Science.gov

Sample records for angled high frequency

  1. Neptune high-latitude emission: Dependence of angle on frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Constance

    1993-01-01

    Smooth broadband radio emission reached a maximum and then cut off as Voyager approached the north magnetic pole of Neptune. The time of each event depends on frequency, yielding information on radio source location, and emission angle. In a preliminary analysis L-shell and magnetic longitude define radio-source locations in a dipole field. The emission angle at each frequency is identified with the angle between the magnetic-field direction at the source and the line of sight to Voyager 2 at the time of emission maximum. At each value of L in the range 6 less than L less than 9, there is one source longitude for which emission angle varies smoothly from greater or equal to 90 deg at 40 kHz to as low as 20 deg at 462 kHz. A more complex magnetic-field model can give a qualitatively different result.

  2. Study of High-Frequency Impedance of Small-Angle Tapers and Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; Podobedov, B.; /Brookhaven

    2010-06-04

    Collimators and transitions in accelerator vacuum chambers often include small-angle tapering to lower the wakefields generated by the beam. While the low-frequency impedance is well described by Yokoya's formula (for axisymmetric geometry), much less is known about the behavior of the impedance in the high frequency limit. In this paper we develop an analytical approach to the highfrequency regime for round collimators and tapers. Our analytical results are compared with computer simulations using the code ECHO.

  3. Effect of high-frequency in-plane substrate vibration on a three-phase contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Ofer; Pismen, Len M.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate analytically the contribution of high-frequency horizontal (in-plane) vibration of a solid substrate to the apparent contact angle of a liquid meniscus in the framework of the lubrication approximation. We show that oscillatory excitation invokes a drift of liquid within the meniscus resulting from nonlinear contributions from both the motion of the solid surface and acoustically induced capillary waves at the free surface of the liquid. Our analysis reveals that under this type of excitation, the relative increase of the steady apparent contact angle is proportional to the product of the capillary and Reynolds numbers.

  4. Feasibility of Rotational Scan Ultrasound Imaging by an Angled High Frequency Transducer for the Posterior Segment of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Chang, Jin Ho; Chen, Ruimin; Humayun, Mark S.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    High frequency ultrasound over 40 MHz has been used to image the anterior segment of the eye, but it is not suitable for the posterior segment due to the frequency-dependent attenuation of ultrasound and thus the limitation of penetration depth. This paper proposes a novel scan method to image the posterior segment of the eye with an angled high frequency (beyond 40 MHz) ultrasound needle transducer. In this method, the needle transducer is inserted into the eye through a small incision hole (∼1 mm in diameter) and rotated around the axial direction to form a cone-shaped imaging plane, allowing the spatial information of retinal vessels and diagnosis of their occlusion to be displayed. The feasibility of this novel technique was tested with images of a wire phantom, a polyimide tube, and an excised pig eye obtained by manually rotating a 40-MHz PMN-PT needle transducer with a beveled tip of 45°. From the results, we believe that rotational scan imaging will help expand the minimally invasive applications of high frequency ultrasound to other areas due to the capability of increased closeness of an angled needle transducer to structures of interest buried in other tissues. PMID:19411226

  5. Data for phase angle shift with frequency.

    PubMed

    Paul, T; Banerjee, D; Kargupta, K

    2016-06-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  6. Data for phase angle shift with frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paul, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kargupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  7. Relationship between frequency and deflection angle in the DNA prism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Dorfman, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    The DNA prism is a modification of the standard pulsed-field electrophoresis protocol to provide a continuous separation, where the DNA are deflected at an angle that depends on their molecular weight. The standard switchback model for the DNA prism predicts a monotonic increase in the deflection angle as a function of the frequency for switching the field until a plateau regime is reached. However, experiments indicate that the deflection angle achieves a maximum value before decaying to a size-independent value at high frequencies. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show that the maximum in the deflection angle is related to the reorientation time for the DNA and the decay in deflection angle at high frequencies is due to inadequate stretching. The generic features of the dependence of the deflection angle on molecular weight, switching frequency, and electric field strength explain a number of experimental phenomena. PMID:23410375

  8. Implementation of a Rotational Ultrasound Biomicroscopy System Equipped with a High-Frequency Angled Needle Transducer — Ex Vivo Ultrasound Imaging of Porcine Ocular Posterior Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Juho; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical scanning of a single element transducer has been mostly utilized for high-frequency ultrasound imaging. However, it requires space for the mechanical motion of the transducer. In this paper, a rotational scanning ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) system equipped with a high-frequency angled needle transducer is designed and implemented in order to minimize the space required. It was applied to ex vivo ultrasound imaging of porcine posterior ocular tissues through a minimal incision hole of 1 mm in diameter. The retina and sclera for the one eye were visualized in the relative rotating angle range of 270° ∼ 330° and at a distance range of 6 ∼ 7 mm, whereas the tissues of the other eye were observed in relative angle range of 160° ∼ 220° and at a distance range of 7.5 ∼ 9 mm. The layer between retina and sclera seemed to be bent because the distance between the transducer tip and the layer was varied while the transducer was rotated. Certin features of the rotation system such as the optimal scanning angle, step angle and data length need to be improved for ensure higher accuracy and precision. Moreover, the focal length should be considered for the image quality. This implementation represents the first report of a rotational scanning UBM system. PMID:25254305

  9. Low-loss smile-insensitive external frequency-stabilization of high power diode lasers enabled by vertical designs with extremely low divergence angle and high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, Paul; Knigge, Steffen; Maaßdorf, Andre; Bugge, Frank; Hengesbach, Stefan; Witte, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter; Köhler, Bernd; Hubrich, Ralf; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Erbert, Götz; Traenkle, Guenther

    2013-02-01

    Broad area lasers with narrow spectra are required for many pumping applications and for wavelength beam combination. Although monolithically stabilized lasers show high performance, some applications can only be addressed with external frequency stabilization, for example when very narrow spectra are required. When conventional diode lasers with vertical far field angle, ΘV 95% ~ 45° (95% power) are stabilized using volume holographic gratings (VHGs), optical losses are introduced, limiting both efficiency and reliable output power, with the presence of any bar smile compounding the challenge. Diode lasers with designs optimized for extremely low vertical divergence (ELOD lasers) directly address these challenges. The vertical far field angle in conventional laser designs is limited by the waveguiding of the active region itself. In ELOD designs, quantum barriers are used that have low refractive index, enabling the influence of the active region to be suppressed, leading to narrow far field operation from thin vertical structures, for minimal electrical resistance and maximum power conversion efficiency. We review the design process, and show that 975 nm diode lasers with 90 μm stripes that use ELOD designs operate with ΘV 95% = 26° and reach 58% power conversion efficiency at a CW output power of 10 W. We demonstrate directly that VHG stabilized ELOD lasers have significantly lower loss and larger operation windows than conventional lasers in the collimated feedback regimes, even in the presence of significant (≥ 1 μm) bar smile. We also discuss the potential influence of ELOD designs on reliable output power and options for further performance improvement.

  10. Rotated garnets: a mechanism to explain the high frequency of inclusion trail curvature angles around 90° and 180°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouw, Rudolph A. J.; Tavares, Felipe M.; Robyr, Martin

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents numerical data from garnets with inclusion trail curvature angles of up to 260°. Three hundred and twenty-five garnets were studied from an outcrop of greenschist facies phyllite in southern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Apart from the inclusion trail curvature angle α, also the aspect ratio R and the angle between the long axis of the garnets and the foliation, β, were measured. The results show a remarkable concentration of α at 180° and a minor one at 90°. R varies between 1 and 2 showing that the garnets deviate from sphericity and β shows that all garnets have their long axis in the "forward rotated" quadrant, supporting the rotational interpretation. A model is proposed to explain the concentrations of α, based on preferential growth of the garnets into the mica rich strain caps, orthogonal to the foliation, causing elongated crystals that, because of their shape and position would experience accelerated rotation until relatively stable positions with their long axes parallel to the foliation would be attained. Renewed growth, again into the mica-rich strain caps, orthogonal to the foliation would first restore the spherical shape and then produce an elongated shape, again perpendicular to the foliation, forcing a repetition of the process. It is concluded that this model is capable of explaining the concentration of α in multiples of 90°, in a rotational model, where this concentration was considered earlier as an argument in favor of the non-rotational model.

  11. High-speed pitch angle sorter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, John W.; Torbert, R. B.; Vandiver, James

    1991-01-01

    A high-speed method was developed to compress the two-dimensional angular distribution of space particles gathered by space plasma instrumentation into the angle distribution, where the pitch angle is polar angle with respect to the ambient magnetic field. The pitch angle sorter can handle rates of up to 2 MHz and it is designed to accommodate high angular resolution plasma analyzers that are placed on a rotating spacecraft. This compression is achieved by relying on digitally encoded lookup tables to eliminate all arithmetic operations while applying the high symmetry of this compression to reduce the amount of digital memory.

  12. Schlemm’s Canal and Trabecular Meshwork in Eyes with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: A Comparative Study Using High-Frequency Ultrasound Biomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoqin; Li, Mu; Chen, Zhiqi; Zhu, Ying; Song, Yinwei; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated in vivo changes in Schlemm’s canal and the trabecular meshwork in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Relationships between Schlemm’s canal diameter, trabecular meshwork thickness, and intraocular pressure (IOP) were examined. Forty POAG patients and 40 normal individuals underwent 80-MHz Ultrasound Biomicroscopy examinations. The Schlemm’s canal and trabecular meshwork were imaged in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal regions. Normal individuals had an observable Schlemm’s canal in 80.3% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 233.0±34.5 μm, a coronal diameter of 44.5±12.6 μm and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 103.9±11.1 μm, in POAG patients, Schlemm’s canal was observable in 53.1% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 195.6±31.3 μm, a coronal diameter of 35.7±8.0 μm, and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 88.3±13.2 μm, which significantly differed from normal (both p <0.001). Coronal canal diameter (r = -0.623, p < 0.001) and trabecular meshwork thickness (r = -0.663, p < 0.001) were negatively correlated with IOP, but meridional canal diameter was not (r = -0.160, p = 0.156). Schlemm’s canal was observable in 50.5% and 56.6% of POAG patients with normal (<21 mmHg) and elevated (>21 mmHg) IOP, respectively (χ = 1.159, p = 0.282). Coronal canal diameter was significantly lower in the elevated IOP group (32.6±4.9 μm) than in the normal IOP group (35.7±8.0 μm, p < 0.001). This was also true of trabecular meshwork thickness (81.9±10.0 μm vs. 97.1±12.0 μm, p < 0.001). In conclusion, eyes with POAG had fewer sections with an observable Schlemm’s canal. Canal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were also lower than normal in POAG patients. Schlemm’s canal coronal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were negatively correlated with IOP. PMID:26726880

  13. Schlemm's Canal and Trabecular Meshwork in Eyes with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: A Comparative Study Using High-Frequency Ultrasound Biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoqin; Li, Mu; Chen, Zhiqi; Zhu, Ying; Song, Yinwei; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated in vivo changes in Schlemm's canal and the trabecular meshwork in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Relationships between Schlemm's canal diameter, trabecular meshwork thickness, and intraocular pressure (IOP) were examined. Forty POAG patients and 40 normal individuals underwent 80-MHz Ultrasound Biomicroscopy examinations. The Schlemm's canal and trabecular meshwork were imaged in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal regions. Normal individuals had an observable Schlemm's canal in 80.3% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 233.0±34.5 μm, a coronal diameter of 44.5±12.6 μm and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 103.9±11.1 μm, in POAG patients, Schlemm's canal was observable in 53.1% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 195.6±31.3 μm, a coronal diameter of 35.7±8.0 μm, and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 88.3±13.2 μm, which significantly differed from normal (both p <0.001). Coronal canal diameter (r = -0.623, p < 0.001) and trabecular meshwork thickness (r = -0.663, p < 0.001) were negatively correlated with IOP, but meridional canal diameter was not (r = -0.160, p = 0.156). Schlemm's canal was observable in 50.5% and 56.6% of POAG patients with normal (<21 mmHg) and elevated (>21 mmHg) IOP, respectively (χ = 1.159, p = 0.282). Coronal canal diameter was significantly lower in the elevated IOP group (32.6±4.9 μm) than in the normal IOP group (35.7±8.0 μm, p < 0.001). This was also true of trabecular meshwork thickness (81.9±10.0 μm vs. 97.1±12.0 μm, p < 0.001). In conclusion, eyes with POAG had fewer sections with an observable Schlemm's canal. Canal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were also lower than normal in POAG patients. Schlemm's canal coronal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were negatively correlated with IOP. PMID:26726880

  14. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  15. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  16. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  17. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  18. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  19. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  20. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  1. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  2. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  3. A single-layer wide-angle negative-index metamaterial at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Stanley P; de Waele, Rene; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2010-05-01

    Metamaterials are materials with artificial electromagnetic properties defined by their sub-wavelength structure rather than their chemical composition. Negative-index materials (NIMs) are a special class of metamaterials characterized by an effective negative index that gives rise to such unusual wave behaviour as backwards phase propagation and negative refraction. These extraordinary properties lead to many interesting functions such as sub-diffraction imaging and invisibility cloaking. So far, NIMs have been realized through layering of resonant structures, such as split-ring resonators, and have been demonstrated at microwave to infrared frequencies over a narrow range of angles-of-incidence and polarization. However, resonant-element NIM designs suffer from the limitations of not being scalable to operate at visible frequencies because of intrinsic fabrication limitations, require multiple functional layers to achieve strong scattering and have refractive indices that are highly dependent on angle of incidence and polarization. Here we report a metamaterial composed of a single layer of coupled plasmonic coaxial waveguides that exhibits an effective refractive index of -2 in the blue spectral region with a figure-of-merit larger than 8. The resulting NIM refractive index is insensitive to both polarization and angle-of-incidence over a +/-50 degree angular range, yielding a wide-angle NIM at visible frequencies. PMID:20400955

  4. High frequency dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K; Swager, Timothy M; Temkin, Richard J; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-09-17

    During the three decades 1980-2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical, and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = 1/2 species (13)C or (15)N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, such as (17)O or (27)Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime, roughly 150-660 GHz, and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades, scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  5. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  6. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  7. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  8. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  9. X-29 high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishmael, Stephen D.; Smith, Rogers E.; Purifoy, Dana D.; Womer, Rodney K.

    1990-01-01

    Flight test program highlights are discussed for the X-29 high angle-of-attack (AOA) aircraft. The AOA envelope extended from 10 to 66 deg; the X-29 exhibited precise pitch control, allowing AOA to be maintained within 1 deg during stabilized points as well as permitting rapid recoveries from all AOAs. Attention is given to controllability degradation above 40-deg AOA due to asymmetric yawing moments. The use of this aircraft as a fundamental research tool which complements analytical methods is powerfully justified by the obviation of scaling effects.

  10. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  11. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  12. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  13. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  14. Broadband and wide-angle reflective polarization converter based on metasurface at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linbo; Zhou, Peiheng; Chen, Haiyan; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang

    2015-09-01

    We propose to realize a broadband and wide-angle reflective polarization converter in microwave regions. The proposed converter can convert a linearly polarized (LP) wave to its cross-polarized wave at three resonant frequencies. It can also convert the LP wave to a circularly polarized wave at other two resonant frequencies. Furthermore, the proposed converter can achieve broad bandwidth with incident angle up to 45°. The simulated and measured results are in agreement in the entire frequency regions, and the bandwidth of polarization conversion over 75 % can be obtained from 7.6 to 15.5 GHz under normal incidence and from 7.8 to 13.0 GHz under incident angle of 45°. The surface current distributions of the proposed converter are discussed to analyze the physical mechanism. The converter tolerance to wide angle of incidence and the broad bandwidth could be useful in the range of applications in the microwave regions.

  15. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  16. Multi-frequency properties of an narrow angle tail radio galaxy J 0037+18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Dusmanta; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Pal, Sabyasachi; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We will present multi-frequency properties of narrow angle tailed radio galaxy J 0037+18 using data from Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). The angle between two lobes is only 38 degree. We will discuss magnetic field and particle life time of the jet. Spectral properties of the source will be discussed. We also used optical and X-ray data to investigate host environment.

  17. Mobile high frequency vibrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D.W.; Buller, P.L.

    1985-01-08

    A carrier mounted seismic vibrator system that is primarily adapted for generation of high force, high frequency seismic energy into an earth medium. The apparatus includes first and second vibrators as supported by first and second lift systems disposed in tandem juxtaposition generally centrally in said vehicle, and the lift systems are designed to maintain equal hold-down force on the vibrator coupling baseplates without exceeding the weight of the carrier vehicle. The juxtaposed vibrators are then energized in synchronized relationship to propagate increased amounts of higher frequency seismic energy into an earth medium.

  18. Unique determination of the -CN group tilt angle in Langmuir monolayers using sum-frequency polarization null angle and phase

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-10-14

    The relative phase and amplitude ratio between the ssp and ppp polarization combinations of the vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) response can be uniquely and accurately determined by the polarization null angle (PNA) method. In this report we show that PNA measurements of the -CN vibration in the 4-n pentyl-4'-cyanoterphenyl (5CT) Langmuir monolayer at the air/water interface yields ssp and ppp response of the same phase, while those in the 4-n-octyl-4'cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer have the opposite phase. Accordingly, the -CN group in the 5CT monolayer is tilted around 25+/-2 from the interface normal, while that in the 8CB is tilted around 57+/-2, consistent with the significant differences in the phase diagrams and hydrogen bonding SFG spectra of the two Langmuir monolayers as reported in the literature. These results also demonstrate that in SFG studies the relative phase information of the different polarization combinations, especially for the ssp and ppp, is important in the unique determination of the tilt angle and conformation of a molecular group at the interface.

  19. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  20. Wide Angle, Single Screen, Gridded Square-Loop Frequency Selective Surface for Diplexing Two Closely Separated Frequency Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The design and performance of a wide angle, single screen, frequency selective surface (FSS) with gridded square-loop path elements are described for diplexing closely separated signal bands, for example, X- and Ku-band signals in an Orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer (OVLBI) earth station reflector antenna system, as well as other applications such as military and commercial communications via satellites. Excellent agreement is obtained between the predicted and measured results of this FSS design using the gridded square-loop patch elements sandwiched between 0.0889 cm thick tetrafluoroethylene fluorocarbon polymer (PTFE) slabs. Resonant frequency drift is reduced by 1 GHz with an incidence angle from 0 deg normal to 40 deg from normal.

  1. Fast frequency-sweep spectroscopic imaging with an ultra-low flip angle

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junyu; Patay, Zoltan; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging has become an important tool in clinical settings for noninvasively obtaining spatial and metabolic information on a molecular scale. Conventional spectroscopic imaging is acquired in the time domain, and its clinical application is limited by the long acquisition time, restricted spatial coverage, and complex suppression and reconstruction procedures. We introduce a fast MR spectroscopic imaging technique in the frequency domain, termed phase-cycled spectroscopic imaging (PCSI). PCSI uses a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence with an ultra-low flip angle to achieve very high acquisition efficiency with a short repetition time. This approach enables faster frequency sweeping by changing the cycled RF phase and using flexible non-uniform sampling, and it greatly reduces the RF energy deposition in tissue. With its intrinsic water and fat suppression, PCSI more closely resembles routine clinical scans because it eliminates the suppression steps. We demonstrate that it is feasible to acquire PCSI spectra in a phantom and in humans and that PCSI provides an efficient spectroscopic imaging method, even for J-coupled metabolites. PCSI may enable spectroscopic imaging to play a larger role in the clinical assessment of the spatial tissue distribution of metabolites. PMID:27440077

  2. Fast frequency-sweep spectroscopic imaging with an ultra-low flip angle.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junyu; Patay, Zoltan; Reddick, Wilburn E

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging has become an important tool in clinical settings for noninvasively obtaining spatial and metabolic information on a molecular scale. Conventional spectroscopic imaging is acquired in the time domain, and its clinical application is limited by the long acquisition time, restricted spatial coverage, and complex suppression and reconstruction procedures. We introduce a fast MR spectroscopic imaging technique in the frequency domain, termed phase-cycled spectroscopic imaging (PCSI). PCSI uses a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence with an ultra-low flip angle to achieve very high acquisition efficiency with a short repetition time. This approach enables faster frequency sweeping by changing the cycled RF phase and using flexible non-uniform sampling, and it greatly reduces the RF energy deposition in tissue. With its intrinsic water and fat suppression, PCSI more closely resembles routine clinical scans because it eliminates the suppression steps. We demonstrate that it is feasible to acquire PCSI spectra in a phantom and in humans and that PCSI provides an efficient spectroscopic imaging method, even for J-coupled metabolites. PCSI may enable spectroscopic imaging to play a larger role in the clinical assessment of the spatial tissue distribution of metabolites. PMID:27440077

  3. Dual-resonant polarization-independent and wide-angle metamaterial absorber in X-band frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayop, Osman; Rahim, Mohamad Kamal A.; Murad, Noor Asniza; Samsuri, Noor Asmawati

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the analysis of dual-resonant polarization-independent metamaterial absorber with wide operating angle in X-band frequency. Two circular rings with different radius are used as resonating elements. The resonating elements which are made by copper are printed on two surfaces (top and bottom) of dual-layer FR4 substrate. At the middle layer, a full copper layer is placed. The performance of dual-resonant circular ring metamaterial absorber is observed using CST software. From simulated result, the proposed structure achieves high absorbance, which is 96.41 and 93.61 % at 9 and 11 GHz, respectively, for normal incident wave. For measurement, the resonant frequencies are found at 9.39 and 11.63 GHz with absorbance of 99.07 and 83.70 %, respectively. Then, the structure is also simulated for oblique incident angles. It is observed that the operating angle of the proposed metamaterial absorber is 70° for TE modes and 67° for TM modes. Measurement for oblique incident angle is done to validate the simulated result. Mutual agreement is achieved between simulated and measured result with slight frequency shift and ripples.

  4. Frequency domain impedance measurements of erythrocytes. Constant phase angle impedance characteristics and a phase transition.

    PubMed

    Bao, J Z; Davis, C C; Schmukler, R E

    1992-05-01

    We report measurements of the electrical impedance of human erythrocytes in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, and for temperatures from 4 to 40 degrees C. In order to achieve high sensitivity in this frequency range, we embedded the cells in the pores of a filter, which constrains the current to pass through the cells in the pores. Based on the geometry of the cells embedded in the filter a circuit model is proposed for the cell-filter saline system. A constant phase angle (CPA) element, i.e., an impedance of the form Z = A/(j omega)alpha, where A is a constant, j = square root of -1, omega is angular frequency, and 0 less than alpha less than 1 has been used to describe the ac response of the interface between the cell surface and the electrolyte solution, i.e., the electrical double layer. The CPA and other elements of the circuit model are determined by a complex nonlinear least squares (CNLS) fit, which simultaneously fits the real and imaginary parts of the experimental data to the circuit model. The specific membrane capacitance is determined to be 0.901 +/- 0.036 microF/cm2, and the specific cytoplasm conductivity to be 0.413 +/- 0.031 S/m at 26 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the cytoplasm conductivity, membrane capacitance, and CPA element has been obtained. The membrane capacitance increases markedly at approximately 37 degrees C, which suggests a phase transition in the cell membrane. PMID:1600086

  5. Frequency domain impedance measurements of erythrocytes. Constant phase angle impedance characteristics and a phase transition.

    PubMed Central

    Bao, J Z; Davis, C C; Schmukler, R E

    1992-01-01

    We report measurements of the electrical impedance of human erythrocytes in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, and for temperatures from 4 to 40 degrees C. In order to achieve high sensitivity in this frequency range, we embedded the cells in the pores of a filter, which constrains the current to pass through the cells in the pores. Based on the geometry of the cells embedded in the filter a circuit model is proposed for the cell-filter saline system. A constant phase angle (CPA) element, i.e., an impedance of the form Z = A/(j omega)alpha, where A is a constant, j = square root of -1, omega is angular frequency, and 0 less than alpha less than 1 has been used to describe the ac response of the interface between the cell surface and the electrolyte solution, i.e., the electrical double layer. The CPA and other elements of the circuit model are determined by a complex nonlinear least squares (CNLS) fit, which simultaneously fits the real and imaginary parts of the experimental data to the circuit model. The specific membrane capacitance is determined to be 0.901 +/- 0.036 microF/cm2, and the specific cytoplasm conductivity to be 0.413 +/- 0.031 S/m at 26 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the cytoplasm conductivity, membrane capacitance, and CPA element has been obtained. The membrane capacitance increases markedly at approximately 37 degrees C, which suggests a phase transition in the cell membrane. PMID:1600086

  6. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  7. Pulsed arrays: A new method of flaw detection by generating a frequency dependent angle of propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. J.; Dixon, S. M.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of using an array of generation sources, pulsed simultaneously to generate a wavefront with a frequency dependant angle of propagation, has been developed. If pulsed arrays are used to generate a wave with a frequency dependent angle of propagation, the angle at which the wave was launched can be identified by measuring the frequency of the detected wave. In an isotropic material this means that it is possible use a second transducer to locate the position of the scatterer, whereas with a conventional single element generator method, it can only be located onto an ellipse. In addition to an increased scan speed, the resolution of detection should also be improved. A theoretical framework is put forward to explain how the wavefront is created from the superposition of the waves from the individual elements, and how the frequency varies along the wavefront. Finite element models and experimental measurements were also carried out, and both agreed with the analytic model. This method will have applications within NDE, but could also extend to sonar and radar techniques.

  8. Numerical analysis on the effect of angle of attack on evaluating radio-frequency blackout in atmospheric reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Minseok; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation model that considers the effect of the angle of attack was developed to evaluate plasma flows around reentry vehicles. In this simulation model, thermochemical nonequilibrium of flowfields is considered by using a four-temperature model for high-accuracy simulations. Numerical simulations were performed for the orbital reentry experiment of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and the results were compared with experimental data to validate the simulation model. A comparison of measured and predicted results showed good agreement. Moreover, to evaluate the effect of the angle of attack, we performed numerical simulations around the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator of the European Space Agency by using an axisymmetric model and a three-dimensional model. Although there were no differences in the flowfields in the shock layer between the results of the axisymmetric and the three-dimensional models, the formation of the electron number density, which is an important parameter in evaluating radio-frequency blackout, was greatly changed in the wake region when a non-zero angle of attack was considered. Additionally, the number of altitudes at which radio-frequency blackout was predicted in the numerical simulations declined when using the three-dimensional model for considering the angle of attack.

  9. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  10. INDIVIDUAL OPTIMAL FREQUENCY IN WHOLE BODY VIBRATION: EFFECT OF PROTOCOL, JOINT ANGLE AND FATIGUING EXERCISE.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Flaminia; Felici, Francesco; Piccinini, Alberto; Haxhi, Jonida; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2013-04-12

    Recent studies have shown the importance of individualizing the vibration intervention in order to produce greater effects on the neuromuscular system in less time. The purpose of this study was to assess theindividualoptimalvibration frequency (O.V.F.)corresponding to the highestmuscle activation (RMSmax) duringvibrationat differentfrequencies, comparing different protocols. Twenty-nine university students underwent 3 Continuous (C) and 2 Random (R) different vibrating protocols, maintaining a squat position on a vibration platform. The C protocol lasted 50 seconds and involved the succession of ascending frequencies from 20 to 55 Hz, every 5 seconds. The same protocol was performed twice, having the knee angle at 120° (C) and 90° (C90), in order to assess the effect of joint angle, and after a fatiguing squatting exercise (CF) to evaluate the influence of fatigue on O.V.F. assessment. In therandomprotocols vibration time was 20 seconds with a 2-minute (R2) and a 4-minute (R4) pauses between tested frequencies. Muscle activation and O.V.F. values did not differ significantly in the C, R2 and R4 protocols. RMSmax was higher in C90 (p< 0.001) and in CF (p = 0.04) compared to the Cprotocol. Joint angle and fatiguing exercise had no effect on optimalvibration frequency. In conclusion, the shorter C protocol produced similar myoelectrical activity in the R2 and the R4 protocols and therefore could be equally valid in identifying the O.V.F. with considerable time efficiency. Knee joint angle and fatiguing exercise had an effect on sEMG response during vibration but did not affect significantly O.V.F. identification. PMID:23588483

  11. Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha

    1995-01-01

    Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes during the solar cycle are calculated for a non-magnetic polytrope convection zone model. An isothermal chromospheric atmosphere threaded by a uniform horizontal magnetic field is correlated to this model. The relevant observations of such frequency changes are discussed. The calculated simultaneous changes in the field strength and chromospheric temperature result in the frequency shifts that are similar to those of the observations.

  12. High-speed measurement of nozzle swing angle of rocket engine based on monocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yufu; Yang, Haijuan

    2015-02-01

    A nozzle angle measurement system based on monocular vision is proposed to achieve high-speed and non-contact angle measurement of rocket engine nozzle. The measurement system consists of two illumination sources, a lens, a target board with spots, a high-speed camera, an image acquisition card and a PC. A target board with spots was fixed on the end of rocket engine nozzle. The image of the target board moved along with the rocket engine nozzle swing was captured by a high-speed camera and transferred to the PC by an image acquisition card. Then a data processing algorithm was utilized to acquire the swing angle of the engine nozzle. Experiment shows that the accuracy of swing angle measurement was 0.2° and the measurement frequency was up to 500Hz.

  13. Laser interferometric high-precision angle monitor for JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Yoshito; Arai, Koji; Sakagami, Masaaki; Gouda, Naoteru; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Taihei

    2006-06-01

    The JASMINE instrument uses a beam combiner to observe two different fields of view separated by 99.5 degrees simultaneously. This angle is so-called basic angle. The basic angle of JASMINE should be stabilized and fluctuations of the basic angle should be monitored with the accuracy of 10 microarcsec in root-mean-square over the satellite revolution period of 5 hours. For this purpose, a high-precision interferometric laser metrogy system is employed. One of the available techniques for measuring the fluctuations of the basic angle is a method known as the wave front sensing using a Fabry-Perot type laser interferometer. This technique is to detect fluctuations of the basic angle as displacement of optical axis in the Fabry-Perot cavity. One of the advantages of the technique is that the sensor is made to be sensitive only to the relative fluctuations of the basic angle which the JASMINE wants to know and to be insensitive to the common one; in order to make the optical axis displacement caused by relative motion enhanced the Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by two mirrors which have long radius of curvature. To verify the principle of this idea, the experiment was performed using a 0.1m-length Fabry-Perot cavity with the mirror curvature of 20m. The mirrors of the cavity were artificially actuated in either relative way or common way and the resultant outputs from the sensor were compared.

  14. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  15. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to, and a broad overiew of, the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack are provided. Items include: (1) some important fundamental phenomena which determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack; (2) static and dynamic aerodynamic characteristics near the stall; (3) aerodynamics of the spin; (4) test techniques used in stall/spin studies; (5) applications of aerodynamic data to problems in flight dynamics in the stall/spin area; and (6) the outlook for future research in the area. Although stalling and spinning are flight dynamic problems of importance to all aircraft, including general aviation aircraft, commercial transports, and military airplanes, emphasis is placed on military configurations and the principle aerodynamic factors which influence the stability and control of such vehicles at high angles of attack.

  17. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  18. High Pressure Angle Gears: Comparison to Typical Gear Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zabrajsek, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study has been completed to determine the feasibility of using high-pressure angle gears in aeronautic and space applications. Tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Spur Gear Test Facility at speeds up to 10,000 rpm and 73 N*m (648 in.*lb) for 3.18, 2.12, and 1.59 module gears (8, 12, and 16 diametral pitch gears), all designed to operate in the same test facility. The 3.18 module (8-diametral pitch), 28 tooth, 20deg pressure angle gears are the GRC baseline test specimen. Also, 2.12 module (12-diametral pitch), 42 tooth, 25deg pressure angle gears were tested. Finally 1.59 module (16-diametral pitch), 56 tooth, 35deg pressure angle gears were tested. The high-pressure angle gears were the most efficient when operated in the high-speed aerospace mode (10,000 rpm, lubricated with a synthetic turbine engine oil), and produced the lowest wear rates when tested with a perfluoroether-based grease. The grease tests were conducted at 150 rpm and 71 N*m (630 in.*lb).

  19. High contact angle hysteresis of superhydrophobic surfaces: Hydrophobic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Hong, Siang-Jie; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-08-01

    A typical superhydrophobic surface is essentially nonadhesive and exhibits very low water contact angle (CA) hysteresis, so-called Lotus effect. However, leaves of some plants such as scallion and garlic with an advancing angle exceeding 150° show very serious CA hysteresis. Although surface roughness and epicuticular wax can explain the very high advancing CA, our analysis indicates that the unusual hydrophobic defect, diallyl disulfide, is the key element responsible for contact line pinning on allium leaves. After smearing diallyl disulfide on an extended polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film, which is originally absent of CA hysteresis, the surface remains superhydrophobic but becomes highly adhesive.

  20. Frequency-stepped acquisition in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy under magic angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pell, Andrew J.; Clément, Raphaële J.; Grey, Clare P.; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2013-03-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of paramagnetic solids is usually characterized by the presence of large chemical shifts and shift anisotropies due to hyperfine interactions. Frequently the resulting spectra cover a frequency range of several megahertz, which is greater than the bandwidth of commercially available radio-frequency (RF) probes, making it impossible to acquire the whole spectrum in a single experiment. In these cases it common to record a series of spectra, in which the probe is tuned to a different frequency for each, and then sum the results to give the "true" spectrum. While this method is very widely used on static samples, the application of frequency stepping under magic-angle spinning (MAS) is less common, owing to the increased complexity of the spin dynamics when describing the interplay of the RF irradiation with the mechanical rotation of the shift tensor. In this paper, we present a theoretical description, based on the jolting frame formalism of Caravatti et al. [J. Magn. Reson. 55, 88 (1983), 10.1016/0022-2364(83)90279-2], for describing the spin dynamics of a powder sample under MAS when subjected to a selective pulse of low RF-field amplitude. The formalism is used to describe the frequency stepping method under MAS, and under what circumstances the true spectrum is reproduced. We also present an experimental validation of the methodology under ultra-fast MAS with the paramagnetic materials LiMnPO4 and TbCsDPA.

  1. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  2. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  3. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  4. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  5. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  6. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  7. High Resolution Quantitative Angle-Scanning Widefield Surface Plasmon Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Han-Min; Pechprasarn, Suejit; Zhang, Jing; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Michael G.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the construction of a prismless widefield surface plasmon microscope; this has been applied to imaging of the interactions of protein and antibodies in aqueous media. The illumination angle of spatially incoherent diffuse laser illumination was controlled with an amplitude spatial light modulator placed in a conjugate back focal plane to allow dynamic control of the illumination angle. Quantitative surface plasmon microscopy images with high spatial resolution were acquired by post-processing a series of images obtained as a function of illumination angle. Experimental results are presented showing spatially and temporally resolved binding of a protein to a ligand. We also show theoretical results calculated by vector diffraction theory that accurately predict the response of the microscope on a spatially varying sample thus allowing proper quantification and interpretation of the experimental results.

  8. High Resolution Quantitative Angle-Scanning Widefield Surface Plasmon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Han-Min; Pechprasarn, Suejit; Zhang, Jing; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction of a prismless widefield surface plasmon microscope; this has been applied to imaging of the interactions of protein and antibodies in aqueous media. The illumination angle of spatially incoherent diffuse laser illumination was controlled with an amplitude spatial light modulator placed in a conjugate back focal plane to allow dynamic control of the illumination angle. Quantitative surface plasmon microscopy images with high spatial resolution were acquired by post-processing a series of images obtained as a function of illumination angle. Experimental results are presented showing spatially and temporally resolved binding of a protein to a ligand. We also show theoretical results calculated by vector diffraction theory that accurately predict the response of the microscope on a spatially varying sample thus allowing proper quantification and interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:26830146

  9. High Resolution Quantitative Angle-Scanning Widefield Surface Plasmon Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Han-Min; Pechprasarn, Suejit; Zhang, Jing; Pitter, Mark C; Somekh, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction of a prismless widefield surface plasmon microscope; this has been applied to imaging of the interactions of protein and antibodies in aqueous media. The illumination angle of spatially incoherent diffuse laser illumination was controlled with an amplitude spatial light modulator placed in a conjugate back focal plane to allow dynamic control of the illumination angle. Quantitative surface plasmon microscopy images with high spatial resolution were acquired by post-processing a series of images obtained as a function of illumination angle. Experimental results are presented showing spatially and temporally resolved binding of a protein to a ligand. We also show theoretical results calculated by vector diffraction theory that accurately predict the response of the microscope on a spatially varying sample thus allowing proper quantification and interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:26830146

  10. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  11. Quantitative Surface Chirality Detection with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy: Twin Polarization Angle Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Feng; Xu, Yanyan; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hongfei

    2009-12-27

    Here we report a novel twin polarization angle (TPA) approach in the quantitative chirality detection with the surface sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS). Generally, the achiral contribution dominates the surface SFG-VS signal, and the pure chiral signal is usually two or three orders of magnitude smaller. Therefore, it has been difficult to make quantitative detection and analysis of the chiral contributions to the surface SFG- VS signal. In the TPA method, by varying together the polarization angles of the incoming visible light and the sum frequency signal at fixed s or p polarization of the incoming infrared beam, the polarization dependent SFG signal can give not only direct signature of the chiral contribution in the total SFG-VS signal, but also the accurate measurement of the chiral and achiral components in the surface SFG signal. The general description of the TPA method is presented and the experiment test of the TPA approach is also presented for the SFG-VS from the S- and R-limonene chiral liquid surfaces. The most accurate degree of chiral excess values thus obtained for the 2878 cm⁻¹ spectral peak of the S- and R-limonene liquid surfaces are (23.7±0.4)% and ({25.4±1.3)%, respectively.

  12. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  13. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  14. High frequency gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R. A.; Lee, W. W.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.

    2007-07-15

    The gyrokinetic approach for arbitrary frequency dynamics in magnetized plasmas is explored, using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory. Contrary to low-frequency gyrokinetics, which views each particle as a rigid charged ring, arbitrary frequency response of a particle is described by a quickly changing Kruskal ring. This approach allows the separation of gyrocenter and gyrophase responses and thus allows for, in many situations, larger time steps for the gyrocenter push than for the gyrophase push. The gyrophase response which determines the shape of Kruskal rings can be described by a Fourier series in gyrophase for some problems, thus allowing control over the cyclotron harmonics at which the plasma responds. A computational algorithm for particle-in-cell simulation based on this concept has been developed. An example of the ion Bernstein wave is used to illustrate its numerical properties, and comparison with a direct Lorentz-force approach is presented.

  15. Atomistic aspects of crack propagation along high angle grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, D.

    1997-12-31

    The author presents atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration near a high angle {Sigma} = 5 [001](210) symmetrical tilt grain boundary in NiAl. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and embedded atom (EAM) potentials. The cracks are stabilized near a Griffith condition involving the cohesive energy of the grain boundary. The atomistic configurations of the tip region are different in the presence of the high angle grain boundary than in the bulk. Three different configurations of the grain boundary were studied corresponding to different local compositions. It was found that in ordered NiAl, cracks along symmetrical tilt boundaries show a more brittle behavior for Al rich boundaries than for Ni-rich boundaries. Lattice trapping effects in grain boundary fracture were found to be more significant than in the bulk.

  16. Growth of Nanowires by High-Temperature Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Minamitake, Haruhiko; Kita, Ryo; Hamachi, Kenji; Hara, Hideki; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chou, Li-Jen

    2013-11-01

    We have demonstrated that nanowires of various metals, Ge, and Ga2O3 can be grown by high-temperature glancing angle deposition (HT-GLAD). The nanowires of metals including Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Zn are self-catalyzed, while the nanowires of other materials such as Ge and Ga2O3 are catalyzed by Au nanoparticles. However, once the nanowires start to grow, the growth modes of the HT-GLAD nanowires are fundamentally the same, i.e., nanowires with uniform diameter grow only when the vapor is incident at a very high glancing angle and reach a length larger than 1-8 µm even though the number of deposited atoms corresponds to the average thickness of 20-30 nm. This suggests that there is a universal growth mechanism for the nanowires grown by HT-GLAD.

  17. Pneumatic vortical flow control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, Domingo A.; Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1990-01-01

    The injection of thin, high-momentum jets of air into the fuselage forebody boundary layers of the F-18 aircraft is explored numerically as a means of controlling the onset of fuselage vortices and of generating yaw control forces. The study was carried out for an angle of attack of 30 deg with symmetrical and asymmetrical blowing configurations. One-sided blowing results in a strongly asymmetrical flow pattern in the fore portion of the fuselage, leading to a net lateral force.

  18. A propagation experiment for modelling high elevation angle land mobile satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richharia, M.; Evans, B. G.; Butt, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a feasibility study for conducting high elevation angle propagation experiments in the European region for land mobile satellite communication. The study addresses various aspects of a proposed experiment. These include the selection of a suitable source for transmission, possibility of gathering narrow and wide band propagation data in various frequency bands, types of useful data, data acquisition technique, possible experimental configuration, and other experimental details.

  19. Coplanar stripline components for high frequency application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goverdhanam, Kavita; Simons, Rainee N.; Dib, Nihad; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, coplanar stripline discontinuities such as a slit, a right angle bend and a T-junction are characterized and their performance is parameterized with respect to frequency and geometry. Lumped equivalent circuits are presented for some of them. The element values are obtained from the measured discontinuity scattering (S) parameters. The experimental results are compared with theoretical data obtained using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FD-TD) technique for validation and show very good agreement.

  20. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  1. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  2. Analysis of hydrogen maser frequency drift due to possible drifts in load VSWR and phase angle of reflection coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R. W.; Otosh, T. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical equations are derived for calculating the effects of local VSWR and reflection coefficient phase angle drifts on hydrogen maser frequency stability. Sample calculations made for a typical JPL maser show that under special load conditions, a VSWR drift of 0.000075/h or phase angle drive of 0.01 deg/h can produce a frequency drift of (10 to the -14th power f sub 0) Hz/h where f sub 0 is the maser frequency of approximately 1.42 x 10 to the 9th power Hz.

  3. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  4. From hygrophilic to superhygrophobic: theoretical conditions for making high-contact-angle surfaces from low-contact-angle materials.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2008-07-15

    The possibility of making high-contact-angle, rough surfaces from low-contact-angle materials has recently been suggested and demonstrated. A thermodynamic analysis of this possibility in terms of feasibility and stability is presented. It turns out that only roughness topographies that conform to a feasibility condition which is developed in the present paper can support this phenomenon. Even under conditions that support the phenomenon, the high-contact-angle state may not be stable, and transition from the heterogeneous (Cassie-Baxter) wetting regime to the homogeneous (Wenzel) regime with a lower contact angle may occur. In addition, it is suggested to use the general terms hygrophilic and hygrophobic (based on the Greek prefix hygro- that means liquid) to describe low- and high-contact-angle surfaces, respectively. PMID:18543997

  5. Numerical investigation of ion energy distribution and ion angle distribution in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma with a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Xu, Xiang; Wang, You-Nian

    2007-11-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid model is developed to study the characteristics of energy and angular distributions of the ions and fast neutrals impinging on the rf-biased electrode in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled Ar discharge. The hybrid model consists of a fluid model that determines the spatiotemporal evolution of the discharge, and a Monte-Carlo model that, including the electron-neutral, ion-neutral, and fast neutral-neutral collisions, predicts the energy and angular distributions of the ions and fast neutrals on the rf-biased electrode. The influence of pressure, voltage amplitude, and frequencies of the two rf sources on the energy and angular distributions is discussed. The ion energy distributions (IEDs) appear to have multiple peaks in the dual-frequency capacitively coupled rf discharge rather than bimodal shape in a conventional single-frequency rf discharge. The ion angle distributions (IADs) have a significant peak at a small angle, and most ions strike to the process surface with the angle less than 4°. With the increase of the pressure, the maximum energy of IEDs and the peaks of IADs decrease. The structures of IEDs are controlled mainly by the voltage and frequency applied to the two rf sources. By decreasing the frequency or adding the voltage applied to the low-frequency (LF) source, the width of IEDs and the maximum energy increase. More ions strike to the electrode with a small angle by increasing either the voltage of LF source or the frequency of high-frequency source. The energy and angular distributions of the fast neutrals are correlative with those of the ions. Compared with the ions, the fast neutrals have a much lower energy and the scattering effect becomes more prominent.

  6. High frequency oscillations in the intact brain

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) constitute a novel trend in neurophysiology that is fascinating neuroscientists in general, and epileptologists in particular. But what are HFOs? What is the frequency range of HFOs? Are there different types of HFOs, physiological and pathological? How are HFOs generated? Can HFOs represent temporal codes for cognitive processes? These questions are pressing and this symposium volume attempts to give constructive answers. As a prelude to this exciting discussion, we summarize the physiological high frequency patterns in the intact brain, concentrating mainly on hippocampal patterns, where the mechanisms of high frequency oscillations are perhaps best understood. PMID:22449727

  7. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  8. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  9. A high angle of attack inviscid shuttle orbiter computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1992-01-01

    As a preliminary step toward predicting the leeside thermal environment for winged reentry vehicles at flight conditions, a computational solution for the flow about the Shuttle Orbiter at wind tunnel conditions was made using a point-implicit, finite volume scheme known as the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). The surface pressures resulting from the computational solution are compared with wind tunnel data. The results indicate that the dominant inviscid flow features are being accurately predicted on the leeside of the Shuttle Orbiter at a moderately high angle of attack.

  10. Right-angle slot waveguide bends with high bending efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbao; Zhang, Qun; Van Keuren, Edward

    2008-09-15

    Two right-angle bends for nanoscale slot waveguides with high bending efficiency based on a corner mirror and different resonant cavities are presented, one with a triangular cavity and the other with a square cavity. Through two-dimensional parametric scanning of the position of the mirror and the dimension of the cavity, a maximum bending efficiency calculated using mode overlap integral (MOI) of 94.3% is achieved for the bend with the triangular cavity and 93.1% is achieved for the bend with the square cavity. Although they both have similar bending performance, the position of the mirror is different between the two cases. PMID:18794968

  11. Polarization and angle insensitive dual-band bandpass frequency selective surface using all-dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Du, Hongliang; Xu, Zhuo; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a dual-band bandpass all-dielectric frequency selective surface (FSS), the building elements of which are high-permittivity ceramic particles rather than metallic patterns. With proper structural design and parameter adjustment, the resonant frequency can be tuned at will. Dual-band bandpass response can be realized due to the coupling between electric and magnetic resonances. As an example, a dual-band bandpass FSS is designed in Ku band, which is composed of two-dimensional periodic arrays of complementary quatrefoil structures (CQS) cut from dielectric plates. Moreover, cylindrical dielectric resonators are introduced and placed in the center of each CQS to broaden the bandwidth and to sharpen the cut-off frequency. Theoretical analysis shows that the bandpass response arises from impedance matching caused by electric and magnetic resonances. In addition, effective electromagnetic parameters and dynamic field distributions are presented to explain the mechanism of impedance matching. The proposed FSS has the merits of polarization independence, stable transmission, and sharp roll-off frequency. The method can also be used to design all-dielectric FSSs with continuum structures at other frequencies.

  12. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  13. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  14. Effect of operating frequency and phase angle on performance of Alpha Stirling cryocooler driven by a novel compact mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, K. D.; Bapat, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Amongst the mechanical cryocoolers in use, Stirling cycle cryocoolers exhibit the desirable features such as high efficiency, low specific power consumption, small size and mass and large mean time before failure. Stirling cycle cryocooler of Alpha configuration exhibits better theoretical performance as compared to Gamma. However, the theory could not be put into practice due to unavailability of compatible drive mechanism for Alpha cryocooler providing large stroke to diameter ratio. The concept of novel compact drive mechanism can be made functional to operate miniature Alpha Stirling cryocoolers. It allows the use of multicylinder system while converting rotary motion to reciprocating. This permits the drive mechanism to be employed for driving different configurations of Stirling cryocooler simultaneously. This drive is capable of providing large stroke to diameter ratio compared to other drive mechanisms generally in use for the purpose. A stroke to diameter ratio of three is chosen in the present work and the drive dimensions are calculated for four piston-cylinder arrangements with 90° phase difference between adjacent arrangements providing two Alpha Stirling cryocoolers working simultaneously. It has to be noted that the coolers operate at half the frequency of the motor used. As the two coolers operate at phase difference of 180°, during compression stroke of one unit, the suction stroke occurs for the other unit. Due to power output of second unit, the combined peak torque requirement falls by 26.81% below the peak torque needed when one unit is operated separately. This allows for use of a comparatively lower torque motor. The practicability of the drive ensuring smooth operation of the system is decided based on comparison between torque availability from the motor and torque requirement of the complete unit. The second order method of cyclic (or thermodynamic) analysis provides a simple computational procedure useful for the design of Stirling

  15. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  16. Ultra-High-Frequency Capacitive Displacement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved class of compact, high-resolution capacitive displacement sensors operates at excitation frequency of 915 MHz and measures about 7.5 by 4 by 2 centimeters. Contains commercially available 915-MHz oscillator and transmission-line resonator. Resonator contains stripline inductor in addition to variable capacitor. Ultrahigh excitation frequency offers advantages of resolution and frequency response. Not deleteriously affected by mechanical overdriving, or contact between electrodes.

  17. Three-dimensional surface imaging by multi-frequency phase shift profilometry with angle and pattern modeling for system calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhou

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D surface imaging system based on the well-known phase shift profilometry. To yield the analytical solutions, four shifted phases and three high carrier frequencies are used to compute the phase map and reduce the noises that are caused by the inherent optical aberrations and external influences, e.g. different illumination light sources, uneven intensity distribution and automatic image processing algorithms. To reduce the system noise, we propose to model the pattern of the calibration grid in a virtual space. To obtain the modeled pattern, we use a plane to intercept the rays that are modeled by the proposed angle modeling method. In the world coordinate system, the angle and the pattern are computed based on the calibration data. A registration method is used to transform the modeled pattern in the virtual space to the ideal pattern in the world coordinate system by computing the least squared errors between the true points in the modeled pattern and the measured points in the practical pattern. The modeled (true) points are used for re-calibration of the 3D imaging system. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy increases considerably and the MSE is reduced from 0.95 mm to 0.65 mm (32% average error decrease) after replacing the measured points with the true points for calibration.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering from high impact polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, O.A.

    1981-01-01

    High impact polystyrene (HIPS) is a toughened plastic composed of a polystyrene matrix containing a few percent rubber in the form of dispersed 0.1 to 10 micron diameter rubber particles. Some commercial formulations of HIPS include the addition of a few percent mineral oil, which improves the toughness of the plastic. Little is known about the mechanism by which the mineral oil helps toughen the plastic. It is hypothesized that the oil is distributed only in the rubber particles, but whether this hypothesis is correct was not known prior to this work. The size of the rubber particles in HIPS and their neutron scattering length density contrast with the polystyrene matrix cause HIPS samples to scatter neutrons at small angles. The variation of this small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signal with mineral oil content has been used to determine the location of the oil in HIPS. The SANS spectrometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR) was used to study plastic samples similar in composition to commercial HIPS. The MURR SANS spectrometer is used to study the small angle scattering of a vertical beam of 4.75 A neutrons from solid and liquid samples. The scattered neutrons are detected in a 54 x 60 cm/sup 2/ position sensitive detector designed and built at MURR. A series of plastic samples of varying rubber and oil content and different rubber domain sizes and shapes were examined on the MURR SANS spectrometer. Analysis of the scattering patterns showed that the mineral oil is about eight to ten times more likely to be found in the rubber particles than in the polystyrene matrix. This result confirmed the hypothesis that the mineral oil is distributed primarily in the rubber particles.

  19. X-31 Demonstrating High Angle of Attack - Herbst Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall

  20. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. Finally, as an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacted with supercritical CO2 and H2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  1. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, David W; Turcu, Romulus V F; Sears, Jesse A; Rosso, Kevin M; Burton, Sarah D; Felmy, Andrew R; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ(13)C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg(2)SiO(4)) reacted with supercritical CO(2) and H(2)O at 150 bar and 50°C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. PMID:21862372

  2. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg 2SiO 4) reacted with supercritical CO 2 and H 2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  3. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers. PMID:18447548

  4. Full-scale high angle-of-attack tests of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Lanser, Wendy R.; James, Kevin D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of high angle-of-attack tests of a full-scale F/A-18 in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. A production aircraft was tested over an angle-of-attack range of 18 to 50 deg and at wind speeds of up to 100 knots. These tests had three primary test objectives. Pneumatic and mechanical forebody flow control devices were tested at full-scale and shown to produce significant yawing moments for lateral control of the aircraft at high angles of attack. Mass flow requirements for the pneumatic system were found to scale with freestream density and speed rather than freestream dynamic pressure. Detailed measurements of the pressures buffeting the vertical tail were made and spatial variations in the buffeting frequency were found. The LEX fence was found to have a significant effect on the frequency distribution on the outboard surface of the vertical fin. In addition to the above measurements, an extensive set of data was acquired for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes and for comparison with flight test and small-scale wind tunnel test results.

  5. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  6. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  7. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  8. Vinculin Binding Angle in Podosomes Revealed by High Resolution Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Walde, Marie; Monypenny, James; Heintzmann, Rainer; Jones, Gareth E.; Cox, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-rich adhesive structures formed predominantly by cells of the monocytic lineage, which degrade the extracellular matrix. They consist of a core of F-actin and actin-regulating proteins, surrounded by a ring of adhesion-associated proteins such as vinculin. We have characterised the structure of podosomes in macrophages, particularly the structure of the ring, using three super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques: stimulated emission depletion microscopy, structured illumination microscopy and localisation microscopy. Rather than being round, as previously assumed, we found the vinculin ring to be created from relatively straight strands of vinculin, resulting in a distinctly polygonal shape. The strands bind preferentially at angles between 116° and 135°. Furthermore, adjacent vinculin strands are observed nucleating at the corners of the podosomes, suggesting a mechanism for podosome growth. PMID:24523880

  9. Development of a portable frequency-domain angle-resolved low coherence interferometry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyhtila, John W.; Wax, Adam

    2007-02-01

    Improved methods for detecting dysplasia, or pre-cancerous growth, are a current clinical need. Random biopsy and subsequent diagnosis through histological analysis is the current gold standard in endoscopic surveillance for dysplasia. However, this approach only allows limited examination of the at-risk tissue and has the drawback of a long delay in time-to-diagnosis. In contrast, optical scattering spectroscopy methods offer the potential to assess cellular structure and organization in vivo, thus allowing for instantaneous diagnosis and increased coverage of the at-risk tissue. Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI), a novel scattering spectroscopy technique, combines the ability of low-coherence interferometry to isolate scattered light from sub-surface tissue layers with the ability of light scattering spectroscopy to obtain structural information on sub-wavelength scales, specifically by analyzing the angular distribution of the backscattered light. In application to examining tissue, a/LCI enables depthresolved quantitative measurements of changes in the size and texture of cell nuclei, which are characteristic biomarkers of dysplasia. The capabilities of a/LCI were demonstrated initially by detecting pre-cancerous changes in epithelial cells within intact, unprocessed, animal tissues. Recently, we have developed a new frequency-domain a/LCI system, with sub-second acquisition time and a novel fiber optic probe. Preliminary results using the fa/LCI system to examine human esophageal tissue in Barrett's esophagus patients demonstrate the clinical viability of the approach. In this paper, we present a new portable system which improves upon the design of the fa/LCI system to allow for higher quality data to be collected in the clinic. Accurate sizing of polystyrene microspheres and cell nuclei from ex vivo human esophageal tissue is presented. These results demonstrate the promise of a/LCI as a clinically viable diagnostic tool.

  10. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed. PMID:26206489

  11. High-angle origin of the currently low-angle Badwater Turtleback fault, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G. )

    1991-04-01

    The late Cenozoic Badwater Turtleback fault separates an upper plate of volcanic and sedimentary rocks from a lower plate of predominantly mylonitic plutonic and metamorphic rocks. The Turtleback fault, however, is not a single continuous surface, but consists of a least three generations of faults. These faults occur as discrete, crosscutting segments that progressively decrease in age and increase in dip to the west. Therefore, they probably began at moderate to steep angles but rotated to lower angles with extensional strain. If so, lower plate mylonitic rocks also restore to steeper dips and suggest that transport of the upper plate occurred on moderate to steeply dipping surfaces in the middle and upper crust. The crosscutting nature of the fault segments and their initial moderate to steep dips, plus a possible offset marker on one of the segments, are most consistent with moderate amounts of extension in the Death Valley region.

  12. Nanofabrication advances for high efficiency critical-angle transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Guan, Dong; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Vargo, Steve; DiPiazza, Frank; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2013-09-01

    We report several break-through nanofabrication developments enabling high efficiency and high resolving power spectrometers in the soft x-ray band. The device is the critical-angle transmission (CAT) grating, which combines the low mass and relaxed alignment tolerances of a transmission grating with the high broad-band efficiency and high diffraction orders of a blazed reflection grating. Past work successfully demonstrated the CAT grating concept; however, the open-area fraction was often less than 20% whilst more than 50% is desired. This presents numerous nanofabrication challenges including a requirement for a freestanding silicon membrane of ultra high-aspect ratio bars at a period of 200 nanometers with minimal cross support blockage. Furthermore, the sidewalls must be smooth to a few nanometers to efficiently reflect soft x-rays. We have developed a complete nanofabrication process for creating freestanding CAT gratings via plasma-etching silicon wafers with a buried layer of SiO2. This removable buried layer enables combining a record-performance plasma etch for the CAT grating with a millimeter-scale honeycomb structural support to create a large-area freestanding membrane. We have also developed a process for polishing sidewalls of plasma-etched ultra-high aspect ratio nanoscale silicon structures via potassium hydroxide (KOH). This process utilizes the anisotropic etch nature of single crystal silicon in KOH. We developed a novel alignment technique to align the CAT grating bars to the {111} planes of silicon within 0.2 degrees, which enables KOH to etch away sidewall roughness without destroying the structure, since the {111} planes etch approximately 100 times slower than the non-{111} planes. Preliminary results of a combined freestanding grating with polishing are presented to enable efficient diffraction of soft x-rays.

  13. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  14. Simultaneous piston position and tilt angle sensing for large vertical displacement micromirrors by frequency detection inductive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, V. F.-G.; Xie, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a frequency detection based inductive eddy current sensing mechanism to simultaneously sense the piston position and tilt angle of the mirror plate of large vertical displacement micromirrors that exhibit piston scan ranges above 100 μm. This is accomplished by sensing the inductance change, and thus resonant frequency shift, of two microfabricated sensing coils packaged underneath the mirror plate. For demonstration purpose, the coils were paired with discrete circuit components to oscillate at 11.9 MHz and 12.5 MHz, respectively. The piston position and tilt angle of the mirror plate could be simultaneously monitored over a 500 μm piston scan range, achieving a maximum piston sensitivity of 4.15 kHz/μm with a piston sensing resolution of 96 nm and a maximum tilt angle sensitivity of 60.5 kHz/° with a tilt angle sensing resolution of 0.0013°. Analytical modeling of the coil inductance change via image theory was also conducted, showing that the sensor sensitivity and resolution could be improved by increasing the coil oscillation frequency and decreasing the coil size.

  15. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of cruciform missiles at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, Daniel J.; Mendenhall, Michael R.; Nazario, Susana M.; Hemsch, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    An aerodynamic prediction method for missile aerodynamic performance and preliminary design has been developed to utilize a newly available systematic fin data base and an improved equivalent angle of attack methodology. The method predicts total aerodynamic loads and individual fin forces and moments for body-tail (wing-body) and canard-body-tail configurations with cruciform fin arrangements. The data base and the prediction method are valid for angles of attack up to 45 deg, arbitrary roll angles, fin deflection angles between -40 deg and 40 deg, Mach numbers between 0.6 and 4.5, and fin aspect ratios between 0.25 and 4.0. The equivalent angle of attack concept is employed to include the effects of vorticity and geometric scaling.

  17. High efficiency coupling of radio frequency beams from the dual frequency gyrotron with a corrugated waveguide transmission system.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Mitsunaka, Yoshika; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    High efficiency coupling of the millimeter-wave output of the dual-frequency gyrotron with the transmission line was demonstrated. The dual-frequency gyrotron was design to produce similar beam profiles for two operation frequencies (170 GHz and 137 GHz). Using two RF beam reflecting mirrors in a matching optics unit (MOU), which are designed to transform the beam profile of the gyrotron output to the fundamental waveguide mode (HE(11) mode) at 170 GHz, high efficiency coupling was demonstrated for two frequencies. The measured mode purity of HE(11) mode was 96% at 170 GHz and 94% at 137 GHz operations with the identical mirrors at the fixed mirror position and angle. The results indicate that the significantly simple dual frequency system is realized by the gyrotron designed to output the similar beam profiles at different frequency operation. PMID:23387644

  18. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  19. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  20. Martian high-altitude photoelectrons independent of solar zenith angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui; Liemohn, Michael; Bougher, Stephen; Mitchell, David

    2016-04-01

    Many aspects of the Martian upper atmosphere are known to vary with solar zenith angle (SZA). One would assume that dayside photoelectron fluxes are also SZA dependent, especially when transport along a semivertical magnetic field line is significant. However, our investigation presented here of the observed Martian high-altitude (˜400 km) photoelectron fluxes by the magnetometer/electron reflectometer (MAG/ER) instruments on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) shows that the photoelectron fluxes are better correlated with just the solar irradiance, without SZA factored in, and also that the median photoelectron fluxes are independent of SZA, especially for high energies (above 100 eV). For lower energies (below 70 eV), the observed fluxes tend to vary to some degree with SZA. Such counterintuitive results are due to the existence of a photoelectron exobase, only above which the photoelectrons are able to transport and escape to high altitudes. Two methods are used here to determine the altitude range of this exobase, which varies between 145 km and 165 km depending on the atmosphere and SZA. Through our SuperThermal Electron Transport (STET) model, we found that the integral of the production rate above the photoelectron exobase, and therefore the high-altitude photoelectron fluxes, is rather independent of SZA. Such an independent relationship concerns energy redistribution in the Martian upper atmosphere, using photoelectrons to map magnetic topology and connectivity, as well as ion escape. This finding can also be carefully adapted to other solar bodies with semivertical magnetic fields at ionospheric altitudes, such as Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn.

  1. Influence of pore roughness on high-frequency permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortis, Andrea; Smeulders, David M. J.; Guermond, Jean Luc; Lafarge, Denis

    2003-06-01

    The high-frequency behavior of the fluid velocity patterns for smooth and corrugated pore channels is studied. The classical approach of Johnson et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 176, 379 (1987)] for smooth geometries is obtained in different manners, thus clarifying differences with Sheng and Zhou [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1591 (1988)] and Avellaneda and Torquato [Phys. Fluids A 3, 2529 (1991)]. For wedge-shaped pore geometries, the classical approach is modified by a nonanalytic extension proposed by Achdou and Avellaneda [Phys. Fluids A 4, 2561 (1992)]. The dependency of the nonanalytic extension on the apex angle of the wedge was derived. Precise numerical computations for various apex angles in two-dimensional channels confirmed this theoretical dependency, which is somewhat different from the original Achdou and Avellaneda predictions. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the singularities does not alter the parameters of the classical theory by Johnson et al..

  2. High frequency electromagnetic response of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Schwartz, K.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the contribution of higher harmonics to the lunar transfer functions for the tangential components of the surface magnetic field is significant at frequencies greater than 0.01 Hz. The inclusion of the higher harmonics shows that there are two distinct transfer functions corresponding to the components of the tangential surface magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the wave vector of the external disturbance forcing the lunar induction. The dependences of these transfer functions on frequency and location are determined. The effects of the higher harmonics can: (1) account for a hitherto unexplained feature in the Apollo 12-Explorer 35 transfer functions, namely the rolloff at high frequencies; and (2) offer a possible explanation for the frequency dependence of the difference between the transfer functions for the two orthogonal components of the surface magnetic field. The harmonic response of a simple current layer model of the moon is derived.

  3. Apollo 11 Launched Via Saturn V Rocket - High Angle View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon. This high angle view of the launch was provided by a `fisheye' camera mounted on the launch tower. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard the spacecraft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  4. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  5. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  6. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  7. Equations for the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci using frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagle, A. E.; Levy, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency domain methods are developed to obtain explicit equations for the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci. The techniques involve an evaluation of polynomials formulated within the transfer function matrix. The equations defined require simpler computations than the state-space results of Shaked (1976). A class of higher order poles and zeros is formulated in terms of simpler equations than Shaked's, and the equations are shown to be generalizations of the single-input-single-output root locus equations.

  8. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  9. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  10. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  11. Experimental Observation of Flow Structure and Resistance over High- and Low-angle Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwoll, E.; Venditti, J. G.; Bradley, R. W.; Winter, C.

    2015-12-01

    A prominent control on the flow over dunes in sedimentary environments is the slope of the downstream lee-side. While previous work has focused on steep (~30°), asymmetric dunes with permanent flow separation ('high-angle dunes'), little is known about dunes with lower lee-slope angles for which flow separation is absent or intermittent ('low-angle dunes'). Here, we use laboratory experiments to systematically vary and isolate the effect of the dune lee-slope on the turbulent flow field over dunes. Three sets of fixed dunes with lee-slope angles of 10°, 20° and 30° were separately installed in a 15 m long and 1 m wide flume and subjected to flow 0.20 m deep. At present, no clear hydraulic scaling has been demonstrated for low- and high-angle dunes as both dune configurations occur at the same Froude and Reynolds numbers. However, observations indicate that low-angle dunes are more frequent in environments dominated by suspension of bed material. Therefore, we focus on matching the transport stage between field conditions and our experiments using field observations of bedform morphology and flow stage. Measurements consisted of high-frequency, vertical profiles collected with a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) along one dune-length and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) of the flow field. We show that the temporal and spatial occurrence of flow separation decreases with dune lee-slope and may be fully absent for lee-slopes <<10°, only. Velocity gradients in the dune leeside depict a free shear layer downstream of the 30° dunes and a weaker shear layer closer to the bed for the 20° and 10° dunes. The decrease in velocity gradients leads to lower turbulence production for gentle lee-slopes. Consequently, flow resistance of dunes decreases with lee-slope; the transition being non-linear. Over the 10°, 20° and 30° dunes, shear stress is 8%, 33% and 90 % greater than a flat bed, respectively. Our results demonstrate that dune shape plays an important, but often

  12. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  13. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  14. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  15. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  16. High Frequency Laser-Based Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, R; Chinn, D; Balogun, O; Murray, T

    2005-09-12

    To obtain micrometer resolution of materials using acoustics requires frequencies around 1 GHz. Attenuation of such frequencies is high, limiting the thickness of the parts that can be characterized. Although acoustic microscopes can operate up to several GHz in frequency, they are used primarily as a surface characterization tool. The use of a pulsed laser for acoustic generation allows generation directly in the part, eliminating the loss of energy associated with coupling the energy from a piezoelectric transducer to the part of interest. The use of pulsed laser acoustic generation in combination with optical detection is investigated for the non-contact characterization of materials with features that must be characterized to micrometer resolution.

  17. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  18. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  19. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  20. Topology optimization design of a lightweight ultra-broadband wide-angle resistance frequency selective surface absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Sai; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Pang, Yongqiang; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the topology design of a lightweight ultra-broadband polarization-independent frequency selective surface absorber is proposed. The absorption over a wide frequency range of 6.68-26.08 GHz with reflection below -10 dB can be achieved by optimizing the topology and dimensions of the resistive frequency selective surface by virtue of genetic algorithm. This ultra-broadband absorption can be kept when the incident angle is less than 55 degrees and is independent of the incident wave polarization. The experimental results agree well with the numerical simulations. The density of our ultra-broadband absorber is only 0.35 g cm  -  3 and thus may find potential applications in microwave engineering, such as electromagnetic interference and stealth technology.

  1. Modified surface boundary conditions for elastic waveform inversion of low-frequency wide-angle active land seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessix, René-Édouard; Pérez Solano, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    In presence of large wavelength-scale shear-velocity variations in the Earth, acoustic waveform inversion may not be sufficient even when inverting long-offset data to retrieve the long-to-intermediate wavelengths of the compressional velocity. An acoustic modelling does not always correctly represent the compressional/primary waves when tuning effects and energy conversion between compressional and shear waves occur. Elastic waveform inversion with land data is challenging not only because of its computational cost but also due to the presence of the very energetic ground roll. To avoid inverting the ground roll and focus the inversion on the body waves recorded at long offsets, we propose to modify the surface boundary conditions in the elastic modelling. Zeroing the normal derivatives of the shear stress components parallel to the surface instead of the shear stress components themselves as with the free-surface boundary conditions leads to an elastic modelling that does not generate ground roll. These modified elastic surface conditions allow us to invert the seismic data that have been pre-processed to remove the ground roll as we do in acoustic waveform inversion. In this way, the inversion can focus on the retrieval of the long-to-intermediate wavelengths of the compressional velocity and we can apply the standard frequency continuation approach without having to process out the ground roll in the (elastic) synthetic data. An analysis of the modified surface conditions based on a plane wave decomposition shows that the reflection coefficients at the surface do not depend on incident angles and earth parameters. With a not too high shear-to-compressional (S-to-P) velocity ratio at the surface, the PP-reflection coefficients are close to the ones with the free-surface conditions, but with a high ratio they differ significantly. The approximation is then valid when the (S-to-P) velocity ratio is not too high at the surface in the actual Earth. Based on some

  2. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  3. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  4. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  5. Joint angle and Doppler frequency estimation of coherent targets in monostatic MIMO radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Renzheng; Zhang, Xiaofei

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses the problem of joint direction of arrival (DOA) and Doppler frequency estimation of coherent targets in a monostatic multiple-input multiple-output radar. In the proposed algorithm, we perform a reduced dimension (RD) transformation on the received signal first and then use forward spatial smoothing (FSS) technique to decorrelate the coherence and obtain joint estimation of DOA and Doppler frequency by exploiting the estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT) algorithm. The joint estimated parameters of the proposed RD-FSS-ESPRIT are automatically paired. Compared with the conventional FSS-ESPRIT algorithm, our RD-FSS-ESPRIT algorithm has much lower complexity and better estimation performance of both DOA and frequency. The variance of the estimation error and the Cramer-Rao Bound of the DOA and frequency estimation are derived. Simulation results show the effectiveness and improvement of our algorithm.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Phase Fluctuation in a High-Precision Roll Angle Measurement Based on a Heterodyne Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junhui; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Yu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometry is a high-precision method applied in roll angle measurements. Phase metering is essential for high precision. During a high-precision measurement, a phase fluctuation appears even when the roll angle does not vary, which has never been analyzed before. Herein, the reason for the phase fluctuation is revealed, which results from the frequency-difference fluctuation and time difference between measurement and reference beams. A mathematical model of that phase-fluctuation mechanism is established, and that model provides a theoretical basis for analyzing and reducing the phase fluctuation. The impact that the main factors have on the phase metering is analyzed quantitatively, and experiments are carried out to validate the model. Finally, the phase fluctuation decreases to 0.02° by frequency reduction, which conversely verifies the theoretical model. PMID:27490552

  7. High-resolution NMR of anisotropic samples with spinning away from the magic angle

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A.; Martin, Rachel W.; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    High-resolution NMR of samples in the solid state is typically performed under mechanical sample spinning around an axis that makes an angle, called the magic angle, of 54.7 degrees with the static magnetic field. There are many cases in which geometrical and engineering constraints prevent spinning at this specific angle. Implementations of in-situ and ex-situ magic angle field spinning might be extremely demanding because of the power requirements or an inconvenient sample size or geometry. Here we present a methodology based on switched angle spinning between two angles, none of which is the magic angle, which provide both isotropic and anisotropic information. Using this method, named Projected Magic Angle Spinning, we were able to obtain resolved isotropic chemical shifts in spinning samples where the broadening is mostly inhomogeneous.

  8. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herent, O.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melot, F.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    Wedescribe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.´7 to 4.´6. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively, 10, 6 , 12, and 39 μK in the four lowest HFI frequency channels (100-353GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy sr-1 in the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Relative to the 143 GHz channel, these two high frequency channels are calibrated to within 5% and the 353 GHz channel to the percent level. The 100 and 217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 <ℓ < 2500), are calibrated relative to 143 GHz to better than 0.2%.

  9. Performance of annular high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ivan A.

    This thesis presents studies of the behavior of miniature annular thermoacoustic prime movers and the imaging of the complex sound fields using PIV inside the small acoustic wave guides when driven by a temperature gradient. Thermoacoustic engines operating in the standing wave mode are limited in their acoustic efficiency by a high degree of irreversibility that is inherent in how they work. Better performance can be achieved by using traveling waves in the thermoacoustic devices. This has led to the development of an annular high frequency thermoacoustic prime mover consisting of a regenerator, which is a random stack in-between a hot and cold heat exchanger, inside an annular waveguide. Miniature devices were developed and studied with operating frequencies in the range of 2-4 kHz. This corresponds to an average ring circumference of 11 cm for the 3 kHz device, the resonator bore being 6 mm. A similar device of 11 mm bore, length of 18 cm was also investigated; its resonant frequency was 2 kHz. Sound intensities as high as 166.8 dB were generated with limited heat input. Sound power was extracted from the annular structure by an impedance-matching side arm. The nature of the acoustic wave generated by heat was investigated using a high speed PIV instrument. Although the acoustic device appears symmetric, its performance is characterized by a broken symmetry and by perturbations that exist in its structure. Effects of these are observed in the PIV imaging; images show axial and radial components. Moreover, PIV studies show effects of streaming and instabilities which affect the devices' acoustic efficiency. The acoustic efficiency is high, being of 40% of Carnot. This type of device shows much promise as a high efficiency energy converter; it can be reduced in size for microcircuit applications.

  10. High frequency stimulation can block axonal conduction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alicia L; Durand, Dominique M

    2009-11-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) is used to control abnormal neuronal activity associated with movement, seizure, and psychiatric disorders. Yet, the mechanisms of its therapeutic action are not known. Although experimental results have shown that HFS suppresses somatic activity, other data has suggested that HFS could generate excitation of axons. Moreover it is unclear what effect the stimulation has on tissue surrounding the stimulation electrode. Electrophysiological and computational modeling literature suggests that HFS can drive axons at the stimulus frequency. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that unlike cell bodies, axons are driven by pulse train HFS. This hypothesis was tested in fibers of the hippocampus both in-vivo and in-vitro. Our results indicate that although electrical stimulation could activate and drive axons at low frequencies (0.5-25 Hz), as the stimulus frequency increased, electrical stimulation failed to continuously excite axonal activity. Fiber tracts were unable to follow extracellular pulse trains above 50 Hz in-vitro and above 125 Hz in-vivo. The number of cycles required for failure was frequency dependent but independent of stimulus amplitude. A novel in-vitro preparation was developed, in which, the alveus was isolated from the remainder of the hippocampus slice. The isolated fiber tract was unable to follow pulse trains above 75 Hz. Reversible conduction block occurred at much higher stimulus amplitudes, with pulse train HFS (>150 Hz) preventing propagation through the site of stimulation. This study shows that pulse train HFS affects axonal activity by: (1) disrupting HFS evoked excitation leading to partial conduction block of activity through the site of HFS; and (2) generating complete conduction block of secondary evoked activity, as HFS amplitude is increased. These results are relevant for the interpretation of the effects of HFS for the control of abnormal neural activity such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. PMID

  11. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  12. High power and high SFDR frequency conversion using sum frequency generation in KTP waveguides.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Russell J; Brewer, Tyler; Barber, Zeb W

    2016-08-01

    We characterize the intermodulation distortion of high power and efficient frequency conversion of modulated optical signals based on sum frequency generation (SFG) in a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide. Unwanted frequency two-tone spurs are generated near the converted signal via a three-step cascaded three-wave mixing process. Computer simulations describing the process are presented along with the experimental measurements. High-conversion efficiencies and large spur-free dynamic range of the converted optical signal are demonstrated. PMID:27472638

  13. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K.

    2015-12-01

    1H -detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong 1H -1H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40 kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic 1H -detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30 kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the 1H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60 kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid- β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current 13C -detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  14. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  15. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  16. Flutter Clearance of the F-18 High-angle-of-attack Research Vehicle with Experimental Wingtip Instrumentation Pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    1989-01-01

    An F-18 aircraft was modified with wingtip instrumentation pods for use in NASA's high-angle-of-attack research program. Ground vibration and flight flutter testing were performed to clear an acceptable flight envelope for the aircraft. Flight test utilized atmospheric turbulence for structural excitation; the aircraft displayed no adverse aeroelastic trends within the envelope tested. The data presented in this report include mode shapes from the ground vibration and estimates of frequency and damping as a function of Mach number.

  17. Compact reflection holographic recording system with high angle multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayasu, Mayumi; Yamada, Takehumi; Takekawa, Shunsuke; Akieda, Kensuke; Goto, Akiyo; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2011-02-01

    Holographic memory systems have been widely researched since 1963. However, the size of the drives required and the deterioration of reconstructed data resulting from shrinkage of the medium have made practical use of a hologram memory difficult. In light of this, we propose a novel holographic recording/reconstructing system: a dual-reference beam reflection system that is smaller than conventional systems such as the off-axis or co-axis types, and which is expected to increase the number of multiplexing in angle multiplexed recording. In this multiplex recording system, two laser beams are used as reference beams, and the recorded data are reconstructed stably, even if there is shrinkage of the recording medium. In this paper, a reflection holographic memory system is explained in detail. In addition, the change in angle selectivity resulting from shrinkage of the medium is analyzed using the laminated film three-dimensional simulation method. As a result, we demonstrate that a dual-reference beam multiplex recording system is effective in reducing the influence of medium shrinkage.

  18. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  19. High frequency plasma generator for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, H.; Divergilio, W. F.; Fosnight, V. V.; Komatsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program to experimentally develop two new types of plasma generators for 30 cm electrostatic argon ion thrusters are presented. The two plasma generating methods selected for this study were by radio frequency induction (RFI), operating at an input power frequency of 1 MHz, and by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at an operating frequency of 5.0 GHz. Both of these generators utilize multiline cusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement and beam profile optimization. The program goals were to develop a plasma generator possessing the characteristics of high electrical efficiency (low eV/ion) and simplicity of operation while maintaining the reliability and durability of the conventional hollow cathode plasma sources. The RFI plasma generator has achieved minimum discharge losses of 120 eV/ion while the ECH generator has obtained 145 eV/ion, assuming a 90% ion optical transparency of the electrostatic acceleration system. Details of experimental tests with a variety of magnet configurations are presented.

  20. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date. PMID:21805988

  1. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z = 0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI γ-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. establishing this source as the best studied southern TeV blazar. Detection from the northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE γ-emission. During the outburst, the VHE γ-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 h at large zenith angles. Aims: We studied the behavior of the source after its extraordinary flare. Furthermore, we developed an analysis method in order to analyze these data taken under large zenith angles. Methods: Here we present an enhanced analysis method for data taken at high zenith angles. We developed improved methods for event selection that led to a better background suppression. Results: The quality of the results presented here is superior to the results presented previously for this data set: detection of the source on a higher significance level and a lower analysis threshold. The averaged energy spectrum we derived has a spectral index of (-3.5 ± 0.2) above 400 GeV, which is in good agreement with the spectral shape measured by H.E.S.S. during the major flare on MJD 53 944. Furthermore, we present the spectral energy distribution modeling of PKS 2155-304. With our observations we increased the duty cycle of the source

  2. High Frequency Self-pulsing Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassalle, John; Pollard, William; Staack, David

    2014-10-01

    Pulsing behavior in high-pressure microplasmas was studied. Microplasmas are of interest because of potential application in plasma switches for robust electronics. These devices require fast switching. Self-pulsing microplasmas were generated in a variable-length spark gap at pressures between 0 and 220 psig in Air, Ar, N2, H2, and He for spark gap lengths from 15 to 1810 μm. Resulting breakdown voltages varied between 90 and 1500 V. Voltage measurements show pulse frequencies as high as 8.9 MHz in argon at 100 psig. These findings demonstrate the potential for fast switching of plasma switches that incorporate high-pressure microplasmas. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant #1057175, and the Department of Defense, ARO Grant #W911NF1210007.

  3. High frequency ultrasonic mitigation of microbial corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahamedh, Hussain H.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.; Spear, John R.

    2012-05-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in oil industry facilities, and considerable effort has been spent to mitigate this costly issue. More environmentally benign methods are under consideration as alternatives to biocides, among which are ultrasonic techniques. In this study, a high frequency ultrasonic technique (HFUT) was used as a mitigation method for MIC. The killing percentages of the HFUT were higher than 99.8 percent and their corrosivity on steel was reduced by more than 50 percent. The practice and result will be discussed.

  4. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of general aviation at high angle of attack with the propeller slipstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuo, N.; Hirano, S.

    1986-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the FA-300 business aircraft at high angle of attack with the propeller stream are described. The FA-300 offers two types, FA-300-700 for 340 HP, and -710 for 450 Hp of the engine. The effects of the propeller slipstream on the high angle of the attack are discussed.

  6. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  7. Extending reference scan drift correction to high-magnification high-cone-angle tomography.

    PubMed

    Myers, Glenn R; Kingston, Andrew M; Varslot, Trond K; Sheppard, Adrian P

    2011-12-15

    The reference scan method is a simple yet powerful method for measuring spatial drift of the x-ray spot during a low-cone-angle μ-CT experiment. As long as the drift is smooth, and occurring on a time scale that is long compared to the acquisition time of each projection, this method provides a way to compensate for the drift by applying 2D in-plane translations to the radiographs. Here we show that this compensation may be extended to the regime of high-magnification, high-cone-angle CT experiments where source drift perpendicular to the detector plane can cause significant magnification changes throughout the acquisition. PMID:22179891

  8. Note: High precision angle generator using multiple ultrasonic motors and a self-calibratable encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Jae Wan; Kang, Chu-Shik; Jin, Jonghan; Bong Eom, Tae

    2011-11-01

    We present an angle generator with high resolution and accuracy, which uses multiple ultrasonic motors and a self-calibratable encoder. A cylindrical air bearing guides a rotational motion, and the ultrasonic motors achieve high resolution over the full circle range with a simple configuration. The self-calibratable encoder can compensate the scale error of a divided circle (signal period: 20″) effectively by applying the equal-division-averaged method. The angle generator configures a position feedback control loop using the readout of the encoder. By combining the ac and dc operation mode, the angle generator produced stepwise angular motion with 0.005″ resolution. We also evaluated the performance of the angle generator using a precision angle encoder and an autocollimator. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) in the angle generation was estimated less than 0.03″, which included the calibrated scale error and the nonlinearity error.

  9. Spectral line polarization with angle-dependent partial frequency redistribution. I. A Stokes parameters decomposition for Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, H.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The linear polarization of a strong resonance lines observed near the solar limb is created by a multiple-scattering process. Partial frequency redistribution (PRD) effects must be accounted for to explain the polarization profiles. The redistribution matrix describing the scattering process is a sum of terms, each containing a PRD function multiplied by a Rayleigh type phase matrix. A standard approximation made in calculating the polarization is to average the PRD functions over all the scattering angles, because the numerical work needed to take the angle-dependence of the PRD functions into account is large and not always needed for reasonable evaluations of the polarization. Aims: This paper describes a Stokes parameters decomposition method, that is applicable in plane-parallel cylindrically symmetrical media, which aims at simplifying the numerical work needed to overcome the angle-average approximation. Methods: The decomposition method relies on an azimuthal Fourier expansion of the PRD functions associated to a decomposition of the phase matrices in terms of the Landi Degl'Innocenti irreducible spherical tensors for polarimetry T^K_Q(i, Ω) (i Stokes parameter index, Ω ray direction). The terms that depend on the azimuth of the scattering angle are retained in the phase matrices. Results: It is shown that the Stokes parameters I and Q, which have the same cylindrical symmetry as the medium, can be expressed in terms of four cylindrically symmetrical components I_Q^K (K = Q = 0, K = 2, Q = 0, 1, 2). The components with Q = 1, 2 are created by the angular dependence of the PRD functions. They go to zero at disk center, ensuring that Stokes Q also goes to zero. Each component I_Q^K is a solution to a standard radiative transfer equation. The source term S_Q^K are significantly simpler than the source terms corresponding to I and Q. They satisfy a set of integral equations that can be solved by an accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) method.

  10. Flow structure and resistance over subaquaeous high- and low-angle dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwoll, E.; Venditti, J. G.; Bradley, R. W.; Winter, C.

    2016-03-01

    A prominent control on the flow over subaqueous dunes is the slope of the downstream leeside. While previous work has focused on steep (~30°), asymmetric dunes with permanent flow separation, little is known about dunes with lower lee slope angles for which flow separation is absent or intermittent. Here we present a laboratory investigation where we systematically varied the dune lee slope, holding other geometric parameters and flow hydraulics constant, to explore effects on the turbulent flow field and flow resistance. Three sets of fixed dunes (lee slopes of 10°, 20°, and 30°) were separately installed in a 15 m long and 1 m wide flume and subjected to 0.20 m deep flow. Measurements consisted of high-frequency, vertical profiles collected with a Laser Doppler Velocimeter. We show that the temporal and spatial occurrence of flow separation decreases with dune lee slope. Velocity gradients in the dune leeside depict a free shear layer downstream of the 30° dunes and a weaker shear layer closer to the bed for the 20° and 10° dunes. The decrease in velocity gradients leads to lower magnitude of turbulence production for gentle lee slopes. Aperiodic, strong ejection events dominate the shear layer but decrease in strength and frequency for low-angle dunes. Flow resistance of dunes decreases with lee slope; the transition being nonlinear. Over the 10°, 20°, and 30° dunes, shear stress is 8%, 33%, and 90% greater than a flat bed, respectively. Our results demonstrate that dune lee slope plays an important but often ignored role in flow resistance.

  11. The development of high angle deformation boundaries and local orientations in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    High angle boundaries and their local surroundings are important for all aspects of recrystallization including nucleation, growth and texture formation. They are thus important for processing of aluminum alloys. Deformation induced high angle boundaries have been observed and quantitatively characterized using transmission electron microscopy in aluminum following rolling to large reductions. The distribution of local orientations between individual dislocation boundaries and their angle/axis pairs have been measured using convergent beam Kikuchi analysis and are compared to the macroscopic texture. The sequence of near neighbor orientations shows that individual grains subdivide across their thickness into three to four different texture components separated by sharp boundaries. The local orientations surrounding high angle boundaries are much more diverse than suggested by simple models and single crystal studies. The origins for these high angle boundaries are suggested and discussed.

  12. High frequency homogenization for structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolde, E.; Craster, R. V.; Kaplunov, J.

    2011-03-01

    We consider a net created from elastic strings as a model structure to investigate the propagation of waves through semi-discrete media. We are particularly interested in the development of continuum models, valid at high frequencies, when the wavelength and each cell of the net are of similar order. Net structures are chosen as these form a general two-dimensional example, encapsulating the essential physics involved in the two-dimensional excitation of a lattice structure whilst retaining the simplicity of dealing with elastic strings. Homogenization techniques are developed here for wavelengths commensurate with the cellular scale. Unlike previous theories, these techniques are not limited to low frequency or static regimes, and lead to effective continuum equations valid on a macroscale with the details of the cellular structure encapsulated only through integrated quantities. The asymptotic procedure is based upon a two-scale approach and the physical observation that there are frequencies that give standing waves, periodic with the period or double-period of the cell. A specific example of a net created by a lattice of elastic strings is constructed, the theory is general and not reliant upon the net being infinite, none the less the infinite net is a useful special case for which Bloch theory can be applied. This special case is explored in detail allowing for verification of the theory, and highlights the importance of degenerate cases; the specific example of a square net is treated in detail. An additional illustration of the versatility of the method is the response to point forcing which provides a stringent test of the homogenized equations; an exact Green's function for the net is deduced and compared to the asymptotics.

  13. Flight test of the X-29A at high angle of attack: Flight dynamics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has flight tested two X-29A aircraft at low and high angles of attack. The high-angle-of-attack tests evaluate the feasibility of integrated X-29A technologies. More specific objectives focus on evaluating the high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, defining multiaxis controllability limits, and determining the maximum pitch-pointing capability. A pilot-selectable gain system allows examination of tradeoffs in airplane stability and maneuverability. Basic fighter maneuvers provide qualitative evaluation. Bank angle captures permit qualitative data analysis. This paper discusses the design goals and approach for high-angle-of-attack control laws and provides results from the envelope expansion and handling qualities testing at intermediate angles of attack. Comparisons of the flight test results to the predictions are made where appropriate. The pitch rate command structure of the longitudinal control system is shown to be a valid design for high-angle-of-attack control laws. Flight test results show that wing rock amplitude was overpredicted and aileron and rudder effectiveness were underpredicted. Flight tests show the X-29A airplane to be a good aircraft up to 40 deg angle of attack.

  14. High-frequency laser sonar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Sarma, Ashwin; Kirsteins, Ivars P.

    2002-11-01

    A set of measurements recently completed at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) demonstrated that a laser-based sonar system can be used to detect acoustic particle velocity on the surface of a thin acoustically-compliant plate embedded beneath a standard acoustic window. The theoretical acoustic and measured surface particle velocity varied by less than 1 dB (reference m/s) over a wide frequency band (10 kHz to 100 kHz). However, the Polytec Model PSV-100 Scanning Laser Vibrometer System (SLVS) used in the experiments had relatively poor acoustic sensitivity, presumably due to high electronic noise, speckle noise, stand-off distance, and drifting laser focus. The laser's acoustic sensitivity appears to be inversely proportional to the backscatter signal level. The existing SLVS can sample a grid of 512 by 512 points, with each grid point having a spot size of approximately 10 mm (0.0004 in.). Such fine sampling may be used to create essentially a continuous aperture, eliminating acoustic grating lobes at all frequencies of practical sonar interest.

  15. Frequency metrology using highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the scaling laws of relativistic fine structure splitting, many forbidden optical transitions appear within the ground state configurations of highly charged ions (HCI). In some hydrogen-like ions, even the hyperfine splitting of the 1s ground state gives rise to optical transitions. Given the very low polarizability of HCI, such laser-accessible transitions are extremely impervious to external perturbations and systematics that limit optical clock performance and arise from AC and DC Stark effects, such as black-body radiation and light shifts. Moreover, AC and DC Zeeman splitting are symmetric due to the much larger relativistic spin-orbit coupling and corresponding fine-structure splitting. Appropriate choice of states or magnetic sub-states with suitable total angular momentum and magnetic quantum numbers can lead to a cancellation of residual quadrupolar shifts. All these properties are very advantageous for the proposed use of HCI forbidden lines as optical frequency standards. Extremely magnified relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, and nuclear size contributions to the binding energies of the optically active electrons make HCI ideal tools for fundamental research, as in proposed studies of a possible time variation of the fine structure constant. Beyond this, HCI that cannot be photoionized by vacuum-ultraviolet photons could also provide frequency standards for future lasers operating in that range.

  16. Source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Calvert, W.

    1989-01-01

    The source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus has been determined. Specifically, by fitting the signal dropouts which occurred as Voyager traversed the hollow center of the emission pattern to a symmetrical cone centered on the source magnetic field direction at the cyclotron frequency, a southern-hemisphere (nightside) source was found at approximately 56 deg S, 219 deg W. The half-angle for the hollow portion of the emission pattern was found to be 13 deg.

  17. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  18. A study of roll attractor and wing rock of delta wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjana, T.; Rao, D. M.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1993-01-01

    Wing rock is a high angle of attack dynamic phenomenon of limited cycle motion predominantly in roll. The wing rock is one of the limitations to combat effectiveness of the fighter aircraft. Roll Attractor is the steady state or equilibrium trim angle (phi(sub trim)) attained by the free-to-roll model, held at some angle of attack, and released form rest at a given initial roll (bank) angle (phi(sub O)). Multiple roll attractors are attained at different trim angles depending on initial roll angle. The test facility (Vigyan's low speed wind tunnel) and experimental work is presented here along with mathematical modelling of roll attractor phenomenon and analysis and comparison of predictions with experimental data.

  19. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liqiu, Wei; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-01

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  20. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  1. High frequency oscillators for chaotic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, A. N.; Blakely, J. N.; Corron, N. J.; Dean, R. N.

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on implementing a class of exactly solvable chaotic oscillators at speeds that allow real world radar applications. The implementation of a chaotic radar using a solvable system has many advantages due to the generation of aperiodic, random-like waveforms with an analytic representation. These advantages include high range resolution, no range ambiguity, and spread spectrum characteristics. These systems allow for optimal detection of a noise-like signal by the means of a linear matched filter using simple and inexpensive methods. This paper outlines the use of exactly solvable chaos in ranging systems, while addressing electronic design issues related to the frequency dependence of the system's stretching function introduced by the use of negative impedance converters (NICs).

  2. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  3. Inline high frequency ultrasonic particle sizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, F.; Petit, J.; Nassar, G.; Debreyne, P.; Delaplace, G.; Nongaillard, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the development of a new method of particle sizing in a liquid. This method uses high frequency focused ultrasounds to detect particles crossing the focal zone of an ultrasonic sensor and to determine their size distribution by processing the reflected echoes. The major advantage of this technique compared to optical sizing methods is its ability to measure the size of particles suspended in an opaque liquid without any dedicated sample preparation. Validations of ultrasonic measurements were achieved on suspensions of polymethyl methacrylate beads in a size range extending from a few micrometer to several hundred micrometer with a temporal resolution of 1 s. The inline detection of aggregate formation was also demonstrated.

  4. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  5. High Power Third Gyroharmonic Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, M. A.; Ganguly, A. K.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; Yoder, R. B.; Wang, Mei

    1998-11-01

    A high power freqeuncy multplier which uses a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA)(M.A. LaPointe, R.B. Yoder, Changbiao Wang, A.K. Ganguly and J.L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett., 76), 2718 (1996) and a third harmonic, TE_311 cavity is being tested. Primary power at 2.856 GHz is used to accelerate a 20--30 A, 75--96kV electron beam up to 320 kV in a CARA. The prepared beam interacts with the TE_311 cavity tuned to the third harmonic of the drive frequency. Simulations show that conversion efficiencies from beam power to microwave power can be as high as 48% producing up to 4.5 MW of 8.568 GHz power. Experiments to date have shown under certain conditions only third harmonic radiation has been generated with a FWHM of 350 kHz, the Fourier limit for the length of the radiation pulse. High power experiments are underway to measure the efficiency of the device.

  6. High-speed reference-beam-angle control technique for holographic memory drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ken-ichiro; Ogata, Takeshi; Hosaka, Makoto; Fujita, Koji; Okuyama, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    We developed a holographic memory drive for next-generation optical memory. In this study, we present the key technology for achieving a high-speed transfer rate for reproduction, that is, a high-speed control technique for the reference beam angle. In reproduction in a holographic memory drive, there is the issue that the optimum reference beam angle during reproduction varies owing to distortion of the medium. The distortion is caused by, for example, temperature variation, beam irradiation, and moisture absorption. Therefore, a reference-beam-angle control technique to position the reference beam at the optimum angle is crucial. We developed a new optical system that generates an angle-error-signal to detect the optimum reference beam angle. To achieve the high-speed control technique using the new optical system, we developed a new control technique called adaptive final-state control (AFSC) that adds a second control input to the first one derived from conventional final-state control (FSC) at the time of angle-error-signal detection. We established an actual experimental system employing AFSC to achieve moving control between each page (Page Seek) within 300 µs. In sequential multiple Page Seeks, we were able to realize positioning to the optimum angles of the reference beam that maximize the diffracted beam intensity. We expect that applying the new control technique to the holographic memory drive will enable a giga-bit/s-class transfer rate.

  7. High frequency of tumours in Mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Niklas; Karlberg, Susann; Karikoski, Riitta; Mikkola, Sakari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Jalanko, Hannu

    2009-06-01

    Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a monogenic disorder with prenatal-onset growth failure, typical clinical characteristics, cardiopathy and tendency for a metabolic syndrome. It is caused by recessive mutations in the TRIM37 gene encoding for the peroxisomal TRIM37 protein with ubiquitin-ligase activity. In this work, the frequency and pathology of malignant and benign tumours were analysed in a national cohort of 89 Finnish MUL patients aged 0.7-76 years. The subjects had a clinical and radiological evaluation, and histological and immunohistocemical analyses on specimens obtained from biopsy, surgery or autopsy, were performed. The results show that the MUL patients have disturbed architecture with ectopic tissues and a high frequency of both benign and malignant tumours detectable in several internal organs. A total of 210 tumorous lesions were detected in 66/89 patients (74%). Fifteen malignancies occurred in 13 patients (15%), seven of them in the kidney (five Wilms' tumours), three in the thyroid gland, two gynaecological cancers, one gastrointestinal carcinoid tumour, one neuropituitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and one case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Tumours detected by radiology in the liver and other organs mainly comprised strongly dilated blood vessels (peliosis), vascularized cysts and nodular lesions. The lesions showed strong expression of the endothelial cell markers CD34 and CD31 as well as the myocyte marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). Our findings show that MUL is associated with frequent malignant tumours and benign adenomatous and vascular lesions, as well as disturbed organ development. PMID:19334051

  8. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  9. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  10. Experimental investigation of the high angle of attack characteristics of a high performance general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. F.; Yip, L. P.; Perkins, J. N.; Vess, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Scale model wind tunnel tests and full scale flight tests have been conducted for the Questair Venture general aviation aircraft configuration in order to investigate its high angle-of-attack aerodynamics. Attention is given to the formulation of a wing leading-edge modification capable of enhancing stall departure characteristics. This modification, which involved both outboard wing leading-edge droop and two chordwise leading-edge slots, is found to produce almost no wing-rock tendency when tested on a wind tunnel free-to-roll apparatus; in the full-scale aircraft, the modification yielded gentle, controllable stall characteristics with little cruise and climb performance penalty.

  11. Optimum angle-cut of collimator for dense objects in high-energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Bo, Xu; Na, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The use of minus identity lenses with an angle-cut collimator can achieve high contrast images in high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the principles of choosing the angle-cut aperture of the collimator for different energies and objects. Numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 has been implemented to investigate the entire radiography for the French test object. The optimum angle-cut apertures of the collimators are also obtained for different energies. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  12. ENGLISH WORDS OF VERY HIGH FREQUENCY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARD, WILLIAM; MCDAVID, VIRGINIA

    THE BIAS OF THE FREQUENCY OF THE 122 MOST COMMONLY USED ENGLISH WORDS WAS STUDIED. THE METHOD USED TO ASSEMBLE THESE DATA IS DESCRIBED FULLY. THE MOST FREQUENTLY USED WORDS WERE TAKEN FROM A DISSERTATION BY GEORGE K. MONROE, "PHONEMIC TRANSCRIPTION OF GRAPHIC POSTBASE AFFIXES IN ENGLISH," GODFREY DEWEY, "RELATIVE FREQUENCY OF ENGLISH SPEECH…

  13. Identification of an unsteady aerodynamic model up to high angle of attack regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yigang

    1997-12-01

    The harmonic oscillatory tests for a fighter aircraft configuration using the Dynamic Plunge-Pitch-Roll (DyPPiR) model mount at Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel are described and analyzed. The corresponding data reduction methods are developed on the basis of multirate digital signal processing techniques. Since the model is sting-mounted to the support system of DyPPiR, the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is first used to identify the frequencies of the elastic modes of sting. Then the sampling rate conversion systems are built up in digital domain to resample the data at a lower rate without introducing distortions to the signals of interest. Finally linear-phase Finite Impulse Response (FIR) filters are designed by Remez exchange algorithm to extract the aerodynamic characteristics responses to the programmed motions from the resampled measurements. These data reduction procedures are also illustrated through examples. The results obtained from the harmonic oscillatory tests are then illustrated and the associated flow mechanisms are discussed. Since no significant hysteresis loops are observed for the lift and the drag coefficients for the current angle of attack range and the tested reduced frequencies, the dynamic lags of separated and vortex flow effects are small in the current oscillatory tests. However, large hysteresis loops are observed for pitch moment coefficient in the current tests. This observation suggests that at current flow conditions, pitch moment has large pitch rate dotalpha dependencies. Then the nondimensional maximum pitch rate \\ qsb{max} is introduced to characterize these harmonic oscillatory motions. It is found that at current flow conditions, all the hysteresis loops of pitch moment coefficient with same \\ qsb{max} are tangential to one another at both top and bottom of the loops, implying approximately same maximum offset of these loops from static values. Several cases are also illustrated. Based on the results obtained and

  14. High-speed large angle mammography tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Staudinger, Paul; Smolenski, Joe; Ding, Jason; Schmitz, Andrea; McCoy, Julie; Rumsey, Michael; Al-Khalidy, Abdulrahman; Ross, William; Landberg, Cynthia E.; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Carson, Paul; Goodsitt, Mitchell; Chan, Heang-Ping; Roubidoux, Marilyn; Thomas, Jerry A.; Osland, Jacqueline

    2006-03-01

    A new mammography tomosynthesis prototype system that acquires 21 projection images over a 60 degree angular range in approximately 8 seconds has been developed and characterized. Fast imaging sequences are facilitated by a high power tube and generator for faster delivery of the x-ray exposure and a high speed detector read-out. An enhanced a-Si/CsI flat panel digital detector provides greater DQE at low exposure, enabling tomo image sequence acquisitions at total patient dose levels between 150% and 200% of the dose of a standard mammographic view. For clinical scenarios where a single MLO tomographic acquisition per breast may replace the standard CC and MLO views, total tomosynthesis breast dose is comparable to or below the dose in standard mammography. The system supports co-registered acquisition of x-ray tomosynthesis and 3-D ultrasound data sets by incorporating an ultrasound transducer scanning system that flips into position above the compression paddle for the ultrasound exam. Initial images acquired with the system are presented.

  15. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1998-02-05

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectivensss of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbinite complex through u se of hydraulically fractgured horizontal of high-angle wells. TGhe combinaton of a horizontal or high-angle weoo and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

  16. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-08

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angled well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thininterbedded layers and the well bore.

  17. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1998-05-29

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal end of a protruding turbidite complex through use of hydraulically fractured horizontal of high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the well bore.

  18. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Laue, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

  19. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  20. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  1. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  2. Reversible tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R M; Bath, A P; Bance, M L

    2000-01-01

    We report an unusual case of tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity with subsequent clinical and objective evidence of functional recovery. In those patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of aminoglycoside-induced bilateral vestibular toxicity (ataxia and oscillopsia) and normal low-frequency (ENG-caloric) responses, high-frequency rotation chair testing should be performed to exclude a high-frequency vestibular deficit. PMID:10810261

  3. Low Frequency Error Analysis and Calibration for High-Resolution Optical Satellite's Uncontrolled Geometric Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mi; Fang, Chengcheng; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-06-01

    The low frequency error is a key factor which has affected uncontrolled geometry processing accuracy of the high-resolution optical image. To guarantee the geometric quality of imagery, this paper presents an on-orbit calibration method for the low frequency error based on geometric calibration field. Firstly, we introduce the overall flow of low frequency error on-orbit analysis and calibration, which includes optical axis angle variation detection of star sensor, relative calibration among star sensors, multi-star sensor information fusion, low frequency error model construction and verification. Secondly, we use optical axis angle change detection method to analyze the law of low frequency error variation. Thirdly, we respectively use the method of relative calibration and information fusion among star sensors to realize the datum unity and high precision attitude output. Finally, we realize the low frequency error model construction and optimal estimation of model parameters based on DEM/DOM of geometric calibration field. To evaluate the performance of the proposed calibration method, a certain type satellite's real data is used. Test results demonstrate that the calibration model in this paper can well describe the law of the low frequency error variation. The uncontrolled geometric positioning accuracy of the high-resolution optical image in the WGS-84 Coordinate Systems is obviously improved after the step-wise calibration.

  4. Single-step process for the deposition of high water contact angle and high water sliding angle surfaces by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Verdier, Stéphane; Choquet, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Fluorine-free surfaces with high water contact angle (WCA) and high adhesion force to water are prepared by the atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD) of hexamethyldisiloxane on cold rolled aluminum foil. Water droplets, which remained on the plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (ppHMDSO) surface with contact angle of 155°, do not slide even when the surface is tilted vertically or turned upside down. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy highlight the importance of the dual-scale roughness of the ppHMDSO surface. The "sticky" high WCA property is achieved only when the nanometer scale particles generated during the AP-DBD process are present at the surface of the film and combine to the micrometer scale rolling lines of the aluminum substrate. PMID:23339545

  5. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  6. Delayed detached eddy simulations of fighter aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoliang; Jiang, Xiong; Liu, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The massively separated flows over a realistic aircraft configuration at 40°, 50°, and 60° angles of attack are studied using the delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES). The calculations are carried out at experimental conditions corresponding to a mean aerodynamic chord-based Reynolds number of 8.93× 105 and Mach number of 0.088. The influence of the grid size is investigated using two grids, 20.0× 106 cells and 31.0× 106 cells. At the selected conditions, the lift, drag, and pitching moment from DDES predictions agree with the experimental data better than that from the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes. The effect of angle of attack on the flow structure over the general aircraft is also studied, and it is found that the dominated frequency associated with the vortex shedding process decreases with increasing angle of attack.

  7. Delayed detached eddy simulations of fighter aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoliang; Jiang, Xiong; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The massively separated flows over a realistic aircraft configuration at 40°, 50°, and 60° angles of attack are studied using the delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES). The calculations are carried out at experimental conditions corresponding to a mean aerodynamic chord-based Reynolds number of 8.93× 105 and Mach number of 0.088. The influence of the grid size is investigated using two grids, 20.0× 106 cells and 31.0× 106 cells. At the selected conditions, the lift, drag, and pitching moment from DDES predictions agree with the experimental data better than that from the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes. The effect of angle of attack on the flow structure over the general aircraft is also studied, and it is found that the dominated frequency associated with the vortex shedding process decreases with increasing angle of attack.

  8. The high frequency fatigue behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Nikhilesh

    Many potential applications for continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCMCs), such as gas turbines and heat exchangers, will involve high frequency cyclic loading (75 Hz or higher). While most of the work in the area of fatigue of CFCMCs has concentrated on low frequency behavior, it has been shown that fatigue at high frequencies can exacerbate the accumulation of microstructural damage and significantly decrease fatigue life. "Soft" matrix composites with strong interface bonding provided superior resistance to high frequency fatigue damage. Nicalon/SiCON composites with strong interfacial bonding between the fibers and matrix exhibited very little internal heating during high frequency fatigue loading. This composite system exhibited excellent fatigue life, with fatigue runout at 10sp7 cycles occurring for stresses close to 80% of the ultimate strength (at a loading frequency of 100 Hz). Thick fiber coatings may be more effective in reducing the amount of fiber wear and damage which occur during high frequency fatigue. More effective lubrication at the fiber/matrix interface was achieved with thicker carbon coatings in Nicalon/C/SiC composites subjected to high frequency fatigue loading. Composites with thicker coatings exhibited substantially lower frictional heating and had much higher fatigue lives. The effect of laminate stacking sequence had a significant effect on the high frequency fatigue behavior of CFCMCs. In SCS-6/Sisb3Nsb4 composites, frictional heating in angle-ply laminates (±45) was substantially higher than that in cross-ply laminates (0/90). Since the angle-ply had a lower stiffness, matrix microcracking in this composite was more predominant. Finally, preliminary fatigue damage mechanism maps for CFCMCs were developed. These maps provided a means to identify which fatigue mechanisms were operating at a given stress level and number of cycles.

  9. Research on high precision equal-angle scanning method in rotary kiln temperature measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaosheng; Guo, Zhongyuan; You, Changhui; Liu, Jinsong; Cheng, Yang; Tang, Huaming

    2016-05-01

    Aiming at traditional horizontal equal-angle scanning method's disadvantage of measurement error, a high precision equal-angle scanning method is proposed, the proposed method establishes a tilt scanning model by the following steps: introducing height variable, precisely calculating the viewing angle, building scanning model. The model is used to calculate scanning position on rotary kiln's surface, which helps to locate and track temperature variation. The experiment shows that the proposed method can effectively improve the precision of temperature spots' location on the rotary kiln surface.

  10. Simulation study of high-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao Ido, Takeshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    High-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAM) observed in the large helical device plasmas are investigated using a hybrid simulation code for energetic particles and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Energetic particle inertia is incorporated in the MHD momentum equation for the simulation where the beam ion density is comparable to the bulk plasma density. Bump-on-tail type beam ion velocity distribution created by slowing down and charge exchange is considered. It is demonstrated that EGAMs have frequencies higher than the geodesic acoustic modes and the dependence on bulk plasma temperature is weak if (1) energetic particle density is comparable to the bulk plasma density and (2) charge exchange time (τ{sub cx}) is sufficiently shorter than the slowing down time (τ{sub s}) to create a bump-on-tail type distribution. The frequency of high-frequency EGAM rises as the energetic particle pressure increases under the condition of high energetic particle pressure. The frequency also increases as the energetic particle pitch angle distribution shifts to higher transit frequency. It is found that there are two kinds of particles resonant with EGAM: (1) trapped particles and (2) passing particles with transit frequency close to the mode frequency. The EGAMs investigated in this work are destabilized primarily by the passing particles whose transit frequencies are close to the EGAM frequency.

  11. Development and characterization of high-frequency resonance-enhanced microjet actuators for control of high-speed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Puja; Gustavsson, Jonas P. R.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    For flow control applications requiring high-frequency excitation, very few actuators have sufficient dynamic response and/or control authority to be useful in high-speed flows. Due to this reason, experiments involving high-frequency excitation, attempted in the past, have been limited to either low-frequency actuation with reasonable control authority or moderate-frequency actuation with limited control authority. The current work expands on the previous development of the resonance-enhanced microactuators to design actuators that are capable of producing high-amplitude pulses at much higher frequencies [{O} (10 kHz)]. Using lumped element modeling, two actuators have been designed with nominal frequencies of 20 and 50 kHz. Extensive benchtop characterization using acoustic measurements as well as optical diagnostics using a high-resolution micro-schlieren setup is employed to characterize the dynamic response of these actuators. The actuators performed at a range of frequencies, 20.3-27.8 and 54.8-78.2 kHz, respectively. In addition to providing information on the actuator flow physics and performance at various operating conditions, this study serves to develop easy-to-integrate high-frequency actuators for active control of high-speed jets. Preliminary testing of these actuators is performed by implementing the 20-kHz actuator on a Mach 0.9 free jet flow field for noise reduction. Acoustic measurements in the jet near field demonstrate attenuation of radiated noise at all observation angles.

  12. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  13. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  14. Near infrared frequency dependence of high-order sideband generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaks, Benjamin; Banks, Hunter; Sherwin, Mark; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2013-12-04

    The near infrared frequency dependence of high order sideband generation in InGaAs quantum wells is discussed. The NIR frequency dependence of the sidebands indicates that the HSG phenomenon is excitonic in nature.

  15. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  16. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  17. High-performance iodine fiber frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Anna; Baynes, Fred N; Anstie, James D; Light, Philip S; Benabid, Fetah; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2011-12-15

    We have constructed a compact and robust optical frequency standard based around iodine vapor loaded into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). A 532 nm laser was frequency locked to one hyperfine component of the R(56) 32-0 (127)I(2) transition using modulation transfer spectroscopy. The stabilized laser demonstrated a frequency stability of 2.3×10(-12) at 1 s, almost an order of magnitude better than previously reported for a laser stabilized to a gas-filled HC-PCF. This limit is set by the shot noise in the detection system. We present a discussion of the current limitations to the performance and a route to improve the performance by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:22179880

  18. High-angle-of-attack yawing moment asymmetry of the X-31 aircraft from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries led to position saturations of the thrust vector vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some of the dynamic stability axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. This slowed the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion and resulted in maneuver restrictions. Several aerodynamic modifications were made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. A method for determining the yawing moment asymmetry from flight data was developed and an analysis of the various configuration changes completed. The baseline aircraft were found to have significant asymmetries above 45 deg angle of attack with the largest asymmetry typically occurring around 60 deg angle of attack. Applying symmetrical boundary layer transition strips along the forebody sides increased the magnitude of the asymmetry and widened the angle-of-attack range over which the largest asymmetry acted. Installing longitudinal forebody strakes and rounding the sharp nose of the aircraft caused the yawing moment asymmetry magnitude to be reduced. The transition strips and strakes made the asymmetry characteristic of the aircraft more repeatable than the clean forebody configuration. Although no geometric differences between the aircraft were known, ship 2 consistently had larger yawing moment asymmetries than ship 1.

  19. Mercury's radius change estimates revisited using high incidence angle MESSENGER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Achille, G.; Popa, C.; Massironi, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Palumbo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Estimates of Mercury's radius decrease obtained using the amount of strain recorded by tectonics on the planet range from 0.5 km to 2 km. These latter figures appear too low with respect to the radius contraction (up to 5-6 km) predicted by the most accredited studies based on thermo-mechanical evolution models. For this reason, it has been suggested that there may be hidden strain accommodated by features yet unseen on Mercury. Indeed, as it has been already cautioned by previous studies, the identification of tectonic features on Mercury might be largely biased by the lighting geometry of the used basemaps. This limitation might have affected the results of the extrapolations for estimating the radius change. In this study, we mapped tectonic features at the terminator thus using images acquired at high sun incidence angle (>50°) that represents the optimal condition for their observation. In fact, images with long shadows enhance the topography and texture of the surface and are ideal to detect tectonic structures. This favorable illumination conditions allowed us to infer reliable measurements of spatial distribution (i.e. frequency, orientation, and areal density) of tectonic features which can be used to estimate the average contractional strain and planetary radius decrease. We digitized tectonic structures within a region extending for an area of about 12 million sq. km (~16% of planet's surface). More than 1300 tectonic lineaments were identified and interpreted to be compressional features (i.e. lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges, and high relief ridges) with a total length of more than 12300 km. Assuming that the extensional strain is negligible within the area, the average contractional strain calculated for the survey area is ~0.21-0.28% (~0.24% for θ=30°). This strain, extrapolated to the entire surface, corresponds to a contraction in radius of about 2.5-3.4 km (~2.9 km for θ=30°). Interestingly, the values of contractional strain and radius decrease

  20. High frequency formulation for the acoustic power spectrum due to cascade-turbulence interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Cheolung; Joseph, Phillip; Lee, Soogab

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the noise radiated by a cascade of flat-plate airfoils interacting with homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. An analytic formulation for the spectrum of acoustic power of a two-dimensional flat-plate is derived. The main finding of this paper is that the acoustic power spectrum from the cascade of flat airfoils may be split into two distinct frequency regions of low frequency and high frequency, separated by a critical frequency. Below this frequency, cascade effects due to the interaction between neighboring airfoils are shown to be important. At frequencies above the critical frequency, cascade effects are shown to be relatively weak. In this frequency range, acoustic power is shown to be approximately proportional to the number of blades. Based on this finding at high frequencies, an approximate expression is derived for the power spectrum that is valid above the critical frequency and which is in excellent agreement with the exact expression for the broadband power spectrum. The formulation is used to perform a parametric study on the effects on the power spectrum of the blade number, stagger angle, gap-chord ratio, and Mach number. The theory is also shown to provide a close fit to the measured spectrum of rotor-stator interaction. PMID:16454269

  1. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment

  2. Highly accurate servo control of reference beam angle in holographic memory with polarized servo beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Makoto; Ogata, Takeshi; Yamada, Kenichiro; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Shimada, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new servo technique for controlling the reference beam angle in angular multiplexing holographic memory to attain higher capacity and higher speed data archiving. An orthogonally polarized beam with an incident angle slightly different from that of the reference beam is newly applied to the optics. The control signal for the servo is generated as the difference between the diffracted light intensities of these two beams from a hologram. The incident angle difference between the beams to the medium was optimized as sufficient properties of the control signal were obtained. The high accuracy of the control signal with an angle error lower than 1.5 mdeg was successfully confirmed in the simulations and experiments.

  3. High angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of crescent and elliptic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Static longitudinal and lateral-directional forces and moments were measured for elliptic- and crescent-wing models at high angles-of-attack in the NASA Langley 14 by 22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel. The forces and moments were obtained for an angle-of-attack range including stall and post-stall conditions at a Reynolds number based on the average wing chord of about 1.8 million. Flow-visualization photographs using a mixture of oil and titanium-dioxide were also taken for several incidence angles. The force and moment data and the flow-visualization results indicated that the crescent wing model with its highly swept tips produced much better high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics than the elliptic model. Leading-edge separation-induced vortex flow over the highly swept tips of the crescent wing is thought to produce this improved behavior at high angles-of-attack. The unique planform design could result in safer and more efficient low-speed airplanes.

  4. Accurate Angle Estimator for High-Frame-Rate 2-D Vector Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Villagomez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for estimating 2-D flow angles using a high-frame-rate ultrasound method. The angle estimator features high accuracy and low standard deviation (SD) over the full 360° range. The method is validated on Field II simulations and phantom measurements using the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS and a flow rig before being tested in vivo. An 8-MHz linear array transducer is used with defocused beam emissions. In the simulations of a spinning disk phantom, a 360° uniform behavior on the angle estimation is observed with a median angle bias of 1.01° and a median angle SD of 1.8°. Similar results are obtained on a straight vessel for both simulations and measurements, where the obtained angle biases are below 1.5° with SDs around 1°. Estimated velocity magnitudes are also kept under 10% bias and 5% relative SD in both simulations and measurements. An in vivo measurement is performed on a carotid bifurcation of a healthy individual. A 3-s acquisition during three heart cycles is captured. A consistent and repetitive vortex is observed in the carotid bulb during systoles. PMID:27093598

  5. High-Frequency, High-Temperature Fretting Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haake, F. K.; Swanson, G. R.; Duke, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism observed when two nominally clamped surfaces are subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation and propagation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting cracks pose to damage tolerance and structural integrity of in-service components, the objective of this work is to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig capable of investigating fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys subjected to load and temperature conditions representative of such turbomachinery components.

  6. Preliminary results from a subsonic high-angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system - Design, calibration, algorithm development, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research vehicle. This paper discusses the airdata algorithm development and composite results expressed as airdata parameter estimates and describes the HI-FADS system hardware, calibration techniques, and algorithm development. An independent empirical verification was performed over a large portion of the subsonic flight envelope. Test points were obtained for Mach numbers from 0.15 to 0.94 and angles of attack from -8.0 to 55.0 deg. Angles of sideslip ranged from -15.0 to 15.0 deg, and test altitudes ranged from 18,000 to 40,000 ft. The HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz.

  7. Electromagnetic inhibition of high frequency thermal bonding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong; Zhang, Qing-qing; Li, Hang; Zhang, Da-jian; Hou, Ming-feng; Zhu, Xian-wei

    2011-12-01

    The traditional high frequency thermal bonding machine had serious radiation problems at dominant frequency, two times frequency and three times frequency. Combining with its working principle, the problems of electromagnetic compatibility were studied, three following measures were adopted: 1.At the head part of the high frequency thermal bonding machine, resonant circuit attenuator was designed. The notch groove and reaction field can make the radiation being undermined or absorbed; 2.The electromagnetic radiation shielding was made for the high frequency copper power feeder; 3.Redesigned the high-frequency oscillator circuit to reduce the output of harmonic oscillator. The test results showed that these measures can make the output according with the national standard of electromagnetic compatibility (GB4824-2004-2A), the problems of electromagnetic radiation leakage can be solved, and good social, environmental and economic benefits would be brought.

  8. The High Frequency Stabilization of a Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirdyashev, K.

    2004-10-01

    Experimental data on the high-frequency stabilization of the MPD thruster and the suppression of low-frequency oscillations in the frequency range from 20 to 100 kHz are presented. Conditions for the stabilizing effect of a high-frequency magnetic field at the frequency of 40 MHz on the plasma jet produced by the thruster are determined, and the efficiency of this action is evaluated. The action of high frequency field on the MPD thruster consists in the contention of two processes - the stabilization of the plasma drift instability by the magnetic component of high frequency field and the energy conversion of natural plasma oscillations excited by the external field to the ion-sound wave energy.

  9. Mechanisms of high-frequency song generation in brachypterous crickets and the role of ghost frequencies.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Tony; Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Grandcolas, Philippe; Robert, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Sound production in crickets relies on stridulation, the well-understood rubbing together of a pair of specialised wings. As the file of one wing slides over the scraper of the other, a series of rhythmic impacts causes harmonic oscillations, usually resulting in the radiation of pure tones delivered at low frequencies (2-8 kHz). In the short-winged crickets of the Lebinthini tribe, acoustic communication relies on signals with remarkably high frequencies (>8 kHz) and rich harmonic content. Using several species of the subfamily Eneopterinae, we characterised the morphological and mechanical specialisations supporting the production of high frequencies, and demonstrated that higher harmonics are exploited as dominant frequencies. These specialisations affect the structure of the stridulatory file, the motor control of stridulation and the resonance of the sound radiator. We placed these specialisations in a phylogenetic framework and show that they serve to exploit high-frequency vibrational modes pre-existing in the phylogenetic ancestor. In Eneopterinae, the lower frequency components are harmonically related to the dominant peak, suggesting they are relicts of ancestral carrier frequencies. Yet, such ghost frequencies still occur in the wings' free resonances, highlighting the fundamental mechanical constraints of sound radiation. These results support the hypothesis that such high-frequency songs evolved stepwise, by a form of punctuated evolution that could be related to functional constraints, rather than by only the progressive increase of the ancestral fundamental frequency. PMID:23430987

  10. Processing of superconductive materials and high frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    We do not know yet if superconductivity will become useful without refrigeration. Now, the superconductors are so different from copper that it is difficult to imagine replacing copper with such a brittle material. Superconductors conduct dc with no loss, ac with small losses, and microwaves in co-axial lines with almost no loss and with no dispersion from dc to the highest frequencies. They will probably allow us to close the gap between radio frequency and infrared optical transmission. Clearly your industry should know some things about where superconductivity may lead us and must consider whether the greater risk is to develop them or to let others try it. There are no easy answers yet.

  11. Refraction of high frequency noise in an arbitrary jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1994-01-01

    Refraction of high frequency noise by mean flow gradients in a jet is studied using the ray-tracing methods of geometrical acoustics. Both the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) formulations are considered. In the former case, the mean flow is assumed parallel and the governing propagation equations are described by a system of four first order ordinary differential equations. The 3D formulation, on the other hand, accounts for the jet spreading as well as the axial flow development. In this case, a system of six first order differential equations are solved to trace a ray from its source location to an observer in the far field. For subsonic jets with a small spreading angle both methods lead to similar results outside the zone of silence. However, with increasing jet speed the two prediction models diverge to the point where the parallel flow assumption is no longer justified. The Doppler factor of supersonic jets as influenced by the refraction effects is discussed and compared with the conventional modified Doppler factor.

  12. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) prediction of several rectangular plate geometries is discussed using high-frequency techniques such as the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for perfectly conducting and impedance wedges and the Method of Equivalent Currents (MEC). Previous reports have presented detailed solutions to the principal-plane scattering by a perfectly conducting and a coated rectangular plate and nonprincipal-plane scattering by a perfectly conducting plate. These solutions are briefly reviewed and a modified model is presented for the coated plate. Theoretical and experimental data are presented for the perfectly conducting geometries. Agreement between theory and experiment is very good near and at normal incidence. In regions near and at grazing incidence, the disagreement between the data vary according to diffraction distances and angles involved. It is these areas of disagreement which are of extreme interest as an explanation for the disagreement will yield invaluable insight into scattering mechanisms which are not yet identified as major contributors near and at grazing incidence. Areas of disagreement between theory and experiment are identified and examined in an attempt to better understand and predict near-grazing incidence, grazing incidence, and nonprincipal-plane diffractions.

  13. High-Frequency, Conformable Organic Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Reuveny, Amir; Lee, Sunghoon; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Siket, Christian M; Lee, Sungwon; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Takayasu; Bauer, Siegfried; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Large-bandwidth, low-operation-voltage, and uniform organic amplifiers are fabricated on ultrathin foils. By the integration of short-channel OTFTs and AlOx capacitors, organic amplifiers with a bandwidth of 25 kHz are realized, demonstrating the highest gain-bandwidth product (GBWP) reported to date. Owing to material and process advancements, closed-loop architectures operate at frequencies of several kilohertz with an area smaller than 30 mm(2) . PMID:26922899

  14. High-Frequency Radiation and Tritium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonichev, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    In the process of deformation of titanium alloy samples preliminarily saturated by deuterium (at a temperature T = 710°C) radiation, which is not a neutron flux, was detected. Electromagnetic radiation in the range of radio frequencies was detected in titanium alloy samples in the process of their saturation by deuterium. The probable mechanism of its occurrence may be the retardation of charged particles in the metallic matrix.

  15. High Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Eugene; Tobar, Michael

    2009-04-23

    We describe microwave noise measurement system capable of detecting the phase fluctuations of rms amplitude of 2{center_dot}10{sup -11} rad/{radical}(Hz). Such resolution allows the study of intrinsic fluctuations in various microwave components and materials, as well as precise tests of fundamental physics. Employing this system we discovered a previously unknown phenomenon of down-conversion of pump oscillator phase noise into the low-frequency voltage fluctuations.

  16. Improving spatial-resolution in high cone-angle micro-CT by source deblurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heyang; Kingston, Andrew; Myers, Glenn; Recur, Benoit; Turner, Michael; Sheppard, Andrian

    2014-09-01

    Micro scale computed tomography (CT) can resolve many features in cellular structures, bone formations, minerals properties and composite materials not seen at lower spatial-resolution. Those features enable us to build a more comprehensive model for the object of interest. CT resolution is limited by a fundamental trade off between source size and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given acquisition time. There is a limit on the X-ray flux that can be emitted from a certain source size, and fewer photons cause a lower SNR. A large source size creates penumbral blurring in the radiograph, limiting the effective spatial-resolution in the reconstruction. High cone-angle CT improves SNR by increasing the X-ray solid angle that passes through the sample. In the high cone-angle regime current source deblurring methods break down due to incomplete modelling of the physical process. This paper presents high cone-angle source de-blurring models. We implement these models using a novel multi-slice Richardson-Lucy (M-RL) and 3D Conjugate Gradient deconvolution on experimental high cone-angle data to improve the spatial-resolution of the reconstructed volume. In M-RL, we slice the back projection volume into subsets which can be considered to have a relative uniform convolution kernel. We compare these results to those obtained from standard reconstruction techniques and current source deblurring methods (i.e. 2D Richardson-Lucy in the radiograph and the volume respectively).

  17. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, E.S.; Campbell, D.V.

    1997-04-29

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer. 22 figs.

  18. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Eric S.; Campbell, David V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer.

  19. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  20. Preliminary results from an airdata enhancement algorithm with application to high-angle-of-attack flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique was developed to improve the fidelity of airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering. This technique is particularly useful for airdata measured during flight at high angular rates and high angles of attack. To support this research, flight tests using the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility. A Kalman filter was used to combine information from research airdata, linear accelerometers, angular rate gyros, and attitude gyros to determine better estimates of airdata quantities such as angle of attack, angle of sideslip, airspeed, and altitude. The state and observation equations used by the Kalman filter are briefly developed and it is shown how the state and measurement covariance matrices were determined from flight data. Flight data are used to show the results of the technique and these results are compared to an independent measurement source. This technique is applicable to both postflight and real-time processing of data.

  1. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy.

    PubMed

    Vitela, A Davi; Monson, Brian B; Lotto, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  2. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy

    PubMed Central

    Vitela, A. Davi; Monson, Brian B.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  3. Aerodynamic Loads on Tails at High Angles of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Spahr, J. R.

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented for the loads and moments acting on the individual tail surfaces of a body-tail combination over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. The effects of forebody length and panel-panel interference on the characteristics are included. It is shown that large nonlinear variations in these loads and moments, which occur at some combinations of angle of attack and sideslip, cannot be predicted by low-angle theory. A relatively simple, but general, theoretical method for calculating these load and moment characteristics is described, and the results from this method are found to be in good agreement with experiment provided the initial positions of the forebody vortices are known. It is shown that a simple application of slender-body theory can be used to predict the side loads due to sideslip that are contributed by a vertical tail on a wide variety of wing-body-tail combinations at low angles of attack. For several configurations, changes are indicated which reduced the vertical-tail loads per unit yawing moment of each complete configuration at large angles of attack. Some results are presented on the effect of high angle of attack on the induced-flow field and tail loads due to a wing at supersonic speed.

  4. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaev, S. N.; Kvashnin, N. L.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Krysanov, V. A.; Oreshkin, S. I.; Motylev, A. M.; Popov, S. M.; Samoilenko, A. A.; Yudin, I. S.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2014-06-15

    A new setup OGRAN—the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events—gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS.

  5. Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.

    1998-06-23

    The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

  6. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  7. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Bagaev, S N; Bezrukov, L B; Kvashnin, N L; Krysanov, V A; Oreshkin, S I; Motylev, A M; Popov, S M; Rudenko, V N; Samoilenko, A A; Skvortsov, M N; Yudin, I S

    2014-06-01

    A new setup OGRAN--the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events--gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS. PMID:24985859

  8. Exploratory investigation of deflectable forebody strakes for high angle of attack yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Murri, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    A deflectable strake concept was investigated on a conical forebody to evaluate its yaw control potential at high angles of attack. In exploratory low-speed tunnel tests using a generic delta wing fighter configuration, antisymmetrically deflected strakes provided useful levels of yaw power at angles of attack when the conventional rudder became totally degraded. Symmetrical strakes prevented side force development at high angles of attack, and provided pitch control through symmetrical deflection. The strake performance was sensitive to its circumferential position on the forebody due to varying interaction of strake vortices with the wing and vertical tail. The low Reynolds number results of this study provided a favorable initial validation of the concept, subject to verification in regard to scale effects.

  9. Calibration of High Frequency MEMS Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Humphreys, William M.; Bartram, Scott M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and controlling aircraft noise is one of the major research topics of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One of the measurement technologies used to acquire noise data is the microphone directional array (DA). Traditional direction array hardware, consisting of commercially available condenser microphones and preamplifiers can be too expensive and their installation in hard-walled wind tunnel test sections too complicated. An emerging micro-machining technology coupled with the latest cutting edge technologies for smaller and faster systems have opened the way for development of MEMS microphones. The MEMS microphone devices are available in the market but suffer from certain important shortcomings. Based on early experiments with array prototypes, it has been found that both the bandwidth and the sound pressure level dynamic range of the microphones should be increased significantly to improve the performance and flexibility of the overall array. Thus, in collaboration with an outside MEMS design vendor, NASA Langley modified commercially available MEMS microphone as shown in Figure 1 to meet the new requirements. Coupled with the design of the enhanced MEMS microphones was the development of a new calibration method for simultaneously obtaining the sensitivity and phase response of the devices over their entire broadband frequency range. Over the years, several methods have been used for microphone calibration. Some of the common methods of microphone calibration are Coupler (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous), Pistonphone, Electrostatic actuator, and Free-field calibration (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous). Traditionally, electrostatic actuators (EA) have been used to characterize air-condenser microphones for wideband frequency ranges; however, MEMS microphones are not adaptable to the EA method due to their construction and very small diaphragm size. Hence a substitution-based, free-field method was developed to

  10. Leaky-mode waveguide modulators with high deflection angle for use in holographic video displays.

    PubMed

    Qaderi, Kamran; Smalley, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Film display holograms typically diffract light over a wide enough view-angle to be viewed, directly, without intervening optics. However, all holographic video displays (with the exception of eye-tracked systems) must use optics beyond the hologram surface to overcome the challenges of small display extent and low diffraction angle by using some form of demagnification and derotation (i.e. angle magnification and optical multiplexing). We report a leaky mode waveguide spatial light modulator with sufficiently high angular diffraction to obviate the need for demagnification in scanned aperture systems. This high angle was achieved by performing a number of experiments to determine the depth of the annealed, proton-exchanged waveguide which corresponded to a maximized diffracted angle. Diffraction sweeps were recorded in excess of 19.5° (corresponding to only 70 MHz of input bandwidth) for 632.8 nm light which is above the 15° required for direct view display. Device geometries are proposed which might achieve greater than 20° of total angular sweep for red, green, and blue light. PMID:27607687