irradiated right lung did not change significantly until 30 days after exposure, when it decreased to 72% of that in the left lung. ACE activity in the right lung declined steadily from 30 to 90 days postirradiation, then reached a plateau through 150 days at less than 20% of normal. Perivascular and interstitial edema was evident at 1 day after irradiation and persisted for 30 days. Endothelial cells exhibited blebbing, fragmentation, and increased basement membrane at 30 days. Mast cells were present in the septa, but interstitial collagen was not increased at that time. From 90 to 150 days postexposure, progressive obliteration of capillaries by fibrotic reactions was observed. Thus decreased ACE activity accompanies radiation-induced hypoperfusion and endothelial ultrastructural changes in rat lung. All of these reactions precede the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Angioedema in the emergency department: the impact of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pigman, E C; Scott, J L

    1993-07-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to cause angioedema. The purpose of this study was to establish what proportion of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with angioedema were concomitantly taking any of the ACE inhibitors and to show how this group differed in presentation and response to treatment from the larger population of patients with non-ACE inhibitor-related angioedema. An 8-year retrospective chart review of all patients with the diagnosis of angioedema observed from January 1, 1984 to December 31, 1991 was undertaken in the ED of an urban teaching hospital. Forty-nine patients ranging from 12 to 88 years of age with symptoms and physical examination that was consistent with the diagnosis of angioedema were entered onto the study. Twelve cases of ACE inhibitor-related angioedema were identified, all occurring in the last 4 years of the review, and when compared with the non-ACE inhibitor-related group were older (mean age, 63.3 vs 43.0 years), had less of an allergic history (0% vs 49%; P = .013), but demonstrated the same severity of symptoms and response to medical therapy. No case required an artificial or surgical airway. ACE inhibitor related angioedema is becoming a common type of angioedema observed in this ED. These patients are older and free of other allergic disease and respond well to traditional therapy. PMID:8216515

  7. CES1 genetic variation affects the activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wang, G; Shi, J; Aa, J; Comas, R; Liang, Y; Zhu, H-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) genetic variation on the activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) prodrugs. In vitro incubation study of human liver, intestine and kidney s9 fractions demonstrated that the ACEI prodrugs enalapril, ramipril, perindopril, moexipril and fosinopril are selectively activated by CES1 in the liver. The impact of CES1/CES1VAR and CES1P1/CES1P1VAR genotypes and diplotypes on CES1 expression and activity on enalapril activation was investigated in 102 normal human liver samples. Neither the genotypes nor the diplotypes affected hepatic CES1 expression and activity. Moreover, among several CES1 nonsynonymous variants studied in transfected cell lines, the G143E (rs71647871) was a loss-of-function variant for the activation of all ACEIs tested. The CES1 activity on enalapril activation in human livers with the 143G/E genotype was approximately one-third of that carrying the 143G/G. Thus, some functional CES1 genetic variants (for example, G143E) may impair ACEI activation, and consequently affect therapeutic outcomes of ACEI prodrugs. PMID:26076923

  8. Assessing the teratogenic potential of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Burrows, R F; Burrows, E A

    1998-08-01

    To assess the teratogenic potential of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, we report on 20 prospective pregnancies and 85 identified from articles in the literature. The anomaly rate was 20.6% in small series <10 entrants (95% CI 8.7-37.9%) and 1.4% in larger series > or =10 entrants (95% CI 0.03-7.3%) p=0.0016. The most consistent anomaly seen, skull hypoplasia, along with renal dysfunction appear to be more related to prolonged or late pregnancy exposure than to first trimester exposure. There is little supportive evidence that ACE inhibitors (captopril or enalapril) are teratogenic. There seems to be no absolute reason to discontinue these 2 medications prior to pregnancy, nor to create anxiety when a patient is identified with the combination of early pregnancy and treatment with these medications. There appears to be reason to discontinue the medication in pregnancy but the adverse event rate cannot be assessed because of inadequate prospective information. PMID:9761159

  9. Diagnostic use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in radioisotope evaluation of unilateral renal artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer Hovinga, T.K.; de Jong, P.E.; Piers, D.A.; Beekhuis, H.; van der Hem, G.K.; de Zeeuw, D.

    1989-05-01

    Iodine-123 hippurate renography, (/sup 99m/Tc)diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) renography, and (/sup 99m/Tc)dimercapto succinic acid (DMSA) renal scintigraphy were performed before and during angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition in a group of 15 hypertensive patients with angiographically ''significant'' unilateral renal artery stenosis. Visual and quantitative evaluation of the three radioisotope methods before ACE inhibition already disclosed abnormalities suggestive of renal artery stenosis in a high percentage (87%, 60%, and 60%, respectively) in this group of patients, but ACE inhibition further improved the diagnostic yield in all three methods (93%, 86%, and 80%). Iodine-123 hippurate renography was at least as useful as (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA renography in this respect, while (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA scintigraphy can be used particularly in segmental stenosis. Despite a large drop in blood pressure after ACE inhibition little adverse reactions were seen and overall renal function was fairly well maintained, the exceptions noted in patients with initially a more impaired renal function.

  10. [A Case of Life-Threatening Angioedema Occurred During Prolonged Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Treatment].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Rintaro; Nihei, Shun-Ichi; Arai, Hideaki; Nagata, Keiji; Isa, Yasuki; Harayama, Nobuya; Aibara, Keiji; Kamochi, Msayuki

    2016-03-01

    Although angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are widely used as the first choice drug for treating hypertension, we have only a superficial understanding of their relationship to angioedema. We report a case of life-threatening angioedema. The case was a 60-year-old man who had been taking an ACE inhibitor for hypertension for 11 years. He visited his home doctor for dyspnea, and tongue and neck swelling. He was transported to our hospital because of the possibility of airway obstruction. On admission, his tongue and neck swelling became more severe. We performed an intubation using an endoscope and started airway management. We also stopped his ACE inhibitor. The severe tongue and neck swelling improved gradually and he was extubated on day 3. On the fifth day he was discharged. We diagnosed angioedema caused by an ACE inhibitor. Although the risk of airway obstruction with ACE inhibitors is acknowledged, we have only a superficial understanding of how prolonged ACE inhibitor treatment induces angioedema. So we should consider angioedema in cases of taking ACE inhibitors, especially in cases of prolonged treatment. PMID:26972946

  11. Lung is the target organ for a monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, S.M.; Muzykantov, V.R.; Martynov, A.V.; Atochina, E.N.; Sakharov, I.Yu.; Trakht, I.N.; Smirnov, V.N. )

    1991-01-01

    125I-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to human angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), termed 9B9 and cross-reacting with rat and monkey ACE, when injected into the circulation, accumulates in the lung in up to 10 to 20 greater concentrations than in other organs and blood. That 111In-labeled MoAb 9B9 also accumulates in the lungs of both rats and monkeys very selectively, was clearly revealed by gamma-scintigraphy. Unlike polyclonal anti-ACE antibodies that induce an immunodependent lethal reaction when administered intravenously, MoAb 9B9 was well tolerated by rats even at very high doses (up to 300 mg/kg/body weight). At the same time, the administration of this antibody (which does not inhibit the catalytic activity of ACE) resulted in both a 3-fold decrease of the lung ACE activity and an increase in the activity of serum ACE. The highly organ-specific, nondamaging accumulation of the MoAb 9B9 makes it a promising vector for targeted drug delivery to the lung, for modeling of lung pathology, and for gamma-scintigraphic visualization of the lung vascular bed. We also suggest that MoAb 9B9 accumulation in the lung may serve as a highly sensitive marker of lung vessel damage upon various lung pathology.

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme is a GPI-anchored protein releasing factor crucial for fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Gen; Tojo, Hiromasa; Nakatani, Yuka; Komazawa, Nobuyasu; Murata, Chie; Yamagata, Kazuo; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Okabe, Masaru; Taguchi, Ryo; Takeda, Junji

    2005-02-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key regulator of blood pressure. It is known to cleave small peptides, such as angiotensin I and bradykinin and changes their biological activities, leading to upregulation of blood pressure. Here we describe a new activity for ACE: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein releasing activity (GPIase activity). Unlike its peptidase activity, GPIase activity is weakly inhibited by the tightly binding ACE inhibitor and not inactivated by substitutions of core amino acid residues for the peptidase activity, suggesting that the active site elements for GPIase differ from those for peptidase activity. ACE shed various GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, and the process was accelerated by the lipid raft disruptor filipin. The released products carried portions of the GPI anchor, indicating cleavage within the GPI moiety. Further analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry predicted the cleavage site at the mannose-mannose linkage. GPI-anchored proteins such as TESP5 and PH-20 were released from the sperm membrane of wild-type mice but not in Ace knockout sperm in vivo. Moreover, peptidase-inactivated E414D mutant ACE and also PI-PLC rescued the egg-binding deficiency of Ace knockout sperms, implying that ACE plays a crucial role in fertilization through this activity. PMID:15665832

  13. [Preplacentation pregnancy loss in cases of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P; Konova, E; Komsa-Penkova, R; Kovacheva, K; Nikolov, N; Simeonova, M; Tanchev, St

    2014-01-01

    The balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis processes is critical for establishment and development of early pregnancy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is related with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity which is a key regulator in embryo implantation. Therefor polymorphisms in ACE gene and variation in ACE activity could be associated with an early pregnancy wastage risk. This study investigated carrier status for insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in introne 16 of ACE gene in 71 women with two or more pregnancy loss in preplacentation period (between 10 and 14 weeks of gestation) and 75 women without pregnancy complications. DD genotype for I/D polymorphism was found respectively in 31% and 24% in patients and controls. Heterozygosity of D allele was found correspondingly in 47.9% and 54.7%. The dominant genetic model was used for allele prevalence comparison. D allele in DD genotype was not significantly prevalent in women with early pregnancy wastage compared with the control subjects, OR = 1.42, 95% CI (0.64-3.15). The study found a weak association between I/D polymorphism and preplacentation pregnancy loss. The additive effect over the pregnancy loss risk of I/D polymorphism could be supposed in a presence of other inherited or acquired factors connected with endometrial receptivity and implantation process. PMID:25510065

  14. /sup 67/Ga citrate scanning and serum angiotensin converting enzyme levels in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.G.; Bekerman, C.; Sicilian, L.; Oparil, S.; Pinsky, S.M.; Szidon, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    /sup 67/Ga citrate scans and serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels were obtained in 54 patients with sarcoidosis and analyzed in relation to clinical manifestations. /sup 67/Ga scans were abnormal in 97% of patients with clinically active disease (n . 30) and in 71% of patients with inactive disease (n . 24). Serum ACE levels were abnormally high (2 standard deviations above the control mean) in 73% of patients with clinically active disease and in 54% of patients with inactive disease. Serum ACE levels correlated significantly with /sup 67/Ga uptake score (r..436; p less than .005). The frequency of abnormal /sup 67/Ga scans and elevated serum ACE levels suggests that inflammatory activity with little or no clinical expression is common in sarcoidosis. Abnormal /sup 67/Ga scans were highly sensitive (97%) but had poor specificity (29%) to clinical disease activity. The accuracy of negative prediction of clinical activity by normal scans (87%) was better than the accuracy of positive prediction of clinical activity by abnormal scans (63%). /sup 67/Ga scans can be used to support the clinical indentification of inactive sacoidosis.

  15. Increased risk of pneumonia associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) rs4340 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Liu, Fangzhu

    2016-08-01

    The study aims to investigate the genetic association between rs4340 polymorphism at intron 16 of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) gene and pneumonia predisposition. Electronic database of PubMed, Embase, and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) was searched for the studies addressing the association between CD143 rs4340 genotypes and pneumonia risk. The odds ratio (OR) with its 95 % confidence interval (CI) was employed to estimate the association. In total, ten case-control studies, including 1239 pneumonia cases and 2400 healthy controls, met the inclusion criteria. Our results showed a significant association between rs4340 SNP and pneumonia risk using the recessive model (OR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.20-1.70). A significantly increased risk was also indicated under the recessive model in Asian populations (OR 1.63, 95 % CI 1.16-2.30), Caucasian populations (OR 1.34, 95 % CI 1.09-1.65), community-acquired pneumonia (OR 1.42, 95 % CI 1.16-1.75) rather than nosocomial pneumonia (OR 1.47, 95 % CI 0.97-2.23). However, further studies with gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions should be considered to confirm this association. PMID:25982566

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphisms and hypertension in occupational noise exposure in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zawilla, Nermin; Shaker, Dalia; Abdelaal, Amaal; Aref, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Background: The gene–environment interaction in the pathogenesis of hypertension has not been extensively studied in occupational noise. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between noise and hypertension in Egyptian workers, the interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms as modifiers, and the possible relationship between noise hearing impairment and hypertension. Methods: Study subjects were divided into two groups depending on noise exposure level. The control group (n = 161) was exposed to noise intensity <85 dB and the exposed group (n = 217) was exposed to noise intensity ≧85 dB. A polymerase chain reaction was used to differentiate the various genotypes of ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) and ACE G2350A. Results: Noise significantly increased the likelihood of hypertension. Carriers of the genotypes AG, GG, and DD were vulnerable to hypertension on noise exposure. No association between hypertension and hearing impairment or noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) was found. Conclusion: Our results support the association between ACE gene polymorphisms and occurrence of hypertension in noise-exposed workers. PMID:25000107

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory effects by plant phenolic compounds: a study of structure activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Van Camp, John; Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Staljanssens, Dorien; Struijs, Karin; Zotti, Moises J; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-12-01

    In this study, 22 phenolic compounds were investigated to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Tannic acid showed the highest activity (IC50 = 230 μM). The IC50 values obtained for phenolic acids and flavonoids ranged between 0.41 and 9.3 mM. QSAR analysis confirmed that the numbers of hydroxyl groups on the benzene ring play an important role for activity of phenolic compounds and that substitution of hydroxyl groups by methoxy groups decreased activity. Docking studies indicated that phenolic acids and flavonoids inhibit ACE via interaction with the zinc ion and this interaction is stabilized by other interactions with amino acids in the active site. Other compounds, such as resveratrol and pyrogallol, may inhibit ACE via interactions with amino acids at the active site, thereby blocking the catalytic activity of ACE. These structure-function relationships are useful for designing new ACE inhibitors and potential blood-pressure-lowering compounds based on phenolic compounds. PMID:24219111

  18. [Psychotropic effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: what are the arguments?].

    PubMed

    Mesure, G; Fallet, A; Chevalier, J F

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a case of acute mania induced by perindopril (Coversyl) in a 57 year old man with no prior history of mental illness. This Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (ACEI) had been introduced eight days prior to the first signs of excitation, in order to treat recently diagnosed arterial hypertension. Without proof of reintroduction, and on the basis of clinical observations, the attribution appears plausible. Similar observations have been made for other molecules in this class of medication, such as captopril (Lopril). A review of literature regroups recent data concerning psychotropic effects of ACEIs. Several reports claim that captopril clearly acts as an antidepressant. Studies on the mood or the quality of life of treated hypertensive patients show ACEIs to have an euphoric-type positive effect compared to other anti-hypertensive treatments. Captopril and perindopril also act like potential antidepressants in experimental models of antidepression. Furthermore, pharmacologic data confirm that the most lipophilic ACEIs penetrate the central nervous system and argue in favor of the role of these molecules in activating central opioides. As these data provide evidence of mood swing in some patients, but also of an overall benefit in hypertensive populations, the clinical importance of the antidepressant effect of ACEIs needs further investigations. PMID:8529571

  19. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-related Angioedema: A Case of an Unexpected Death.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Eray; Özdemir, Mehmet Tamer; Çiğsar, Gülşen; Omurca, Ferhat; Aslan, Nurullah; Yildiz, Mehmet; Gey, Zehra Bahar

    2015-11-01

    Angioedema is an asymmetric non-pitting oedema on face, lips, tongue and mucous membranes; any delay in diagnosis and treatment can be fatal. Treatment with lisinopril as an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, can be a reason of angioedema. Here we report a case who developed oral-facial edema four years after using lisinopril/hydrochlorothiazide. Laryngeal oedema is a main cause of death in angioedema. The treatment of choice in angioedema including fresh frozen plasma, C1 inhibitor concentrations and BRK-2 antagonists (bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists) were used. In this case; a 77 years old female patient suffering from hypertension was considered. This patient was suffering two days from swelling on her face and neck. Non- allergic angioedema was distinguished in five major forms; acquired (AAO), hereditary (HAE), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blocker-dependent, pseudoallergic angioedema (PAS) and an idiopathic angioedema (IAO). She was admitted to our clinic with the diagnosis of hereditary angioedema. Patient had skin edema and life threatening laryngeal edema. In emergency department treatment was started using intravenous methylprednisolone, diphenydramine as well as inhaled and subcutaneous epinephrine simultaneously. Despite the initial treatment, the patient died due to the insufficient respiration and cardiac arrest. The patient has no history of kidney disease. PMID:26725563

  20. Identification of a new angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor from Thai edible plants.

    PubMed

    Simaratanamongkol, Arunee; Umehara, Kaoru; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2014-12-15

    Eight Thai edible plants were tested for their inhibitory activity against an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) using an in vitro assay. The methanol extract of Apium graveolens exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.7 mg/ml, and was then subjected to an isolation procedure that resulted in identification of a pure active constituent, junipediol A 8-O-β-d-glucoside (1-β-d-glucosyloxy-2-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-propane-1,3-diol) (1), which had good ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 76 μg/ml. Another eight known compounds, isofraxidin-β-d-glucoside (2), roseoside (3), apigenin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (4), luteolin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (5), icariside D2 (6), apiin (7), chrysoeriol-7-O-β-d-apiosylglucoside (8), and 11,21-dioxo-3 β,15 α,24-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-24-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (9) were also identified. Although each of these five constituents (2-6) isolated from the same fraction as 1 showed no activity at concentrations of 500 μM, together, when each was present at 300 μg/ml, they enhanced the inhibitory activity of 500 μM of 1 from 64% to 81%. PMID:25038653

  1. Anti-hypertensive Effects of Diminazene Aceturate: An Angiotensin- Converting Enzyme 2 Activator in Rats.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Marilda L A; Araújo, Liliane D; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Pereira, Letícia A S; Ribeiro, Heder J; Menezes, Gustavo B; Shenoy, Vinayak; Raizada, Mohan K; Ferreira, Anderson J

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that activation of endogenous angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) results in various beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system. Recently, a new ACE2 activator, named diminazene aceturate (DIZE), was described. Here, we evaluated the actions of this compound in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) of conscious normotensive and hypertensive rats, as well as explored its mechanism of actions using isolated vessels. The renovascular model of hypertension was utilized. The participation of the Angiotensin-(1-7) receptor Mas and nitric oxide (NO) in the effects of DIZE was evaluated using A-779 and L-NAME, respectively. It was observed that DIZE caused a marked decrease in BP with a compensatory increase in HR in nornotensive rats. Accordingly, a significant reduction in the blood flow of the mesenteric bed was evidenced using intravital microscopy. Moreover, in rats with renovascular hypertension, DIZE caused a decrease in BP similar to the hypotensive effect induced by captopril. Importantly, this compound also prevented the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by hypertension. The isolated vessels technique revealed that the vasodilator effects of DIZE were dependent on Mas activation and NO release. Thus, our findings demonstrated that DIZE reduces the BP of normotensinve and hypertensive rats possibly by a mechanism involving Mas and NO. PMID:26458404

  2. In silico analysis and molecular docking studies of potential angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor using quercetin glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Fatima, Nighat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the inhibitory action of quercetin glycosides by computational docking studies. For this, natural metabolite quercetin glycosides isolated from buckwheat and onions were used as ligand for molecular interaction. The crystallographic structure of molecular target angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) was obtained from PDB database (PDB ID: 1O86). Enalapril, a well-known brand of ACE inhibitor was taken as the standard for comparative analysis. Computational docking analysis was performed using PyRx, AutoDock Vina option based on scoring functions. The quercetin showed optimum binding affinity with a molecular target (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) with the binding energy of −8.5 kcal/mol as compared to the standard (−7.0 kcal/mol). These results indicated that quercetin glycosides could be one of the potential ligands to treat hypertension, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. PMID:26109757

  3. Alterations in tissue glutathione and angiotensin converting enzyme due to inhalation of diesel engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, A.; Dutta, S.

    1982-02-01

    Quantitative changes in reduced glutathione (GSH) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) of lung and extrapulmonary tissues were determined following exposure of laboratory animals to diesel engine exhaust (DEE). Exposure of male rats and guinea pigs to DEE containing 750 ..mu..g particulates per cubic meter for 1 wk did not cause any changes in GSH levels of lung, liver, and heart compared to control values. Rats were then exposed for various time periods to 6 mg/m/sup 3/ DEE. Two weeks of exposure produced statistically significant increases of 21 and 7% in GSH levels of lung and liver, respectively, but no change in the heart. Following 4 wk of exposure, lung showed a 14% increase and heat an 11% increase in GSH level. Furthermore, rats exposed for 4 wk to DEE did not show any particular susceptibility toward the GSH-depleting effect of acetaminophen as compared to controls. A significant depletion (15%) of hepatic GSH was observed after 8 wk of exposure, while lung was still showing an increase of 18% in GSH and heart was unaffected. Time-dependent increases of 18 and 33% in serum ACE activity were noted after 4 and 8 wk of exposure. Pulmonary ACE activity did not decrease until after 8 wk, and then to a small extent (7%). The observed increases in GSH may have been related to the presence of NO/sub 2/ in the DEE. On the other hand, the depletion of hepatic GSH suggests production of electrophillic compounds due to an induction of metabolic activity of liver. The change in serum ACE activity may be due to time-requiring perturbations in the pulmonary endothelial cells.

  4. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Pollen Count and Presentation of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Associated Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Brittany; Nian, Hui; Sloan, Chantel; Byrd, James Brian; Woodard-Grice, Alencia; Yu, Chang; Stone, Elizabeth; Steven, Gary; Hartert, Tina; Teo, Koon K.; Pare, Guillaume; McCarty, Catherine A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-associated angioedema is increased in patients with seasonal allergies. OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema present during months when pollen counts are increased. METHODS Cohort analysis examined the month of presentation of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema and pollen counts in the ambulatory and hospital setting. Patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema were ascertained through (1) an observational study of patients presenting to Vanderbilt University Medical Center, (2) patients presenting to the Marshfield Clinic and participating in the Marshfield Clinic Personalized Medicine Research Project, and (3) patients enrolled in The Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET). Measurements include date of presentation of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema, population exposure to ACE inhibitor by date, and local pollen counts by date. RESULTS At Vanderbilt, the rate of angioedema was significantly associated with tree pollen months (P = .01 from χ2 test). When separate analyses were conducted in patients with a history of seasonal allergies and patients without, the rate of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema was increased during tree pollen months only in patients with a history of seasonal allergies (P = .002). In Marshfield, the rate of angioedema was significantly associated with ragweed pollen months (P = .025). In ONTARGET, a positive trend was observed between the ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema rate and grass season, although it was not statistically significant (P = .057). CONCLUSIONS Patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema are more likely to present with this adverse drug event during months when pollen counts are increased. PMID:24565618

  6. Association of polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with gestational diabetes mellitus in Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Parul; Agarwal, Nutan; Das, Nibhriti; Dalal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous genes have been reported in relation with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the findings were not consistently replicated across populations, or there have been no detailed studies on them. Previous literatures suggested that, out of all angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms, only ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism has a strong association with GDM in Asian Indian women. Aim: This study was devoted to evaluate the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A and I/D with GDM and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This study recruited 105 GDM cases, 119 Type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects and 120 controls. PCR-RFLP was used for identifying genotypes of ACE A240T, C1237T and G2350A and PCR was performed in the case of ACE I/D. Results: Significant associations of ACE SNP's, C1237T, and G2350A with GDM were observed. Haplotype analysis revealed the remarkably significant evidence of association with SNP combination ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A, and I/D with GDM patients (P = 0.024). Individuals possessing haplotype “TTAI” (frequency 30% in GDM and 0 in controls) derived from these SNPs had 185 fold increased risk of developing GDM (95% of confidence interval: 11.13–3102.15), which was highest when compared with other 15 haplotypes. Conclusion: Shorter-range haplotypes were also significant, but the only consistently associated alleles were found to be in ACE C1237T, G2350A, and I/D. These results suggested that the variant in close proximity to ACE C1237T, G2350A and/or I/D modulates susceptibility to GDM and noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Indian women. PMID:26958520

  7. Activation of endogenous angiotensin converting enzyme 2 prevents early injuries induced by hyperglycemia in rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Foureaux, G.; Nogueira, B. S.; Coutinho, D. C. O.; Raizada, M. K.; Nogueira, J. C.; Ferreira, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that may result in blindness. We evaluated the effects of activation of endogenous angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 on the early stages of DR. Rats were administered an intravenous injection of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. The ACE2 activator 1-[[2-(dimethylamino) ethyl] amino]-4-(hydroxymethyl)-7-[[(4-methylphenyl) sulfonyl] oxy]-9H-xanthone 9 (XNT) was administered by daily gavage. The death of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) was evaluated in histological sections, and retinal ACE2, caspase-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. XNT treatment increased ACE2 expression in retinas of hyperglycemic (HG) rats (control: 13.81±2.71 area%; HG: 14.29±4.30 area%; HG+XNT: 26.87±1.86 area%; P<0.05). Importantly, ACE2 activation significantly increased the RCG number in comparison with HG animals (control: 553.5±14.29; HG: 530.8±10.3 cells; HG+XNT: 575.3±16.5 cells; P<0.05). This effect was accompanied by a reduction in the expression of caspase-3 in RGC of the HG+XNT group when compared with untreated HG rats (control: 18.74±1.59; HG: 38.39±3.39 area%; HG+XNT: 27.83±2.80 area%; P<0.05). Treatment with XNT did not alter the VEGF expression in HG animals (P>0.05). Altogether, these findings indicate that activation of ACE2 reduced the death of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis in HG rats. PMID:26421871

  8. Angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart. Predominance of the angiotensin-converting enzyme pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, L S; Abraham, W T; Meixell, G E; Vamvakias, B N; Quaife, R A; Lowes, B D; Roden, R L; Peacock, S J; Groves, B M; Raynolds, M V

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the contribution of myocardial tissue angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (Ang II) formation in the human heart is low compared with non-ACE pathways. However, little is known about the actual in vivo contribution of these pathways to Ang II formation in the human heart. To examine angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart, we administered intracoronary 123I-labeled angiotensin I (Ang I) with and without intracoronary enalaprilat to orthotopic heart transplant recipients. The fractional conversion of Ang I to Ang II, calculated after separation of angiotensin peptides by HPLC, was 0.415 +/- 0.104 (n = 5, mean +/- SD). Enalaprilat reduced fractional conversion by 89%, to a value of 0.044 +/- 0.053 (n = 4, P = 0.002). In a separate study of explanted hearts, a newly developed in vitro Ang II-forming assay was used to examine cardiac tissue ACE activity independent of circulating components. ACE activity in solubilized left ventricular membrane preparations from failing hearts was 49.6 +/- 5.3 fmol 125I-Ang II formed per minute per milligram of protein (n = 8, +/- SE), and 35.9 +/- 4.8 fmol/min/mg from nonfailing human hearts (n = 7, P = 0.08). In the presence of 1 microM enalaprilat, ACE activity was reduced by 85%, to 7.3 +/- 1.4 fmol/min/mg in the failing group and to 4.6 +/- 1.3 fmol/min/mg in the nonfailing group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the predominant pathway for angiotensin II formation in the human heart is through ACE. Images PMID:7657820

  9. Inhibitory effects of kiwifruit extract on human platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Dizdarevic, Lili L; Biswas, Dipankar; Uddin, M D Main; Jørgenesen, Aud; Falch, Eva; Bastani, Nasser E; Duttaroy, Asim K

    2014-01-01

    Previous human studies suggest that supplementation with kiwifruits lowers several cardiovascular risk factors such as platelet hyperactivity, blood pressure and plasma lipids. The cardiovascular health benefit of fruit and vegetables is usually attributed to the complex mixture of phytochemicals therein; however, kiwifruit's cardioprotective factors are not well studied. In this study, we investigated the effects of kiwifruit extract on human blood platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. A sugar-free, heat-stable aqueous extract with molecular mass less than 1000 Da was prepared from kiwifruits. Typically, 100 g kiwifruits produced 66.3 ± 5.8 mg (1.2 ± 0.1 mg CE) of sugar-free kiwifruit extract (KFE). KFE inhibited both human platelet aggregation and plasma ACE activity in a dose-dependent manner. KFE inhibited platelet aggregation in response to ADP, collagen and arachidonic acid, and inhibitory action was mediated in part by reducing TxA2 synthesis. The IC50 for ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 1.6 ± 0.2 mg/ml (29.0 ± 3.0 μg CE/ml), whereas IC50 for serum ACE was 0.6 ± 0.1 mg/ml (11.0 ± 1.2 μg CE/ml). Consuming 500 mg of KFE (9.0 mg CE) in 10 g margarine inhibited ex vivo platelet aggregation by 12.7%, 2 h after consumption by healthy volunteers (n = 9). All these data indicate that kiwifruit contains very potent antiplatelet and anti-ACE components. Consuming kiwifruits might be beneficial as both preventive and therapeutic regime in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24219176

  10. DNA Methylation Analysis of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Gene in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Peter; Baghai, Thomas C.; Schüle, Cornelius; Born, Christoph; Früstück, Clemens; Büttner, Andreas; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang; Varallo-Bedarida, Gabriella; Rupprecht, Rainer; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Bondy, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    Background The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) has been repeatedly discussed as susceptibility factor for major depression (MD) and the bi-directional relation between MD and cardiovascular disorders (CVD). In this context, functional polymorphisms of the ACE gene have been linked to depression, to antidepressant treatment response, to ACE serum concentrations, as well as to hypertension, myocardial infarction and CVD risk markers. The mostly investigated ACE Ins/Del polymorphism accounts for ∼40%–50% of the ACE serum concentration variance, the remaining half is probably determined by other genetic, environmental or epigenetic factors, but these are poorly understood. Materials and Methods The main aim of the present study was the analysis of the DNA methylation pattern in the regulatory region of the ACE gene in peripheral leukocytes of 81 MD patients and 81 healthy controls. Results We detected intensive DNA methylation within a recently described, functional important region of the ACE gene promoter including hypermethylation in depressed patients (p = 0.008) and a significant inverse correlation between the ACE serum concentration and ACE promoter methylation frequency in the total sample (p = 0.02). Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between the concentrations of the inflammatory CVD risk markers ICAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin and the degree of ACE promoter methylation in MD patients could be demonstrated (p = 0.01 - 0.04). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that aberrations in ACE promoter DNA methylation may be an underlying cause of MD and probably a common pathogenic factor for the bi-directional relationship between MD and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22808171

  11. Characterization of a secretase activity which releases angiotensin-converting enzyme from the membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Oppong, S Y; Hooper, N M

    1993-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.1.15.1) exists in both membrane-bound and soluble forms. Phase separation in Triton X-114 and a competitive e.l.i.s.a. have been employed to characterize the activity which post-translationally converts the amphipathic, membrane-bound form of ACE in pig kidney microvilli into a hydrophilic, soluble form. This secretase activity was enriched to a similar extent as other microvillar membrane proteins, was tightly membrane-associated, being resistant to extensive washing of the microvillar membranes with 0.5 M NaCl, and displayed a pH optimum of 8.4. The ACE secretase was not affected by inhibitors of serine-, thiol- or aspartic-proteases, nor by reducing agents or alpha 2-macroglobulin. The metal chelators, EDTA and 1,10-phenanthroline, inhibited the secretase activity, with, in the case of EDTA, an inhibitor concentration of 2.5 mM causing 50% inhibition. In contrast, EGTA inhibited the secretase by a maximum of 15% at a concentration of 10 mM. The inhibition of EDTA was reactivated substantially (83%) by Mg2+ ions, and partially (34% and 29%) by Zn2+ and Mn2+ ions respectively. This EDTA-sensitive secretase activity was also present in microsomal membranes prepared from pig lung and testis, and from human lung and placenta, but was absent from human kidney and human and pig intestinal brush-border membranes. The form of ACE released from the microvillar membrane by the secretase co-migrated on SDS/PAGE with ACE purified from pig plasma, thus the action and location of the secretase would be consistent with it possibly having a role in the post-translational proteolytic cleavage of membrane-bound ACE to generate the soluble form found in blood, amniotic fluid, seminal plasma and other body fluids. Images Figure 4 PMID:8389141

  12. QM/MM investigation of the catalytic mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xia; Zhang, Chunchun; Xu, Dingguo

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and degrades bradykinin and other vasoactive peptides. ACE inhibitors are used to treat diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. It is thus highly desirable to understand the catalytic mechanism of ACE, as this should facilitate the design of more powerful and selective ACE inhibitors. ACE exhibits two different active domains, the C-domain and the N-domain. In this work, we systematically investigated the inhibitor- and substrate-binding patterns in the N-domain of human ACE using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach. The hydrolysis of hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL) as catalyzed by the N-domain of human somatic ACE was explored, and the effects of chloride ion on the overall reaction were also investigated. Two models, one with and one without a chloride ion at the first binding position, were then designed to examine the chloride dependence of inhibitor-substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Our calculations indicate that the hydrolysis reaction follows a stepwise general base/general acid catalysis path. The estimated mean free energy barrier height in the two models is about 15.6 kcal/mol, which agrees very well with the experimentally estimated value of 15.8 kcal/mol. Our simulations thus suggest that the N-domain is in a mixed form during ACE-catalyzed hydrolysis, with the single-chloride-ion and the double-chloride-ion forms existing simultaneously. Graphical Abstract Superposition of ACE C- and N- domains. PMID:27184002

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities of enzymatically synthesized phenolic and vitamin glycosides.

    PubMed

    Charles, Rajachristu Einstein; Ponrasu, Thangavel; Sivakumar, Ramaiah; Divakar, Soundar

    2009-03-01

    Amyloglucosidase from Rhizopus mould and beta-glucosidase from sweet almond were employed for the preparation of phenolic and vitamin glycosides of vanillin, N-vanillylnonanamide, DL-dopa, dopamine, curcumin, alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), pyridoxine (vitamin B(6)), ergocalciferol (vitamin D(2)), thiamin (vitamin B(1)) and riboflavin (vitamin B(2)). Approx. 20 enzymatically prepared phenolic and vitamin glycosides were subjected to ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibition activity measurements, and 14 glycosides were tested for antioxidant activities. Both phenolic and vitamin glycosides exhibited IC(50) values for ACE inhibition in the 0.52+/-0.03-3.33+/-0.17 mM range and antioxidant activities ranging from 0.8+/-0.04 to 1.18+/-0.06 mM. Comparable ACE inhibition values were observed between free phenols and vitamin glycosides. However, antioxidant activities of glycosides were, in general, lesser than those of free phenols. Best IC(50) value for ACE inhibition were observed for 11-O-(D-fructofuranosyl)thiamin (0.52+/-0.03 mM), 3-hydroxy-4-O-(6-D-sorbitol)phenylalanine (0.56+/-0.03 mM), 4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)vanillin (0.61+/-0.03 mM), 4-O-(D-galactopyranosyl)vanillin (0.61+/-0.03 mM) and pyridoxine-D-glucoside (0.84+/-0.04 mM). Similarly, best IC(50) values for antioxidant activity were observed for 1,7-O-(bis-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)curcumin (0.8+/-0.04 mM), 4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)vanillin (0.9+/-0.05 mM), 3-hydroxy-4-O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1'-->4)beta-D-glucopyranosyl)phenylalanine (0.9+/-0.05 mM), 20-O-(D-glucopyranosyl)ergocalciferol (0.9+/-0.05 mM) and dopamine-D-galactoside (0.93+/-0.05 mM). PMID:18547170

  14. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme is elevated in association with underground coal mining

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.B.; Cale, W.F.; Lapp, N.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (SACE) and lysozyme activity were measured in a group of 40 underground coal miners and two control groups, 20 subjects with sarcoidosis and 15 normal non-dust-exposed volunteers. The miners were grouped first according to whether they had recent exposure (still actively mining or retired three years or less prior to measurement) or temporally more distant exposure (retired more than three years prior to measurement). Secondly, they were grouped as to whether or not they had coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). The subjects with sarcoidosis were grouped according to disease activity. As expected, the subjects with active sarcoidosis had elevated SACE activity compared with normal subjects. The coal miners as a group did not have elevation of their SACE activity. However, the coal miners with recent exposure had elevated SACE activity (57.1 {plus minus} 3.9 U/ml) compared with normal controls (43.8 {plus minus} 1.5 U/ml, p = 0.007). The SACE activity in miners without recent exposure was not elevated (39.8 {plus minus} 1.3 U/ml) compared with the normal controls. No increase in SACE activity was found when the miners were grouped according to the presence or absence of CWP. In contrast, the miners' serum lysozyme activity was not elevated. Since alveolar macrophages are a potential source of SACE, elevation of SACE activity in underground coal miners may reflect alveolar macrophage activation caused by increased pulmonary mixed coal mine dust burden. Furthermore, since both SACE and serum lysozyme are elevated in association with silicosis, these findings may confirm that the macrophage responses to inhaled silica and coal dust differ.

  15. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene Polymophism in Adult Primary Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Rozita; Wahab, Zaimi Abdul; Cader, Rizna; Gafor, Halim A.; Radzi, Azizah Md; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Tong, Norella Kong Chiew

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for a third of biopsy-proven primary glomerulonephritis in Malaysia. Pediatric studies have found the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene to be associated with renal disease progression. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the ACE (I/D) genotypes in adult primary FSGS and its association with renal outcome on follow-up. Methods Prospective observational study involving primary FSGS patients was conducted. Biochemical and urine tests at the time of study were compared to the time of the diagnosis and disease progression analyzed. ACE gene polymorphism was identified using polymerase chain reaction amplification technique and categorized into II, ID and DD genotypes. Results Forty-five patients with a median follow-up of 3.8 years (interquartile range: 1.8 - 5.6) were recruited. The commonest genotype was II (n = 23, 51.1%) followed by ID (n = 19, 42.2%) and DD (n = 3, 6.7%). The baseline characteristics were comparable between the II and non-II groups at diagnosis and at study recruitment except that the median urine protein-creatinine index was significantly lower in the II group compared to the non-II group (0.02 vs. 0.04 g/mmol (P = 0.03). Regardless of genotypes, all parameters of renal outcome improved after treatment. Conclusion The II followed by ID genotypes were the predominant ACE gene alleles in our FSGS. Although the D allele has been reported to have a negative impact on renal outcome, treatment appeared to be more important than genotype in preserving renal function in this cohort. PMID:24883149

  16. Genetic Variants of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Are Linked to Autism: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Firouzabadi, Negar; Erfani, Nasrallah; Fathi, Farshid; Bazrafkan, Mozhdeh; Bahramali, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background Autism is a disease of complex nature with a significant genetic component. The importance of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) elements in cognition and behavior besides the interaction of angiotensin II (Ang II), the main product of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), with neurotransmitters in CNS, especially dopamine, proposes the involvement of RAS in autism. Since the genetic architecture of autism has remained elusive, here we postulated that genetic variations in RAS are associated with autism. Methods Considering the relation between the three polymorphisms of ACE (I/D, rs4343 and rs4291) with the level of ACE activity, we have investigated this association with autism, in a case-control study. Genotype and allele frequencies of polymorphisms were determined in DNAs extracted from venous blood of 120 autistic patients and their age and sex-matched healthy controls, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) methods. Results There were strong associations between both DD genotype of ACE I/D and the D allele, with autism (P = 0.006, OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.64–5.13 and P = 0.006, OR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.37–3.48 respectively). Furthermore, a significant association between the G allele of rs4343 and autism was observed (P = 0.006, OR = 1.84, 95%CI = 1.26–2.67). Moreover, haplotype analysis revealed an association between DTG haplotype and autism (P = 0.008). Conclusion Our data suggests the involvement of RAS genetic diversity in increasing the risk of autism. PMID:27082637

  17. Angiotensin-Receptor Blocker, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, and Risks of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have protective effects against atrial fibrillation (AF). The differences between ARB and ACEI in their effects on the primary prevention of AF remain unclear. This study compared ARB and ACEI in combined antihypertensive medications for reducing the risk of AF in patients with hypertension, and determined which was better for AF prevention in a nationwide cohort study. Patients aged ≥55 years and with a history of hypertension were identified from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical records of 25,075 patients were obtained, and included 6205 who used ARB, 8034 who used ACEI, and 10,836 nonusers (no ARB or ACEI) in their antihypertensive regimen. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF. During an average of 7.7 years’ follow-up, 1619 patients developed new-onset AF. Both ARB (adjusted HR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.44–0.58, P < 0.001) and ACEI (adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.47–0.59, P < 0.001) reduced the risk of AF compared to nonusers. Subgroup analysis showed that ARB and ACEI were equally effective in preventing new-onset AF regardless of age, gender, the presence of heart failure, diabetes, and vascular disease, except for those with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). ARB prevents new-onset AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of stroke or TIA (log-rank P = 0.012). Both ARB and ACEI reduce new-onset AF in patients with hypertension. ARB prevents AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of prior stroke or TIA. PMID:27196491

  18. The association of angiotensin-converting enzyme with biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lower angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity could increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as ACE functions to degrade amyloid-β (Aβ). Therefore, we investigated whether ACE protein and activity levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were associated with CSF Aβ, total tau (tau) and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau). Methods We included 118 subjects from our memory clinic-based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (mean age 66 ± 8 years) with subjective memory complaints (n = 40) or AD (n = 78), who did not use antihypertensive drugs. We measured ACE protein levels (ng/ml) and activity (RFU) in CSF and serum, and amyloid β1–42, tau and ptau (pg/ml) in CSF. Results Cross-sectional regression analyses showed that ACE protein level and activity in CSF and serum were lower in patients with AD compared to controls. Lower CSF ACE protein level, and to a lesser extent serum ACE protein level and CSF ACE activity, were associated with lower CSF Aβ, indicating more brain Aβ pathology; adjusted regression coefficients (B) (95% CI) per SD increase were 0.09 (0.04; 0.15), 0.06 (0.00; 0.12) and 0.05 (0.00; 0.11), respectively. Further, lower CSF ACE protein level was associated with lower CSF tau and ptau levels; adjusted B’s (95% CI) per SD increase were 0.15 (0.06; 0.25) and 0.17 (0.10; 0.25), respectively. Conclusions These results strengthen the hypothesis that ACE degrades Aβ. This could suggest that lowering ACE levels by for example ACE-inhibitors might have adverse consequences for patients with, or at risk for AD. PMID:24987467

  19. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB.We conducted a nested case-control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates.From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66-0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine.In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, C.L.; O`Malley, J.P.; Illingworth, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The insertion/deletion polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE/ID) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI). Patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are known to be at greatly increased risk for heart disease because of their high levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol. We obtained DNA samples from 105 unrelated FH patients and typed them for ACE/ID by PCR analysis. The frequencies of the DD, DI, and II genotypes were 0.381, 0.390, and 0.229, respectively. The allele frequencies were 0.576 for D and 0.423 for I. This is similar to the allele frequencies observed by Cambien et al. in a control population in Toulouse, France. The relative risk for MI or coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed in patients who were aged 50 years or older. The criteria for CAD was history of coronary arterial bypass surgery. While the relative risk of having had a myocardial infarction was slightly increased from 0.14 (4/28) in the DI + II group to 0.16 (3/19) in the DD genotype, the differences were not statistically significant. The individual`s risk of CAD increased in the DD genotype, (0.579 of the DD population (n=19) compared to 0.321 of the DI + II population (n=28)). Therefore the ACE/ID polymorphism does appear to interact with FH in increasing a DD individual`s risk of heart disease by a factor of 1.8 relative to the DI and II genotypes.

  1. No association of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2) polymorphisms with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Benjafield, Adam V; Wang, William Y S; Morris, Brian J

    2004-07-01

    Recent intriguing findings from genetic linkage, knockout, and physiologic studies in mice and rats led us to conduct the first investigation of the novel angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2) in human hypertension (HT). We genotyped four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) (A-->G at nucleotide 1075 in intron 1, G-->A at nucleotide 8790 in intron 3, C-->G at nucleotide 28330 in intron 11, and G-->C at nucleotide 36787 in intron 16) in HT (n = 152) and normotensive (NT, n = 193) groups having inherently high biological power (>80%) due to our inclusion only of subjects whose parents had the same BP status as themselves. The SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (D' = 54% to 100%, P =.05 to 0.0001). Because ACE2 is on the X chromosome, data for each sex were analyzed separately. Minor allele frequencies in HT versus NT were as follows: for the intron 1 variant 0.21 versus 0.17 in female subjects (P =.31) and 0.25 versus 0.29 in male subjects (P =.60); intron 3 variant 0.22 versus 0.18 in female subjects (P =.35) and 0.15 versus 0.20 in male subjects (P =.47); intron 11 variant 0.39 versus 0.46 in male subjects (P = 0.17) and 0.31 versus 0.30 in male subjects (P =.96); intron 16 variant 0.20 versus 0.19 in female subjects (P =.72) and 0.17 versus 0.17 in male subjects (P =.95). Haplotype analysis was also negative. These data provide little support for ACE2 in genetic predisposition to HT. PMID:15233982

  2. Correlation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene polymorphisms with stage 2 hypertension in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenquan; Qi, Yue; Hou, Shuqin; Zhou, Wenyu; Qiu, Changchun

    2007-12-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of human ACE, might negatively regulate the activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and might function as a protective regulator in the pathogenesis of hypertension. However, association studies regarding ACE2 are sparse in the literature, with negative results in the majority of cases. Here we conducted an association study between 2 intronic polymorphisms (A1075G and G8790A) of the ACE2 gene and stage 2 hypertension in Han Chinese. We genotyped the 2 polymorphisms in 1494 subjects (808 stage 2 hypertensives and 686 normotensives) recruited from the Fangshan district (Beijing). Data were analyzed using chi(2) test, 1-way analysis of variance, and logistic regression where appropriate. The frequency of A1075G allele distribution in males differed significantly (P < 0.0001), whereas the genotype and allele distributions of G8790A polymorphism were similar, between stage 2 hypertensives and normotensives. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) differed significantly in females across both genotypes: SBP was significantly lower in subjects with the 1075AA and 8790GG genotypes, higher in the 1075GG (+13.65 mm Hg versus AA) and 8790AA (+13.36 mm Hg versus GG) genotypes, and intermediate in the 1075AG (+5.76 mm Hg versus AA) and 8790GA (+5.65 mm Hg versus GG) genotypes. Our data suggest that the polymorphism (A1075G) might be a risk factor-at least a marker-for stage 2 hypertension in males and that the 2 studied polymorphisms might be the indicators of systolic hypertension in females. PMID:18022600

  3. Inhibition of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity by Flavonoids: Structure-Activity Relationship Studies

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Ligia; Castillo, Julián; Quiñones, Mar; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Arola, Lluis; Pujadas, Gerard; Muguerza, Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that certain flavonoids can have an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, which plays a key role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. In the present study, 17 flavonoids belonging to five structural subtypes were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit ACE in order to establish the structural basis of their bioactivity. The ACE inhibitory (ACEI) activity of these 17 flavonoids was determined by fluorimetric method at two concentrations (500 µM and 100 µM). Their inhibitory potencies ranged from 17 to 95% at 500 µM and from 0 to 57% at 100 µM. In both cases, the highest ACEI activity was obtained for luteolin. Following the determination of ACEI activity, the flavonoids with higher ACEI activity (i.e., ACEI >60% at 500 µM) were selected for further IC50 determination. The IC50 values for luteolin, quercetin, rutin, kaempferol, rhoifolin and apigenin K were 23, 43, 64, 178, 183 and 196 µM, respectively. Our results suggest that flavonoids are an excellent source of functional antihypertensive products. Furthermore, our structure-activity relationship studies show that the combination of sub-structures on the flavonoid skeleton that increase ACEI activity is made up of the following elements: (a) the catechol group in the B-ring, (b) the double bond between C2 and C3 at the C-ring, and (c) the cetone group in C4 at the C-ring. Protein-ligand docking studies are used to understand the molecular basis for these results. PMID:23185345

  4. Endocrinological control and cellular localization of rat testicular angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3. 4. 15. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Velletri, P.A.; Aquilano, D.R.; Bruckwick, E.; Tsai-Morris, C.H.; Dufau, M.L.; Lovenberg, W.

    1985-06-01

    Hypophysectomy of prepubescent (3-week-old) rats prevented the pubertal development of testicular, but not pulmonary, angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1). Additionally, hypophysectomy resulted in a loss of testicular converting enzyme activity in 10-week-old rats that had achieved puberty and had developed enzyme activity. Hormone regimens consisting of FSH/LH (7.5 U/rat X day), hCG (10 U/rat X day), or testosterone (1 mg/rat X day) were employed to ascertain their ability to maintain activity in hypophysectomized rats. All three of the above hormone regimens, if initiated on the first day after hypophysectomy of 10-week-old rats, were capable of maintaining testicular converting enzyme activity. Centrifugal elutriation of dispersed testicular cells indicated that the majority of enzyme activity in mature rats was associated with the germinal cells, a result consistent with the data accumulated from the hormonal studies. Lastly, (/sup 3/H)captopril bound specifically to cellular fractions enriched in germinal cells. The above studies suggest that the pituitary gland is required for the development and maintenance of testicular angiotensin-converting enzyme in the rat by stimulating steroidogenesis in the testes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of converting enzyme activity to androgen coupled with the centrifugal elutriation and (/sup 3/H) captopril binding studies strongly support the notion that testicular converting enzyme is associated with germinal cells.

  5. Adipocyte-derived lipids increase angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and modulate macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Trouvain, Caroline; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Fleming, Ingrid

    2011-03-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages express the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) but nothing is known about its role under physiological conditions. As adipose tissue contains resident macrophages that have been implicated in the generation of insulin resistance in expanding fat mass, we determined whether adipocytes release factors that affect ACE expression and function in monocytes. Incubation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with conditioned medium from freshly isolated human adipocytes (BMI = 25.4 ± 0.96) resulted in a 4-fold increase in ACE expression. The effect was insensitive to denaturation and different proteases but abolished after lipid extraction. mRNA levels of the major histocompatibility complex class II protein increased in parallel with ACE, whereas the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 decreased. As a consequence of the reduction in MCP-1, monocyte recruitment was also attenuated. Moreover, adipocyte-conditioned medium prevented the interferon (IFN)-γ induced formation of TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, all markers of classically-activated (M1 type) macrophages. The decrease in cytokine expression in adipocyte-conditioned medium-treated macrophages was sensitive to ACE silencing by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Accordingly, ACE overexpression in THP-1 cells mimicked the effect of adipocyte-conditioned medium. In both cell types, ACE inhibition failed to affect the changes induced by adipocyte conditioned-medium treatment and ACE overexpression. Thus, the modulation of macrophage polarization by ACE appears to be mediated independently of enzyme activity, probably via intracellular signaling. Interestingly, human macrophage ACE expression was also upregulated by IL-4 and IL-13, which promote the "alternative" activation of macrophages and decreased by LPS and IFN-γ. Mechanistically, adipocyte-conditioned medium stimulated the phosphorylation of

  6. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Genotype Affects Skeletal Muscle Strength In Elite Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Aldo Matos; Silva, António José; Garrido, Nuno; Louro, Hugo; Marinho, Daniel Almeida; Cardoso Marques, Mário; Breitenfeld, Luiza

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) D allele with variability in the skeletal muscle baseline strength, though conclusions have been inconsistent across investigations. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible association between ACE genotype and skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite male and female athletes involved in different event expertise. A group of 58 elite athletes, designated as Olympic candidates, were studied: 35 swimmers (19 males and 16 females, 18.8 ± 3.2 years) and 23 triathletes (15 males and 8 females, 18.7 ± 3.0 years). The athletes were classified as: short (≤ 200m) and middle (400m to 1500m) distance athletes, respectively. For each subject the grip strength in both hands was measure using an adjustable mechanical hand dynamometer. The maximum height in both squat jump (SJ) and counter movement jump (CMJ) were also assessed, using a trigonometric carpet (Ergojump Digitime 1000; Digitest, Jyvaskyla, Finland). DNA extraction was obtained with Chelex 100® and genotype determination by PCR-RFLP methods. Both males and females showed significantly higher right grip strength in D allele carriers compared to II homozygote’s. We found that allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance specialization in both genders (p < 0.05). In fact, sprinter D allele carriers showed the superior scores in nearly all strength measurements (p < 0.05), in both genders. Among endurance athletes, the results also demonstrated that female D allele carriers exhibited the higher performance right grip and CMJ scores (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ACE D allele seems associated with skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite athletes, being easily identified in females. Key points DD homozygote’s and D allele carriers from both genders shows significantly higher right grip strength. Right grip strength remains significantly higher in the D allele carrier’s female endurance group. Female’s D allele

  7. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for targeted imaging of angiotensin converting enzyme design, characterization, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William Emmanuel

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States with approximately one in every three death being attributed to these diseases. The overarching problem with heart diseases is that once a person has suffered from an attack, there is a high likelihood of a recurrent attack. According to the American Heart Association, approximately 785,000 Americans per year suffer from heart attacks for the first time and about half of the aforementioned experience an ensuing attack. The second attack is often fatal, and therefore relapse prevention is crucial. One of the possible ways of averting the recurrence of such an attack is through the precise monitoring of the preceding biomarkers or risk indicators. This project encompasses the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of nanoparticle-based contrast agents that can potentially be used in the monitoring of the reemergence of a biomarker expressed after a person has suffered myocardial infarction. The overexpression of this biomarker, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), is also associated with development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis. To this end, highly concentrated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized and conjugated to Lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor, for the molecular imaging of ACE using X-ray CT. Various stabilities studies were conducted to verify the resistance of this gold nanoprobe in biological relevant media. They have also been successfully used in X-ray computed tomography to visualize tissue ACE and thus render them potentially versatile in the monitoring of cardiovascular diseases. An MRI tag was also conjugated to the gold nanoparticle affording the opportunity for bimodal imaging of ACE. This contrast agent could further be used for the quantification using K-edge CT of the relationship between the amount of the said marker and its role in predicting the possibility of a successive heart attack. The prepared nanoparticle-based contrast

  8. The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Modifies Exercise-Induced Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, David; Brogioli, Michael; Maier, Thomas; White, Andy; Waldron, Sarah; Rittweger, Jörn; Toigo, Marco; Wettstein, Jessica; Laczko, Endre; Flück, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A silencer region (I-allele) within intron 16 of the gene for the regulator of vascular perfusion, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is implicated in phenotypic variation of aerobic fitness and the development of type II diabetes. We hypothesised that the reportedly lower aerobic performance in non-carriers compared to carriers of the ACE I-allele, i.e. ACE-DD vs. ACE-ID/ACE-II genotype, is associated with alterations in activity-induced glucose metabolism and capillarisation in exercise muscle. Methods Fifty-three, not-specifically trained Caucasian men carried out a one-legged bout of cycling exercise to exhaustion and/or participated in a marathon, the aim being to identify and validate genotype effects on exercise metabolism. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER), serum glucose and lipid concentration, glycogen, and metabolite content in vastus lateralis muscle based on ultra-performance lipid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), were assessed before and after the cycling exercise in thirty-three participants. Serum metabolites were measured in forty subjects that completed the marathon. Genotype effects were assessed post-hoc. Results Cycling exercise reduced muscle glycogen concentration and this tended to be affected by the ACE I-allele (p = 0.09). The ACE-DD genotype showed a lower maximal RER and a selective increase in serum glucose concentration after exercise compared to ACE-ID and ACE-II genotypes (+24% vs. +2% and –3%, respectively). Major metabolites of mitochondrial metabolism (i.e. phosphoenol pyruvate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, L-Aspartic acid, glutathione) were selectively affected in vastus lateralis muscle by exercise in the ACE-DD genotype. Capillary-to-fibre ratio was 24%-lower in the ACE-DD genotype. Individuals with the ACE-DD genotype demonstrated an abnormal increase in serum glucose to 7.7 mM after the marathon. Conclusion The observations imply a genetically modulated role for ACE in control of

  9. Cardiac-restricted angiotensin-converting enzyme overexpression causes conduction defects and connexin dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kasi, Vijaykumar S.; Xiao, Hong D.; Shang, Lijuan L.; Iravanian, Shahriar; Langberg, Jonathan; Witham, Emily A.; Jiao, Zhe; Gallego, Carlos J.; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin (RAS) system activation is associated with an increased risk of sudden death. Previously, we used cardiac-restricted angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) overexpression to construct a mouse model of RAS activation. These ACE 8/8 mice die prematurely and abruptly. Here, we have investigated cardiac electrophysiological abnormalities that may contribute to early mortality in this model. In ACE 8/8 mice, surface ECG voltages are reduced. Intracardiac electrograms showed atrial and ventricular potential amplitudes of 11% and 24% compared with matched wild-type (WT) controls. The atrioventricular (AV), atrio-Hisian (AH), and Hisian-ventricular (HV) intervals were prolonged 2.8-, 2.6-, and 3.9-fold, respectively, in ACE 8/8 vs. WT mice. Various degrees of AV nodal block were present only in ACE 8/8 mice. Intracardiac electrophysiology studies demonstrated that WT and heterozygote (HZ) mice were noninducible, whereas 83% of ACE 8/8 mice demonstrated ventricular tachycardia with burst pacing. Atrial connexin 40 (Cx40) and connexin 43 (Cx43) protein levels, ventricular Cx43 protein level, atrial and ventricular Cx40 mRNA abundances, ventricular Cx43 mRNA abundance, and atrial and ventricular cardiac Na+ channel (Scn5a) mRNA abundances were reduced in ACE 8/8 compared with WT mice. ACE 8/8 mice demonstrated ventricular Cx43 dephosphorylation. Atrial and ventricular L-type Ca2+ channel, Kv4.2 K+ channel α-subunit, and Cx45 mRNA abundances and the peak ventricular Na+ current did not differ between the groups. In isolated heart preparations, a connexin blocker, 1-heptanol (0.5 mM), produced an electrophysiological phenotype similar to that seen in ACE 8/8 mice. Therefore, cardiac-specific ACE overexpression resulted in changes in connexins consistent with the phenotype of low-voltage electrical activity, conduction defects, and induced ventricular arrhythmia. These results may help explain the increased risk of arrhythmia in states of RAS activation such as

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibition for Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Lee, Jen Y.; Natanek, Amanda; Lewis, Amy; Murphy, Patrick B.; Hart, Nicholas; Moxham, John; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Kemp, Paul R.; Polkey, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle impairment is a recognized complication of COPD, predicting mortality in severe disease. Increasing evidence implicates the renin-angiotensin system in control of muscle phenotype. We hypothesized that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition would improve quadriceps function and exercise performance in COPD. METHODS: This double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial investigated the effect of the ACE inhibitor, fosinopril, on quadriceps function in patients with COPD with quadriceps weakness. Primary outcomes were change in quadriceps endurance and atrophy signaling at 3 months. Quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction (QMVC), mid-thigh CT scan of the cross-sectional area (MTCSA), and incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD) were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Eighty patients were enrolled (mean [SD], 65 [8] years, FEV1 43% [21%] predicted, 53% men). Sixty-seven patients (31 fosinopril, 36 placebo) completed the trial. The treatment group demonstrated a significant reduction in systolic BP (Δ−10.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, −19.9 to −1.1; P = .03) and serum ACE activity (Δ−20.4 IU/L; 95% CI, −31.0 to −9.8; P < .001) compared with placebo. No significant between-group differences were observed in the primary end points of quadriceps endurance half-time (Δ0.5 s; 95% CI, −13.3-14.3; P = .94) or atrogin-1 messenger RNA expression (Δ−0.03 arbitrary units; 95% CI, −0.32-0.26; P = .84). QMVC improved in both groups (fosinopril: Δ1.1 kg; 95% CI, 0.03-2.2; P = .045 vs placebo: Δ3.6 kg; 95% CI, 2.1-5.0; P < .0001) with a greater increase in the placebo arm (between-group, P = .009). No change was shown in the MTCSA (P = .09) or ISWD (P = .51). CONCLUSIONS: This randomized controlled trial found that ACE inhibition, using fosinopril for 3 months, did not improve quadriceps function or exercise performance in patients with COPD with quadriceps weakness. TRIAL REGISTRY: Current Controlled Trials; No.: ISRCTN05581879; URL: www

  11. Role of angiotensin converting enzyme in the vascular effects of an endopeptidase 24.15 inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Telford, S E; Smith, A I; Lew, R A; Perich, R B; Madden, A C; Evans, R G

    1995-01-01

    1. We investigated the role of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the cardiovascular effects of N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-aminobenzoate (cFP), a peptidase inhibitor selective for metalloendopeptidase (EP) E.C. 3.4.24.15. 2. In conscious rabbits, cFP (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) markedly slowed the degradation of [3H]-bradykinin, potentiated the depressor response to right atrial administration of bradykinin (10-1000 ng kg-1), and inhibited the pressor response to right atrial angiotensin I (10-100 ng kg-1). In each of these respects, the effects of cFP were indistinguishable from those of the ACE inhibitor, captopril (0.5 mg plus 10 mg kg-1h-1 i.v.). Furthermore, the effects of combined administration of cFP and captopril were indistinguishable from those of captopril alone. 3. In experimentally naive anaesthetized rats, cFP administration (9.3 mg kg-1, i.v.) was followed by a moderate but sustained fall in arterial pressure of 13 mmHg. However, in rats pretreated with bradykinin (50 micrograms kg-1) a more pronounced fall of 30 mmHg was observed. Captopril (5 mg kg-1) had similar hypotensive effects to those of cFP, and cFP had no effect when it was administered after captopril. 4. CFP displaced the binding of [125I]-351A (the p-hydroxybenzamidine derivative of lisinopril) from preparations of rat plasma ACE and solubilized lung membrane ACE (KD = 1.2 and 0.14 microM respectively), and inhibited rat plasma ACE activity (KI = 2.4 microM). Addition of phosphoramidon (10 microM), an inhibitor of a range of metalloendopeptidases, including neutral endopeptidase (E.C.3.4.24.11), markedly reduced the potency of cFP in these systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620708

  12. Lymphocyte-suppressing action of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in coronary artery disease patients with normal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2011-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders partially results from its anti-inflammatory action. No previous study has investigated the effect of any ACE inhibitor on lymphocyte cytokine release. In this study, we compared the effects of serum- and tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on systemic inflammation and lymphocyte secretory function in normotensive patients with stable coronary artery disease. The study included 134 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized into one of three groups and treated with enalapril (20 mg/d, n = 47), perindopril (4 mg/d, n = 45) or placebo (n = 42), respectively. The control group included 40 age-, sex- and weight-matched healthy subjects. The plasma lipid profile, glucose metabolism markers, hsCRP and lymphocyte cytokine release were examined at the beginning of the study and after 30 and 90 days of treatment. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T cells released significantly more interleukin-2, interferon-γ and TNFα than the lymphocytes of control subjects. Neither enalapril nor perindopril treatment was associated with any significant changes in blood pressure. Perindopril treatment inhibited lymphocyte cytokine release and systemic inflammation, while the effect of enalapril was insignificant. Perindopril, and, to a lesser extent, enalapril, strongly reduced lymphocyte cytokine release in insulin-resistant but not insulin-sensitive subjects. Our results indicate that perindopril is superior to enalapril in producing lymphocyte-suppressing and systemic anti-inflammatory effects in normotensive coronary artery disease patients. These effects may contribute to a reduction in the vascular risk of this group of patients, particularly in those subjects who are resistant to insulin, when these patients are treated with tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22180357

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme polymorphism and development of diabetic nephropathy in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Hemmi, H; Inoue, A; Yoshikawa, H; Tanegashima, M; Fushimi, T; Ishigami, M; Amagasaki, Y; Ohara, T; Shimatake, H

    1995-01-01

    We determined the distribution frequency of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in 111 Japanese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) of at least 10 years duration (80 patients with diabetic nephropathy and 31 patients without nephropathy) and 76 healthy Japanese controls. Patients with diabetic nephropathy showed an excess of the ID genotype compared with patients without nephropathy (p < 0.02) and less of the II genotype compared with healthy controls (p < 0.01) and patients without nephropathy (p < 0.01). NIDDM patients with the II genotype have a decreased risk for the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:7477652

  14. Design of Peptide Substrate for Sensitively and Specifically Detecting Two Aβ-Degrading Enzymes: Neprilysin and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Ting; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Lilian Tsai-Wei; Lo, Chun-Hsien; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chen, Rita P.-Y.; Wang, Steven S.-S.

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of neprilysin (NEP) to reduce Aβ accumulation in the brain is a promising strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This report describes the design and synthesis of a quenched fluorogenic peptide substrate qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC (with the sequence VHHQKAAC), which has a fluorophore, Alexa-350, linked to the side-chain of its C-terminal cysteine and a quencher, Dabcyl, linked to its N-terminus. This peptide emitted strong fluorescence upon cleavage. Our results showed that qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC is more sensitive to NEP than the previously reported peptide substrates, so that concentrations of NEP as low as 0.03 nM could be detected at peptide concentration of 2 μM. Moreover, qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC had superior enzymatic specificity for both NEP and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), but was inert with other Aβ-degrading enzymes. This peptide, used in conjunction with a previously reported peptide substrate qf-Aβ(1–7)C [which is sensitive to NEP and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE)], could be used for high-throughput screening of compounds that only upregulate NEP. The experimental results of cell-based activity assays using both qf-Aβ(1–7)C and qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC as the substrates confirm that somatostatin treatment most likely upregulates IDE, but not NEP, in neuroblastoma cells. PMID:27096746

  15. Studies on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Genotype Distributions in Turkish Preeclampsia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bereketoğlu, Ceyhun; Kasap, Mülkiye; Pazarbaşı, Ayfer

    2012-01-01

    Placental, immune and genetic factors are thought to play an important role in preeclampia (PE)'s pathophysiology. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) plays a vital role in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) which regulates blood pressure by converting angiotensin I into a powerfull vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. A deletion polymorphism (D allele) has been reported to be associated with elevated ACE activity. The aim of the this study was to investigate whether there is an association between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and PE. In this study, 120 preeclamptic and 116 normotensive Turkish pregnant women were genotyped for ACE I/D polymorphism and the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of this polymorphism in preeclampsia and controls were evaluated. Codominant, dominant and recessive models were appplied in ACE gene I/D polymorphism. In the codominant model, DD genotype was found significantly more frequent in preeclampsia than controls (P = 0.016). Moreover, in dominant model (DD frequency versus DI+II frequency) there was a significant relation between DD genotype and preeclampsia (P = 0.006). D allele frequency was 64.6% in preeclampsia while it was 56.1% in controls (P = 0.062). In conclusion, there was significant difference in genotype distribution between preeclampsia and controls. PMID:22545216

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril maleate) accelerates recovery of mouse skin from UVB-induced wrinkles

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura-Hachiya, Yuko; Arai, Koji Y.; Ozeki, Rieko; Kikuta, Ayako; Nishiyama, Toshio

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) increases in UVB-irradiated skin. •Administration of an ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced skin wrinkle. •ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced epidermal hypertrophy. •ACE inhibitor improved transepidermal water loss in the UVB-irradiated skin. -- Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II signaling regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling, as well as blood pressure, while in skin, angiotensin II signaling is involved in wound healing, inflammation, and pathological scar formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II is also involved in photoaging of skin. In this study, we examined the effect of enalapril maleate, an ACE inhibitor, on recovery of wrinkled skin of hairless mice exposed to long-term UVB irradiation. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that expression of ACE, angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in the skin was increased after UVB irradiation (3 times/week at increasing intensities for 8 weeks). Administration of enalapril maleate (5 times/week for 6 weeks, starting 1 week after 10-week irradiation) accelerated recovery from UVB-induced wrinkles, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal barrier dysfunction, as compared with the vehicle control. Our results indicate that ACE and angiotensin II activity are involved in skin photoaging, and suggest that ACE inhibitor such as enalapril maleate may have potential for improvement of photoaged skin.

  17. Radioimmunoimaging of lung vessels: An approach using indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, S.M.; Martynov, A.V.; Klibanov, A.L.; Slinkin, M.A.; Sakharov, I.Yu.; Malov, A.G.; Sergienko, V.B.; Vedernikov, A.Yu.; Muzykantov, V.R.; Torchilin, V.P.

    1989-10-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody against human angiotensin-converting enzyme was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In via diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid without substantial loss of antigen-binding capacity. This monoclonal antibody designated 9B9 cross-reacted with rat and monkey angiotensin-converting enzyme. Indium-111-labeled 9B9 selectively accumulated 10-20 times greater in the lung than in blood or other organs following intravenous administration in rats. Kinetics of lung accumulation and blood clearance were studied for {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody and compared to that of {sup 125}I-labeled 9B9 in rat. Highly specific accumulation of {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody in the lung of Macaca Rhesus monkeys after intravenous injection was monitored by gamma-imaging. Images of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody 9B9 biodistribution in monkey lung noticeably differ from the images of biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled albumin microspheres. This difference may provide information concerning the state of the endothelium of lung capillaries, which is different from the blood flow characteristics determined with routine microsphere technique.

  18. Pharmacology of a phosphorus-containing novel angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, SQ 29 852 in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohara, N; Yokota, S; Konishi, C; Shukunobe, K; Ono, H

    1991-12-01

    The effects of (S)-1[6-amino-2[[hydrozy(4- phenylbutyl)phosphinyl]oxy]-1-oxohexyl]-L-proline (SQ 29 852), a phosphorus-containing novel angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), which is synthesized aiming an ACEI with long-lasting activity and with few side effects, were studied using anesthetized dogs. SQ 29 852 was equipotent with captopril to modify blood pressure response of the animals to angiotensin I (Ang I) and bradykinin (Bdk). An intravenous infusion of SQ 29 852 at 0.1 mg/kg/min for 30 min caused a remarkable hypotension without reflex tachycardia in open-chest dogs. In these animals cardiac contractility (dP/dtmax of left ventricular pressure) appeared to be reduced by SQ 29 852 without any changes in right atrial pressure (RAP), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and aortic blood flow (AoF, cardiac output). In sodium-restricted dogs, the hypotension and renal vasodilation by SQ 29 852 (at 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/kg, i.v.) were slightly pronounced compared with animals fed with normal diet. It is demonstrated from these results that SQ 29 852 has comparable potency with captopril to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity and as common a pharmacological profile as ACEI. SQ 29 852 may be a favorable antihypertensive agent, if its long-lasting activity and few side effects are confirmed. PMID:1812274

  19. The pharmacological mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat - a study on enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingrid A-L

    2012-04-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) and Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis Dahlg.) inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro and in vivo. The ACE inhibitor enalaprilat has been described previously as a competitive inhibitor and sometimes as a non-competitive inhibitor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of ACE inhibition of green tea and Rooibos by enzyme kinetics, and to compare this with enalaprilat. A Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Lineweaver-Burk graph showed mean values of V(max)  = 3.73 µM and K(m)  = 0.71 µM for green tea, of V(max)  = 6.76 µM and K(m)  = 0.78 µM for Rooibos, of V(max)  = 12.54 µM and K(m)  = 2.77 µM for enalaprilat, and of V(max)  = 51.33 µM and K(m)  = 9.22 µM for the PBS control. Incubating serum with green tea or Rooibos saturated with zinc chloride did not change the inhibitory effect. Enalaprilat preincubated with zinc chloride showed a decrease in the inhibitory effect. In conclusion, green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat seem to inhibit ACE activity using a mixed inhibitor mechanism. PMID:22095883

  20. Molecular evidence for the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme in hemocytes of Locusta migratoria: stimulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Macours, N; Hens, K; Francis, C; De Loof, A; Huybrechts, R

    2003-08-01

    The presence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in insects has been reported many times, but numerous questions about the functional role of this enzyme in insects remain. Here we show by RT-PCR experiments that ACE has a wide tissue distribution in Locusta migratoria, suggesting diverse roles for this enzyme in the locust. Immune challenge through injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides resulted in a tenfold increase of ACE gene transcripts in the hemocytes and is suggestive for a role of ACE in the cellular defense of the locust. However, phenotypic knockout experiments with the ACE inhibitor captopril showed that ACE is not essential for the efficient clearance of injected E. coli bacteria. PMID:12880654

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene 2350 G/A polymorphism and susceptibility to atrial fibrillation in Han Chinese patients with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Min-Hui; Su, Ya-Min; Tang, Jian-Zhong; Shen, Yan-Bo; Deng, Xin-Tao; Yuan, Ding-Shan; Wu, Jie; Pan, Min; Huang, Zhong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The angiotensin-converting enzyme gene is one of the most studied candidate genes related to atrial fibrillation. Among the polymorphisms of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene, the 2350 G/A polymorphism (rs4343) is known to have the most significant effects on the plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme concentration. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2350 G/A polymorphism with atrial fibrillation in Han Chinese patients with essential hypertension. METHODS: A total of 169 hypertensive patients were eligible for this study. Patients with atrial fibrillation (n = 75) were allocated to the atrial fibrillation group, and 94 subjects without atrial fibrillation were allocated to the control group. The PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was used to assess the genotype frequencies. RESULTS: The distributions of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2350 G/A genotypes (GG, GA, and AA, respectively) were 40.43%, 41.49%, and 18.08% in the controls and 18.67%, 46.67%, and 34.66% in the atrial fibrillation subjects (p = 0.037). The frequency of the A allele in the atrial fibrillation group was significantly greater than in the control group (58.00% vs. 38.83%, p = 0.0007). Compared with the wild-type GG genotype, the GA and AA genotypes had an increased risk for atrial fibrillation. Additionally, atrial fibrillation patients with the AA genotype had greater left atrial dimensions than the patients with the GG or GA genotypes (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this study indicate that the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2350 G/A polymorphism is associated with atrial fibrillation and that the A allele shows an increased risk for atrial fibrillation in Han Chinese patients with essential hypertension. PMID:24270955

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in women of childbearing age: risks versus benefits.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Mark; Sarween, Nadia; Knox, Ellen; Lipkin, Graham; Martin, Una

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are effective and widely used antihypertensive drugs. Exposure to these agents is known to be harmful to the fetus in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Concerns have also been raised about the risk of congenital malformations if ACEIs or ARBs are taken during the first trimester of pregnancy. The evidence to date, however, is conflicting and observed malformations may be due to confounders such as undiagnosed diabetes or maternal obesity, other antihypertensive medications or the hypertension itself. Nonetheless, in women who become pregnant while taking an ACEI or ARB, the drug should be stopped as soon as possible. In women with chronic kidney disease and proteinuria, it may be appropriate to continue taking an ACEI or ARB until the pregnancy is confirmed because of the significant benefit to their kidney function and the lower fertility rate in these patients. PMID:25612630

  3. An Unusual Case of Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibitor-Related Penile Angioedema with Evolution to the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jonathan G.; Bench, Elias M.; Plantmason, Lee

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old African American male with a long history of poorly controlled hypertension presented to the emergency department (ED) with two days of genital edema and pain. During ED work-up, the patient developed sudden onset of non-pitting, non-pruritic, and non-urticarial upper lip edema. Review of his antihypertensive medication list revealed that he normally took benazepril, highly suggestive of a diagnosis of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor-related angioedema (ACEI-RA). We present the first reported case of penile ACEI-RA that progressed to involve the oropharynx. The ED management of the condition and some of the newer treatment options available for ACEI-RA is also briefly discussed. PMID:26759679

  4. The angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion–deletion polymorphism in a white British patient cohort with obstetric cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Müllenbach, Roman; Tetlow, Natasha; Bennett, Amanda; Pipkin, Fiona Broughton; Morgan, Linda; Williamson, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The DD genotype of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene is over-represented in Finnish patients with obstetric cholestasis (OC). The purpose of this study was to establish whether this genotype is associated with cholestasis in UK cases. In a retrospective case-control study, we determined the ACE insertion/deletion frequencies in 166 British cases and 100 control women by polymerase chain reaction analysis. No significant difference in allele frequencies was found between these groups, but allele frequencies differed significantly between Finnish and UK OC cases (P = 0.0005). The prevalence of the DD genotype is lower in UK cases than in controls (χ2 [1 d.f.] = 4.32, P = 0.05) and the odds ratio for OC associated with the DD genotypeis 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.30–0.97. In contrast to Finnish OC cases, the DD genotype of the ACE is not increased in UK cases.

  5. Effects of nabumetone, celecoxib, and ibuprofen on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Robert; Weiss, Robert; Zusman, Randall M; Haig, Ann; Flavin, Susan; MacDonald, Brian

    2003-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs interfere with certain antihypertensive therapies. In a double-blind study, 385 hypertensive patients stabilized on an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor were treated with nabumetone, celecoxib, ibuprofen, or placebo for 4 weeks. Ibuprofen caused significantly greater increases in systolic (P < .001) and diastolic (P < .01) blood pressures (BPs) compared to placebo, but not nabumetone or celecoxib. The proportion of patients with systolic BP increases of clinical concern at end point was significantly higher (P < .001) for the ibuprofen group (16.7%; 15 of 90), but not for the nabumetone group (5.5%; 5 of 91) or the celecoxib group (4.6%; 4 of 87) compared to the placebo group (1.1%; 1 of 91). PMID:12559680

  6. Aliskiren – an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  7. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  8. Aliskiren - an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2014-08-29

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  9. Predictors of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced reduction of urinary albumin excretion in nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    van de Wal, Ruud M A; Gansevoort, Ron T; van der Harst, Pim; Boomsma, Frans; Thijs Plokker, H W; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; de Jong, Paul E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Voors, Adriaan A

    2006-11-01

    Urinary albumin excretion is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated which parameters determine baseline urinary albumin excretion in nondiabetic subjects, without renal disease. In addition, we evaluated the parameters that predict the albuminuria-lowering efficacy of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. In this substudy of the Prevention of Renal and Vascular Endstage Disease Intervention Trial, 384 microalbuminuric patients were included. Patient and biochemical characteristics were obtained at baseline and after 3 months of double-blinded, randomized treatment (fosinopril 20 mg or placebo). Mean age was 51.1+/-11.5 years, and 65.6% were male. Median urinary albumin excretion was 22.2 mg per 24 hours. At baseline, mean arterial pressure (beta(standardized)=0.161; P=0.006), urinary sodium excretion (beta(standardized)=0.154; P=0.011), and estimated renal function were independently associated with albumin excretion. In these predominantly normotensive to prehypertensive subjects, fosinopril reduced albumin excretion by 18.5% versus a 6.1% increase on placebo after 3 months (P<0.001). Fosinopril use and blood pressure reduction independently predicted the change in urinary albumin excretion. Baseline urinary albumin excretion independently predicted the antialbuminuric effect of fosinopril (beta(standardized)=-0.303; P<0.001). In conclusion, at baseline, sodium intake and blood pressure were positively associated with urinary albumin excretion. Fosinopril reduced albuminuria more than might be expected from its blood pressure-lowering effect alone, and this effect was more outspoken in subjects with higher baseline albumin excretion. Based on our data, we hypothesize that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition may result in superior cardiovascular protection when compared with other blood pressure-lowering agents in subjects with higher baseline levels of albuminuria. PMID:17000930

  10. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question. PMID:27246933

  11. Short communication: Measuring the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of an 8-amino acid (8mer) fragment of the C12 antihypertensive peptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An eight amino acid fragment (PFPEVFGK) of a known milk protein-derived antihypertensive peptide was synthesized by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis and purified by reverse phase HPLC. Its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme was assessed and compared to that of the ...

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-induced angioedema treated by C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (Berinert®): about one case and review of the therapeutic arsenal

    PubMed Central

    Lipski, Samuel Michael; Casimir, Georges; Vanlommel, Martine; Jeanmaire, Mathieu; Dolhen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert®) is generally used to treat severe attack of hereditary angioedema. We describe here the case of a patient who presented with a severe angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) endangering her life. It could be successfully treated with that medicine. PMID:25767713

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-induced angioedema treated by C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (Berinert®): about one case and review of the therapeutic arsenal.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Samuel Michael; Casimir, Georges; Vanlommel, Martine; Jeanmaire, Mathieu; Dolhen, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert®) is generally used to treat severe attack of hereditary angioedema. We describe here the case of a patient who presented with a severe angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) endangering her life. It could be successfully treated with that medicine. PMID:25767713

  14. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury: an overview.

    PubMed

    Zughaib, M E; Sun, J Z; Bolli, R

    1993-01-01

    There are multiple mechanisms whereby ACE inhibitors could be beneficial during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, including: i) reduced formation of angiotensin II, ii) decreased metabolism of bradykinin, iii) antioxidant activity, and iv) possibly other unknown mechanisms. Reduced formation of angiotensin II should be beneficial because this peptide exerts several actions that are potentially detrimental to the ischemic/reperfused myocardium, including vasoconstriction, increased release of norepinephrine, stimulation of phospholipase C and/or A2, and increased afterload with an attendant increase in oxygen demands. Reduced metabolism of bradykinin could be beneficial by increasing myocardial glucose uptake, by causing vasodilation, and by stimulating production of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and prostacyclin. Although earlier studies suggested that sulfhydryl-containing ACE inhibitors scavenge superoxide anions, recent data have shown that these drugs scavenge hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid with no effect on superoxide anion. Studies in isolated hearts have demonstrated that ACE inhibitors attenuate the metabolic, arrhythmic, and contractile dearrangements associated with ischemia and reperfusion, and have suggested that such beneficial effects are mediated by potentiation of bradykinin and/or increased synthesis of prostacyclin. Studies in models of myocardial stunning after brief (15-min) ischemia in vivo (anesthetized dogs) suggest that ACE inhibitors enhance the recovery of contractile function after a single brief ischemic episode. No data are available regarding the effect of these drugs on myocardial stunning after a prolonged, partly reversible episode, after multiple consecutive brief ischemic episodes, and after global ischemia. The mechanism for the salutary effects of ACE inhibitors on stunning remains a mystery. It may involve an antioxidant action (in the case of thiol-containing molecules) or potentiation of prostaglandins (in

  15. Cognitive enhancing effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Nade, V. S.; Kawale, L. A.; Valte, K. D.; Shendye, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate cognitive enhancing property of angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in rats. Materials and Methods: The elevated plus maze (EPM), passive avoidance test (PAT), and water maze test (WMT) were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity in young and aged rats. Ramipril (10 mg/kg, p.o.), perindopril (10 mg/kg, i.p), losartan (20 mg/kg, i.p), and valsartan (20 mg/kg, p.o) were administered to assess their effect on learning and memory. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p) was used to impair cognitive function. Piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p) was used as reference drug. Results: All the treatments significantly attenuated amnesia induced by aging and scopolamine. In EPM, aged and scopolamine-treated rats showed an increase in transfer latency (TL) whereas, ACEI and ARBs showed a significant decrease in TL. Treatment with ACEI and ARBs significantly increased step down latencies and decreased latency to reach the platform in target quadrant in young, aged and scopolamine-treated animals in PAT and WMT, respectively. The treatments inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme in the brain. Similarly, all the treatments attenuated scopolamine-induced lipid peroxidation and normalize antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion: The results suggest that the cognitive enhancing effect of ACEI and ARBs may be due to inhibition of AChE or by regulation of antioxidant system or increase in formation of angiotensin IV. PMID:26069362

  16. Pharmacogenetic Risk Stratification in Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Treated Patients with Congestive Heart Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nelveg-Kristensen, Karl Emil; Busk Madsen, Majbritt; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Egfjord, Martin; Berg Rasmussen, Henrik; Riis Hansen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence for pharmacogenetic risk stratification of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) treatment is limited. Therefore, in a cohort of ACEI-treated patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), we investigated the predictive value of two pharmacogenetic scores that previously were found to predict ACEI efficacy in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypertension, respectively. Score A combined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the angiotensin II receptor type 1 gene (rs275651 and rs5182) and the bradykinin receptor B1 gene (rs12050217). Score B combined SNPs of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (rs4343) and ABO blood group genes (rs495828 and rs8176746). Methods Danish patients with CHF enrolled in the previously reported Echocardiography and Heart Outcome Study were included. Subjects were genotyped and categorized according to pharmacogenetic scores A and B of ≤1, 2 and ≥3 each, and followed for up to 10 years. Difference in cumulative incidences of cardiovascular death and all-cause death were assessed by the cumulative incidence estimator. Survival was modeled by Cox proportional hazard analyses. Results We included 667 patients, of whom 80% were treated with ACEIs. Differences in cumulative incidences of cardiovascular death (P = 0.346 and P = 0.486) and all-cause death (P = 0.515 and P = 0.486) were not significant for score A and B, respectively. There was no difference in risk of cardiovascular death or all-cause death between subjects with score A ≤1 vs. 2 (HR 1.03 [95% CI 0.79–1.34] and HR 1.11 [95% CI 0.88–1.42]), score A ≤1 vs. ≥3 (HR 0.80 [95% CI 0.59–1.08] and HR 0.91 [95% CI 0.70–1.20]), score B ≤1 vs. 2 (HR 1.02 [95% CI 0.78–1.32] and HR 0.98 [95% CI 0.77–1.24]), and score B ≤1 vs. ≥3 (HR 1.03 [95% CI 0.75–1.41] and HR 1.05 [95% CI 0.79–1.40]), respectively. Conclusions We found no association between either of the analyzed pharmacogenetic scores and fatal outcomes in ACEI

  17. A new high-resolution crystal structure of the Drosophila melanogaster angiotensin converting enzyme homologue, AnCE.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Charlotte; Acharya, K Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase with an essential role in blood pressure homeostasis in mammals. ACE has long been targeted in the treatment of hypertension through ACE inhibitors, however current inhibitors are known to cause severe side effects. Therefore, there is a requirement for a new generation of ACE inhibitors and structural information will be invaluable in their development. ACE is a challenging enzyme to work with due to its extensive glycosylation. As such, the Drosophila melanogaster ACE homologue, AnCE, which shares ∼60% sequence similarity with human ACE, can be used as a model for studying inhibitor binding. The presence of ligands originating from the crystallisation condition at the AnCE active site has proved an obstacle to studying the binding of new inhibitor precursors. Here we present the crystal structure of AnCE (in a new crystal form) at 1.85 Å resolution, using crystals grown under different conditions. This new structure may be more suitable for studying the binding of new compounds, with the potential of developing a new generation of improved ACE inhibitors. PMID:26380810

  18. Implications of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in health and disease: a snapshot review

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    This review considers the 250+ papers concerning the association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs1799752) and various disease conditions published in 2009. The deletion allele occurs in approximately 55% of the population and is associated with increased activity of the ACE enzyme. It might be predicted that the D allele, therefore, might be associated with pathologies involving increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system. The D allele was seen to be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, pre-eclampsia, heart failure, cerebral infarct, diabetic nephropathy, encephalopathy, asthma, severe hypoglycaemia in diabetes, gastric cancer (in Caucasians) and poor prognosis following kidney transplant. On the positive side, the D allele appears to offer protection against schizophrenia and chronic periodontitis and confers greater up-per-body strength in old age. The I allele, meanwhile, offers improved endurance/athletic performance and aerobic capacity as determined by lung function tests, although it does increase the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma and obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensives. PMID:21537387

  19. Increase of migration of cultured endothelial cells by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor derived from tuna muscle.

    PubMed

    Kohama, Y; Oka, H; Murayama, N; Iida, K; Itoh, M; Itoh, M; Ying, X; Mimura, T

    1992-05-01

    The influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory octapeptide derived from tuna muscle (tuna AI) on the bovine aorta endothelial cell (BAEC) migration was investigated, as compared with captopril. BAEC migration was quantitated 6 d after release from contact inhibition by a teflon fence assay. The culture grown in the presence of tuna AI (1 and 10 microM) clearly exhibited an increase in migration, compared with the control. The media collected from tuna AI (1 and 10 microM)-stimulated BAECs significantly exhibited the interleukin (IL) -1 activity that was detected by the thymocyte costimulation assay with phytohemagglutinin. Although tuna AI was a weaker ACE inhibitor than captopril, the increasing effect of tuna AI on the migration and the IL-1 generation in BAECs was slightly greater than that of captopril. In quiescent BAECs, tuna AI (1 microM) apparently induced c-myc and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) A-chain messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expressions within 30 min, which persisted for 6 h. In contrast, captopril induced a very low expression of c-myc mRNA, and had no relation to PDGF A-chain mRNA expression. These results suggest that the increase of BAEC migration by tuna AI, unlike captopril, is likely related to the induction or activation of IL-1, and c-myc and PDGF mRNAs, in addition to the inhibition of the conversion of endogenous angiotensin I to angiotensin II. PMID:1527698

  20. Significant correlation of angiotensin converting enzyme and glycoprotein IIIa genes polymorphisms with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss in north of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fazelnia, Shokoufeh; Farazmandfar,, Touraj; Hashemi-Soteh, Seyed Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous abortion is considered as the most complex problem during pregnancy. Thrombophilia is resumed as a cause of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). Glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) gene is involved in thrombosis and abortion. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and is involved in thrombosis. The most common polymorphism in this gene is the insertion/deletion (I/D). Objective: In this study, we analyzed the association between ACE I/D and GPIIIa c.98C >T polymorphisms in women with unexplained RPL from the north of Iran. Materials and Methods: Sample population consisted of 100 women with unexplained RPL and 100 controls. The ACE I/D and GPIIIa c.98C>T polymorphisms were genotyped by TETRA-ARMS PCR. The association between genotypes frequency and RPL were analyzed using χ2 and exact fisher tests. Associated risk with double genotype combinations was also investigated by binary logistic regression. Results: There was significant association between ACE DD genotype and RPL (OR=2.04; 95% CI=0.94-4.44; p=0.036). ACE D Allele was also significantly associated with the RPL (OR=1.59; 95% CI=1.05-2.41; p=0.013). No significant association was observed between GPIIIa c.98C>T polymorphism and RPL. Conclusion: ACE I/D polymorphism may probably be a prognostic factor in female family members of women with the history of recurrent abortion. PMID:27326417

  1. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5th day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  2. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition does not affect the response to exogenous angiotensin II in the human forearm.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, D; Stewart, D; Webster, J; Benjamin, N

    1994-01-01

    Suppression of endogenous levels of angiotensin II by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition, may result in up-regulation of vascular AT1 receptors. We have evaluated the effects of orally administered enalapril on angiotensin II induced vasoconstriction in the human forearm. Subjects received in random order, enalapril (20 mg) or matched placebo daily for 2 weeks. Forearm blood flow response to increasing doses of angiotensin II was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography at the beginning of the study and at the end of each 2 week treatment period. Treatment with enalapril significantly reduced plasma angiotensin II levels and supine blood pressure compared with placebo. The percentage reductions in forearm blood flow in the infused arm, in response to the maximum dose of angiotensin II (50,000 fmol min-1) were 48.1 +/- 3.6% at baseline, 57.5 +/- 3.6% on placebo and 54.5 +/- 4.2% on enalapril. The differences were not significantly different. This demonstrates that suppression of plasma angiotensin II for a 14 day period does not enhance the response to exogenous intra-arterial angiotensin II in the human forearm of healthy salt replete subjects. PMID:7893582

  3. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and familial hypercholesterolemia in the Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of the association between genotype and phenotype is of great importance for the prediction of multiple diseases and pathophysiological conditions. The relationship between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) Insertion/Deletion (I/D) polymorphism and Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been not fully investigated in all the ethnicities. In this study we sought to determine the frequency of I/D polymorphism genotypes of ACE gene in Saudi patients with FH. Results This is a case–control study carried out purely in Saudi population. Genomic DNA was isolated from 128 subjects who have participated in this study. ACE gene I/D polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction in 64 FH cases and 64 healthy controls. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to genotype distribution. Furthermore, we did not find any significant difference in the frequency of ACE I/D polymorphism in FH subjects when stratified by gender (p = 0.43). Conclusion Our data suggest that ACE gene I/D polymorphism examined in this study has no role in predicting the occurrence and diagnosis of FH. PMID:24289455

  4. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5(th) day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  5. Cardiovascular risk reduction in hypertension: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers. Where are we up to?

    PubMed

    Sindone, A; Erlich, J; Lee, C; Newman, H; Suranyi, M; Roger, S D

    2016-03-01

    Previously, management of hypertension has concentrated on lowering elevated blood pressure. However, the target has shifted to reducing absolute cardiovascular (CV) risk. It is estimated that two in three Australian adults have three or more CV risk factors at the same time. Moderate reductions in several risk factors can, therefore, be more effective than major reductions in one. When managing hypertension, therapy should be focused on medications with the strongest evidence for CV event reduction, substituting alternatives only when a primary choice is not appropriate. Hypertension management guidelines categorise angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) interchangeably as first-line treatments in uncomplicated hypertension. These medications have different mechanisms of action and quite different evidence bases. They are not interchangeable and their prescription should be based on clinical evidence. Despite this, currently ARB prescriptions are increasing at a higher rate than those for ACEI and other antihypertensive classes. Evidence that ACEI therapy prevents CV events and death, in patients with coronary artery disease or multiple CV risk factors, emerged from the European trial on reduction of cardiac events with perindopril in stable coronary artery disease (EUROPA) and Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) trials respectively. The consistent benefit has been demonstrated in meta-analyses. The clinical trial data for ARB are less consistent, particularly regarding CV outcomes and mortality benefit. The evidence supports the use of ACEI (Class 1a) compared with ARB despite current prescribing trends. PMID:26968600

  6. Sleep-related movement disorder symptoms in SHR are attenuated by physical exercise and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Frank, Miriam Kannebley; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Lee, Kil Sun; Daubian-Nosé, Paulo; Tufik, Sergio; Esteves, Andrea Maculano

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between hypertension and sleep-related movement disorders has been hypothesized for humans, but the causes and mechanisms have not been elucidated. We investigated whether an alteration in blood pressure (BP) induced by physical exercise and/or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril) could affect locomotor activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats, with emphasis on the dopaminergic system. We used SHR and normotensive Wistar rats distributed into 4 groups for each strain: control, physical exercise, enalapril and physical exercise+enalapril. Physical exercise was performed on a treadmill, and enalapril was administered by gavage, both for 8weeks. During this period, locomotor activity was evaluated in an open field test, and BP was evaluated by tail plethysmography. Dopaminergic receptors, dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase levels at the striatum were evaluated by Western blotting. The control group of spontaneously hypertensive rats showed higher BP, increased activity in the open field test and lower levels of D2 receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase compared with all other groups throughout the experimental period. In general, physical exercise and enalapril attenuated these alterations. This study suggested the existence of comorbidity between hypertension and sleep-related movement disorders in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Physical exercise and enalapril conferred protection for both hypertension and the observed behavioral changes. In addition, these treatments led to changes in dopaminergic signaling in the striatal region (i.e., D2 receptor, TH and DAT). PMID:26650246

  7. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Carry a Risk?

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Martin; Pourcelet, Aline; van Nuffelen, Marc; Racapé, Judith; Leeman, Marc; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), mainly excreted by the liver, the dosage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, cleared by the kidney, must be adapted to account for renal clearance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to avoid acute kidney injury (AKI). Community-acquired AKI and the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the emergency department were retrospectively assessed in 324 patients with baseline stage 3 or higher CKD. After stepwise regression analysis, the use of ACE inhibitors (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.1; P=.02) and the presence of dehydration (OR, 30.8; 95% CI, 3.9-239.1) were associated with AKI. A total of 45% of patients using ACE inhibitors experienced overdosing, which causes most of the excess risk of AKI. These results suggest that dosage adjustment of ACE inhibitors to renal function or substitution of ACE inhibitors with ARBs could reduce the incidence of AKI. Moreover, ACE inhibitors and ARBs should be stopped in cases of dehydration. PMID:27080620

  8. Preoperative angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor usage in patients with chronic subdural hematoma: Associations with initial presentation and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neidert, Marian C; Schmidt, Tobias; Mitova, Tatyana; Fierstra, Jorn; Bellut, David; Regli, Luca; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bozinov, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the association of preoperative usage of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with the initial presentation and clinical outcome of patients with chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Patients treated for cSDH between 2009 and 2013 at our institution were included in this retrospective case-control study. Medical charts were reviewed retrospectively and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Out of 203 patients (58 females, mean age 73.2years), 53 (26%) patients were on ACE inhibitors before their presentation with cSDH. Median initial hematoma volume in individuals with ACE inhibitors (179.2±standard error of the mean [SEM] 13.0ml) was significantly higher compared to patients without ACE inhibitors (140.4±SEM 6.2ml; p=0.007). There was an increased probability of surgical reintervention in the ACE inhibitor group (12/53, 23% versus 19/153, 12%; p=0.079), especially in patients older than 80years (6/23, 26% versus 3/45, 7%; p=0.026). ACE inhibitors are associated with higher hematoma volume in patients with cSDH and with a higher frequency of recurrences requiring surgery (especially in the very old). We hypothesize that these effects are due to ACE inhibitor induced bradykinin elevation causing increased vascular permeability of the highly vascularized neomembranes in cSDH. PMID:26898577

  9. Fine-Mapping Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene: Separate QTLs Identified for Hypertension and for ACE Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chia-Min; Wang, Ruey-Yun; Fann, Cathy S. J.; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Kang, Chih-Sen; Chen, Chien-Chung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in multiple biological system, particularly cardiovascular diseases. However, findings associating ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism with hypertension or other related traits are inconsistent. Therefore, in a two-stage approach, we aimed to fine-map ACE in order to narrow-down the function-specific locations. We genotyped 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ACE from 1168 individuals from 305 young-onset (age ≤40) hypertension pedigrees, and found four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks. A tag-SNP, rs1800764 on LD block 2, upstream of and near the ACE promoter, was significantly associated with young-onset hypertension (p = 0.04). Tag-SNPs on all LD blocks were significantly associated with ACE activity (p-value: 10–16 to <10–33). The two regions most associated with ACE activity were found between exon13 and intron18 and between intron 20 and 3′UTR, as revealed by measured haplotype analysis. These two major QTLs of ACE activity and the moderate effect variant upstream of ACE promoter for young-onset hypertension were replicated by another independent association study with 842 subjects. PMID:23469169

  10. Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 attenuates tonically active glutamatergic input to the rostral ventrolateral medulla in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Kai; Shen, Du; Hao, Qiang; Yu, Qiang; Wu, Zhao-Tang; Deng, Yu; Chen, Yan-Fang; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Hu, Qi-Kuan; Su, Ding-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) plays a key role in cardiovascular regulation. It has been reported that tonically active glutamatergic input to the RVLM is increased in hypertensive rats, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the brain has been suggested to be beneficial to hypertension. This study was designed to determine the effect of ACE2 gene transfer into the RVLM on tonically active glutamatergic input in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Lentiviral particles containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (lenti-GFP) or ACE2 (lenti-ACE2) were injected bilaterally into the RVLM. Both protein expression and activity of ACE2 in the RVLM were increased in SHRs after overexpression of ACE2. A significant reduction in blood pressure and heart rate in SHRs was observed 6 wk after lenti-ACE2 injected into the RVLM. The concentration of glutamate in microdialysis fluid from the RVLM was significantly reduced by an average of 61% in SHRs with lenti-ACE2 compared with lenti-GFP. ACE2 overexpression significantly attenuated the decrease in blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity evoked by bilateral injection of the glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (2.7 nmol in 100 nl) into the RVLM in SHRs. Therefore, we suggest that ACE2 overexpression in the RVLM attenuates the enhanced tonically active glutamatergic input in SHRs, which may be an important mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of central ACE2 to hypertension. PMID:24838502

  11. Interactions between carnosine and captopril on free radical scavenging activity and angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Ueno, Akemi; Nishikawa, Yukari

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine), being plentiful in skeletal muscles and neuronal tissues, and captopril, a widely used angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were examined concerning free radical scavenging activity and ACE activity in vitro. Not only captopril, but also carnosine, at concentrations less than those ordinarily found in muscles and neuronal tissues, significantly scavenged 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) radical cations, and inhibited ACE activity. Cupric ions reversed the ABTS scavenging activity of carnosine and captopril, whereas cupric ions strengthened the inhibitory action of carnosine on ACE activity. In contrast, cupric ions antagonized the inhibition of ACE activity induced by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, indicating that the inhibitory effect of carnosine on ACE activity is not related to the chelating action of carnosine. On the other hand, carnosine and captopril synergistically enhanced the free radical scavenging activity, but not the inhibitory effect on the ACE activity. These data suggest that carnosine in its concurrent use with captopril could act as a beneficial free radical scavenger, with less danger of overdose, in the inhibition of ACE activity. PMID:16394648

  12. A Tricholoma matsutake Peptide with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitory and Antioxidative Activities and Antihypertensive Effects in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xueran; Tian, Guoting; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhao, Yongchang; Zhao, Liyan; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A crude water extract of the fruiting bodies of a highly prized mushroom Tricholoma matsutakei exerted an antihypertensive action on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) at a dosage of 400 mg/kg. An angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide with an IC50 of 0.40 μM was purified from the extract and designated as TMP. Its amino acid sequence was elucidated to be WALKGYK through LC-MS/MS analysis. The Lineweaver-Burk plot suggested that TMP was a non-competitive inhibitor of ACE. A short-term assay of antihypertensive activity demonstrated that TMP at the dosage of 25 mg/kg could significantly lower the systolic blood pressure (SBP) of SHRs. TMP exhibited remarkable stability over a wide range of temperatures and pH values. It also demonstrated 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. The aforementioned activities of TMP were corroborated by utilizing the synthetic peptide. Hence T. matsutake can be used as a functional food to help prevent hypertension- associated diseases. PMID:27052674

  13. Reduction of microalbuminuria in type-2 diabetes mellitus with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor alone and with cilnidipine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, V. K.; Mishra, A.; Gupta, K. K.; Misra, R.; Patel, M. L.; Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the antiproteinuric effect of enalapril angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor) alone or in combination with cilnidipine in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was conducted on 71 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus patients with hypertension and microalbuminuria. They were divided into two groups randomly as follows: Group I (enalaprilalone, n = 36) and Group II (enalapril with cilnidipine, n = 35). In both the groups, baseline 24 h urinary albumin was estimated and was repeated every 3 months upto 1-year. After 1-year follow-up, reduction in microalbuminuria was found to be greater in Group II. In Group I microalbuminuria came down by 25.68 ± 21.40 while in Group II it reduced by 54.88 ± 13.84 (P < 0.001). We conclude that in diabetic population, cilnidipine has an additive effect in microalbuminuria reduction over and above the well-proven effect of ACE inhibitors. PMID:26664207

  14. β-blockers and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: Comparison of Effects on Aortic Growth in Pediatric Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Phomakay, Venusa; Huett, Wilson G.; Gossett, Jeffrey M.; Tang, Xinyu; Bornemeier, Renee A.; Collins, R. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have been shown to decrease AGV in Marfan syndrome (MFS). We sought to compare the effect of β-blockers and ACEI on aortic growth velocity (AGV) in MFS. Study design We reviewed retrospectively all data from all patients with MFS seen at Arkansas Children’s Hospital between January 1, 1976 and January 1, 2013. Generalized least squares were used to evaluate AGV over time as a function of age, medication group, and the interaction between the two. A mixed model was used to compare AGV between medication groups as a function of age, medication group (none, β-blocker, ACEI), and the interaction between the two. Results A total of 67 patients with confirmed MFS were identified (34/67, 51% female). Mean age at first encounter was 13 ± 10 years, with mean follow-up of 7.6 ± 5.8 years. There were 839 patient encounters with a median of 10 (range 2–42) encounters per patient. AGV was nearly normal in the β-blocker group, and was less than either the ACEI or untreated groups. The AGV was higher than normal in ACEI and untreated groups (p<0.001 for both). Conclusions β-blocker therapy results in near-normalization of AGV in MFS. ACEI did not decrease AGV in a clinically significant manner. PMID:25109242

  15. Retroviruses Pseudotyped with the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein Efficiently Infect Cells Expressing Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Dorfman, Tatyana; Li, Wenhui; Wong, Swee Kee; Li, Yanhan; Kuhn, Jens H.; Coderre, James; Vasilieva, Natalya; Han, Zhongchao; Greenough, Thomas C.; Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun

    2004-01-01

    Infection of receptor-bearing cells by coronaviruses is mediated by their spike (S) proteins. The coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infects cells expressing the receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Here we show that codon optimization of the SARS-CoV S-protein gene substantially enhanced S-protein expression. We also found that two retroviruses, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and murine leukemia virus, both expressing green fluorescent protein and pseudotyped with SARS-CoV S protein or S-protein variants, efficiently infected HEK293T cells stably expressing ACE2. Infection mediated by an S-protein variant whose cytoplasmic domain had been truncated and altered to include a fragment of the cytoplasmic tail of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein was, in both cases, substantially more efficient than that mediated by wild-type S protein. Using S-protein-pseudotyped SIV, we found that the enzymatic activity of ACE2 made no contribution to S-protein-mediated infection. Finally, we show that a soluble and catalytically inactive form of ACE2 potently blocked infection by S-protein-pseudotyped retrovirus and by SARS-CoV. These results permit studies of SARS-CoV entry inhibitors without the use of live virus and suggest a candidate therapy for SARS. PMID:15367630

  16. Efficient Replication of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Mouse Cells Is Limited by Murine Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenhui; Greenough, Thomas C.; Moore, Michael J.; Vasilieva, Natalya; Somasundaran, Mohan; Sullivan, John L.; Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun

    2004-01-01

    Replication of viruses in species other than their natural hosts is frequently limited by entry and postentry barriers. The coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) utilizes the receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to infect cells. Here we compare human, mouse, and rat ACE2 molecules for their ability to serve as receptors for SARS-CoV. We found that, compared to human ACE2, murine ACE2 less efficiently bound the S1 domain of SARS-CoV and supported less-efficient S protein-mediated infection. Rat ACE2 was even less efficient, at near background levels for both activities. Murine 3T3 cells expressing human ACE2 supported SARS-CoV replication, whereas replication was less than 10% as efficient in the same cells expressing murine ACE2. These data imply that a mouse transgenically expressing human ACE2 may be a useful animal model of SARS. PMID:15452268

  17. Angiotensin converting enzyme as a genetic risk factor for coronary artery spasm. Implication in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Y; Hata, A; Ogata, Y; Numata, Y; Shido, K; Kondo, K

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported that individuals with the D allele of an insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene are at greater risk for myocardial infarction (MI), especially among subjects normally considered to be at low risk. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the ACE polymorphism affects the risk of MI. Coronary artery spasm (CAS) is considered to be one possible mechanism for developing MI. We therefore examined the ACE polymorphism relation to CAS to determine if this was the mechanism by which the DD genotype influences MI. We studied 150 angiographically assessed Japanese males, all more than 60 yr old. CASs were detected using intracoronary injection of ergonovine maleate. Subjects were divided into three groups: those with CAS (group 1), those without CAS, but with fixed organic stenosis (group 2); and those without CAS and no organic stenosis (group 3). DD subjects were significantly represented in group 1 when compared with groups 2 (P = 0.002) and 3 (P = 0.026). These results suggest that the DD genotype relates to the greater risk for MI in the patients with CAS. PMID:8675669

  18. Gallium-67 in the evaluation of sarcoidosis: correlations with serum angiotensin-converting enzyme and bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, D; Herry, J Y; Sapene, M; Bourguet, P; Larzul, J J; de Labarthe, B

    1982-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) scanning was assessed for its usefulness in the evaluation and follow-up of 54 patients with sarcoidosis, both treated and untreated. Scans were repeated in 23 subjects. Serum levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined concurrently in all 54 patients and bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 29 patients. Gallium-67 scan was effective in the detection and assessment of lesions not revealed by traditional methods of investigation, particularly those affecting the mediastinum, spleen, and salivary glands. The scan also enabled fibrotic lesions, which do not show uptake, to be distinguished from granulomatous lesions, which do--an advantage of prognostic interest particularly in patients with pulmonary lesions. Another merit of 67Ga scanning was that it offered a means of following disease progression in each site. In patients showing spontaneous clearing of disease or receiving treatment the scintigraphic method was more sensitive than serum ACE determination. Scan findings showed a rough correlation with serum ACE but not with bronchoalveolar lavage findings. This suggests that the three markers probably reflect different stages of the granulomatous process. On the strength of this study the indications for gallium scanning in sarcoid patients can be defined more clearly than has previously been possible. Images PMID:6280330

  19. Early genes induction in spontaneously hypertensive rats left ventricle with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but not hydralazine

    SciTech Connect

    Susic, D.; Aristizabal, D.J.; Prakash, O.; Nunez, E.; Frohlich, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats were given an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril or quinapril) or hydralazine and were left for up to 6 hr. To examine whether administration of antihypertensive agents affects expression of immediate early genes in left ventricular myocardium, groups of rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, and 6 hr after dosing; total RNA was extracted from left ventricular tissue and analyzed by blot hybridization technique using labeled probes for c-myc, c-fos, and GAPDH mRNA. All three antihypertensive agents reduced pressure similarly, and treatment with the two ACE inhibitors increased c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression in left ventriculum. By contrast, hydralazine did not increase steady-state mRNA expression of either proto-oncogene. Thus, in parallel with the pressure fall, acute administration of the ACE inhibitors induced expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNAs in the left ventricle. Since the equidepressor dose of hyralazine did not affect expression of these proto-oncogenes, this effect of ACE inhibitors is independent of their hemodynamic action. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity and antioxidant properties of Nepeta crassifolia Boiss & Buhse and Nepeta binaludensis Jamzad.

    PubMed

    Tundis, Rosa; Nadjafi, Farsad; Menichini, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    This article reports phytochemical and biological studies on Nepeta binaludensis and Nepeta crassifolia. Both species were investigated for their angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and antioxidant properties through three in vitro models [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay]. Aerial parts were extracted with methanol and partitioned between water and subsequently n-hexane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. N. binaludensis methanol extract exerted significantly higher reducing power (1.9 μM Fe(II)/g) than did the positive control butylhydroxytoluene (63.2 μM Fe(II)/g) in FRAP assay. The highest DPPH radical scavenging activity was found for N. crassifolia, with IC50 values of 9.6 and 12.1 µg/mL for ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions, respectively. n-Butanol fraction of both species showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 59.3 and 81.7 µg/mL for N. binaludensis and N. crassifolia, respectively. Phytochemical investigations resulted in the isolation of ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, apigenin, luteolin and ixoroside. Apigenin-7-O-glucoside, 8-hydroxycirsimaritin and cirsimaritin were furthermore identified in N. crassifolia ethyl acetate-soluble fraction. Nepetanudoside B was isolated from the n-butanol fraction of N. binaludensis. PMID:22693035

  1. [The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism in development of metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular pathology].

    PubMed

    Vynohradova, S V

    2005-01-01

    The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism in development of cardiovascular pathology (CVP), metabolic syndrom and insulin-independent diabet associated with such metabolic disorders as glucose intolerance and hyperglicemia, intolerance to insulin and hyperinsulinemia, dyslipiproteinemia (DLP) and obesity is discussed. Most of authors consider D-allel and DD genotype to be assosiated with development of DLP and such CVP as ishemic heart disease and myocardial infarction. PMID:16018179

  2. Top-down Targeted Metabolomics Reveals a Sulfur-Containing Metabolite with Inhibitory Activity against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-05-22

    The discovery of bioactive natural compounds containing sulfur, which is crucial for inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is a challenging task in metabolomics. Herein, a new S-containing metabolite, asparaptine (1), was discovered in the spears of Asparagus officinalis by targeted metabolomics using mass spectrometry for S-containing metabolites. The contribution ratio (2.2%) to the IC50 value in the crude extract showed that asparaptine (1) is a new ACE inhibitor. PMID:25922884

  3. Adeno-Associated Virus Overexpression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme-2 Reverses Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, James M; Hu, Ping; Caballero, Sergio; Moldovan, Leni; Verma, Amrisha; Oudit, Gavin Y; Li, Qiuhong; Grant, Maria B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2 is the primary enzyme of the vasoprotective axis of the renin angiotensin system that regulates the classic renin angiotensin system axis. We aimed to determine whether local retinal overexpression of adenoassociated virus (AAV)-ACE2 prevents or reverses diabetic retinopathy. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-chimeric mice were generated to distinguish resident (retinal) from infiltrating bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells and were made diabetic using streptozotocin injections. Retinal digestion using trypsin was performed and acellular capillaries enumerated. Capillary occlusion by GFP(+) cells was used to measure leukostasis. Overexpression of ACE2 prevented (prevention cohort: untreated diabetic, 11.3 ± 1.4; ACE2 diabetic, 6.4 ± 0.9 per mm(2)) and partially reversed (reversal cohort: untreated diabetic, 15.7 ± 1.9; ACE2 diabetic, 6.5 ± 1.2 per mm(2)) the diabetes-associated increase of acellular capillaries and the increase of infiltrating inflammatory cells into the retina (F4/80(+)) (prevention cohort: untreated diabetic, 24.2 ± 6.7; ACE2 diabetic, 2.5 ± 1.6 per mm(2); reversal cohort: untreated diabetic, 56.8 ± 5.2; ACE2 diabetic, 5.6 ± 2.3 per mm(2)). In both study cohorts, intracapillary bone marrow-derived cells, indicative of leukostasis, were only observed in diabetic animals receiving control AAV injections. These results indicate that diabetic retinopathy, and possibly other diabetic microvascular complications, can be prevented and reversed by locally restoring the balance between the classic and vasoprotective renin angiotensin system. PMID:27178803

  4. Altered activities of kininase II, an angiotensin converting enzyme, prekallikrein, and nitric oxide in Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J N; Al-Shoumer, Kas; Matar, K M; Madathil, N V; Al-Moalem, Amk

    2015-06-01

    The current investigation was conducted to examine kininase II or angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), plasma prekallikrein (PK), and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in healthy Kuwaiti subjects and newly diagnosed Kuwaiti type 2 diabetic patients before and after treatment for 6 weeks with metformin hydrochloride 500 mg twice daily after meal. With the consent of volunteers, blood and urine samples were collected after an overnight fasting. Samples were collected from the diabetic patients before and after treatment for 6 weeks. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was carried out on the aliquoted samples to measure the concentration of kininase II. NO was detected via colorimetry. Plasma Kininase II or ACE levels were significantly (P <0.01) increased by 18% in untreated diabetics when compared with healthy volunteers. However, after treatment there was a significant decrease of 20% in their ACE levels. Plasma prekallikrein levels were raised significantly (P <0.01) by 28% in diabetic patients in contrast with the control subjects and the levels were significantly reduced (P <0.0001) by 44% after treatment with metformin hydrochloride. NO levels were found to be significantly decreased in plasma by 56% and in urine by 62% in untreated diabetic patients as compared with the healthy subjects. However, when the treated diabetic patients were compared with untreated diabetics, there was an increase of 50% in plasma and 37% in urine samples. The high levels of kininase II, prekallikrein, and reduced NO may be partly responsible for the induction of renal, cardiac, and hypertensive complications associated with type 2 diabetes. Reduced NO level is an indication of endothelial dysfunction resulting in increased blood pressure. Oral anti-diabetic treatment is associated with protective effects through the reduction of kininase II (ACE), prekallikrein, and elevation of NO levels. PMID:25964383

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2(-/y) mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1-7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what's more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1-7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  7. Monocrotaline pyrrole-induced changes in angiotensin-converting enzyme activity of cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hoorn, C. M.; Roth, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. Changes in the structural and functional integrity of endothelium have been recognized as relatively early features of delayed and progressive pulmonary vascular injury caused by the pyrrolizidine alkaloid, monocrotaline (MCT). Although a number of investigators have evaluated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in the lungs of rats treated with MCT, the exact nature of changes in activity of this enzyme and the role they may play in MCT pneumotoxicity remain controversial. 2. We examined the direct effects of monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP), a toxic metabolite of MCT, on cultured endothelial cell ACE activity. Post-confluent monolayers of porcine or bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PECs or BECs, respectively) were treated with a single administration of MCTP at time 0; then they were examined for their ability to degrade the synthetic peptide, [3H]-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro. 3. In PECs, which are relatively insensitive to the direct cytolytic effects of MCTP, monolayer ACE activity was unchanged initially but gradually decreased within 4 days after treatment with a high concentration of MCTP (150 microM). This decrease was transient, and PEC monolayer ACE activity returned to the control value by 10 days post treatment. 4. BEC monolayer ACE activity was also unchanged initially but rapidly declined within 4 days after MCTP treatment and remained depressed throughout the post treatment period. BECs were quite sensitive to the cytolytic effects of MCTP and the decline in ACE activity occurred coincident with the decrease in monolayer cellularity and appearance of marked cytotoxicity. 5. We conclude that high concentrations of MCTP decrease endothelial ACE activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8242234

  8. Addition of Angiotensin Receptor Blockade or Mineralocorticoid Antagonism to Maximal Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Uzma F.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Raskin, Philip; Vega, Gloria L.

    2009-01-01

    Aldosterone promotes glomerular and tubular sclerosis independent of angiotensin II in animal models of diabetic nephropathy. Most human studies testing the renoprotective benefit of adding an angiotensin receptor blocker or a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to a regimen based on inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) used relatively low doses of ACE inhibitors. Furthermore, these studies did not determine whether antiproteinuric effects were independent of BP lowering. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 81 patients with diabetes, hypertension, and albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥300 mg/g) who all received lisinopril (80 mg once daily). We randomly assigned the patients to placebo, losartan (100 mg daily), or spironolactone (25 mg daily) for 48 wk. We obtained blood and urine albumin, urea, creatinine, electrolytes, A1c, and ambulatory BP at baseline, 24, and 48 wk. Compared with placebo, the urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio decreased by 34.0% (95% CI, −51.0%, −11.2%, P = 0.007) in the group assigned to spironolactone and by 16.8% (95% CI, −37.3%, +10.5%, P = 0.20) in the group assigned to losartan. Clinic and ambulatory BP, creatinine clearance, sodium and protein intake, and glycemic control did not differ between groups. Serum potassium level was significantly higher with the addition of either spironolactone or losartan. In conclusion, the addition of spironolactone, but not losartan, to a regimen including maximal ACE inhibition affords greater renoprotection in diabetic nephropathy despite a similar effect on BP. These results support the need to conduct a long-term, large-scale, renal failure outcomes trial. PMID:19926893

  9. Antihypertensive efficacy of the angiotensin receptor blocker azilsartan medoxomil compared with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril

    PubMed Central

    Bönner, G; Bakris, G L; Sica, D; Weber, M A; White, W B; Perez, A; Cao, C; Handley, A; Kupfer, S

    2013-01-01

    Drug therapy often fails to control hypertension. Azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) is a newly developed angiotensin II receptor blocker with high efficacy and good tolerability. This double-blind, controlled, randomised trial compared its antihypertensive efficacy and safety vs the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril (RAM) in patients with clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) 150–180 mm Hg. Patients were randomised (n=884) to 20 mg AZL-M or 2.5 mg RAM once daily for 2 weeks, then force-titrated to 40 or 80 mg AZL-M or 10 mg RAM for 22 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in trough, seated, clinic SBP. Mean patient age was 57±11 years, 52.4% were male, 99.5% were Caucasian. Mean baseline BP was 161.1±7.9/94.9±9.0 mm Hg. Clinic SBP decreased by 20.6±0.95 and 21.2±0.95 mm Hg with AZL-M 40 and 80 mg vs12.2±0.95 mm Hg with RAM (P<0.001 for both AZL-M doses). Adverse events leading to discontinuation were less frequent with AZL-M 40 and 80 mg (2.4% and 3.1%, respectively) than with RAM (4.8%). These data demonstrated that treatment of stage 1–2 hypertension with AZL-M was more effective than RAM and better tolerated. PMID:23514842

  10. Modulation of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products by angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 inhibition in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Josephine M; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Thallas-Bonke, Vicki; Pete, Josefa; Thomas, Merlin C; Deemer, Elizabeth R; Bassal, Sahar; El-Osta, Assam; Long, David M; Panagiotopoulos, Sianna; Jerums, George; Osicka, Tanya M; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-08-01

    Recent studies have identified that first-line renoprotective agents that interrupt the renin-angiotensin system not only reduce BP but also can attenuate advanced glycation end product (AGE) accumulation. This study used in vitro, preclinical, and human approaches to explore the potential effects of these agents on the modulation of the receptor for AGE (RAGE). Bovine aortic endothelial cells that were exposed to the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) ramiprilat in the presence of high glucose demonstrated a significant increase in soluble RAGE (sRAGE) secreted into the medium. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, ramipril treatment (ACEi) at 3 mg/L for 24 wk reduced the accumulation of skin collagen-linked carboxymethyllysine and pentosidine, as well as circulating and renal AGE. Renal gene upregulation of total RAGE (all three splice variants) was observed in ACEi-treated animals. There was a specific increase in the gene expression of the splice variant C-truncated RAGE (sRAGE). There were also increases in sRAGE protein identified within renal cells with ACEi treatment, which showed AGE-binding ability. This was associated with decreases in renal full-length RAGE protein from ACEi-treated rats. Decreases in plasma soluble RAGE that were significantly increased by ACEi treatment were also identified in diabetic rats. Similarly, there was a significant increase in plasma sRAGE in patients who had type 1 diabetes and were treated with the ACEi perindopril. Complexes between sRAGE and carboxymethyllysine were identified in human and rodent diabetic plasma. It is postulated that ACE inhibition reduces the accumulation of AGE in diabetes partly by increasing the production and secretion of sRAGE into plasma. PMID:15930093

  11. Association of exercise training and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator improves baroreflex sensitivity of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lopes, P R; Moreira, M C S; Marques, S M; Pinto, I S J; Macedo, L M; Silva, C C; Freiria-Oliveira, A H; Rebelo, A C S; Reis, A A S; Rosa, D A; Ferreira-Neto, M L; Castro, C H; Pedrino, G R

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to determine cardiovascular effects of aerobic training associated with diminazene aceturate (DIZE), an activator of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male SHRs (280-350 g) were either subjected to exercise training or not (sedentary group). The trained group was subjected to 8 weeks of aerobic training on a treadmill (five times a week, lasting 60 min at an intensity of 50-60% of maximum aerobic speed). In the last 15 days of the experimental protocol, these groups were redistributed into four groups: i) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (S+D1); ii) trained SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (T+D1); iii) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (S+V); and iv) trained SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (T+V). After treatment, SHRs were anesthetized and subjected to artery and femoral vein cannulation prior to the implantation of ECG electrode. After 24 h, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded; the baroreflex sensitivity and the effect of double autonomic blockade (DAB) were evaluated in non-anesthetized SHRs. DIZE treatment improved baroreflex sensitivity in the T+D1 group as compared with the T+V and S+D1 groups. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR) and MAP were reduced in T+D1 group as compared with T+V and S+D1 groups. Hence, we conclude that the association of exercise training with DIZE treatment improved baroreflex function and cardiovascular regulation. PMID:27533767

  12. Association of Apolipoprotein E and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms with the Multidimensional Impairment in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Maria G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Sancarlo, Daniele; Leandro, Gioacchino; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Seripa, Davide; Addante, Filomena; Franceschi, Marilisa; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The role of the apoliprotein E (APOE) and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphisms on health and functional status deterioration in old age is still undefined. Recently, a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-year mortality derived from a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was developed and validated in hospitalized elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the APOE and ACE gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment, as evaluated by the MPI, in older patients. These polymorphisms were assessed in 1894 geriatric inpatients divided into three groups according to their MPI values: MPI-1 low risk (n = 988), MPI-2 moderate risk (n = 671), and MPI-3 severe risk of mortality (n = 235). A slight deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was observed for the APOE genotypes. With the increasing of the MPI grade, a significant increase in the frequencies of ɛ4 allele and the ACE D/D genotype was observed. The APOE ɛ4+ and ACE D/D genotypes were associated with severe MPI grade (APOE ɛ4+, odds ration [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.67; ACE D/D, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.05–1.92). The combined APOE ɛ4+ and ACE D/D genetic status was associated with higher MPI grade (OR = 2.85, 95% CI 1.75–4.65), without interaction. No significant associations between APOE and ACE polymorphisms and 2-year mortality were found. APOE and ACE genes might predispose individuals to health and functional status deterioration in old age, and their effect is additive. PMID:19653879

  13. Proangiogenic effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition is mediated by the bradykinin B(2) receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, J S; Bergaya, S; Tamarat, R; Duriez, M; Boulanger, C M; Levy, B I

    2001-10-12

    Recent studies have suggested a proangiogenic effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. We hypothesized that such a proangiogenic effect of ACE inhibition may be mediated, in part, by bradykinin (BK) B(2)-receptor pathway. This study therefore examined the neovascularization induced by ACE inhibitor treatment in B(2) receptor-deficient mice (B(2)(-/-)) in a model of surgically induced hindlimb ischemia. After artery femoral occlusion, wild-type and B(2)(-/-) mice were treated with or without ACE inhibitor (perindopril, 3 mg/kg/d) for 28 days. Angiogenesis was then quantitated by microangiography, capillary density measurement, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging. The protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were determined by Western blot. In wild-type animals, vessel density and capillary number in the ischemic leg were raised by 1.8- and 1.4-fold, respectively, in mice treated with ACE inhibitor when compared with the nontreated animals (P<0.01). This corresponded to an improved ischemic/nonischemic leg perfusion ratio by 1.5-fold in ACE inhibitor-treated animals when compared with the untreated ones (0.87+/-0.07 versus 0.59+/-0.05, respectively, P<0.01). Activation of the angiogenic process was also associated with a 1.7-fold increase in tissue eNOS protein level in mice treated with ACE inhibitor (P<0.05 versus control) but not with changes in VEGF protein level. Conversely, ACE inhibition did not affect vessel density, blood flow, and eNOS protein level in ischemic hindlimb of B(2)(-/-) mice. Therefore, proangiogenic effect of ACE inhibition is mediated by B(2)-receptor signaling and was associated with upregulation of eNOS content, independently of VEGF expression. PMID:11597990

  14. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphisms with Crohn’s disease in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Sichang; Wang, Zhengting; Fan, Rong; Yuan, Jielu; Zhong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms alter the susceptibility of a Chinese Han population to Crohn’s disease (CD). Methods: Blood samples were collected from patients with CD and from healthy control subjects for analyzing SNP rs4291 (promoter, A262T), SNP rs4343 (exon 16, A11860G), and rs4646994 (intron 16, Alu insertion/deletion). Allele and genotype frequencies were compared, and pairwise linkage disequilibrium and haplotypes were analyzed in patients with CD. Results: Both rs4343 A/G and rs4646994 I/D allele frequencies differed significantly between patients with CD and control subjects (rs4343: OR=1.438, 95% CI=1.099-1.882, P=0.008; rs4646994: OR=1.559, 95% CI=1.191-2.039, P=0.001). There were also significant associations between the risk of CD and both rs4343 AA/(AG+GG) and rs4646994 II/(ID+DD) genotype frequencies (P=0.039 and P=0.019). The frequency of the G-D haplotype was significantly lower in patients with CD than control subjects (31.7% vs. 40.4%, P=0.010). Conclusions: The results suggest that ACE rs4343G and rs4646994D alleles protect against CD, while rs4343AA and the I allele in the dominant genetic model are risk alleles for CD. The association between the G-D haplotype and CD was significant, suggesting a protective role in the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:26823847

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition with developing heart failure: comparative effects on left ventricular function and geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElmurray, J. H. 3rd; Mukherjee, R.; New, R. B.; Sampson, A. C.; King, M. K.; Hendrick, J. W.; Goldberg, A.; Peterson, T. J.; Hallak, H.; Zile, M. R.; Spinale, F. G.

    1999-01-01

    The progression of congestive heart failure (CHF) is left ventricular (LV) myocardial remodeling. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to tissue remodeling and therefore MMP inhibition may serve as a useful therapeutic target in CHF. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition favorably affects LV myocardial remodeling in CHF. This study examined the effects of specific MMP inhibition, ACE inhibition, and combined treatment on LV systolic and diastolic function in a model of CHF. Pigs were randomly assigned to five groups: 1) rapid atrial pacing (240 beats/min) for 3 weeks (n = 8); 2) ACE inhibition (fosinopril, 2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. orally) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 3) MMP inhibition (PD166793 2 mg/kg/day p.o.) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 4) combined ACE and MMP inhibition (2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. and 2 mg/kg/day, respectively) and rapid pacing (n = 8); and 5) controls (n = 9). LV peak wall stress increased by 2-fold with rapid pacing and was reduced in all treatment groups. LV fractional shortening fell by nearly 2-fold with rapid pacing and increased in all treatment groups. The circumferential fiber shortening-systolic stress relation was reduced with rapid pacing and increased in the ACE inhibition and combination groups. LV myocardial stiffness constant was unchanged in the rapid pacing group, increased nearly 2-fold in the MMP inhibition group, and was normalized in the ACE inhibition and combination treatment groups. Increased MMP activation contributes to the LV dilation and increased wall stress with pacing CHF and a contributory downstream mechanism of ACE inhibition is an effect on MMP activity.

  16. Impact of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor versus Angiotensin Receptor Blocker on Incidence of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Choi, Byoung Geol; Choi, Se Yeon; Choi, Jae Woong; Ryu, Sung Kee; Lee, Se Jin; Kim, Seunghwan; Noh, Yung-Kyun; Akkala, Raghavender Goud; Li, Hu; Ali, Jabar; Kim, Ji Bak; Lee, Sunki; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) are associated with a decreased incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM). The aim of this study was to compare the protective effect of ACEI versus ARBs on NODM in an Asian population. Materials and Methods We investigated a total of 2817 patients who did not have diabetes mellitus from January 2004 to September 2009. To adjust for potential confounders, a propensity score matched (PSM) analysis was performed using a logistic regression model. The primary end-point was the cumulative incidence of NODM, which was defined as having a fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dL or HbA1c ≥6.5%. Multivariable cox-regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of ACEI versus ARB on the incidence of NODM. Results Mean follow-up duration was 1839±1019 days in all groups before baseline adjustment and 1864±1034 days in the PSM group. After PSM (C-statistics=0.731), a total 1024 patients (ACEI group, n=512 and ARB group, n=512) were enrolled for analysis and baseline characteristics were well balanced. After PSM, the cumulative incidence of NODM at 3 years was lower in the ACEI group than the ARB group (2.1% vs. 5.0%, p=0.012). In multivariate analysis, ACEI vs. ARB was an independent predictor of the lower incidence for NODM (odd ratio 0.37, confidence interval 0.17-0.79, p=0.010). Conclusion In the present study, compared with ARB, chronic ACEI administration appeared to be associated with a lower incidence of NODM in a series of Asian cardiovascular patients. PMID:26632399

  17. Hypotensive, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Diuretic Activities of the Aqueous-methanol Extract of Ipomoea reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Qaiser; Aslam, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Ipomoea reniformis Roxb. (Convolvulaceae) is a small, weedy herb used for the management of cardiac problems in traditional systems of medicine in India and Pakistan. Objective of the present study was to investigate the hypotensive, diuretic and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the aqueous-methanol (30:70) crude extract of the dried aerial parts of I. reniformis (Ir.Cr.) in rats. To record blood pressure lowering effects of the Ir.Cr, different doses of the extract were administered through jugular vein to the ketamine-diazepam anesthetized normotensive rats and blood pressure was recorded via carotid artery. ACE inhibitory activity of the extract was studied in-vitro; using hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine as substrate, the product hippurate was quantified spectrophotometrically after reacting with cyanuric chloride/dioxane reagent. Effects of intraperitoneal administration of the extract on urine and urinary electrolyte excretion were also investigated in rats. The extract (Ir.Cr.) produced 21.51 ± 3.41, 28.99 ± 2.30, 53.34 ± 0.88 and 61.71 ± 3.37% fall in mean arterial blood pressure of the anesthetized rats at the doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/Kg, respectively. Ir.Cr. was found to have serum ACE inhibitory activity, with IC50 value of 422 ± 21.16 μg/mL. The extract also increased urine volume and urinary Na+ excretion significantly at the doses of 30 and 50 mg/Kg in rats. The study concludes that the crude extract of Ipomoea reniformis (Ir.Cr.) has hypotensive, ACE inhibitory and diuretic activities, which provide the scientific justification for the traditional uses of the plant as cardioprotective, antihypertensive and diuretic remedy. PMID:24523757

  18. Association of exercise training and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator improves baroreflex sensitivity of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, P.R.; Moreira, M.C.S.; Marques, S.M.; Pinto, I.S.J.; Macedo, L.M.; Silva, C.C.; Freiria-Oliveira, A.H.; Rebelo, A.C.S.; Reis, A.A.S.; Rosa, D.A.; Ferreira-Neto, M.L.; Castro, C.H.; Pedrino, G.R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to determine cardiovascular effects of aerobic training associated with diminazene aceturate (DIZE), an activator of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male SHRs (280–350 g) were either subjected to exercise training or not (sedentary group). The trained group was subjected to 8 weeks of aerobic training on a treadmill (five times a week, lasting 60 min at an intensity of 50–60% of maximum aerobic speed). In the last 15 days of the experimental protocol, these groups were redistributed into four groups: i) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (S+D1); ii) trained SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (T+D1); iii) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (S+V); and iv) trained SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (T+V). After treatment, SHRs were anesthetized and subjected to artery and femoral vein cannulation prior to the implantation of ECG electrode. After 24 h, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded; the baroreflex sensitivity and the effect of double autonomic blockade (DAB) were evaluated in non-anesthetized SHRs. DIZE treatment improved baroreflex sensitivity in the T+D1 group as compared with the T+V and S+D1 groups. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR) and MAP were reduced in T+D1 group as compared with T+V and S+D1 groups. Hence, we conclude that the association of exercise training with DIZE treatment improved baroreflex function and cardiovascular regulation. PMID:27533767

  19. Angiotensin-Receptor Blocker, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, and Risks of Atrial Fibrillation: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-05-01

    Both angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have protective effects against atrial fibrillation (AF). The differences between ARB and ACEI in their effects on the primary prevention of AF remain unclear. This study compared ARB and ACEI in combined antihypertensive medications for reducing the risk of AF in patients with hypertension, and determined which was better for AF prevention in a nationwide cohort study.Patients aged ≥55 years and with a history of hypertension were identified from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical records of 25,075 patients were obtained, and included 6205 who used ARB, 8034 who used ACEI, and 10,836 nonusers (no ARB or ACEI) in their antihypertensive regimen. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF.During an average of 7.7 years' follow-up, 1619 patients developed new-onset AF. Both ARB (adjusted HR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.44-0.58, P < 0.001) and ACEI (adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.47-0.59, P < 0.001) reduced the risk of AF compared to nonusers. Subgroup analysis showed that ARB and ACEI were equally effective in preventing new-onset AF regardless of age, gender, the presence of heart failure, diabetes, and vascular disease, except for those with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). ARB prevents new-onset AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of stroke or TIA (log-rank P = 0.012).Both ARB and ACEI reduce new-onset AF in patients with hypertension. ARB prevents AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of prior stroke or TIA. PMID:27196491

  20. Furosemide- sup 131 I-hippuran renography after angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition for the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Erbsloeh-Moeller, B.Du.; Dumas, A.; Roth, D.; Sfakianakis, G.N.; Bourgoignie, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the greater sensitivity of 131I-hippuran renography than 99mTC-DTPA scintigraphy to diagnose renovascular hypertension (RVH). This study assesses the predictive diagnostic value of furosemide-131I-hippuran renography after angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition in patients with and without RVH. All patients were investigated at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center. Twenty-eight patients had RVH and 22 did not. Twenty-eight patients had normal or minimally decreased renal function and 22 had renal insufficiency. Renography was performed 60 minutes after oral administration of 50 mg captopril or 10 minutes after intravenous injection of 40 micrograms/kg enalaprilat. Forty milligrams of furosemide were administered intravenously 2 minutes after injection of 131I-hippuran. The residual cortical activity (RCA) of 131I-hippuran was measured at 20 minutes. RVH was unlikely when RCA after ACE inhibition was less than 30% of peak cortical activity. Conversely, RVH was present when 131I-hippuran cortical activity steadily increased throughout the test to reach 100% at 20 minutes. In azotemic patients with RCA between 31% and 100%, RVH was differentiated from intrinsic renal disease by obtaining a baseline renogram without ACE inhibition and comparing RCA in that study and RCA after ACE inhibition. If RCA increased (indicating worsening renal function) after ACE inhibition, RVH was likely; whereas, intrinsic renal disease was more likely if RCA remained unchanged or decreased (indicating improved renal function) with ACE inhibition. The test had a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 96% in this population. There was a direct correlation between the results of angioplasty or surgery on high blood pressure and the changes in RCA before and after intervention (n = 20).

  1. Polymorphisms in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene region predict coping styles in healthy adults and depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Heck, Angela; Lieb, Roselind; Ellgas, Andrea; Pfister, Hildegard; Lucae, Susanne; Erhardt, Angelika; Himmerich, Hubertus; Horstmann, Sonja; Kloiber, Stefan; Ripke, Stephan; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Bettecken, Thomas; Uhr, Manfred; Holsboer, Florian; Ising, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Dispositional coping styles are important moderators of the stress reaction and are altered in stress-related disorders like cardiovascular diseases and affective disorders. Heritability studies suggest a considerable genetic contribution to the interindividual variability in coping styles. Since the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been described to be associated with the vulnerability for stress-related disorders and with altered stress hormone regulation, we investigated the ACE gene as potential candidate gene for coping styles. Five hundred forty one mentally healthy subjects and 194 patients suffering from depression participating in the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project were examined. Coping styles were assessed with a self-report questionnaire (German Stress Coping Questionnaire SVF78) measuring the individual coping style pattern in response to stressful situations. We genotyped 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the insertion/Deletion (I/D)-polymorphism in the ACE gene region and investigated their associations with coping styles. In healthy subjects, the highest association was observed between rs8066276, an intronic SNP of the ACE gene, and the coping factor Distraction. A further intronic SNP rs4305, not in linkage disequilibrium with rs8066276, showed an association with Devaluation/Defense. All associated copying styles can be categorized as potentially stress reducing factors (positive coping). Both SNPs were also found to be associated with positive coping styles in the patient sample; rs8066276 was associated with Devaluation/Defense, and rs4305 showed associations with Control. These results suggest that the ACE gene is involved in the development of coping strategies. PMID:18484085

  2. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and angiotensin converting enzyme polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Shakarami, Fatemeh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Zare Karizi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) defined by two or more failed pregnancies before 20 weeks of gestation. Several factors play a role in RPL including thrombophilic conditions which can be influenced by gene polymorphisms. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genes are closely related to fibrinolytic process, embryonic development and pregnancy success. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between RPL and common polymorphisms in ACE and PAI-1 genes. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 100 women with recurrent abortions (at least two) were selected as cases and 100 healthy women with two or more normal term deliveries without a history of abortion as controls. Total genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The status of the PAI-1 4G/5G and ACE (D/I) polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP. Results: Homozygosity for PAI-1 4G polymorphism was seen in 17 cases (17%), and 5 controls (5%) (p=0.006) so patients with homozygote 4G mutation were significantly more prone to RPL in contrast to control group (OR: 4.63, % 95 CI: 1.55-13.84). In addition, 7 patients (7 %), and no one from the control group, were homozygote (I/I) for ACE polymorphism (p=0.034), suggesting no significant associations between ACE D allele or DD genotype and RPL. Conclusion: Considering these results, because 4G/4G polymorphism for PAI-1 gene could be a thrombophilic variant leading to abortion, analysis of this mutation and other susceptibility factors are recommended in patients with RPL. PMID:26644791

  3. Association of apolipoprotein E and angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment in older patients.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Matera, Maria G; Ferrucci, Luigi; Sancarlo, Daniele; Leandro, Gioacchino; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Seripa, Davide; Addante, Filomena; Franceschi, Marilisa; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    The role of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphisms on health and functional status deterioration in old age is still undefined. Recently, a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-year mortality derived from a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was developed and validated in hospitalized elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the APOE and ACE gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment, as evaluated by the MPI, in older patients. These polymorphisms were assessed in 1894 geriatric inpatients divided into three groups according to their MPI values: MPI-1 low risk (n = 988), MPI-2 moderate risk (n = 671), and MPI-3 severe risk of mortality (n = 235). A slight deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for the APOE genotypes. With the increasing of the MPI grade, a significant increase in the frequencies of epsilon4 allele and the ACE D/D genotype was observed. The APOE epsilon4(+) and ACE D/D genotypes were associated with severe MPI grade (APOE epsilon4(+), odds ration [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-2.67; ACE D/D, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.05-1.92). The combined APOE epsilon4(+) and ACE D/D genetic status was associated with higher MPI grade (OR = 2.85, 95% CI 1.75-4.65), without interaction. No significant associations between APOE and ACE polymorphisms and 2-year mortality were found. APOE and ACE genes might predispose individuals to health and functional status deterioration in old age, and their effect is additive. PMID:19653879

  4. Preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blocker use and acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Steven G.; Garg, Amit X.; Swaminathan, Madhav; Garwood, Susan; Hong, Kwangik; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Passik, Cary; Koyner, Jay L.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Jai, Raman; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Akhter, Shahab; Devarajan, Prasad; Bennett, Michael; Edelsteinm, Charles; Patel, Uptal; Chu, Michael; Goldbach, Martin; Guo, Lin Ruo; McKenzie, Neil; Myers, Mary Lee; Novick, Richard; Quantz, Mac; Zappitelli, Michael; Dewar, Michael; Darr, Umer; Hashim, Sabet; Elefteriades, John; Geirsson, Arnar

    2013-01-01

    Background Using either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) the morning of surgery may lead to ‘functional’ postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI), measured by an abrupt increase in serum creatinine. Whether the same is true for ‘structural’ AKI, measured with new urinary biomarkers, is unknown. Methods The TRIBE-AKI study was a prospective cohort study of 1594 adults undergoing cardiac surgery at six hospitals between July 2007 and December 2010. We classified the degree of exposure to ACEi/ARB into three categories: ‘none’ (no exposure prior to surgery), ‘held’ (on chronic ACEi/ARB but held on the morning of surgery) or ‘continued’ (on chronic ACEi/ARB and taken the morning of surgery). The co-primary outcomes were ‘functional’ AKI based upon changes in pre- to postoperative serum creatinine, and ‘structural AKI’, based upon peak postoperative levels of four urinary biomarkers of kidney injury. Results Across the three levels (none, held and continued) of ACEi/ARB exposure there was a graded increase in functional AKI, as defined by AKI stage 1 or worse; (31, 34 and 42%, P for trend 0.03) and by percentage change in serum creatinine from pre- to postoperative (25, 26 and 30%, P for trend 0.03). In contrast, there were no differences in structural AKI across the strata of ACEi/ARB exposure, as assessed by four structural AKI biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule-1, interleukin-18 or liver-fatty acid-binding protein). Conclusions Preoperative ACEi/ARB usage was associated with functional but not structural acute kidney injury. As AKI from ACEi/ARB in this setting is unclear, interventional studies testing different strategies of perioperative ACEi/ARB use are warranted. PMID:24081864

  5. Chronic endothelin-A receptor antagonism is as protective as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition against cardiac dysfunction in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wölkart, G; Pang, X; Stessel, H; Kirchengast, M; Brunner, F

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Diabetes mellitus is associated with a specific cardiomyopathy. We compared the cardioprotective effects of an endothelin-A receptor blocker (ETA-RB) with those of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Experimental approach: Diabetic rats were left untreated or received either the ETA-RB atrasentan or the ACE-I ramipril (each 3 mg kg−1 per day) orally for 8 weeks. Isolated isovolumic heart function was studied during normoxia and in response to ischaemia-reperfusion. Cardiac fibrosis, tissue oxidative stress and tissue nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity were determined. Key results: Basal left ventricular systolic contractility was lower in diabetic compared to nondiabetic hearts and ETA-RB or ACE-I treatment significantly antagonised the decline. Following 15 min of no-flow ischaemia, reperfusion systolic function was depressed and left-ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was elevated in diabetic hearts. ETA-RB or ACE-I treatment significantly improved recovery of reperfusion systolic and diastolic function, without differences between groups. Hydroxyproline (an index of tissue fibrosis) and malondialdehyde (a measure of tissue oxidative stress) were elevated at the end of reperfusion in diabetic, compared to nondiabetic hearts. Either treatment reduced hydroxyproline and malondialdehyde to control level. Constitutive NOS activity was similar in nondiabetic and diabetic hearts and unaffected by ETA-RB or ACE-I treatment. Conclusions and implications: These results suggest that in experimental type 1 diabetes ETA-RB is as effective as an ACE-I in ameliorating myocardial functions during normoxia and ischaemia-reperfusion. Combining the two treatments neither afforded additive effects, nor diminished any protection effect seen with either drug. PMID:17572700

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme and progression of white matter lesions and brain atrophy--the SMART-MR study.

    PubMed

    Jochemsen, Hadassa M; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Grool, Anne M; Vincken, Koen L; Mali, Willem Ptm; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Muller, Majon

    2012-01-01

    High levels of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) may increase the risk of dementia through blood pressure elevation and subsequent development of cerebral small-vessel disease. However, high ACE levels may also decrease this risk through amyloid degradation which prevents brain atrophy. Within the SMART-MR study, a prospective cohort study among patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease, serum ACE levels were measured at baseline and a 1.5 Tesla brain MRI was performed at baseline and after on average (range) 3.9 (3.0-5.8) years of follow-up in 682 persons (mean age 58 ± 10 years). Brain segmentation was used to quantify total, deep, and periventricular white matter lesion (WML) volume, and total brain, cortical gray matter and ventricular volume (%ICV). Lacunar infarcts were rated visually. Regression analyses were used to examine the prospective associations between serum ACE and brain measures. Patients with the highest serum ACE levels (>43.3 U/L) had borderline significantly more progression of deep WML volumes than patients with the lowest ACE levels (<21.8 U/L); mean difference (95% CI) in change was 0.20 (-0.02; 0.43) %ICV. On the contrary, patients with the highest serum ACE levels had significantly less progression of cortical brain atrophy than patients with the lowest ACE levels; mean difference (95% CI) in change was 0.78 (0.21; 1.36) %ICV. Serum ACE was not associated with subcortical atrophy, periventricular WML, or lacunar infarcts. Our results show that higher ACE activity is associated with somewhat more progression of deep WML volume, but with less progression of cortical brain atrophy. This suggests both detrimental and beneficial effects of high ACE levels on the brain. PMID:22214784

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema: a multicenter review and an algorithm for airway management.

    PubMed

    Chiu, A G; Newkirk, K A; Davidson, B J; Burningham, A R; Krowiak, E J; Deeb, Z E

    2001-09-01

    Angioedema is a nonpitting edema of which the presentation ranges from benign facial swelling to airway obstruction managed by intubation or tracheotomy. The presentation of this disease is reviewed, and a treatment algorithm based on initial signs and symptoms is proposed for proper airway management. We performed a retrospective review of 108 patients treated in 2 tertiary care centers in the Washington, DC, area over a 5-year period. Ninety-eight patients (90.7%) were African-American, and 81 (75%) were female. Seventy-four patients (68.5%) were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). A classification system was developed based on the location of the edema at initial presentation: 1) isolated facial swelling and oral cavity edema, excluding the floor of the mouth; 2) floor of mouth and/or oropharyngeal edema, and 3) oropharyngeal edema with glottic and/or supraglottic involvement. Fourteen patients (13%) needed airway intervention, 2 of whom underwent a cricothyrotomy after a failed intubation attempt. Eleven (78.6%) were taking ACEIs. The indication for each intubation was massive tongue and floor of mouth edema. The patients were extubated 48 to 72 hours later. No patient demonstrated symptom progression after medical treatment was initiated. Therapy included discontinuation of the ACEI or other inciting agent, a high-humidity face tent, an initial dose of intravenous antihistamines, and a continued course of intravenous steroids. Within 48 hours, most patients had a resolution of their edema. Only cases of significant tongue and oropharyngeal edema took longer than 48 hours to resolve. The ACEIs are a common cause of angioedema. Left untreated, angioedema may progress to involve the oropharynx and supraglottis, resulting in a life-threatening airway compromise. Marked floor of mouth and tongue edema are the indications for airway intervention. An algorithm based on the initial presentation is essential for proper airway and patient management

  8. An angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism may mitigate the effects of angiotensin-pathway medications on posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nylocks, K M; Michopoulos, V; Rothbaum, A O; Almli, L; Gillespie, C F; Wingo, A; Schwartz, A C; Habib, L; Gamwell, K L; Marvar, P J; Bradley, B; Ressler, K J

    2015-06-01

    Angiotensin, which regulates blood pressure may also act within the brain to mediate stress and fear responses. Common antihypertensive medication classes of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been associated with lower PTSD symptoms. Here we examine the rs4311 SNP in the ACE gene, previously implicated in panic attacks, in the relationship between ACE-I/ARB medications and PTSD symptoms. Participants were recruited from outpatient wait rooms between 2006 and March 2014 (n=  803). We examined the interaction between rs4311 genotype and the presence of blood pressure medication on PTSD symptoms and diagnosis. PTSD symptoms were lower in individuals taking ACE-Is or ARBs (N = 776). The rs4311 was associated with PTSD symptoms and diagnosis (N = 3803), as the T-carriers at the rs4311 SNP had significantly greater likelihood of a PTSD diagnosis. Lastly, the rs4311 genotype modified the effect of ACE-Is or ARBs on PTSD symptoms (N = 443; F1,443 = 4.41, P < 0.05). Individuals with the CC rs4311 genotype showed lower PTSD symptoms in the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. In contrast, T- carriers showed the opposite, such that the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs was associated with higher PTSD symptoms. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be important in PTSD, as ACE-I/ARB usage associates with lower symptoms. Furthermore, we provide genetic evidence that some individuals are comparatively more benefitted by ACE-Is/ARBs in PTSD treatment. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which ACE-Is/ARBs affect PTSD symptoms such that pharmaco-genetically informed interventions may be used to treat PTSD. PMID:25921615

  9. Gallium 67 citrate scanning and serum angiotensin converting enzyme levels in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.G.; Bekerman, C.; Sicilian, L.; Oparil, S.; Pinsky, S.M.; Szidon, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Gallium 67 citrate scans and serum angiotension converting enzyme (ACE) levels were obtained in 54 patients with sarcoidosis and analyzed in relation to clinical manifestation. /sup 67/Ga scans were abnormal in 97% of patients with clinically active disease (n = 30) and in 71% of patients with inactive disease (n = 24). Serum ACE levels were abnormally high (2 standard deviations above the control mean) in 73% of patients with clinically active disease and in 54% of patients with inactive disease. Serum ACE levels correlated significantly with /sup 67/Ga uptake score (r = .436; p < .005). The frequency of abnormal /sup 67/Ga scans and elevated serum ACE levels suggests that inflammatory activity with little or no clinical expression is common in sarcoidosis. Abnormal /sup 67/Ga scans were highly sensitive (97%) but had poor specificity (29%) to clinical disease activity. The accuracy of negative prediction of clinical activity by normal scans (87%) was better than the accuracy of positive prediction of clinical activity by abnormal scans (63%). /sup 67/Ga scans can be used to support the clinical identification of inactive sarcoidosis.

  10. Smooth muscle cell conditioned medium elevates angiotensin-converting enzyme of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, F S; Lee, S L; Fanburg, B L

    1989-11-01

    Conditioned medium obtained from bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC) in culture was found to elevate angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (EC) by 2- to 3-fold upon incubation for 24 to 48 h. The elevation in ACE was time dependent and inhibited by 10(-6) M cycloheximide, making it likely that the elevation was related to new protein synthesis by EC. Conditioned medium from EC failed to produce the same effect. The stimulatory effect of SMC conditioned medium on EC ACE was uninfluenced by exposures to anoxia as compared with room air, either during conditioning of medium or while assaying the effect of conditioned medium on EC ACE. Inhibitors of prostaglandin metabolism and calcium transport failed to influence the stimulatory effect of SMC conditioned medium on EC ACE. The stimulatory effect on EC ACE by conditioned medium was additive to that produced by Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and, similar to baseline ACE, was inhibited by 3 x 10(-8) M ouabain. Thus, SMC produce a factor that regulates the level of EC ACE. PMID:2484059

  11. Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves glycemia in angiotensin II-infused mice

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Xia, Huijing; Pedersen, Kim Brint; Speth, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    An overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although ACE2 overexpression has been shown to be protective against the overactive RAS, a role for pancreatic ACE2, particularly in the islets of Langerhans, in regulating glycemia in response to elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) levels remains to be elucidated. This study examined the role of endogenous pancreatic ACE2 and the impact of elevated Ang II levels on the enzyme's ability to alleviate hyperglycemia in an Ang II infusion mouse model. Male C57bl/6J mice were infused with Ang II or saline for a period of 14 days. On the 7th day of infusion, either an adenovirus encoding human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2) or a control adenovirus (Ad-eGFP) was injected into the mouse pancreas. After an additional 7–8 days, glycemia and plasma insulin levels as well as RAS components expression and oxidative stress were assessed. Ang II-infused mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets compared with control mice. This phenotype was associated with decreased ACE2 expression and activity, increased Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, and increased oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas. Ad-hACE2 treatment restored pancreatic ACE2 expression and compensatory activity against Ang II-mediated impaired glycemia, thus improving β-cell function. Our data suggest that decreased pancreatic ACE2 is a link between overactive RAS and impaired glycemia in T2DM. Moreover, maintenance of a normal endogenous ACE2 compensatory activity in the pancreas appears critical to avoid β-cell dysfunction, supporting a therapeutic potential for ACE2 in controlling diabetes resulting from an overactive RAS. PMID:23462816

  12. Protein Kinase C-δ Mediates Shedding of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 from Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Burger, Dylan; Kennedy, Christopher; Hébert, Richard L.; Burns, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7), and protects against diabetic renal injury. Soluble ACE2 fragments are shed from the proximal tubule, and appear at high levels in the urine with diabetes. High glucose-induced shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by the enzyme “a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17″ (ADAM17). Here, we investigated the mechanism for constitutive shedding of ACE2. Mouse proximal tubular cells were cultured and ACE2 shedding into the media was assessed by enzyme activity assay and immunoblot analysis. Cells were incubated with pharmacologic inhibitors, or transfected with silencing (si) RNA. Incubation of proximal tubular cells with increasing concentrations of D-glucose stimulated ACE2 shedding, which peaked at 16 mM, while L-glucose (osmotic control) had no effect on shedding. In cells maintained in 7.8 mM D-glucose, ACE2 shedding was significantly inhibited by the pan-protein kinase C (PKC) competitive inhibitor sotrastaurin, but not by an inhibitor of ADAM17. Incubation of cells with the PKC-α and -β1-specific inhibitor Go6976, the PKC β1 and β2-specific inhibitor ruboxistaurin, inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases-2,-8, and -9, or an inhibitor of ADAM10 (GI250423X) had no effect on basal ACE2 shedding. By contrast, the PKC-δ inhibitor rottlerin significantly inhibited both constitutive and high glucose-induced ACE2 shedding. Transfection of cells with siRNA directed against PKC-δ reduced ACE2 shedding by 20%, while knockdown of PKC-ε was without effect. These results indicate that constitutive shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by PKC-δ, which is also linked to high glucose-induced shedding. Targeting PKC-δ may preserve membrane-bound ACE2 in proximal tubule in disease states and diminish Ang II-stimulated adverse signaling. PMID:27313531

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion, not bradykinin B2 receptor -58T/C gene polymorphism, associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-related cough in Chinese female patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y J; Tsai, J C

    2001-11-01

    To investigate the genetic susceptibility associated with cough related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, 189 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with proteinuria or hypertension treated with perindopril were studied. Cough was considered to be present if the patients had been bothered by a cough during treatment and if they had had related symptoms for at least 2 weeks without an identifiable cause. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was used to detect polymorphisms of ACE and bradykinin B2-receptor genes. After 8 weeks of treatment, 49.2% (93 of 189) of our NIDDM patients were found to be suffering from ACEI-related cough. ACEI-related cough was mainly associated with female patients, with 71.7% (76 of 106) of female and only 20.5% (17 of 83) of male patients experiencing cough after ACEI treatment. There was a significant association of ACE II genotype with ACEI-related cough. The genotype frequencies were 58.2% for II, 47.8% for ID, and 16.7% for DD in patients with ACEI-associated cough and 41.8% for II, 52.2% for ID, and 83.3% for DD in subjects without ACEI-associated cough (chi(2) = 10.268; df = 2, P =.006). As female patients made up the majority of the subjects suffering from ACEI-related cough, we further analyzed the association of ACE I/D genotype with ACEI-related cough separately by sex. Male patients with ACEI-related cough were not associated with ACE I/D genotype distribution, while female patients were strongly associated with ACE I/D genotype polymorphism (chi(2) = 16.12; df = 2; P <.001). There was no association between the bradykinin B2 receptor gene -58T/C polymorphism with ACEI-related cough. In conclusion, our results indicate that Chinese diabetic female subjects are susceptible to ACEI-related cough, and this susceptibility may be genetically predetermined. PMID:11699055

  14. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Daniel; Hanchapola, Iresha; Thomas, Walter G.; Widdop, Robert E.; Smith, Alexander I.; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1–7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R, and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R) receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here, we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, (1) a library of 47 peptides derived from the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-IHPF) of Ang II was synthesized and assessed for ACE2 binding, (2) the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, (3) high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogs were then synthesized and assessed, (4) the structure of the full-length Ang II analogs were assessed by circular dichroism, and (5) the Ang II analogs were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor selectivity. PMID

  15. Casein Fermentate of Lactobacillus animalis DPC6134 Contains a Range of Novel Propeptide Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors▿

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M.; Stanton, C.; Slattery, H.; O'Sullivan, O.; Hill, C.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Ross, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    This work evaluated the angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities of a bovine sodium caseinate fermentate generated using the proteolytic capabilities of the porcine small intestinal isolate Lactobacillus animalis DPC6134 (NCIMB deposit 41355). The crude 10-kDa L. animalis DPC6134 fermentate exhibited ACE-inhibitory activity of 85.51% (±15%) and had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.8 mg protein/ml compared to captopril, which had an IC50 value of 0.005 mg/ml. Fractionation of the crude L. animalis DPC6134 fermentate by membrane filtration and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) generated three bioactive fractions from a total of 72 fractions. Fractions 10, 19, and 43 displayed ACE-inhibitory activity percentages of 67.53 (±15), 83.71 (±19), and 42.36 (±11), respectively, where ACE inhibition was determined with 80 μl of the fractions with protein concentrations of 0.5 mg/ml. HPLC and mass spectrometry analysis identified 25 distinct peptide sequences derived from α-, β-, and κ-caseins. In silico predictions, based on the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequences, suggested that peptide NIPPLTQTPVVVPPFIQ, corresponding to β-casein f(73-89); peptide IGSENSEKTTMP, corresponding to αs1-casein f(201212); peptide SQSKVLPVPQ, corresponding to β-casein f(166-175); peptide MPFPKYPVEP, corresponding to β-casein f(124133); and peptide EPVLGPVRGPFP, corresponding to β-casein f(210-221), contained ACE-inhibitory activities. These peptides were chosen for chemical synthesis to confirm the ACE-inhibitory activity of the fractions. Chemically synthesized peptides displayed IC50 values in the range of 92 μM to 790 μM. Additionally, a simulated gastrointestinal digestion confirmed that the ACE-inhibitory 10-kDa L. animalis DPC6134 fermentation was resistant to a cocktail of digestive enzymes found in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:17483275

  16. The influence of a polymorphism in the gene encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on treatment outcomes in late-onset Pompe patients receiving alglucosidase alfa.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Palmer, Rachel; Pomponio, Robert J; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; McVie-Wylie, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (I/I, I/D, D/D), disease severity at baseline and response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were assessed in the Pompe disease Late-Onset Treatment Study (LOTS). No correlations were observed between ACE genotype and disease severity at baseline. However, D/D patients appeared to have a reduced response to alglucosidase alfa treatment than I/I or I/D patients, suggesting that ACE polymorphisms may influence the response to alglucosidase alfa treatment and warrants further investigation. PMID:27489778

  17. Decreased Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis With Incidental Concurrent Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kharofa, Jordan; Cohen, Eric P.; Tomic, Rade; Xiang Qun; Gore, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to mitigate radiation-induced lung injury in preclinical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ACE inhibitors decrease the risk of radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I through III small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer treated definitively with radiation from 2004-2009 at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Acute pulmonary toxicity was quantified within 6 months of completion of treatment according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. The use of ACE inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, statins, and angiotensin receptor blockers; dose-volume histogram parameters; and patient factors were assessed for association with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Results: A total of 162 patients met the criteria for inclusion. The majority of patients had Stage III disease (64%) and received concurrent chemotherapy (61%). Sixty-two patients were identified as ACE inhibitor users (38%). All patients had acceptable radiation plans based on dose-volume histogram constraints (V20 [volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy] {<=}37% and mean lung dose {<=}20 Gy) with the exception of 2 patients who did not meet both criteria. Grade 2 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (7.4%). The rate of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis was lower in ACE inhibitor users vs. nonusers (2% vs. 11%, p = 0.032). Rates of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis were significantly increased in patients aged greater than 70 years (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.005) or in whom V5 (volume of lung receiving at least 5 Gy) was 50% or greater (13% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). V10 (volume of lung receiving at least 10 Gy), V20, V30 (volume of lung receiving at least 30 Gy), and mean lung dose were not independently associated with Grade 2 or

  18. Increasing brain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity decreases anxiety-like behavior in male mice by activating central Mas receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; de Kloet, Annette D; Pati, Dipanwita; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; Pioquinto, David J; Ludin, Jacob A; Oh, S Paul; Katovich, Michael J; Frazier, Charles J; Raizada, Mohan K; Krause, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Over-activation of the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibits RAS activity by converting angiotensin-II, the effector peptide of RAS, to angiotensin-(1-7), which activates the Mas receptor (MasR). Whether increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety by stimulating central MasR is unknown. To test the hypothesis that increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety-like behavior via central MasR stimulation, we generated male mice overexpressing ACE2 (ACE2 KI mice) and wild type littermate controls (WT). ACE2 KI mice explored the open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) significantly more than WT, suggesting increasing ACE2 activity is anxiolytic. Central delivery of diminazene aceturate, an ACE2 activator, to C57BL/6 mice also reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM, but centrally administering ACE2 KI mice A-779, a MasR antagonist, abolished their anxiolytic phenotype, suggesting that ACE2 reduces anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR. To identify the brain circuits mediating these effects, we measured Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, subsequent to EPM exposure and found that ACE2 KI mice had decreased Fos in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis but had increased Fos in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Within the BLA, we determined that ∼62% of GABAergic neurons contained MasR mRNA and expression of MasR mRNA was upregulated by ACE2 overexpression, suggesting that ACE2 may influence GABA neurotransmission within the BLA via MasR activation. Indeed, ACE2 overexpression was associated with increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (indicative of presynaptic release of GABA) onto BLA pyramidal neurons and central infusion of A-779 eliminated this effect. Collectively, these results suggest that ACE2 may reduce anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR that facilitate GABA release onto pyramidal neurons within the

  19. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a monocarboxypeptidase which metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to generate Ang-(1–7), has been shown to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and injury but the mechanism remains elusive. Irbesartan has the dual actions of angiotensin receptor blockade and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation. We hypothesized that irbesartan would exert its protective effects on ACE2 deficiency-mediated myocardial fibrosis and cardiac injury via the PPARγ signaling. Methods 10-week-old ACE2 knockout (ACE2KO; Ace2-/y) mice received daily with irbesartan (50 mg/kg) or saline for 2 weeks. The wild-type mice (Ace2+/y) were used to the normal controls. We examined changes in myocardial ultrastructure, fibrosis-related genes and pathological signaling by real-time PCR gene array, Western blotting, Masson trichrome staining and transmission electron microscope analyses, respectively. Results Compared with the Ace2+/y mice, cardiac expression of PPARα and PPARγ were reduced in Ace2-/y mice and the myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) and expression of fibrosis-related genes were increased, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and collagen III. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency triggered cardiac hypertrophy, increased myocardial fibrosis and adverse ultrastructure injury in ACE2KO hearts with higher levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), without affecting cardiac systolic function. Intriguingly, treatment with irbesartan significantly reversed ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in Ace2-/y mice linked with enhancement of plasma Ang-(1–7) level and downregulation of AT1 receptor in heart. Consistent with attenuation of myocardial fibrosis and ultrastructure injury, the myocardial CVF and levels of ANF, TGFβ1, CTGF, collagen I, collagen III

  20. Discovery of new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from medicinal plants to treat hypertension using an in vitro assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors plays a critical role in treating hypertension. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate ACE inhibition activity of 50 Iranian medicinal plants using an in vitro assay. Methods The ACE activity was evaluated by determining the hydrolysis rate of substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL), using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and DPPH radical scavenging assay respectively. Results Six extracts revealed > 50% ACE inhibition activity at 330 μg/ml concentration. They were Berberis integerrima Bunge. (Berberidaceae) (88.2 ± 1.7%), Crataegus microphylla C. Koch (Rosaceae) (80.9 ± 1.3%), Nymphaea alba L. (Nymphaeaceae) (66.3 ± 1.2%), Onopordon acanthium L. (Asteraceae) (80.2 ± 2.0%), Quercus infectoria G. Olivier. (Fagaceae) (93.9 ± 2.5%) and Rubus sp. (Rosaceae) (51.3 ± 1.0%). Q. infectoria possessed the highest total phenolic content with 7410 ± 101 mg gallic acid/100 g dry plant. Antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria (IC50 value 1.7 ± 0.03 μg/ml) was more than that of BHT (IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml) and Trolox (IC50 value of 3.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml) as the positive controls. Conclusions In this study, we introduced six medicinal plants with ACE inhibition activity. Despite the high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria, due to its tannin content (tannins interfere in ACE activity), another plant, O. acanthium, which also had high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, but contained no tannin, could be utilized in further studies for isolation of active compounds. PMID:24359711

  1. Effects of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition or Angiotensin Receptor Blockade in Dialysis Patients: A Nationwide Data Survey and Propensity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cho-Kai; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Wang, Yi-Chih; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Lai, Ling-Ping; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Pau-Chung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Lin, Lian-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Long-term benefit of using a renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blocker such as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) for patients already receiving dialysis remains undetermined. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of ACEI or ARB use in dialysis patients. We performed a population-based cohort study with time-to-event analyses to estimate the relation between the use of ACEI/ARB and their outcomes. We used a nationwide database (Registry for Catastrophic Illnesses) for Taiwan, which has data from 1995 to 2008 nearly of all patients who received dialysis therapy. The records of all dialysis patients aged ≥18 with no evidence of cardiovascular (CV) events in 1997 and 1998 (133,564 patients) were examined. Users (n = 50,961) and nonusers (n = 59,913) of an ACEI/ARB were derived. We then used propensity score matching and Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality and CV events in users and nonusers of an ACRI/ARB. The 15,182 patients, who used an ACEI/ARB, and the 15,182 nonusers had comparable baseline characteristics during the 14 years of follow-up. The mortality was significantly greater in patients who did not use an ACEI/ARB (HR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval = 0.86–0.93). Subgroup analysis of 3 tertiles of patients who used different total amounts of ACEI/ARB during the study period indicated that CV events were more common in patients who used an ACEI/ARB for a short duration (tertile 1: HR = 1.63), but less common in those who used an ACEI/ARB for long durations (tertile 2: HR = 1.05; tertile 3: HR = 0.94; trend for declining HR from tertile 1 to 3: P < 0.001). The mortality benefit provided by use of an ACEI/ARB was consistent across most patient subgroups, as was the benefit of ARB monotherapy rather than ACEI monotherapy. Independent of traditional risk factors

  2. Weight loss for reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy: Comparison with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patil, M. R.; Mishra, A.; Jain, N.; Gutch, M.; Tewari, R.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of weight in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) individuals is emerging as a significant strategy in the reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy along with control of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The objective was to evaluate the reduction in 24-h proteinuria in T2DM patients with nephropathy by weight loss, with conventional therapy (angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors) as the control arm. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted between June 2010 and May 2011. T2DM patients with confirmed nephropathy by 24-h urinary protein estimation with a body mass index (BMI) of >25 kg/m2 were studied. Patients who had nondiabetic nephropathy, uncontrolled hypertension (>125/75 mmHg) irrespective of antihypertensive drugs, excess weight due to edema or obesity due to other specific diseases, alcoholics, smokers, and patients who were on hemodialysis were excluded from the study. The patients were divided into three groups, namely, group A, patients on ACE inhibitor therapy; group B, patients on lifestyle modifications for weight loss; and group C, patients on an antiobesity drug (orlistat) and lifestyle modifications. At the end of 6 months, all the three groups were compared. Data were analyzed using software SPSS version 15.0. This study encompassed a total of 88 patients; 12 patients were dropped during the study period and 76 (group A: 22, group B: 23, and group C: 31) patients remained. The mean age of the patients was 58.36 ± 10.87 years (range: 30-70 years). At baseline, age, gender, mean BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and 24-h proteinuria did not vary significantly among the three groups. At 6 months, the mean BMI significantly decreased in group C (P < 0.001) compared to that in the other two groups. Among the parameters BMI and WHR, the proportional form of BMI correlated well with the degree of reduction in proteinuria (r = 0.397, P = 0.01). Reduction in weight using lifestyle modifications and

  3. [STUDIES IN VITRO INHIBITION OF THE ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME-I, HYPOTENSIVE AND ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECTS OF PEPTIDE FRACTIONS OF V. UNGUICULATA].

    PubMed

    Cú-Cañetas, Trinidad; Betancur Ancona, David; Gallegos Tintoré, Santiago; Sandoval Peraza, Mukthar; Chel Guerrero, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme I (ACE-I) in vitro and in vivo from peptide fractions by enzymatic hydrolysis of the Vigna unguiculata protein concentrate was evaluated. Hydrolysis was done with Pepsin-Pancreatin and Flavourzima in two separate systems. The resulting hidrolysates were ultrafiltrated to obtain fractions with different molecular weight. The fractions with better inhibition Flavourzima were size > 1 kDa (> 1 kDa-F) and < 1 kDa (< 1 kDa-F), with an IC50 of 1222.84 and 1098.6 μg/ml respectively. Pepsin-Pancreatin fraction. PMID:26545668

  4. Comparative study of Mg/Al- and Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide-perindopril erbumine nanocomposites for inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Hussein Al Ali, Samer Hasan; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2012-01-01

    The intercalation of a drug active, perindopril, into Mg/Al-layered double hydroxide for the formation of a new nanocomposite, PMAE, was accomplished using a simple ion exchange technique. A relatively high loading percentage of perindopril of about 36.5% (w/w) indicates that intercalation of the active took place in the Mg/Al inorganic interlayer. Intercalation was further supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermal analysis shows markedly enhanced thermal stability of the active. The release of perindopril from the nanocomposite occurred in a controlled manner governed by pseudo-second order kinetics. MTT assay showed no cytotoxicity effects from either Mg/Al-layered double hydroxide or its nanocomposite, PMAE. Mg/Al-layered double hydroxide showed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity, with 5.6% inhibition after 90 minutes of incubation. On incubation of angiotensin-converting enzyme with 0.5 μg/mL of the PMAE nanocomposite, inhibition of the enzyme increased from 56.6% to 70.6% at 30 and 90 minutes, respectively. These results are comparable with data reported in the literature for Zn/Al-perindopril. PMID:22904631

  5. A focused parameter update: hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.

    PubMed

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lang, David M; Craig, Timothy; Dreyfus, David; Hsieh, Fred; Khan, David; Sheikh, Javed; Weldon, David; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Cox, Linda; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane E; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen A; Wallace, Dana

    2013-06-01

    These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters (JTFPP), representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The AAAAI and the ACAAI have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "A focused parameter update: Hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the JTFPP, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters understands that the cost of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents is an important concern that might appropriately influence the work-up and treatment chosen for a given patient. The JTFPP recognizes that the emphasis of our primary recommendations regarding a medication might vary, for example, depending on third-party payer issues and product patent expiration dates. However, because the cost of a given test or agent is so widely variable and there is a paucity of pharmacoeconomic data, the JTFPP generally does not consider cost when formulating practice parameter recommendations. In some instances the cost benefit of an intervention is considered relevant, and commentary might be provided. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion

  6. Necessity of angiotensin-converting enzyme-related gene for cardiac functions and longevity of Drosophila melanogaster assessed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fang-Tsu; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Su, Ming-Tsan; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies have established the necessity of an angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) gene for heart morphogenesis of Drosophila. Nevertheless, the physiology of ACER has yet to be comprehensively understood. Herein, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of ACER in Drosophila's heart and swept source optical coherence tomography to assess whether ACER is required for cardiac functions in living adult flies. Several contractile parameters of Drosophila heart, including the heart rate (HR), end-diastolic diameter (EDD), end-systolic diameter (ESD), percent fractional shortening (%FS), and stress-induced cardiac performance, are shown, which are age dependent. These age-dependent cardiac functions declined significantly when ACER was down-regulated. Moreover, the lifespans of ACER knock-down flies were significantly shorter than those of wild-type control flies. Thus, we posit that ACER, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is essential for both heart physiology and longevity of animals. Since mammalian ACE2 controls many cardiovascular physiological features and is implicated in cardiomyopathies, our findings that ACER plays conserved roles in genetically tractable animals will pave the way for uncovering the genetic pathway that controls the renin-angiotensin system.

  7. Systemic administration of platelet-activating factor in rat reduces specific pulmonary uptake of circulating monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Atochina, E N; Hiemisch, H H; Muzykantov, V R; Danilov, S M

    1992-01-01

    The biodistribution of radiolabeled mouse monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and control, nonimmune mouse IgG in platelet activating factor (PAF)-treated rats was studied. The blood level of both preparations was slightly decreased (90% of the control) in PAF-treated rats. Specific pulmonary accumulation of anti-ACE MoAb was reduced to 50% of control in contrast to a doubling in nonspecific pulmonary uptake of non-immune IgG. The changes in anti-ACE MoAb biodistribution were lung-specific and were accompanied by decrease in the pulmonary ACE activity (to 60% of control) and increase in serum ACE activity (to 170% of control). Thus anti-ACE MoAb reveals PAF-induced changes in the status of the pulmonary ACE and therefore can be used for the studies of pathology of the pulmonary endothelium. PMID:1331624

  8. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette; Rasmussen, Eva Rye

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema (ACEi-AE) of the hypopharynx that completely resolved rapidly after the infusion of plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate adding to the sparse reports in the existing literature. PMID:27123347

  9. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette; Rasmussen, Eva Rye

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema (ACEi-AE) of the hypopharynx that completely resolved rapidly after the infusion of plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate adding to the sparse reports in the existing literature. PMID:27123347

  10. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;1) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  11. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;(1)) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  12. Differential regulation of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and nuclear factor-κB by angiotensin II receptor subtypes in type 2 diabetic kidney.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anuradha; Goru, Santosh Kumar; Kadakol, Almesh; Malek, Vajir; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts through Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE)/Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis to promote renal failure whereas the Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R)/Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang1-7/Mas axis constitutes the protective arm of Renin Angiotensin System (RAS). Though Ang II has been known to activate the Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling pathway through different receptor subtype(s) in different tissues under various diseases, the subtype orchestrating this stimulation in type 2 diabetic kidney remains elusive. ACE2, a protective monocarboxypeptidase, responsible for conversion of Ang II to Ang1-7, opposes the deleterious effects of RAS pathway but how its expression is altered with blockade of AT1R and AT2R is not yet known. Hence, the present study was conceived to understand the regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by using specific AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists in non-genetic model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Our results show that the AT1R and AT2R antagonists lead to the repression and activation of NF-κB signalling pathway, respectively which suggests the role of AT1R in NF-κB activation. The blockade of AT2R led to an increase in ACE2 expression, which may be a compensatory response to the drastically increased inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the differential regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by Ang II receptor subtypes and thus this study improves our understanding regarding regulation of inflammatory cascade and ACE2 by AT1R and AT2R in type 2 diabetic kidney, which may help in designing novel strategies to combat the disease in future. PMID:26271886

  13. Neuroprotective Effect of Scutellarin on Ischemic Cerebral Injury by Down-Regulating the Expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and AT1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jichun; Zhou, Mingjie; Ren, Huanhuan; Pan, Qunwen; Zheng, Chunli; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is involved in brain ischemic injury. In the present study, we investigated whether Scutellarin (Scu) exerts neuroprotective effects by down-regulating the Expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and AT1 receptor in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Methods Adult Sprague–Dawley rats were administrated with different dosages of Scu by oral gavage for 7 days and underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). Blood pressure was measured 7 days after Scu administration and 24 h after pMCAO surgery by using a noninvasive tail cuff method. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by Laser Doppler perfusion monitor and the neuronal dysfunction was evaluated by analysis of neurological deficits before being sacrificed at 24 h after pMCAO. Histopathological change, cell apoptosis and infarct area were respectively determined by hematoxylin–eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transfer-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Tissue angiotensin II (Ang II) and ACE activity were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression levels of ACE, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by Western blot and real-time PCR. ACE inhibitory activity of Scu in vitro was detected by the photometric determination. Results Scu treatment dose-dependently decreased neurological deficit score, infarct area, cell apoptosis and morphological changes induced by pMCAO, which were associated with reductions of ACE and AT1R expression and the levels of Ang II, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in ischemic brains. Scu has a potent ACE inhibiting activity. Conclusion Scu protects brain from acute ischemic injury probably through its inhibitory effect on the ACE/Ang II/AT1 axis, CBF preservation and

  14. New Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Therapeutic Strategies Based on the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/Angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas Receptor Axis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Anderson J.; Murça, Tatiane M.; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A.; Castro, Carlos Henrique; Raizada, Mohan K.; Santos, Robson A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1–7) is now recognized as a biologically active component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme homologue ACE2 revealed important metabolic pathways involved in the Ang-(1–7) synthesis. This enzyme can form Ang-(1–7) from Ang II or less efficiently through hydrolysis of Ang I to Ang-(1–9) with subsequent Ang-(1–7) formation. Additionally, it is well established that the G protein-coupled receptor Mas is a functional ligand site for Ang-(1–7). The axis formed by ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas represents an endogenous counter regulatory pathway within the RAS whose actions are opposite to the vasoconstrictor/proliferative arm of the RAS constituted by ACE/Ang II/AT1 receptor. In this review we will discuss recent findings concerning the biological role of the ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas arm in the cardiovascular and pulmonary system. Also, we will highlight the initiatives to develop potential therapeutic strategies based on this axis. PMID:22319643

  15. Interdependent effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene polymorphisms on the progression of immunoglobulin A nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, H-J; Kim, H; Kim, H L; Lee, S G; Zheng, S-H; Shin, J H; Lim, C S; Kim, S; Lee, J S; Lee, D S; Kim, Y S

    2002-08-01

    In order to investigate the interdependent action of the insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene and polymorphism in exon 11 (C1136-->T; Ala379Val) of the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) gene, which encodes a functional antagonist of PAF, on the progression of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, we analysed both polymorphisms in patients with primary IgA nephropathy, who were followed-up for longer than 3 years. During the follow-up (87.3 +/- 50.0 months), the disease progressed in 38 of the 191 patients (19.9%). The D allele of the ACE gene in the absence of the T allele of the PAF-AH gene did not affect the prognosis [odds ratio (OR), 3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-16.4] and neither did the T allele in the absence of the D allele (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 0.4-24.2). However, the presence of both was a significant prognostic factor (OR, 6.6; 95% CI, 1.4-31.3). After adjusting for other risk factors, the presence of both proved to be an independent risk factor (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.6-12.7). These results suggest that the interdependent effects of ACE and PAF-AH polymorphisms on the progression of IgA nephropathy might be more important than the effect of the individual polymorphisms. PMID:12220450

  16. Long-range safety and protective benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors for hypertension. Do we need more clinical trials?

    PubMed Central

    Sambhi, M P; Gavras, H; Robertson, J I; Smith, W M

    1993-01-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is being applied with considerable success to the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are the only currently available agents that can achieve this objective. In general, the major therapeutic effects of these agents in the treatment of mild to moderate hypertension or of heart failure are exerted on the vascular tissue through inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system and, secondarily, of the sympathetic nervous system. When cardiovascular functional reserve is diminished and autoregulation of regional and systemic blood flow is strained, however, ACE inhibitors may affect other organ functions (heart, kidneys, and possibly brain), hormones other than the renin system, and local tissue humoral systems. The interrelations between the renin-angiotensin system and several other vasoactive systems--including circulating and locally generated tissue hormones and centrally acting neurohormonal factors--are complex and unclear. A better understanding of these mechanisms and interrelations would allow for a more rational therapeutic use of these agents. Unknown also are the clinical effects of prolonged ACE inhibition. Whether the use of ACE inhibitors can provide primary cardiorenal protection requires proof through definitive clinical trials. Images PMID:8460511

  17. Sperm-specific expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is mediated by a 91-base-pair promoter containing a CRE-like element.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, T; Balogh, R; Overbeek, P; Bernstein, K E

    1993-01-01

    The gene encoding the testis isozyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme (testis ACE) is one example of the many genes expressed uniquely during spermatogenesis. This protein is expressed by developing germ cells late in their development and results from the activation of a sperm-specific promoter that is located within intron 12 of the gene encoding the somatic isozyme of ACE. In vitro transcription, DNase footprinting, gel shift assays, and transgenic mouse studies have been used to define the minimal testes ACE promoter and to characterize DNA-protein interactions mediating germ cell-specific expression. These studies show that proper cell- and stage-specific expression of testis ACE requires only a small portion of the immediate upstream sequence extending to -91. A critical motif within this core promoter is a cyclic AMP-responsive element sequence that interacts with a testis-specific transactivating factor. Since this putative cyclic AMP-responsive element has been conserved within the testis ACE promoters of different species and is found at the same site in other genes that are expressed specifically in the testis, it may provide a common mechanism for the recognition of sperm-specific promoters. Images PMID:8380220

  18. Pleiotropic Effect of Common Variants at ABO Glycosyltranferase Locus in 9q32 on Plasma Levels of Pancreatic Lipase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For forty-three clinical test values presumably associated to common complex human diseases, we carried out a genome-wide association study using 600K SNPs in a general Japanese population of 1,639 individuals (1,252 after quality control procedures) drawn from a regional cohort, followed by a replication study for statistically significant SNPs (p = 1.95×10−9–8.34×10−39) using an independent population of 1,671 from another cohort. In this single two-stage study, we newly found strong and robust associations of common variants at the ABO histo-blood glycosyltransferase locus in 9q32 with the plasma levels of pancreatic lipase (P-LIP), in addition to successful confirmation of the known ABO association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) independent of the ACE1 gene in 17q23.2 with the ACE level. Our results are compatible with the previously reported association between the ABO gene and pancreatic cancer, and show that the effect of these common variants at the ABO locus on the P-LIP and ACE levels is largely opposing and pleiotropic. PMID:24586218

  19. Bioassay-guided preparative separation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory C-flavone glycosides from Desmodium styracifolium by recycling complexation high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Qi; Luo, Jian-Guang; Han, Chao; Xu, Jin-Fang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A new strategy of the convergence of high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) and bioactive assay technique was developed for rapidly screening and separating the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from the aerial parts of Desmodium styracifolium. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the crude extract was first established to target the bioactive fractions based on HSCCC coupled with in vitro ACE inhibitory assay. Subsequently, the bioactive fractions were further separated by the recycling complexation HSCCC respectively, using 0.10 mol/L copper sulfate in the lower phase of two-phase solvent system composed of n-butanol/water (1:1, v/v). Five C-glycosylflavones, vicenin 2 (1), carlinoside (2), vicenin 1 (3), schaftoside (4) and vicenin 3 (5), were successfully obtained. Their chemical structures were identified using ESI-MS and NMR. All the isolates showed in vitro ACE inhibitory activity with the IC50 values between 33.62 and 58.37 μM. The results demonstrated that the established method was proposed as an excellent strategy to systematically screen and purify active compounds from traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:25459924

  20. Association between angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and renal scar risk in children vesicoureteral reflex: a reappraise meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jin-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Liu, Ying; Fu, Yu; Liu, Tong-Zu; Pei, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflex(VUR) is a common disease in children. Some studies indicated that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism associated with the renal scar in VUR, but not all researchers agreed with it. To clarify the effect of ACE I/D polymorphism on renal scar risk in children with VUR, we performed the present meta-analysis. PubMed, CNKI, CBM, and Embase databases were searched for studies that examined the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and renal scar risk in children with VUR. The Stata 12.0 software was used for statistical analyses. 11 case-control studies with 1,032 VUR patients were analyzed. The results showed that the DD genotype and D allele were associated with renal scar risk in overall VUR patients, DD vs. DI + II: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04-2.49, P = 0.03; DD vs. II: OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.20-2.65, P < 0.01; D vs. I: OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.02-1.86, P = 0.04. Similar results were revealed in Turks, but not in Caucasians and Asians. Our meta-analysis indicated that the ACE DD genotype may increase the risk of renal scar in children with VUR. PMID:27506878

  1. Recovery of casein-derived peptides with in vitro inhibitory activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) using aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Evaldo Cardozo; Coimbra, Jane Sélia Dos Reis; de Oliveira, Eduardo Basílio; Bonomo, Renata Cristina Ferreira

    2014-10-22

    Peptides inhibiting the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were obtained by trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of bovine milk casein, performed at 37°C, during 1, 2, 5, 8 and 24h. Results of in vitro inhibitory activity ranged between 13.4% and 78.5%. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was evidenced for hydrolysates obtained after 2h of reaction. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) formed by polyethylene glycol of 1500gmol(-1) (PEG 1500)+sodium phosphate or potassium phosphates were produced and evaluated, in terms of partition coefficients (K) and extraction yields (y), to recovery the casein hydrolysates at room temperature. In ATPS containing sodium phosphate, the peptides showed a slightly greater affinity toward the bottom salt-rich phase (0.1≤K≤0.9; 5.7%≤y≤47%). In the case of ATPS containing potassium phosphates, these molecules showed substantially greater affinity toward the top polymer-rich phase (137≤K≤266; y≥99%). These results point out extraction using PEG 1500/potassium phosphate ATPS is an efficient technique to recover casein hydrolysates containing ACE inhibitors peptides. Outlined data will be helpful in integrating such unit operation to larger scale processes. PMID:25464099

  2. AAV8-Mediated Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Gene Delivery Prevents Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis by Regulating MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiguo; Tao, Lifei; Zheng, Shijie; Lin, Ru; Fu, Xinyu; Chen, Zihe; Lei, Chunyan; Wang, Jiaming; Li, Hongwei; Li, Qiuhong; Lei, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is a key hormonal system which regulates the cardiovascular function and is implicated in several autoimmune diseases. With the discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a protective axis of RAS namely ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas that counteracts the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis has been established. This axis is emerging as a novel target to attenuate ocular inflammation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the activity of the protective axis of RAS by subretinal delivery of an AAV8 (Y733F)-ACE2 vector would protect against the ocular inflammation in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) mice through regulating the local immune responses. Our studies demonstrated that increased ACE2 expression exerts protective effects on inflammation in EAU mouse by modulating ocular immune responses, including the differentiation of Th1/Th17 cells and the polarization of M1/M2 macrophages; whereas the systemic immune responses appeared not affected. These effects were mediated by activating the Ang-(1–7)/Mas and inhibiting the MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 signaling pathways. This proof-of-concept study suggests that activation of ocular ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis with AAV gene transfer modulates local immune responses and may be a promising, long-lasting therapeutic strategy for refractory and recurrent uveitis, as well as other inflammatory eye diseases. PMID:27558087

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme/vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and bioelectrical impedance analysis in predicting athletic performances of Italian young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Matteo Levi; Gulisano, Massimo; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Ruggiero, Marco; Ceroti, Marco; Marella, Mario; Castellini, Elena; Pacini, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated the association between 2 genetic polymorphisms known to be involved in fitness and performance, and anthropometric features, body composition, and athletic performances in young male soccer players with the goal of identifying genetic profiles that can be used to achieve maximal results from training. One hundred twenty-five medium-high-level male soccer players were genotyped for angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D, and vitamin D receptor (VDR) FokI gene polymorphisms and scored for anthropometric measurements, body composition, and athletic performance. Body mass index, fat mass, fat-free mass, resistance, reactance, impedance, phase angle (PA), and body cell mass were measured. Athletic performance was evaluated by squat jump, countermovement jump (CMJ), 2-kg medicine ball throw, 10- and 20-m sprint time. We observed that the homozygous ff genotype of the VDR gene was significantly more represented in young soccer players than in a matched sedentary population. Values of reactance and PA were differently distributed in ACE and VDR genotypes with high mean values in subjects with DD (ACE) and FF (VDR) genotypes. No correlation was observed between ACE or VDR genotypes and 2-kg medicine ball throw, 10- and 20-m sprint times. The ID genotype of ACE was associated with the best performances in squat jump and CMJ. Our results suggest that determination of ACE and VDR genotypes might help select those young athletes harboring the most favorable genetic potential to succeed in soccer. PMID:21747292

  4. Angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and activity in Alzheimer's disease: differences in brain and CSF ACE and association with ACE1 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Scott; Ashby, Emma; Baig, Shabnam; Harrison, Rachel; Tayler, Hannah; Speedy, Elizabeth; Prince, Jonathan A; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD): ACE1 variations influence plasma ACE and risk of AD, and ACE is increased in AD brain. We measured frontal ACE level and activity in 89 AD and 51 control brains, and post-mortem CSF from 101 cases and 19 controls. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level and Braak stage were used to indicate neuronal preservation and disease progression. We genotyped the common ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism, rs4343, rs1800764 and rs4921. ACE activity was elevated in AD and correlated with Braak stage. Crude ACE levels were unchanged but adjustment for NSE suggested increased neuronal ACE production with Braak stage. Exposing SH-SY-5Y neurons to oligomeric Aβ1-42 increased ACE level and activity, suggesting Aβ may upregulate ACE in AD. In CSF, ACE level but not activity was reduced in AD. ACE1 genotype did not predict ACE level or activity in brain or CSF. ACE activity and neuronal production increase in AD brain, possibly in response to Aβ. Peripheral measurements do not reflect ACE activity in the brain. PMID:19956428

  5. Regulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin AT1 receptor gene expression in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in the control of blood pressure and fluid volume is a key issue in cardiovascular medicine. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) signalling antagonizes the physiological and pathophysiological effects mediated by the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis.The targeted-disruption of the Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/PRA) leads to activation of the cardiac RAAS involved in the hypertrophic remodelling process, which influences cardiac size, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and the behaviour of various hypertrophy marker genes. The Npr1 gene-knockout (Npr1−/−) mice exhibit 35–40 mmHg higher systolic blood pressure and a significantly greater heart weight to bodyweight ratio than wild-type (Npr1+/+) mice.The expression of both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II AT1a receptors are significantly increased in hearts from Npr1−/− mice compared with hearts from Npr1+/+ mice. In parallel, the expression of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α is also markedly increased in hearts from Npr1−/− mice.These findings indicate that disruption of NPRA/cGMP signalling leads to augmented expression of the cardiac RAAS in conjunction with pro-inflammatory cytokines in Npr1-null mutant mice, which promotes the development of cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling. PMID:19843097

  6. Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hypertension Treated With the Renin Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil vs Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: The Prospective EARLY Registry.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Bramlage, Peter; Baumgart, Peter; Mahfoud, Felix; Buhck, Hartmut; Ouarrak, Taoufik; Ehmen, Martina; Senges, Jochen; Gitt, Anselm K

    2015-12-01

    For patients with newly diagnosed hypertension, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are usually the first-line therapies. There is, however, no real-life data regarding the relative clinical effectiveness and tolerability of either drug class. The prospective registry, Treatment With Azilsartan Compared to ACE Inhibitors in Antihypertensive Therapy (EARLY), was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the ARB azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) vs ACE inhibitors in real-world patients. Of the 1153 patients with newly diagnosed hypertension who were included in the registry, 789 were prescribed AZL-M and 364 were prescribed an ACE inhibitor. After multivariate adjustment, AZL-M was found to provide superior blood pressure reduction and better target blood pressure (<140/90 mm Hg) achievement. The proportion of patients with adverse events was not statistically different between groups. The authors conclude that in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients, AZL-M provides superior blood pressure control with a similar safety profile compared with ACE inhibitors. PMID:26105590

  7. Association between angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and renal scar risk in children vesicoureteral reflex: a reappraise meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jin-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Liu, Ying; Fu, Yu; Liu, Tong-Zu; Pei, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflex(VUR) is a common disease in children. Some studies indicated that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism associated with the renal scar in VUR, but not all researchers agreed with it. To clarify the effect of ACE I/D polymorphism on renal scar risk in children with VUR, we performed the present meta-analysis. PubMed, CNKI, CBM, and Embase databases were searched for studies that examined the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and renal scar risk in children with VUR. The Stata 12.0 software was used for statistical analyses. 11 case-control studies with 1,032 VUR patients were analyzed. The results showed that the DD genotype and D allele were associated with renal scar risk in overall VUR patients, DD vs. DI + II: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04–2.49, P = 0.03; DD vs. II: OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.20–2.65, P < 0.01; D vs. I: OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.02–1.86, P = 0.04. Similar results were revealed in Turks, but not in Caucasians and Asians. Our meta-analysis indicated that the ACE DD genotype may increase the risk of renal scar in children with VUR. PMID:27506878

  8. Different reactivity to angiotensin II of peripheral and renal arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats: effect of acute and chronic angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidi, E.; Hollenberg, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    We assessed renal blood flow and pressor responses to graded angiotensin II doses in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats ingesting a diet containing 1.6% sodium basally and after acute and chronic angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with captopril. In the basal state the pressor response to angiotensin II was enhanced (P<0.0005) and the renal vascular response was blunted (P<0.005) in SHR compared with WKY rats. After acute captopril administration the pressor response was enhanced in both strains, and the difference between them was maintained, while the renal vascular response was enhanced in both, but more in SHR, so that the renal vascular response in the SHR became larger than in WKY (P<0.0001). Chronic captopril treatment blunted both pressor and renal responses in WKY rats, but only the pressor response in SHR. The renal vessels of SHR seem to be different from those of WKY rats in reaction to exogenous angiotensin II, and in response to both acute administration of captopril (probably acting through blockade of angiotensin II production) and chronic administration of captopril (probably acting mainly through accumulation of kinin or production of prostaglandins).

  9. Comparison of gallium-67 scanning, bronchoalveolar lavage, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels in pulmonary sarcoidosis. Predicting response to therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baughman, R.P.; Fernandez, M.; Bosken, C.H.; Mantil, J.; Hurtubise, P.

    1984-05-01

    Patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis underwent bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level determination prior to treatment with corticosteroids. Pulmonary function was tested before and after therapy. Increase in vital capacity after treatment ranged from 40 to 1,030 ml; 12 of the 16 patients studied had an increase of more than 200 ml. There was a close correlation between the percentage uptake of gallium scan and the increase of the vital capacity after therapy (r . 0.95, p less than 0.01). There was no relationship between the percentage of lymphocytes obtained on lavage and the changes in vital capacity with therapy (r . 0.05). There was a positive correlation between the changes in vital capacity and the ratio of T4(+):T8(+)lymphocytes (r . 0.62, p less than 0.05) and number of T4 (+) lymphocytes (r . 0.92, p less than 0.01) in the bronchoalveolar fluid. There was a low correlation between the pretreatment ACE level and the change in vital capacity (r . 0.368, p greater than 0.05).

  10. Prediction of therapeutic response in steroid-treated pulmonary sarcoidosis. Evaluation of clinical parameters, bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium-67 lung scanning, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, W.M.; Staton, G.W. Jr.; Fajman, W.A.; Gilman, M.J.; Pine, J.R.; Check, I.J.

    1985-07-01

    To find a pretreatment predictor of steroid responsiveness in pulmonary sarcoidosis the authors studied 21 patients before and after steroid treatment by clinical evaluation, pulmonary function tests, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), gallium-67 lung scan, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (SACE) level. Although clinical score, forced vital capacity (FVC), BAL percent lymphocytes (% lymphs), quantitated gallium-67 lung uptake, and SACE levels all improved with therapy, only the pretreatment BAL % lymphs correlated with the improvement in FVC (r = 0.47, p less than 0.05). Pretreatment BAL % lymphs of greater than or equal to 35% predicted improvement in FVC of 10/11 patients, whereas among 10 patients with BAL % lymphs less than 35%, 5 patients improved and 5 deteriorated. Clinical score, pulmonary function parameters, quantitated gallium-67 lung uptake, and SACE level used alone, in combination with BAL % lymphs or in combination with each other, did not improve this predictive value. The authors conclude that steroid therapy improves a number of clinical and laboratory parameters in sarcoidosis, but only the pretreatment BAL % lymphs are useful in predicting therapeutic responsiveness.

  11. Use of beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers and breast cancer survival: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Sara; Botteri, Edoardo; Munzone, Elisabetta; Cipolla, Carlo; Rotmensz, Nicole; DeCensi, Andrea; Gandini, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in Western Countries. Beta-blocker (BB) drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) were suggested to have a favorable role in the development and progression of BC. We have performed a meta-analysis to clarify the potential benefits of these drugs on BC survival. A total number of 46 265 BC patients from eleven papers were included, ten independent studies on BB use and seven on ACEi/ARB use. The summary hazard ratio (SHR) was estimated by pooling the study-specific estimates with random effects models and maximum likelihood estimation. We assessed the homogeneity of the effects across studies and evaluated between-study heterogeneity by meta-regression and sensitivity analyses. We found a significant improvement in BC specific survival for patients treated with BB drugs at the time of BC diagnosis (SHR: 0.44; 95%CI: 0.26-0.73 with I(2)  = 78%). We also observed a borderline significant improvement in disease free survival for subjects treated with BB (SHR: 0.71, 95%CI: 0.19-1.03). No association of ACEi/ARB use with disease free and overall survival was found. In conclusion, we report epidemiological evidence that BB improve BC-specific survival. Clinical trials addressing this hypothesis are warranted. PMID:26916107

  12. Short communication: Measuring the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of an 8-amino acid (8mer) fragment of the C12 antihypertensive peptide.

    PubMed

    Paul, Moushumi; Phillips, John G; Renye, John A

    2016-05-01

    An 8-AA (8mer) fragment (PFPEVFGK) of a known antihypertensive peptide derived from bovine αS1-casein (C12 antihypertensive peptide) was synthesized by microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis and purified by reverse phase HPLC. Its ability to inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was assessed and compared with that of the parent 12mer peptide (FFVAPFPEVFGK) to determine the effect of truncating the sequence on overall hypotensive activity. The activity of the truncated 8mer peptide was found to be almost 1.5 times less active than that of the 12mer, with ACE-inhibiting IC50 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) values of 108 and 69μM, for the 8mer and 12mer, respectively. Although the 8mer peptide is less active than the original 12mer peptide, its overall activity is comparable to activities reported for other small proteins that elicit physiological responses within humans. These results suggest that microbial degradation of the 12mer peptide would not result in a complete loss of antihypertensive activity if used to supplement fermented foods and that the stable 8mer peptide could have potential as a blood pressure-lowering agent for use in functional foods. PMID:26971162

  13. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E; Montgomery, Hugh E

    2016-07-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3-55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P < 0·01) whilst increasing ACE expression within a physiological range (<1·8-fold at 48 h; P < 0·01). Our findings suggest novel hypotheses. Firstly, cellular feedback regulation may occur between UCPs and ACE. Secondly, cellular UCP regulation of sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. PMID:27417115

  14. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the testis and assessment of the in vivo effects of the ACE inhibitor perindopril

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Cubela, R.B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Johnston, C.I.

    1988-07-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was characterized by radioligand studies utilizing the potent ACE inhibitor 351A, a derivative of lisinopril. Ligand binding characteristics were similar for ACE derived from testis, lung, and kidney, despite known differences in structure between ACe from these sources. This observation suggests that the ACE active enzymatic site is similar in different tissues. The effect of the orally active ACE inhibitor perindopril was studied ex vivo in tissues of the rat after oral gavage. Radioligand bound to tissue ACE was reduced after perindopril treatment, in tissue homogenates of lung and kidney, but not testis. Autoradiographs of radioligand binding to tissue sections obtained ex vivo after oral perindopril showed inhibition of ACE in the aorta, lung, and kidney, but did not reveal any inhibition of ACE in the testis. ACE in small vessels of the testis was inhibited as in the aorta, while at the same time testicular ACE was unaffected. ACE in rat testis appears to have a similar enzymatic binding site to ACE from the lung and kidney. Perindopril inhibited ACE in the lung and kidney but did not affect ACE in the testis, suggesting the drug is limited in testicular penetration by the blood-testis barrier. This may explain the lack of any reports of adverse effects of ACE inhibitors on testicular function.

  15. Diabetes and CVD risk during angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment in hypertension: a study of 15 990 patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasvold, L P; Bodegård, J; Thuresson, M; Stålhammar, J; Hammar, N; Sundström, J; Russell, D; Kjeldsen, S E

    2014-01-01

    Differences in clinical effectiveness between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in the primary treatment of hypertension are unknown. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients treated with ARBs or ACEis. Patients initiated on enalapril or candesartan treatment in 71 Swedish primary care centers between 1999 and 2007 were included. Medical records data were extracted and linked with nationwide hospital discharge and cause of death registers. The 11 725 patients initiated on enalapril and 4265 on candesartan had similar baseline characteristics. During a mean follow-up of 1.84 years, 36 482 patient-years, the risk of new diabetes onset was lower in the candesartan group (hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69–0.96, P=0.01) compared with the enalapril group. No difference between the groups was observed in CVD risk (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87–1.13, P=0.86). More patients discontinued treatment in the enalapril group (38.1%) vs the candesartan group (27.2%). In a clinical setting, patients initiated on candesartan treatment had a lower risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes and lower rates of drug discontinuation compared with patients initiated on enalapril. No differences in CVD risk were observed. PMID:25211055

  16. Serum levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II in patients treated by surgical excision, propranolol and captopril for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, L; Baillie, R; Itinteang, T; de Jong, S; Marsh, R; Leadbitter, P; Tan, S T

    2016-03-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the biology of infantile haemangioma (IH) and its accelerated involution induced by β-blockers was first proposed in 2010. This led to the first clinical trial in 2012 using low-dose captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, demonstrating a similar response in these tumours. This study aimed to compare serial serum levels of the components of the RAS in patients before and after surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment for problematic proliferating IH. Patients with problematic proliferating IH underwent measurements of serum levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), ACE and angiotensin II (ATII) before, and 1-2 and 6 months following surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment. This study included 27 patients undergoing surgical excision (n = 8), propranolol (n = 11) and captopril (n = 8) treatment. Treatment with either surgical excision or propranolol resulted in significant decrease in the mean levels of PRA. Surgical excision or captopril treatment led to significant decline in the mean levels of ATII. All three treatment modalities had no significant effect on the mean levels of ACE. This study demonstrates the effect of surgical excision, propranolol and captopril treatment in lowering the levels of PRA and ATII, but not ACE, supporting a mechanistic role for the RAS in the biology of IH. PMID:26612192

  17. Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) prevented hypertension by an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Matsuda; Yasuo, Aoyagi

    2013-06-12

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is known to be rich in functional components. In the present study, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were used to clarify whether green asparagus prevents hypertension by inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. Six-week-old male SHR were fed a diet with (AD group) or without (ND group) 5% asparagus for 10 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) (AD: 159 ± 4.8 mmHg, ND: 192 ± 14.7 mmHg), urinary protein excretion/creatinine excretion, and ACE activity in the kidney were significantly lower in the AD group compared with the ND group. Creatinine clearance was significantly higher in the AD group compared with the ND group. In addition, ACE inhibitory activity was observed in a boiling water extract of asparagus. The ACE inhibitor purified and isolated from asparagus was identified as 2″-hydroxynicotianamine. In conclusion, 2″-hydroxynicotianamine in asparagus may be one of the factors inhibiting ACE activity in the kidney, thus preventing hypertension and preserving renal function. PMID:23647085

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Assessment of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Milk by Lactobacillus casei Strains.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhijie; Chi, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of fermented soybean milk (FSM) by Lactobacillus casei strains in vitro was investigated in this study. Effects of fermented soybean milk administration by gavage on systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure was also evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) rats and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Results showed that, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM showed high ACE inhibitory activity in vitro test and ACE inhibitory activity of CICC 23184 FSM was higher than CICC 20280 FSM. The bioactive substances of FSM were peptide and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Their contents in CICC 20280 FSM and CICC 23184 FSM were 3.97 ± 0.67 mg/ml (peptide), 1.71 ± 0.36 mg/ml (GABA) and 5.17 ± 0.22 mg/ml (peptide), 1.57 ± 0.21 mg/ml (GABA), respectively. Moreover, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM administration by gavage could effectively lower the blood pressure of SHR to a normal level, while there was no effect on blood pressure of WKY rats. This result indicated that the bioactive substances could play an antihypertensive role when the blood pressure was not within the normal levels (high levels). PMID:27139252

  19. An SNP within the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Distinguishes between Sprint and Distance Performing Alaskan Sled Dogs in a Candidate Gene Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Heather J.; Byers, Alexandra M.; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The Alaskan sled dog offers a unique mechanism for studying the genetics of elite athletic performance. They are a group of mixed breed dogs, comprised of multiple common breeds, and a unique breed entity seen only as a part of the sled dog mix. Alaskan sled dogs are divided into 2 primary groups as determined by their racing skills. Distance dogs are capable of running over 1000 miles in 10 days, whereas sprint dogs run much shorter distances, approximately 30 miles, but in faster times, that is, 18–25 mph. Finding the genes that distinguish these 2 types of performers is likely to illuminate genetic contributors to human athletic performance. In this study, we tested for association between polymorphisms in 2 candidate genes; angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and myostatin (MSTN) and enhanced speed and endurance performance in 174 Alaskan sled dogs. We observed 81 novel genetic variants within the ACE gene and 4 within the MSTN gene, including a polymorphism within the ACE gene that significantly (P value 2.38 × 10−5) distinguished the sprint versus distance populations. PMID:21846742

  20. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  1. Aib-containing analogues of the insect kinin neuropeptide family demonstrate resistance to an insect angiotensin-converting enzyme and potent diuretic activity.

    PubMed

    Nachman, R J; Isaac, R E; Coast, G M; Holman, G M

    1997-01-01

    Analogues of the insect kinin family in which the Xaa2 residue of the C-terminal pentapeptide core sequence Phe-Xaa1-Xaa2-Trp-Gly-NH2 (Xaa1 = Asn, His, Phe, Ser, or Tyr; Xaa2 = Ala, Ser, or Pro) is replaced with sterically hindered aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) prove to be resistant to hydrolysis by housefly (Musca domestica) angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), an endopeptidase capable of hydrolysis and inactivation of the naturally occurring insect kinin peptides. The Aib residue is compatible with formation of turn in the active core region that is important for the biological activity of the insect kinins. One of the Aib-containing analogues, pGlu-Lys-Phe-Phe-Aib-Trp-Gly-NH2, is five- and eightfold more active than the most active endogenous insect kinins in cockroach (Leucophaea maderae) hindgut myotropic and cricket (Acheta domesticus) Malpighian tubule fluid secretion assays, respectively. As the analogue is blocked at both the amino- and the carboxyl-terminus and resistant to an endopeptidase present in insects, it is better adapted than the endogenous peptides to survive for long periods in the hemolymph. Enzyme-resistant insect kinin analogues can provide useful tools to insect researchers studying the neuroendocrine control of water and ion balance and the physiological consequences of challenging insect with diuretic factors that demonstrate enhanced resistance to peptidase attack. If these analogues, whether in isolation or in combination with other factors, can disrupt the water and/or ion balance they hold potential utility for the control of pest insect populations in the future. PMID:9114452

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) from raccoon dog can serve as an efficient receptor for the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Zhang, Yanfang; Liu, Yun; Chen, Zhiwei; Deng, Hongkui; Ma, Zhongbin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong; Deng, Fei

    2009-11-01

    Raccoon dog is one of the suspected intermediate hosts of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In this study, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene of raccoon dog (rdACE2) was cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequence of rdACE2 has identities of 99.3, 89.2, 83.9 and 80.4 % to ACE2 proteins from dog, masked palm civet (pcACE2), human (huACE2) and bat, respectively. There are six amino acid changes in rdACE2 compared with huACE2, and four changes compared with pcACE2, within the 18 residues of ACE2 known to make direct contact with the SARS-CoV S protein. A HeLa cell line stably expressing rdACE2 was established; Western blot analyses and an enzyme-activity assay indicated that the cell line expressed ACE2 at a similar level to two previously established cell lines that express ACE2 from human and masked palm civet, respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus-backboned pseudoviruses expressing spike proteins derived from human SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs were tested for their entry efficiency into these cell lines. The results showed that rdACE2 is a more efficient receptor for human SARS-CoV, but not for SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs, than huACE2 or pcACE2. This study provides useful data to elucidate the role of raccoon dog in SARS outbreaks. PMID:19625462

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor prevents oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in carbon tetrachloride-treated rat liver.

    PubMed

    Reza, Hasan Mahmud; Tabassum, Nabila; Sagor, Md Abu Taher; Chowdhury, Mohammed Riaz Hasan; Rahman, Mahbubur; Jain, Preeti; Alam, Md Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a common feature of chronic liver injury, and the involvement of angiotensin II in such process has been studied earlier. We hypothesized that anti-angiotensin II agents may be effective in preventing hepatic fibrosis. In this study, Long Evans female rats were used and divided into four groups such as Group-I, Control; Group-II, Control + ramipril; Group-III, CCl4; and Group-IV, CCl4 + ramipril. Group II and IV are treated with ramipril for 14 d. At the end of treatment, the livers were removed, and the level of hepatic marker enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase, Alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase), nitric oxide, advanced protein oxidation product , catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation were determined. The degree of fibrosis was evaluated through histopathological staining with Sirius red and trichrome milligan staining. Carbon-tetrachloride (CCl4) administration in rats developed hepatic dysfunction and raised the hepatic marker enzymes activities significantly. CCl4 administration in rats also produced oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in liver. Furthermore, angiotensinogen-inhibitor ramipril normalized the hepatic enzymes activities and improved the antioxidant enzyme catalase activity. Moreover, ramipril treatment ameliorated lipid peroxidation and hepatic inflammation in CCl4-treated rats. Ramipril treatment also significantly reduced hepatic fibrosis in CCl4-administered rats. In conclusion, our investigation suggests that the antifibrotic effect of ramipril may be attributed to inhibition of angiotensin-II mediated oxidative stress and inflammation in liver CCl4-administered rats. PMID:26862777

  4. Angioedema of the lips and tongue induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Helen A; Steele, John C; Field, E Anne; Darroch, Campbell J

    2004-01-01

    The following case reports describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of two patients who attended Liverpool University Dental Hospital with rapidly increasing swelling of the lips and tongue. Both patients were suffering from angioedema and were taking an angiotension-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (ACEI). A provisional diagnosis of ACEI-induced angioedema was made. An intramuscular injection of chlorpheniramine maleate was given to both patients and they were immediately transferred to the local accident and emergency department. These cases illustrate the potential role of the general dental practitioner in the early recognition and management of this potentially life-threatening condition. PMID:14768205

  5. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan; Wen Fuqiang

    2010-05-15

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  6. Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor and Statin Medication Use and Incident Mobility Limitation in Community Older Adults. The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Shelly L.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Newman, Anne B.; Studenski, Stephanie A.; Shorr, Ronald I; Bauer, Douglas C.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Hanlon, Joseph T

    2012-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statin medications have been proposed as potential agents to prevent or delay physical disability; yet limited research has evaluated whether such use in older community dwelling adults is associated with a lower risk of incident mobility limitation. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Participants 3055 participants who were well functioning at baseline (e.g., no mobility limitations). Measurements Summated standardized daily doses (low, medium and high) and duration of ACE inhibitor and statin use was computed. Mobility limitation (two consecutive self-reports of having any difficulty walking 1/4 mile or climbing 10 steps without resting) was assessed every 6 months after baseline. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses were conducted adjusting for demographics, health status, and health behaviors. Results At baseline, ACE inhibitors and statins were used by 15.2% and 12.9%, respectively and both increased to over 25% by year 6. Over 6.5 years of follow-up, 49.8% had developed mobility limitation. In separate multivariable models, neither ACE inhibitor (multivariate hazard ratio [HR] 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82–1.09) nor statin use (multivariate HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.87–1.17) was associated with a lower risk for mobility limitation. Similar findings were seen in analyses examining dose- and duration-response relationships and sensitivity analyses restricted to those with hypertension. Conclusions These findings indicate that ACE inhibitors and statins widely prescribed to treat hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, respectively do not lower risk of mobility limitation, an important life quality indicator. PMID:22092102

  7. Impact of non-starter lactobacilli on release of peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities during bovine milk fermentation.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa; Rutella, Giuseppina Sefora; Tagliazucchi, Davide

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at evaluating non-starter lactobacilli (NSLAB) isolated from cheeses for their proteolytic activity and capability to produce fermented milk enriched in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant peptides. Preliminarily, 34 NSLAB from Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) and 5 from Pecorino Siciliano cheeses were screened based on their capacity to hydrolyze milk proteins. Two NSLAB strains from PR, Lactobacillus casei PRA205 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus PRA331, showed the most proteolytic phenotype and were positively selected to inoculate sterile cow milk. The fermentation process was monitored by measuring viable cell population, kinetic of acidification, consumption of lactose, and synthesis of lactic acid. Milk fermented with Lb. casei PRA205 exhibited higher radical scavenging (1184.83 ± 40.28 mmol/L trolox equivalents) and stronger ACE-inhibitory (IC50 = 54.57 μg/mL) activities than milk fermented with Lb. rhamnosus PRA331 (939.22 ± 82.68 mmol/L trolox equivalents; IC50 = 212.38 μg/mL). Similarly, Lb. casei PRA205 showed the highest production of ACE-inhibitory peptides Val-Pro-Pro and Ile-Pro-Pro, which reached concentrations of 32.88 and 7.52 mg/L after 87 and 96 h of milk fermentation, respectively. This evidence supports Lb. casei PRA205, previously demonstrated to possess characteristics compatible with probiotic properties, as a promising functional culture able to promote health benefits in dairy foods. PMID:26187835

  8. In vivo kinetics of indoxyl sulfate in humans and its renal interaction with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor quinapril in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoe; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Shuichi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Maeda, Mika; Kobayashi, Mami; Sahashi, Kunihiko; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Kumagai, Yuji; Majima, Masataka

    2012-06-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is an organic anion uremic toxin that accumulates in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aims of this study were to examine the kinetic profiles of IS in humans at a steady state after multiple doses of L-Trp, a precursor of IS, and the in vivo interaction of IS with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor quinapril, whose active metabolite is a substrate of organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3) in rats. First, 12-h kinetics after single doses of Trp (2, 4, and 8 g) were examined in two healthy volunteers. Second, 24-h kinetics after a single dose of 2 g of Trp was studied in six volunteers. Third, 35-h kinetics after single and multiple doses of 2 g of Trp were examined in five volunteers. In anesthetized rats, quinapril or probenecid, an inhibitor of OATs, was given intravenously before IS, and blood and urine samples were taken until 90 min. Trp and IS concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ultrafiltration was used to measure serum unbound IS concentrations. Renal tubular secretion of IS accounted for more than 90% of its renal clearance in the steady state of serum IS levels after multiple doses in humans. In animals, the serum area under the curve of IS increased in conjunction with a decrease in renal clearances after coadministration of IS with quinapril or probenecid. It is concluded that quinapril may inhibit the urine excretion of IS via OAT3-mediated renal tubular transport in patients with CKD. PMID:22389425

  9. Effect of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Receptor Blockers on Appropriate Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Shock in Patients with Severe Systolic Heart Failure (From the GRADE Multicenter Study)

    PubMed Central

    AlJaroudi, Wael A.; Refaat, Marwan M.; Habib, Robert H.; Al-Shaar, Laila; Singh, Madhurmeet; Gutmann, Rebecca; Bloom, Heather L.; Dudley, Samuel C.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Saba, Samir F.; Shalaby, Alaa A.; Weiss, Raul; McNamara, Dennis M.; Halder, Indrani; London, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with cardiomyopathy. While angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and receptor blockers (ARB) decrease cardiac mortality in these cohorts, their role in preventing SCD has not been well established. We sought to determine whether the use of ACEi or ARB in patients with cardiomyopathy is associated with a lower incidence of appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) shocks in the Genetic Risk Assessment of Defibrillator Events (GRADE) study which included subjects with an ejection fraction of ≤30% and ICDs. Treatment with ACEi/ARB versus no ACEi/ARB was physician dependent. There were 1509 patients (mean age [SD] 63[12] years, 80% male, mean [SD] EF 21% [6%]) with 1213 (80%) on ACEi/ARB, and 296 (20%) not on ACEi/ARB. We identified 574 propensity matched patients (287 in each group). After a mean (SD) of 2.5(1.9) years, there were 334 (22%) appropriate shocks in the entire cohort. The use of ACEi/ARB was associated with lower incidence of shocks at 1, 3 and 5 years in the matched cohort (7.7%, 16.7%, 18.5% vs. 13.2%, 27.5%, and 32.0% (RR= 0.61[0.43–0.86], p =0.005). Among patients with GFR >60 and 30–60 ml/min/1.73m2, those on no-ACEi/ARB were at 45% and 77% increased risk of ICD shock as compared to those on ACEi/ARB, respectively. ACEi/ARB were associated with significant lower incidence of appropriate ICD shock in patients with cardiomyopathy and GFR ≥30 ml/min/1.73m2, and with neutral effect among those GFR <30 ml/min/1.73m2. PMID:25682436

  10. Update on the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2-Angiotensin (1–7)-Mas Receptor Axis: Fetal Programing, Sex Differences, and Intracellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Mark C.; Marshall, Allyson C.; Alzayadneh, Ebaa M.; Shaltout, Hossam A.; Diz, Debra I.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) constitutes an important hormonal system in the physiological regulation of blood pressure. Indeed, dysregulation of the RAS may lead to the development of cardiovascular pathologies including kidney injury. Moreover, the blockade of this system by the inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) or antagonism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) constitutes an effective therapeutic regimen. It is now apparent with the identification of multiple components of the RAS that the system is comprised of different angiotensin peptides with diverse biological actions mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The classic RAS can be defined as the ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis that promotes vasoconstriction, sodium retention, and other mechanisms to maintain blood pressure, as well as increased oxidative stress, fibrosis, cellular growth, and inflammation in pathological conditions. In contrast, the non-classical RAS composed of the ACE2-Ang-(1–7)-Mas receptor axis generally opposes the actions of a stimulated Ang II-AT1R axis through an increase in nitric oxide and prostaglandins and mediates vasodilation, natriuresis, diuresis, and oxidative stress. Thus, a reduced tone of the Ang-(1–7) system may contribute to these pathologies as well. Moreover, the non-classical RAS components may contribute to the effects of therapeutic blockade of the classical system to reduce blood pressure and attenuate various indices of renal injury. The review considers recent studies on the ACE2-Ang-(1–7)-Mas receptor axis regarding the precursor for Ang-(1–7), the intracellular expression and sex differences of this system, as well as an emerging role of the Ang1-(1–7) pathway in fetal programing events and cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:24409169