Science.gov

Sample records for angles loa mutation

  1. Subconjunctival Loa loa.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pallavi; Asensio, Maria; Bekir, Oral Adil; Jabir, Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    Loa loa (commonly known as the 'African eye worm') is a nematode commonly found in areas in and around the rainforests and swamps of Western and Central Africa. In recent years, due to an increase in international travel and migration various 'exotic' tropical diseases are being reported all over the world especially in Europe and North America. So far there have been no recent cases reported from the UK. This case report highlights one such case of Loa loa diagnosed recently in the UK. These filarial diseases should be considered in patients who present with unusual ocular or systemic symptoms if they have migrated or travelled from endemic areas in the recent past. PMID:22714600

  2. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kagmeni, G; Cheuteu, R; Bilong, Y; Wiedemann, P

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis. PMID:27441005

  3. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kagmeni, G.; Cheuteu, R.; Bilong, Y.; Wiedemann, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis. PMID:27441005

  4. Subconjuctival Loa loa with Calabar swelling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee-Yoon; Lee, Yoon-Jung; Shin, Sun-Young; Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2008-08-01

    Loa loa is unique among the human filariae in that adult worms are occasionally visible during subconjunctival migration. A 29-yr-old African female student, living in Korea for the past 5 yr without ever visiting her home country, presented with acute eyelid swelling and a sensation of motion on the left eyeball. Her symptoms started one day earlier and became worse over time. Examination revealed a threadlike worm beneath the left upper bulbar conjunctiva with mild eyelid swelling as well as painless swelling of the right forearm. Upon exposure to slit-lamp illumination, a sudden movement of the worm toward the fornix was noted. After surgical extraction, parasitologic analysis confirmed the worm to be a female adult Loa loa with the vulva at the extreme anterior end. On blood smear, the microfilariae had characteristic features of Loa loa, including sheath and body nuclei up to the tip of the tail. The patient also showed eosinophilia (37%) measuring 4,100/microL. She took ivermectin (200 microg/kg) as a single dose and suffered from a mild fever and chills for one day. This patient, to the best of our knowledge, is the first case of subconjunctival loiasis with Calabar swelling in Korea. PMID:18756067

  5. The Loa-Kea trend revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2003-12-01

    along the Loa-Kea trend is also present in the temporal evolution of a single volcano (e.g. Koolau and Mauna). This may be explained if the azimuth of the compositional boundary between Loa and Kea type chemistry is at a slight angle to the azimuth of the plate motion. It is quite possible that the change in the direction of plate motion, 2 to 3 Ma ago, also caused a change in the position of Koolau volcano in such a way that its magma supply switched from one side of the plume to the other. [1] J.D. Dana, Geology, Volume 10 of United States Exploring Expedition, during the years 1838-1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, C. Sherman, Philadelphia, 1849. [2] J. Eisele, W. Abouchami, S.J.G. Galer, A.W. Hofmann, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 4(2), 8710, doi:10.1029/2002GC000339, 2003 [3] R. Tanaka, E. Nakamura, Geophys. Monograph Ser., vol. 128, 311-332, 2002 [4] P. Wessel, L. Kroenke, Nature 387, 365-369, 1997. [5] C.F. Hieronymus, D. Bercovici, Nature 397, 604-607, 1999. [6] U. ten Brink, Geology, 19, 397-400, 1991.

  6. Subconjunctival Loa loa worm: first case report in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Passos, Renato Magalhães; Barbosa, Carolina Pelegrini; Almeida, Juliana de Souza; Ogawa, Guilherme Maerschner; Camargo, Luis Marcelo Aranha

    2012-01-01

    We report the first case of ocular infestation by Loa loa in Brazil. Loiasis is caused by infestation with Loa loa, a filarial parasite originally found in the rainforests of western and central Africa. It is transmitted by the bite of the fly Chrysops and has been recently described in other places other than Africa, in African immigrants or travellers. Our case is a 33 year-old woman from Cameroon who was living in São Paulo, Brazil, for 5 years. She was asymptomatic until one morning she started feeling "something moving" in the left eye. Under topical anesthesia, on the slit lamp, a moving worm was removed from the subconjunctival space, which later was confirmed to be a male Loa loa adult specimen. Blood tests revealed microfilaraemia of 129 mf/mL. The patient was treated with 400 mg oral albendazole for 3 weeks and 60 mg prednisone. This report illustrates an unusual ocular disease, which is extremely rare outside of Africa, but easily diagnosed and treated. Ophthalmologists should be aware of it, in face of an increasingly globalized world. PMID:22552423

  7. Loa loa-does it deserve to be neglected?

    PubMed

    Metzger, Wolfram Gottfried; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    More than 10 million people in western and central Africa are estimated to be infected with Loa loa filarial nematodes. Like most other infectious diseases, L loa filariasis (loiasis) covers a wide range of symptoms. Severe complications have been reported; however, most observations are anecdotal, typically in travellers. The widespread use of filaricidal drugs within eradication programmes of Onchocerca volvulus and Wuchereria bancrofti led to the observation that concomitant L loa infection increases the risk of severe treatment-associated, life-threatening complications. Initiatives were therefore launched to map the risk of loiasis. Insight about the epidemiology of L loa has advanced notably; however, its effect on the individual as well as on the community level has not been well studied. In the absence of appropriate studies, L loa is commonly judged a harmless nematode, and loiasis as a separate entity does not belong to the list of neglected tropical diseases to be controlled or eradicated in worldwide campaigns. We advocate reorientation of research efforts towards a patient-centric view of loiasis and, as a first step, to establish the disease burden in disability-adjusted life-years of this chronic infection, and to answer the question of whether loiasis should be included in future control programmes. PMID:24332895

  8. Analysis of the mdr-1 gene in patients co-infected with Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa who experienced a post-ivermectin serious adverse event.

    PubMed

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Kamgno, Joseph; Boussinesq, Michel; Mackenzie, Charles D; Prichard, Roger K; Geary, Timothy G

    2010-07-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is exceptionally safe in humans, and is used for mass treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. However, cases of encephalopathy, sometimes fatal, have been reported in a small number of individuals who harbored large numbers of Loa loa microfilariae (mf). A loss-of-function mutation in the mdr-1 gene in some dog breeds and in mice leads to accumulation of the drug in the brain, causing coma and death. This hypothesis was tested in four individuals from Cameroon who experienced a post-IVM serious adverse event (SAE) and in nine non-SAE matched controls. No loss-of-function mutation was detected in mdr-1 in any subject. However, haplotypes, associated with altered drug disposition, were present as homozygotes in two of the SAE patients (50%), but absent as homozygotes in the controls (0%). An association of high Loa mf load and a genetic predisposition to altered IVM distribution could be involved in IVM SAEs. PMID:20595473

  9. Genomics of Loa loa, a Wolbachia-free filarial parasite of humans.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Cerqueira, Gustavo C; Goldberg, Jonathan M; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Haas, Brian J; Zucker, Jeremy; Ribeiro, José M C; Saif, Sakina; Levin, Joshua Z; Fan, Lin; Zeng, Qiandong; Russ, Carsten; Wortman, Jennifer R; Fink, Doran L; Birren, Bruce W; Nutman, Thomas B

    2013-05-01

    Loa loa, the African eyeworm, is a major filarial pathogen of humans. Unlike most filariae, L. loa does not contain the obligate intracellular Wolbachia endosymbiont. We describe the 91.4-Mb genome of L. loa and that of the related filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and predict 14,907 L. loa genes on the basis of microfilarial RNA sequencing. By comparing these genomes to that of another filarial parasite, Brugia malayi, and to those of several other nematodes, we demonstrate synteny among filariae but not with nonparasitic nematodes. The L. loa genome encodes many immunologically relevant genes, as well as protein kinases targeted by drugs currently approved for use in humans. Despite lacking Wolbachia, L. loa shows no new metabolic synthesis or transport capabilities compared to other filariae. These results suggest that the role of Wolbachia in filarial biology is more subtle than previously thought and reveal marked differences between parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes. PMID:23525074

  10. New Mauna Loa coronagraph systems.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R R; Lee, R H; Macqueen, R M; Poland, A I

    1981-03-15

    A new set of instruments, consisting of two coronagraph systems, has been installed and is operating at the Mauna Loa Observing Station, Hawaii, operated by the High Altitude Observatory of Boulder, Colorado. The instruments are the 23-cm objective Mark III K-coronameter (K-III) system, a photoelectric instrument used to observe the inner solar corona from 1.2 R(0) to 2.2 R(0) and the 12.5-cm objective Prominence Monitor system used for the detection of H(alpha) limb activity. New features of the K-coronameter system include the use of achromatic wave plates for wide bandpass operation and linear diode array detectors. Raster scans of the coronal image are obtained in 1.5 min for a critical sampling scheme of 20-sec of arc resolution (10 x 10-sec of arc pixels) in the coronal p(B) image. This represents a 350 information gain factor for each detection channel when compared with the previous Mauna Loa K-coronameters. PMID:20309264

  11. YPR139c/LOA1 encodes a novel lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase associated with lipid droplets and involved in TAG homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ayciriex, Sophie; Le Guédard, Marina; Camougrand, Nadine; Velours, Gisèle; Schoene, Mario; Leone, Sebastien; Wattelet-Boyer, Valerie; Dupuy, Jean-William; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Lessire, René; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Testet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    For many years, lipid droplets (LDs) were considered to be an inert store of lipids. However, recent data showed that LDs are dynamic organelles playing an important role in storage and mobilization of neutral lipids. In this paper, we report the characterization of LOA1 (alias VPS66, alias YPR139c), a yeast member of the glycerolipid acyltransferase family. LOA1 mutants show abnormalities in LD morphology. As previously reported, cells lacking LOA1 contain more LDs. Conversely, we showed that overexpression results in fewer LDs. We then compared the lipidome of loa1Δ mutant and wild-type strains. Steady-state metabolic labeling of loa1Δ revealed a significant reduction in triacylglycerol content, while phospholipid (PL) composition remained unchanged. Interestingly, lipidomic analysis indicates that both PLs and glycerolipids are qualitatively affected by the mutation, suggesting that Loa1p is a lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPA AT) with a preference for oleoyl-CoA. This hypothesis was tested by in vitro assays using both membranes of Escherichia coli cells expressing LOA1 and purified proteins as enzyme sources. Our results from purification of subcellular compartments and proteomic studies show that Loa1p is associated with LD and active in this compartment. Loa1p is therefore a novel LPA AT and plays a role in LD formation. PMID:22090344

  12. A possible case of spontaneous Loa loa encephalopathy associated with a glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lukiana, Tuna; Mandina, Madone; Situakibanza, Nanituma H; Mbula, Marcel M; Lepira, Bompeka F; Odio, Wobin T; Kamgno, Joseph; Boussinesq, Michel

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that renal and neurological complications may occur after antifilarial treatment of patients infected with Loa loa. Conversely, spontaneous cases of visceral complications of loiasis have been rarely reported. A 31-year-old Congolese male patient who had not received any antifilarial drug developed oedema of the lower limbs, and then transient swellings of upper limbs. Two months after, he developed troubles of consciousness within several hours. At hospital, the patient was comatose with mild signs of localization. Laboratory tests and an abdominal echography revealed a chronic renal failure due to a glomerulopathy. Three weeks after admission, Loa microfilariae were found in the cerebrospinal fluid, and a calibrated blood smear revealed a Loa microfilaraemia of 74,200 microfilariae per ml. The level of consciousness of the patient improved spontaneously, without any specific treatment, but several days after becoming completely lucid, the patient died suddenly, from an undetermined cause. Unfortunately, no biopsy or autopsy could be performed. The role of Loa loa in the development of the renal and neurological troubles of this patient is questionable. But the fact that such troubles, which are known complications of Loa infection, were found concomitantly in a person harbouring a very high microfilarial load suggests that they might have been caused by the filarial parasite. In areas endemic for loiasis, examinations for a Loa infection should be systematically performed in patients presenting an encephalopathy or a glomerulopathy. PMID:16686951

  13. Mutant Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase (Gars) Ameliorates SOD1G93A Motor Neuron Degeneration Phenotype but Has Little Affect on Loa Dynein Heavy Chain Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hazel P.; Chia, Ruth; Achilli, Francesca; Bryson, J. Barney; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background In humans, mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system, and clinical phenotypes ranging from Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy to a severe infantile form of spinal muscular atrophy. GARS is ubiquitously expressed and may have functions in addition to its canonical role in protein synthesis through catalyzing the addition of glycine to cognate tRNAs. Methodology/Principal Findings We have recently described a new mouse model with a point mutation in the Gars gene resulting in a cysteine to arginine change at residue 201. Heterozygous GarsC201R/+ mice have locomotor and sensory deficits. In an investigation of genetic mutations that lead to death of motor and sensory neurons, we have crossed the GarsC201R/+ mice to two other mutants: the TgSOD1G93A model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the Legs at odd angles mouse (Dync1h1Loa) which has a defect in the heavy chain of the dynein complex. We found the Dync1h1Loa/+;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mice are more impaired than either parent, and this is may be an additive effect of both mutations. Surprisingly, the GarsC201R mutation significantly delayed disease onset in the SOD1G93A;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mutant mice and increased lifespan by 29% on the genetic background investigated. Conclusions/Significance These findings raise intriguing possibilities for the study of pathogenetic mechanisms in all three mouse mutant strains. PMID:19593442

  14. Cloning and characterization of a Loa loa-specific repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Egwang, T G; Ajuh, P M; Akue, J P

    1992-12-01

    A Loa loa EcoRI genomic library in lambda gt11 was screened with 32P-labeled L. loa DNA and 1 repetitive clone, LL20, was isolated. An 800-bp Rsa I fragment of LL20, which is L. loa specific, was subcloned into pUC19 and the recombinant plasmid was designated pRsa4. While the 3.8-kb Eco RI fragment of LL20 cross-hybridized to other filarial DNA under low stringency conditions, the 800-bp fragment of pRsa4 was L. loa specific under the same conditions. Further characterization of the insert of pRsa4 was therefore carried out. Its lower limit of detection is 800 pg of L. loa genomic DNA, it has a low copy number (50-100) and an interspersed distribution in the genome. As a probe it does not distinguish between simian and human L. loa DNA. The nucleotide sequence contains 69% A + T and 31% G + C and shows no notable internal repeats. PMID:1484545

  15. Primary open angle glaucoma due to T377M MYOC: Population mapping of a Greek founder mutation in Northwestern Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kitsos, George; Petrou, Zacharias; Grigoriadou, Maria; Samples, John R; Hewitt, Alex W; Kokotas, Haris; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Mackey, David A; Wirtz, Mary K; Moschou, Marilita; Ioannidis, John PA; Petersen, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the MYOC gene have been shown to explain 5% of unrelated primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in different populations. In particular, the T377M MYOC mutation has arisen at least three separate times in history, in Great Britain, India, and Greece. The purpose of this study is to investigate the distribution of the mutation among different population groups in the northwestern region of Greece. Materials and methods: We explored the distribution of the “Greek” T377M founder mutation in the Epirus region in Northwestern Greece, which could be its origin. Genotyping was performed in POAG cases and controls by PCR amplification of the MYOC gene, followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. Statistical analyses were performed by an exact test, the Kaplan–Meier method and the t-test. Results: In the isolated Chrysovitsa village in the Pindus Mountains, a large POAG family demonstrated the T377M mutation in 20 of 66 family members while no controls from the Epirus region (n = 124) carried this mutation (P < 0.001). Among other POAG cases from Epirus, 2 out of 14 familial cases and 1 out of 80 sporadic cases showed the mutation (P = 0.057). The probability of POAG diagnosis with advancing age among mutation carriers was 23% at age 40, and reached 100% at age 75. POAG patients with the T377M mutation were diagnosed at a mean age of 51 years (SD ± 13.9), which is younger than the sporadic or familial POAG cases: 63.1 (SD ± 11) and 66.8 (SD ± 9.8) years, respectively. Conclusions: The T377M mutation was found in high proportion in members of the Chrysovitsa family (30.3%), in lower proportion in familial POAG cases (14.2%) and seems rare in sporadic POAG cases (1.2%), while no controls (0%) from the Epirus region carried the mutation. Historical and geographical data may explain the distribution of this mutation within Greece and worldwide. PMID:20390039

  16. Identification of MYOC gene mutation and polymorphism in a large Malay family with juvenile-onset open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mimiwati, Z; Nurliza, K; Marini, M; Liza-Sharmini, AT

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To screen for mutations in the coding region of the myocilin (MYOC) gene in a large Malay family with juvenile-onset open angle glaucoma (JOAG). Methods A total of 122 family members were thoroughly examined and screened for JOAG. Venipuncture was conducted. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The presence of a mutation and a polymorphism was ascertained with PCR amplification followed by the direct sequencing technique. Results Thirty-two of the 122 screened family members were identified to have JOAG (11 new cases and 21 known cases). An autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with incomplete penetrance was observed. A C→A substitution at position 1440 in exon 3 that changes asparagine (AAC) to lysine (AAA) was identified in affected family members except two probands (III:5 and IV:6). Six probands were identified as having the Asn480Lys mutation but have not developed the disease yet. An intronic polymorphism IVS2 730 +35 G>A was also identified. There was a significant association between Asn480Lys (p<0.001) and IVS2 730+35G>A (p<0.001) in the affected and unaffected probands in this family. Conclusions The Asn480Lys mutation and the IVS2 730+35 G>A polymorphism increased susceptibility to JOAG in this large Malay pedigree. Identifying the MYOC mutations and polymorphisms is important for providing presymptomatic molecular diagnosis. PMID:24883016

  17. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid and semiquantitative detection of Loa loa infection.

    PubMed

    Drame, Papa M; Fink, Doran L; Kamgno, Joseph; Herrick, Jesica A; Nutman, Thomas B

    2014-06-01

    Rapid and accurate tests are currently needed to identify individuals with high levels of Loa loa microfilaria (mf), so that these individuals may be excluded from mass ivermectin administration campaigns against onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis being conducted in areas where Onchocerca volvulus, Wuchereria bancrofti, and L. loa are coendemic. To address this need, colorimetric loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays targeting the L. loa-specific gene sequences LLMF72 and LLMF342 were developed for the detection and quantification of L. loa microfilaremia. Both LAMP assays were highly specific (100%) for L. loa infection compared to the absence of infection or infection with related filarial pathogens. The LLMF72-based LAMP assay showed greater analytic sensitivity (limit of detection, 0.1 pg/ml of genomic DNA [gDNA] and/or 5 mf/ml) than the LLMF342-based LAMP assay (10 pg/ml of gDNA and/or 50 mf/ml), and its analytic sensitivity was similar to that of LLMF72-based quantitative PCR (qPCR). A high level of correlation was observed between microfilaria counts as determined by LLMF72-based qPCR and time to positivity by the LAMP assay, and performance measures of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were similar for both assays when applied to field-collected clinical samples. By simply varying the run time, the LAMP assay was able to accurately distinguish individuals at risk for serious adverse events (SAEs) after exposure to ivermectin, using thresholds of >5,000 mf/ml and >30,000 mf/ml as indicators of increasing levels of risk. In summary, LLMF72 LAMP represents a new molecular diagnostic tool that is readily applicable as a point-of-care method for L. loa microfilarial detection and quantification in resource-limited countries where L. loa infection is endemic. PMID:24696020

  18. Loa loa Microfilariae evade complement attack in vivo by acquiring regulatory proteins from host plasma.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Karita; Meri, Taru; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2009-09-01

    Loa loa is a filarial nematode that infects humans. The adults live in subcutaneous tissues and produce microfilariae that live for several weeks in the blood circulation in order to be transmitted to another person via blood meals of a dipterian vector. As microfilariae live in continuous contact with plasma, it is obvious that they evade the complement system. We studied markers of complement activation and signs of complement regulation on Loa loa microfilariae in vivo. The microfilariae were isolated from anticoagulated blood samples of a Loa loa-infected Caucasian patient. C1q and some mannose-binding lectin but only a limited amount of C3b or C4b fragments and practically no C5 or C5b-9 were present on the microfilariae. The covalently microfilaria-bound C3 and C4 depositions were mainly inactive iC3b, C3c, and iC4b fragments indicating that microfilariae had regulated complement activation in vivo. Also, in vitro deposition of C3b onto the microfilariae upon serum exposure was limited. The patient-isolated microfilariae were found to carry the host complement regulators factor H and C4b-binding protein on the outermost layer, so called sheath. The microfilaria-bound factor H was functionally active. Binding of the complement regulators to the microfilariae was confirmed in vitro using (125)I-labeled factor H and C4b-binding protein. In conclusion, our study shows that Loa loa microfilariae block complement activation and acquire the host complement regulators factor H and C4b-binding protein in blood circulation. This is the first time that binding of complement regulators onto nonviral pathogens has been demonstrated to occur in humans in vivo. PMID:19528206

  19. Production and immunological characterization of a recombinant subunit of a Loa loa polyprotein antigen.

    PubMed

    Azzibrouck, G Blampain; Akue, J P; Lenoble, D Richard

    2010-06-01

    Diagnosis of loiasis and analysis of the specific immune response are limited by a paucity of parasite material. To circumvent this problem, a Loa loa antigen has been expressed in a prokaryote vector (pTrcHis). Immunization of Balb/c mice with this soluble recombinant protein produced a strong antibody response, with antibodies recognizing 2 major bands of 38 and 20 kDa in a native crude extract of Loa loa adult worms and microfilariae on Western blots. The target molecule was located mainly in the hypodermis and cuticle of the adult worm. Analysis of human IgG subclasses against this antigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 but not IgG4 reactivity. IgG2 against this recombinant antigen was 100% specific for loiasis when tested against samples from European donor individuals. The same IgG2 antibodies showed 91% specificity for loiasis by comparison with Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus, Mansonnella perstans and other helminth infections. Furthermore, the IgG2 antibody level correlated with the density of Loa loa microfilariae (r=0.400; P=0.02). This recombinant 15r3 molecule and specific IgG2 assay may be useful for monitoring control programmes. PMID:20441677

  20. Space radar image of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the Mauna Loa volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii shows the capability of imaging radar to map lava flows and other volcanic structures. Mauna Loa has erupted more than 35 times since the island was first visited by westerners in the early 1800s. The large summit crater, called Mokuaweoweo Caldera, is clearly visible near the center of the image. Leading away from the caldera (towards top right and lower center) are the two main rift zones shown here in orange. Rift zones are areas of weakness within the upper part of the volcano that are often ripped open as new magma (molten rock) approaches the surface at the start of an eruption. The most recent eruption of Mauna Loa was in March and April 1984, when segments of the northeast rift zones were active. If the height of the volcano was measured from its base on the ocean floor instead of from sea level, Mauna Loa would be the tallest mountain on Earth. Its peak (center of the image) rises more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) above the ocean floor. The South Kona District, known for cultivation of macadamia nuts and coffee, can be seen in the lower left as white and blue areas along the coast. North is toward the upper left. The area shown is 41.5 by 75 kilometers (25.7 by 46.5 miles), centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.6 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 36th orbit on October 2, 1994. The radar illumination is from the left of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). The resulting color combinations in this radar image are caused by differences in surface roughness of the lava flows. Smoother flows

  1. In vitro activities of plant extracts on human Loa loa isolates and cytotoxicity for eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mengome, Line-Edwige; Akue, Jean Paul; Souza, Alain; Feuya Tchoua, Guy Raymond; Nsi Emvo, Edouard

    2010-08-01

    Loa loa, a filarial worm, can cause fatal encephalitis in humans. In an attempt to find alternatives to the standard treatments (ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine citrate), we tested 12 methanolic extracts of nine traditional plant remedies. The extracts (100-0.09 microg/ml) were incubated with 20 Loa loa microfilariae isolated from patients at 37 degrees C with 5% CO(2) in modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal serum and antibiotics. Activity was evaluated 120 h later by counting live microfilariae under a microscope. Cytotoxicity for eukaryotic cells was estimated by measuring 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2-5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide transformation to formazan at 450 nM in a spectrophotometer. The plants tested were Lophira alata, Greenwayodendron suaveolens, Uapaca togoensis, Zanthoxylum heitzii, Peperomia pellucida, Piptadeniastrum africanum, Petersianthus macrocarpus, Vernonia conferta, and Vernonia hymenolepis. Chemical screening showed that most of the extracts contained reducing sugars, tannin or polyphenols, sterols or triterpenes, saponosides, and alkaloids. None contained carotinoids and few contained flavonoids. The 50% lethal concentration ranged from 0.22 to 70.28 microg/ml, while the 50% inhibitory concentration for eukaryotic cells (IC(50)) ranged from 8.52 to 119.52 microg/ml. Extracts of P. macrocarpus (selectivity index = 72.16), P. africanum (13.69), Z. heitzii (12.11), and L. alata (9.26) were highly selective for L. loa. PMID:20495930

  2. Rapid assessment method for prevalence and intensity of Loa loa infection.

    PubMed Central

    Takougang, Innocent; Meremikwu, Martin; Wandji, Samuel; Yenshu, Emmanuel V.; Aripko, Ben; Lamlenn, Samson B.; Eka, Braide L.; Enyong, Peter; Meli, Jean; Kale, Oladele; Remme, Jan H.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the validity of observations on eye worm and Calabar swellings for the rapid assessment of the prevalence and intensity of loiasis at the community level. METHOD: A total of 12895 individuals over the age of 15 years living in 102 communities in Cameroon and Nigeria took part in the study. A standardized questionnaire was administered to participants from whom finger-prick blood samples were collected and examined for Loa loa microfilariae. Rapid assessments of the prevalence and intensity of loiasis were made on the basis of a history of eye worm or Calabar swellings. FINDINGS: There was a strong correlation between the indices of the rapid assessment procedures and the parasitological indices of L. loa endemicity. The rapid assessment indices were effective in diagnosing high-risk communities (sensitivity 94-100%; specificity 66-92%). The highest sensitivity (100%) and specificity (92%) were obtained with a rapid assessment procedure based on a history of eye worm lasting 1-7 days together with confirmation by the guided recognition of a photograph of adult L. loa in the eye. CONCLUSION: Rapid assessment of the prevalence and intensity of loiasis at the community level can be achieved using a procedure based on the history of eye worm lasting 1-7 days together with confirmation by the guided recognition of a photograph of an adult L. loa in the eye. PMID:12481206

  3. Mutated myocilin and heterozygous Sod2 deficiency act synergistically in a mouse model of open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Joe, Myung Kuk; Nakaya, Naoki; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2015-06-15

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and axonal degeneration leading to irreversible blindness. Mutations in the myocilin (MYOC) gene are the most common genetic factors of primary open-angle glaucoma. To develop a genetic mouse model induced by the synergistic interaction of mutated myocilin and another significant risk factor, oxidative stress, we produced double-mutant mice (Tg-MYOC(Y437H/+)/Sod2(+/-)) bearing human MYOC with a Y437H point mutation and a heterozygous deletion of the gene for the primary antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). Sod2 is broadly expressed in most tissues including the trabecular meshwork (TM) and heterozygous Sod2 knockout mice exhibit the reduced SOD2 activity and oxidative stress in all studied tissues. Accumulation of Y437H myocilin in the TM induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and led to a 45% loss of smooth muscle alpha-actin positive cells in the eye drainage structure of 10- to 12-month-old Tg-MYOC(Y437H/+)/Sod2(+/-) mice as compared with wild-type littermates. Tg-MYOC(Y437H/+)/Sod2(+/-) mice had higher intraocular pressure, lost about 37% of RGCs in the peripheral retina, and exhibited axonal degeneration in the retina and optic nerve as compared with their wild-type littermates. Single-mutant littermates containing MYOC(Y437H/+) or Sod2(+/-) exhibited no significant pathological changes until 12 months of age. Additionally, we observed elevated expression of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1, a human glaucoma marker, in the TM of Tg-MYOC(Y437H/+)/Sod2(+/-) mice. This is the first reported animal glaucoma model that combines expression of a glaucoma-causing mutant gene and an additional mutation mimicking a deleterious environment factor that acts synergistically. PMID:25740847

  4. Mutated myocilin and heterozygous Sod2 deficiency act synergistically in a mouse model of open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Myung Kuk; Nakaya, Naoki; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tomarev, Stanislav I.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and axonal degeneration leading to irreversible blindness. Mutations in the MYOCILIN (MYOC) gene are the most common genetic factors of primary open-angle glaucoma. To develop a genetic mouse model induced by the synergistic interaction of mutated myocilin and another significant risk factor, oxidative stress, we produced double-mutant mice (Tg-MYOCY437H/+/Sod2+/−) bearing human MYOC with a Y437H point mutation and a heterozygous deletion of the gene for the primary antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). Sod2 is broadly expressed in most tissues including the trabecular meshwork (TM) and heterozygous Sod2 knockout mice exhibit the reduced SOD2 activity and oxidative stress in all studied tissues. Accumulation of Y437H myocilin in the TM induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and led to a 45% loss of smooth muscle alpha-actin positive cells in the eye drainage structure of 10- to 12-month-old Tg-MYOCY437H/+/Sod2+/− mice as compared with wild-type littermates. Tg-MYOCY437H/+/Sod2+/− mice had higher intraocular pressure, lost about 37% of RGCs in the peripheral retina, and exhibited axonal degeneration in the retina and optic nerve as compared with their wild-type littermates. Single-mutant littermates containing MYOCY437H/+ or Sod2+/− exhibited no significant pathological changes until 12 months of age. Additionally, we observed elevated expression of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1, a human glaucoma marker, in the TM of Tg-MYOCY437H/+/Sod2+/− mice. This is the first reported animal glaucoma model that combines expression of a glaucoma-causing mutant gene and an additional mutation mimicking a deleterious environment factor that acts synergistically. PMID:25740847

  5. Carbon dioxide tops 400 ppm at Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-05-01

    The daily mean concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, hit 400.03 parts per million (ppm) on 9 May, marking the first time the concentration there has topped 400 ppm since measurements began at Mauna Loa in 1958, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced on 10 May. NOAA scientists with the agency's Global Monitoring Division have made measurements of CO2 at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory since 1974.

  6. Spatial modelling and the prediction of Loa loa risk: decision making under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Diggle, P J; Thomson, M C; Christensen, O F; Rowlingson, B; Obsomer, V; Gardon, J; Wanji, S; Takougang, I; Enyong, P; Kamgno, J; Remme, J H; Boussinesq, M; Molyneux, D H

    2007-09-01

    Health decision-makers working in Africa often need to act for millions of people over large geographical areas on little and uncertain information. Spatial statistical modelling and Bayesian inference have now been used to quantify the uncertainty in the predictions of a regional, environmental risk map for Loa loa (a map that is currently being used as an essential decision tool by the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control). The methodology allows the expression of the probability that, given the data, a particular location does or does not exceed a predefined high-risk threshold for which a change in strategy for the delivery of the antihelmintic ivermectin is required. PMID:17716433

  7. Occurrence of gravid Loa loa in subconjunctival space of man: a case report from West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Debasish; Roy, Dipankar; Bera, D K; Manna, Buddhadeb

    2013-04-01

    Loa loa a benign filarial eye worm is endemic in tropical rain forests areas of west and central Africa. Reports of its sporadic recovery from India are available mostly from the travellers and miogrants. This is the fifth report from India in 100 years. One 10.5 cm long gravid female eye worm Loa loa was recovered from the subconjunctival area of a 50 year old Indian lady with history of trekking in swamp areas in the Himalayas in Kumayun district. She was suffering from recurrent attacks of swelling, pain and redness of right eye and fleeting itchy rashes all over the body. Slit lamp examination revealed an indistinct coiled structure in the sub conjunctival space. Through a small nick, the structure was pulled out and was found to be a live worm which was identified as a gravid female species of Loa loa. PMID:24431541

  8. Loa loa microfilarial periodicity in ivermectin-treated patients: comparison between those developing and those free of serious adverse events.

    PubMed

    Kamgno, Joseph; Pion, Sébastien D; Mackenzie, Charles D; Thylefors, Björn; Boussinesq, Michel

    2009-12-01

    The main risk factor of post-ivermectin serious adverse events (SAEs) is the presence of a high Loa loa microfilaremia. However, the majority of patients with such high loads do not develop SAEs, suggesting that co-factors may be involved. An infection with simian Loa parasites, whose microfilariae show a nocturnal periodicity, might be such a co-factor. The periodicity of Loa microfilariae was compared, using cosinor methodology, in 4 patients who had developed a post-ivermectin neurologic SAE, 4 patients who had experienced a non-neurologic SAE, and 14 control individuals. The periodicity was similar in all three groups, with a peak of microfilaremia occurring between 12:30 and 2:00 PM. The results of this study, which for the first time characterizes the periodicity of Loa microfilariae mathematically, suggest that post-ivermectin SAEs are not related to an infection with a Loa simian strain. PMID:19996437

  9. Epigenetic Mutation of RAV6 Affects Leaf Angle and Seed Size in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Sun, Jing; Cao, Xiaofeng; Song, Xianwei

    2015-11-01

    Heritable epigenetic variants of genes, termed epialleles, can broaden genetic and phenotypic diversity in eukaryotes. Epialleles may also provide a new source of beneficial traits for crop breeding, but very few epialleles related to agricultural traits have been identified in crops. Here, we identified Epi-rav6, a gain-of-function epiallele of rice (Oryza sativa) RELATED TO ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3)/VIVIPAROUS1 (VP1) 6 (RAV6), which encodes a B3 DNA-binding domain-containing protein. The Epi-rav6 plants show larger lamina inclination and smaller grain size; these agronomically important phenotypes are inherited in a semidominant manner. We did not find nucleotide sequence variation of RAV6. Instead, we found hypomethylation in the promoter region of RAV6, which caused ectopic expression of RAV6 in Epi-rav6 plants. Bisulfite analysis revealed that cytosine methylation of four CG and two CNG loci within a continuous 96-bp region plays essential roles in regulating RAV6 expression; this region contains a conserved miniature inverted repeat transposable element transposon insertion in cultivated rice genomes. Overexpression of RAV6 in the wild type phenocopied the Epi-rav6 phenotype. The brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BR INSENSITIVE1 and BR biosynthetic genes EBISU DWARF, DWARF11, and BR-DEFICIENT DWARF1 were ectopically expressed in Epi-rav6 plants. Also, treatment with a BR biosynthesis inhibitor restored the leaf angle defects of Epi-rav6 plants. This indicates that RAV6 affects rice leaf angle by modulating BR homeostasis and demonstrates an essential regulatory role of epigenetic modification on a key gene controlling important agricultural traits. Thus, our work identifies a unique rice epiallele, which may represent a common phenomenon in complex crop genomes. PMID:26351308

  10. Formaldehyde and hydroperoxides at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Heikes, B.G. )

    1992-11-20

    Hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, and a measure of organic hydroperoxides are presented from the Mauna Loa Observatory Photochemistry Experiment (MLOPEX). MLOPEX was conducted from May 1 to June 4, 1988, at the Mauna Loa Observatory on the island of Hawaii. A modified dual-enzyme serial-coil H[sub 2]O[sub 2]/ROOH method was used to quantify these species. A second enzyme method was used to measure CH[sub 2]O. The location and meteorology at the Mauna Loa Observatory site permitted 35 days of measurements to be made in free tropospheric air and in modified marine boundary layer air. Average concentrations of H[sub 2]O[sub 2], ROOH, and CH[sub 2]O were 1050, 140, and 100 pptv in free tropospheric, or down-slope air. In upslope air, or modified marine boundary layer air, average concentrations were 900, 150, and 190 pptv. Maximum concentrations for all three species were experienced during a two day photochemical haze episode and were 3230, 440, and 450 pptv for H[sub 2]O[sub 2], ROOH, and CH[sub 2]O. H[sub 2]O[sub 2] was depleted in air which had recently been processed by cloud or precipitation. The measured concentrations of these three species were comparable to prior measurements in well- aged air, but were lower than previous models have predicted. Part of this discrepancy may be due to the treatment of heterogeneous removal processes, dry and wet deposition, in these models. The measured ratio of ROOH to H[sub 2]O[sub 2] is significantly different than present theory predicts, with ROOH as measured being approximately a factor of 5 too low. 61 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Development of a highly sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the detection of Loa loa.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Mvoulouga, Prosper Obolo; Akue, Jean Paul; Abán, Julio López; Santiago, Belén Vicente; Sánchez, Miguel Cordero; Muro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The filarial parasite Loa loa, the causative agent of loiasis, is endemic in Central and Western Africa infecting 3-13 million people. L. loa has been associated with fatal encephalopathic reactions in high Loa-infected individuals receiving ivermectin during mass drug administration programs for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. In endemic areas, the only diagnostic method routinely used is the microscopic examination of mid-day blood samples by thick blood film. Improved methods for detection of L. loa are needed in endemic regions with limited resources, where delayed diagnosis results in high mortality. We have investigated the use of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay to facilitate rapid, inexpensive, molecular diagnosis of loiasis. Primers for LAMP were designed from a species-specific repetitive DNA sequence from L. loa retrieved from GenBank. Genomic DNA of a L. loa adult worm was used to optimize the LAMP conditions using a thermocycler or a conventional heating block. Amplification of DNA in the LAMP mixture was visually inspected for turbidity as well as addition of fluorescent dye. LAMP specificity was evaluated using DNA from other parasites; sensitivity was evaluated using DNA from L. loa 10-fold serially diluted. Simulated human blood samples spiked with DNA from L. loa were also tested for sensitivity. Upon addition of fluorescent dye, all positive reactions turned green while the negative controls remained orange under ambient light. After electrophoresis on agarose gels, a ladder of multiple bands of different sizes could be observed in positive samples. The detection limit of the assay was found to be as little as 0.5 ag of L. loa genomic DNA when using a heating block. We have designed, for the first time, a highly sensitive LAMP assay for the detection of L. loa which is potentially adaptable for field diagnosis and disease surveillance in loiasis-endemic areas. PMID:24722638

  12. Identification and Validation of Loa loa Microfilaria-Specific Biomarkers: a Rational Design Approach Using Proteomics and Novel Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Papa M.; Meng, Zhaojing; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Herrick, Jesica A.; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunoassays are currently needed to quantify Loa loa microfilariae (mf). To address this need, we have conducted proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of proteins present in the urine of a Loa mf-infected patient and used this information to identify putative biomarkers produced by L. loa mf. In total, 70 of the 15,444 described putative L. loa proteins were identified. Of these 70, 18 were L. loa mf specific, and 2 of these 18 (LOAG_16297 and LOAG_17808) were biologically immunogenic. We developed novel reverse luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) immunoassays to quantify these 2 proteins in individual plasma samples. Levels of these 2 proteins in microfilaremic L. loa-infected patients were positively correlated to mf densities in the corresponding blood samples (r = 0.71 and P < 0.0001 for LOAG_16297 and r = 0.61 and P = 0.0002 for LOAG_17808). For LOAG_16297, the levels in plasma were significantly higher in Loa-infected (geometric mean [GM], 0.045 µg/ml) than in uninfected (P < 0.0001), Wuchereria bancrofti-infected (P = 0.0005), and Onchocerca volvulus-infected (P < 0.0001) individuals, whereas for LOAG_17808 protein, they were not significantly different between Loa-infected (GM, 0.123 µg/ml) and uninfected (P = 0.06) and W. bancrofti-infected (P = 0.32) individuals. Moreover, only LOAG_16297 showed clear discriminative ability between L. loa and the other potentially coendemic filariae. Indeed, the specificity of the LOAG_16297 reverse LIPS assay was 96% (with a sensitivity of 77%). Thus, LOAG_16297 is a very promising biomarker that will be exploited in a quantitative point-of-care immunoassay for determination of L. loa mf densities. PMID:26884435

  13. A mutation in dynein rescues axonal transport defects and extends the life span of ALS mice

    PubMed Central

    Kieran, Dairin; Hafezparast, Majid; Bohnert, Stephanie; Dick, James R.T.; Martin, Joanne; Schiavo, Giampietro; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Greensmith, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative condition characterized by motoneuron degeneration and muscle paralysis. Although the precise pathogenesis of ALS remains unclear, mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) account for ∼20–25% of familial ALS cases, and transgenic mice overexpressing human mutant SOD1 develop an ALS-like phenotype. Evidence suggests that defects in axonal transport play an important role in neurodegeneration. In Legs at odd angles (Loa) mice, mutations in the motor protein dynein are associated with axonal transport defects and motoneuron degeneration. Here, we show that retrograde axonal transport defects are already present in motoneurons of SOD1G93A mice during embryonic development. Surprisingly, crossing SOD1G93A mice with Loa/+ mice delays disease progression and significantly increases life span in Loa/SOD1G93A mice. Moreover, there is a complete recovery in axonal transport deficits in motoneurons of these mice, which may be responsible for the amelioration of disease. We propose that impaired axonal transport is a prime cause of neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS. PMID:15911875

  14. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  15. Loa loa and Onchocerca ochengi miRNAs detected in host circulation.

    PubMed

    Tritten, Lucienne; O'Neill, Maeghan; Nutting, Chuck; Wanji, Samuel; Njouendoui, Abdel; Fombad, Fanny; Kengne-Ouaffo, Jonas; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    A combination of deep-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis enabled identification of twenty-two microRNA candidates of potential nematode origin in plasma from Loa loa-infected baboons and a further ten from the plasma of an Onchocerca ochengi-infected cow. The obtained data were compared to results from previous work on miRNA candidates from Dirofilaria immitis and O. volvulus found in host circulating blood, to examine the species specificity of the released miRNA. None of the miRNA candidates was found to be present in all four host-parasite scenarios and most of them were specific to only one of them. Eight candidate miRNAs were found to be identical in the full sequence in at least two different infections, while nine candidate miRNAs were found to be similar but not identical in at least four filarial species. PMID:25461483

  16. Genome Filtering for New DNA Biomarkers of Loa loa Infection Suitable for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Catherine B.; Ettwiller, Laurence; Tanner, Nathan A.; Evans, Thomas C.; Wanji, Samuel; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Loa loa infections have emerged as a serious public health problem in patients co-infected with Onchocerca volvulus or Wuchereria bancrofti because of severe adverse neurological reactions after treatment with ivermectin. Accurate diagnostic tests are needed for careful mapping in regions where mass drug administration is underway. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has become a widely adopted screening method because of its operational simplicity, rapidity and versatility of visual detection readout options. Here, we present a multi-step bioinformatic pipeline to generate diagnostic candidates suitable for LAMP and experimentally validate this approach using one of the identified candidates to develop a species-specific LAMP assay for L. loa. The pipeline identified ~140 new L. loa specific DNA repeat families as putative biomarkers of infection. The consensus sequence of one family, repeat family 4 (RF4), was compiled from ~ 350 sequences dispersed throughout the L. loa genome and maps to a L. loa-specific region of the long terminal repeats found at the boundaries of Bel/Pao retrotransposons. PCR and LAMP primer sets targeting RF4 specifically amplified L. loa but not W. bancrofti, O. volvulus, Brugia malayi, human or mosquito DNA. RF4 LAMP detects the DNA equivalent of one microfilaria (100 pg) in 25–30 minutes and as little as 0.060 pg of L. loa DNA (~1/1600th of a microfilaria) purified from spiked blood samples in approximately 50 minutes. In summary, we have successfully employed a bioinformatic approach to mine the L. loa genome for species-specific repeat families that can serve as new DNA biomarkers for LAMP. The RF4 LAMP assay shows promise as a field tool for the implementation and management of mass drug administration programs and warrants further testing on clinical samples as the next stage in development towards this goal. PMID:26414073

  17. Genome Filtering for New DNA Biomarkers of Loa loa Infection Suitable for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Ettwiller, Laurence; Tanner, Nathan A; Evans, Thomas C; Wanji, Samuel; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2015-01-01

    Loa loa infections have emerged as a serious public health problem in patients co-infected with Onchocerca volvulus or Wuchereria bancrofti because of severe adverse neurological reactions after treatment with ivermectin. Accurate diagnostic tests are needed for careful mapping in regions where mass drug administration is underway. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has become a widely adopted screening method because of its operational simplicity, rapidity and versatility of visual detection readout options. Here, we present a multi-step bioinformatic pipeline to generate diagnostic candidates suitable for LAMP and experimentally validate this approach using one of the identified candidates to develop a species-specific LAMP assay for L. loa. The pipeline identified ~140 new L. loa specific DNA repeat families as putative biomarkers of infection. The consensus sequence of one family, repeat family 4 (RF4), was compiled from ~ 350 sequences dispersed throughout the L. loa genome and maps to a L. loa-specific region of the long terminal repeats found at the boundaries of Bel/Pao retrotransposons. PCR and LAMP primer sets targeting RF4 specifically amplified L. loa but not W. bancrofti, O. volvulus, Brugia malayi, human or mosquito DNA. RF4 LAMP detects the DNA equivalent of one microfilaria (100 pg) in 25-30 minutes and as little as 0.060 pg of L. loa DNA (~1/1600th of a microfilaria) purified from spiked blood samples in approximately 50 minutes. In summary, we have successfully employed a bioinformatic approach to mine the L. loa genome for species-specific repeat families that can serve as new DNA biomarkers for LAMP. The RF4 LAMP assay shows promise as a field tool for the implementation and management of mass drug administration programs and warrants further testing on clinical samples as the next stage in development towards this goal. PMID:26414073

  18. 47 CFR 54.632 - Letters of agency (LOA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; the signature, title and contact information (including phone number, mailing address, and email...; signature date; and the type of services covered by the LOA. (2) For HCPs located on Tribal lands, if...

  19. 47 CFR 54.632 - Letters of agency (LOA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; the signature, title and contact information (including phone number, mailing address, and email...; signature date; and the type of services covered by the LOA. (2) For HCPs located on Tribal lands, if...

  20. Mauna Loa Revealed: Structure, Composition, History, and Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Lockwood, John P.

    Mauna Loa is a volcano of superlatives: it is the largest active volcano on Earth and among the most productive. This volume serves to place on record the current state of our knowledge concerning Mauna Loa at the beginning of the Decade Volcano Project. The scope is broad, encompassing the geologic and exploratory history of the volcano, an overview of its submarine geology, its structure, petrologic and geochemical characteristics, and what Mauna Loa has to tell us about the Hawaiian mantle plume; it covers also remote sensing methods and the use of gravity, seismic and deformational studies for eruption monitoring and forecasting, hazards associated with the volcano, and even the importance of a changing volcanic landscape with a wide spectrum of climate zones as an ecological laboratory. We have made a deliberate effort to present a comprehensive spectrum of current Mauna Loa research by building on a December 1993 symposium at the AGU Fall Meeting that considered (1) what is currently known about Mauna Loa, (2) critical problems that need to be addressed, and (3) the technical means to solve these problems, and by soliciting contributions that were not part of the symposium. We encouraged authors to consider how their papers relate to others in the volume through crossreferencing. The intent was that this monograph should be a book about Mauna Loa rather than a collection of disparate papers.

  1. Loa loa infection as a cause of migratory angioedema: report of three cases from the Texas Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rakita, R M; White, A C; Kielhofner, M A

    1993-10-01

    Loa loa is a filarial parasite that is endemic in West and Central Africa. Expatriates infected with L. loa commonly develop characteristic migratory angioedema called Calabar swellings. We describe three patients who presented with classical Calabar swellings for whom the diagnosis of loiasis was delayed. Unusual features that were present included a leukocytoclastic vasculitis seen on skin biopsy (case 1), a relatively short exposure to an area of endemicity (cases 1 and 3), and a normal eosinophil count on initial evaluation (cases 2 and 3). We discuss the characteristic clinical manifestations of, pathological findings of, and therapy for loiasis. With the increased frequency of international travel, L. loa infection must be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with migratory angioedema, urticarial vasculitis, or eosinophilia. PMID:8268351

  2. [Serum filariasis due to Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in the continental area of equatorial Guinea. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Vila Montlleo, R

    1990-01-01

    For the first time, a parasitologic survey has been carried out in the Niefang District (continental area of equatorial Guinea) within a sample of 829 people aged of more than 10 years. Parasitologic incidence was 27.1 p.c. for Loa-Loa and 66.3 p.c. for Mansonella perstans. Significant differences were noted in the prevalence and in the mean density of microfilariae of both species according to the altitude of the villages surveyed. PMID:2077317

  3. Influence of Mansonella perstans microfilaraemia on total IgE levels in Gabonese patients co-infected with Loa loa.

    PubMed

    Bouyou-Akotet, M K; Moussavou Boussougou, M N; Ovono-Abessolo, F; Owono-Medang, M; Kombila, M

    2014-03-01

    Mansonella (M.) perstans filariasis is widely found in Africa, including Gabon where Loa loa is also endemic. This study reports the total IgE titres according to different bioclinical forms of single or co-infection with L. loa and M. perstans in 138 patients and 20 healthy controls. The median parasite density was significantly higher in cases of loiasis. IgE titres were higher in patients with microscopic dual-infection and in the group of patients with occult loiasis plus M. perstans microfilaraemia (8425 [5292-20,679]KUI/L and 6304 [1045-10,326]KUI/L, respectively), compared to individuals with either microfilaraemic Loa loa (3368 [1414-7074]KUI/L) or Mansonella (4370 [1478-7334]KUI/L) single infections (p<0.01). IgE levels were positively correlated with M. perstans microfilaraemia (rho=0.27; p<0.01). Compared to single infections, dual M. perstans-L. loa infection induces very high total IgE titres. Studies correlating IgE titres and clinical symptoms are needed to confirm the involvement of this immunoglobulin in the pathological processes during filariasis. PMID:24280145

  4. The distribution of geochemical heterogeneities in the source of Hawaiian shield lavas as revealed by a transect across the strike of the Loa and Kea spatial trends: East Molokai to West Molokai to Penguin Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangping; Huang, Shichun; Frey, Frederick A.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Abouchami, Wafa; Clague, David A.; Cousens, Brian; Moore, James G.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    2014-05-01

    An important feature of <2 Ma Hawaiian volcanoes is that they define two sub-parallel spatial trends known as the Loa- and Kea-trends. On the Island of Hawaii, the <1.5 Ma shield lavas on the Loa and Kea spatial trends have distinctive geochemical characteristics that are designated as Loa-type and Kea-type. These geochemical differences are clearly expressed in Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb isotopic ratios, major element contents, and ratios of incompatible elements. They are interpreted to reflect varying proportions of sediment, basalt, gabbro and peridotite in subducted oceanic lithosphere. Pb isotopic ratios indicate that the Loa-type component reflects ancient subduction, >2.5 Ga, whereas the Kea-type component reflects younger subduction, <1.5 Ga. To evaluate the temporal persistence of these geochemical differences in the source of Hawaiian shield lavas, we analyzed lavas from the ˜1.5 to 2 Ma Molokai Island volcanoes, East and West Molokai, and the adjacent submarine Penguin Bank. The three volcanoes form a nearly east-west trend that crosscuts the Loa and Kea spatial trends at a high angle; consequently we can determine if these older lavas are Kea-type in the east and Loa-type in the west. All lavas collected from the subaerial flanks of East Molokai, a Kea-trend volcano, have Kea-type geochemical characteristics; however, dive samples collected from Wailau landslide blocks, probably samples of the East Molokai shield that are older than those exposed on the subaerial flanks, include basalt with Loa-type geochemical features. Shield lavas from West Molokai and Penguin Bank, both on the Loa-trend, are dominantly Loa-type, but samples with Kea-type compositions also erupted at these Loa-trend volcanoes. The Loa-trend volcanoes, Mahukona, West Molokai, Penguin Bank, and Koolau, have also erupted lavas with Kea-type geochemical characteristics, and the Kea-trend volcanoes, Mauna Kea, Kohala, Haleakala, and East Molokai, have erupted lavas with Loa-type geochemical

  5. Atmospheric aerosols from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Holmes, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been collected for chemical analysis at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii since 1979. The samples were collected in two wind quadrants, a clean [open quotes]down-slope[close quotes] quadrant and a more contaminated [open quotes]up-slope[close quotes] quadrant. Some of the findings of this work have been the identification of Asian dust traveling to the Hawaiian Islands every spring of the year, and this dust dominates the yearly record because it is very intense and contains predominantly crustal dust along with pollutants from the Asian mainland, such as coal combustion in China. Additional interpretation of the data set of weekly samples has shown the presence of pollutants from both North and South America as well as different areas of Asia that are transported by wind systems to the central Pacific Ocean. By subtracting these episodic transport events, one can look at the oceanic background aerosols that are originating from the ocean and look at the occurrence of the natural aerosol generating systems in the oceanic region that are related to climatic change. One of the important groups of elements are the sulfur and halogen families and the naturally occurring volatile elements (selenium, arsenic, antimony, etc.) that are produced by biogenic activity in the world's oceans and affect the chemistry of the atmosphere, particularly clouds in remote marine areas. Investigations such as this work allow one to evaluate the importance of natural versus anthropogenic sources of the volatile elements to the atmosphere, allowing us to have a much better understanding of man's impact on climate. The nuclear analytical techniques are particularly well suited to this type of sample because it consists of aerosols deposited on a clean Teflon or cellulose substrate, which normally offers very little interference with the analysis.

  6. Thermal areas on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, T.J.; Hazlett, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Active thermal areas are concentrated in three areas on Mauna Loa and three areas on Kilauea. High-temperature fumaroles (115-362?? C) on Mauna Loa are restricted to the summit caldera, whereas high-temperature fumaroles on Kilauea are found in the upper East Rift Zone (Mauna Ulu summit fumaroles, 562?? C), middle East Rift Zone (1977 eruptive fissure fumaroles), and in the summit caldera. Solfataric activity that has continued for several decades occurs along border faults of Kilauea caldera and at Sulphur Cone on the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa. Solfataras that are only a few years old occur along recently active eruptive fissures in the summit caldera and along the rift zones of Kilauea. Steam vents and hot-air cracks also occur at the edges of cooling lava ponds, on the summits of lava shields, along faults and graben fractures, and in diffuse patches that may reflect shallow magmatic intrusions. ?? 1983.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Blood-Borne Human Parasites in a Loa loa-, Mansonella perstans-, and Plasmodium falciparum-Endemic Region of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Drame, Papa M; Montavon, Céline; Pion, Sébastien D; Kubofcik, Joseph; Fay, Michael P; Nutman, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    The study of the interactions among parasites within their hosts is crucial to the understanding of epidemiology of disease and for the design of effective control strategies. We have conducted an assessment of infections with Loa loa, Mansonella perstans, Wuchereria bancrofti, and Plasmodium falciparum in eastern Cameroon using a highly sensitive and specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay using archived dried whole blood spots. The resident population (N = 1,085) was parasitized with M. perstans (76%), L. loa (39%), and P. falciparum (33%), but not with W. bancrofti Compared with single infections (40.1%), coinfection was more common (48.8%): 21.0% had L. loa-M. perstans (Ll(+)/Mp(+)/Pf(-)), 2.7% had L. loa-P. falciparum (Ll(+)/Pf(+)/Mp(-)), 15.1% had M. perstans-P. falciparum (Mp(+)/Pf(+)/Ll(-)), and 10.0% had L. loa-M. perstans-P. falciparum (Ll(+)/Mp(+)/Pf(+)). Interestingly, those with all three infections (Ll(+)/Mp(+)/Pf(+)) had significantly higher L. loa microfilaria (mf) counts than either single Ll(+) (P = 0.004) or double Ll(+)/Mp(+) (P = 0.024) infected individuals. Of those infected with L. loa, the mean estimated counts of L. loa mf varied based on location and were positively correlated with estimated intensities of M. perstans mf. Finally, at a community level, heavy L. loa infections were concentrated in a few individuals whereby they were likely the major reservoir for infection. PMID:27044568

  8. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G E

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained constant to at least (1/2)% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +/-2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau(0) = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 1980 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of Deltatau(0) ~ 0.01-0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption. PMID:20389986

  9. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained c constant to at least 1/2% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +- 2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau/sub 0/ = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 19890 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of ..delta..tau/sub 0/approx.0.01--0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption.

  10. Is the Hawaiian Archipelago dominantly Loa-trend?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.; Harrison, L.; Garcia, M. O.; Rhodes, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes are distributed en echelon on the islands along two chains, the Loa and Kea trends, that are geographically and geochemically distinct1,2. These geochemical differences may be attributed to source zoning (concentric or bilateral) of the Hawaiian mantle plume (HMP) or to variations in pressure and temperature of melting. Most of these models assume a degree of independence of the two trends that is perhaps not realistic. To explore the isotopic characteristics of two "Kea"-trend volcanoes with transitional signatures, we analyzed 11 samples of Kohala shield-stage tholeiitic lavas and three from Haleakala for high-precision Pb-Nd-Sr-Hf isotopes. These samples are transitional in all isotopic systems between Loa and Kea compositions and cross-over the Pb-Pb boundary3. Minor cross-overs had been documented in Mauna Kea4, Kilauea5, and W Molokai6 basalts. A bilateral or concentric view of the HMP is thus too simplistic. Statistical analysis of the MC-ICP-MS or triple-spike shield tholeiite data (n>600) and the existence of three Pb-Pb trends originating from average Loa indicate that Loa is the dominant mantle source composition on the archipelago. Isotopically, four geochemical groups are identified: Kea (Mauna Kea, Kilauea), average Loa (Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kauai, Waianae, W. Molokai, Loihi), enriched Loa (Koolau Makapuu, Lanai, Kahoolawe) and transitional Kea (E. Molokai, W. Maui, Haleakala, Kohala). The implications are: 1) HMP source components refresh and grade into and out of existence on a smaller timescale than previously thought; 2) the Kea trend is also heterogeneous; and 3) vertical heterogeneity of the plume is important on a regional scale as well as at the scale of individual volcanoes6. 1Jackson et al., 1972, GSA Bull. 83, 1-17. 2Weis et al., 2011, Nat. Geosci., 4, 831-838. 3Abouchami et al., 2005, Nature, 434, 851-856. 4Eisele et al., 2003, G-cubed, 4, 5, 32 pages. 5Marske et al., 2007, EPSL, 259, 34-50. 6Xu et al., 2014, GCA, 132

  11. Regulation of Global Gene Expression in Human Loa loa Infection Is a Function of Chronicity

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Cathy; Varma, Sudhir; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human filarial infection is characterized by downregulated parasite-antigen specific T cell responses but distinct differences exist between patients with longstanding infection (endemics) and those who acquired infection through temporary residency or visits to filarial-endemic regions (expatriates). Methods and Findings To characterize mechanisms underlying differences in T cells, analysis of global gene expression using human spotted microarrays was conducted on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from microfilaremic Loa loa-infected endemic and expatriate patients. Assessment of unstimulated cells showed overexpression of genes linked to inflammation and caspase-associated cell death, particularly in endemics, and enrichment of the Th1/Th2 canonical pathway in endemic CD4+ cells. However, pathways within CD8+ unstimulated cells were most significantly enriched in both patient groups. Antigen (Ag)-driven gene expression was assessed to microfilarial Ag (MfAg) and to the nonparasite Ag streptolysin O (SLO). For MfAg-driven cells, the number of genes differing significantly from unstimulated cells was greater in endemics compared to expatriates (p<0.0001). Functional analysis showed a differential increase in genes associated with NFkB (both groups) and caspase activation (endemics). While the expatriate response to MfAg was primarily a CD4+ pro-inflammatory one, the endemic response included CD4+ and CD8+ cells and was linked to insulin signaling, histone complexes, and ubiquitination. Unlike the enrichment of canonical pathways in CD8+ unstimulated cells, both groups showed pathway enrichment in CD4+ cells to MfAg. Contrasting with the divergent responses to MfAg seen between endemics and expatriates, the CD4+ response to SLO was similar; however, CD8+ cells differed strongly in the nature and numbers (156 [endemics] vs 36 [expatriates]) of genes with differential expression. Conclusions These data suggest several important pathways are responsible for the

  12. Parasitological, Hematological and Biochemical Characteristics of a Model of Hyper-microfilariaemic Loiasis (Loa loa) in the Baboon (Papio anubis)

    PubMed Central

    Wanji, Samuel; Eyong, Ebanga-Echi; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Ngwa, Che; Esuka, Elive; Kengne-Ouafo, Arnaud; Datchoua-Poutcheu, Fabrice; Enyong, Peter; Hopkins, Adrian; Mackenzie, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Loiasis, a filarial infection caused by Loa loa usually thought to cause relatively minor morbidity, can cause serious and often fatal reactions in patients carrying very high levels of circulating Loa loa microfilariae (mf) following administration of microfilaricidal drugs. An experimental model of this condition would greatly aid the definition of the optimal management of this important clinical presentation. Methodology/Principle Findings Fifteen baboons (Papio anubis) were infected with 600 infective larvae (L3) isolated from Chrysops vector flies. Animals were observed for any clinical changes; blood samples were collected every 1–2 months for 22 months, and analysed for parasitological, hematological and biochemical profiles using standard techniques. All animals became patent but remained clinically normal throughout the study. The parasitological pre-patent period was between 4–8 months, with a majority (60%) of animals becoming patent by 5 months post infection (MPI); all animals were patent by 8 MPI. Microfilarial loads increased steadily in all animals and reached a peak at 18 MPI. By 10 MPI >70% of animals had mf >8,000 mf/mL, and at 18 MPI >70% of animals had mf >30,000mf/mL with 50% of these animals with mf >50,000mf/mL. Absolute eosinophil, creatinine, Ca2+ and K+ levels were generally above normal values (NV). Positive associations were seen between microfilariaemia and eosinophilia, Hb, Ca2+, and gamma-GT values, whilst significant negative associations were seen between microfilariaemia and potassium, glucose and mononuclear leukocyte levels. Conclusions Infection of splenectomised baboons with L. loa can induce levels of circulating microfilariae, and corresponding haematological profiles, which parallel those seen in those humans in danger of the severe post-microfilariacide clinical responses. Utilization of this experimental model could contribute to the improved management of the loiasis related adverse responses in humans

  13. Two Independent Mutations in ADAMTS17 Are Associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in the Basset Hound and Basset Fauve de Bretagne Breeds of Dog

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, James A. C.; Forman, Oliver P.; Pettitt, Louise; Mellersh, Cathryn S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in ADAMTS10 (CFA20) have previously been associated with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in the Beagle and Norwegian Elkhound. The closely related gene, ADAMTS17, has also been associated with several different ocular phenotypes in multiple breeds of dog, including primary lens luxation and POAG. We investigated ADAMTS17 as a candidate gene for POAG in the Basset Hound and Basset Fauve de Bretagne dog breeds. Methods We performed ADAMTS17 exon resequencing in three Basset Hounds and three Basset Fauve de Bretagne dogs with POAG. Identified variants were genotyped in additional sample cohorts of both breeds and dogs of other breeds to confirm their association with disease. Results All affected Basset Hounds were homozygous for a 19 bp deletion in exon 2 that alters the reading frame and is predicted to lead to a truncated protein. Fifty clinically unaffected Basset Hounds were genotyped for this mutation and all were either heterozygous or homozygous for the wild type allele. Genotyping of 223 Basset Hounds recruited for a different study revealed a mutation frequency of 0.081 and predicted frequency of affected dogs in the population to be 0.007. Based on the entire genotyping dataset the association statistic for the POAG-associated deletion was p = 1.26 x 10−10. All affected Basset Fauve de Bretagne dogs were homozygous for a missense mutation in exon 11 causing a glycine to serine amino acid substitution (G519S) in the disintegrin-like domain of ADAMTS17 which is predicted to alter protein function. Unaffected Basset Fauve de Bretagne dogs were either heterozygous for the mutation (5/24) or homozygous for the wild type allele (19/24). Based on the entire genotyping dataset the association statistic for the POAG-associated deletion was p = 2.80 x 10−7. Genotyping of 85 dogs of unrelated breeds and 90 dogs of related breeds for this variant was negative. Conclusion This report documents strong associations between two independent ADAMTS17

  14. Map Showing Lava Inundation Zones for Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, F.A.; Graves, P.; Tincher, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Island of Hawaii is composed of five coalesced basaltic volcanoes. Lava flows constitute the greatest volcanic hazard from these volcanoes. This report is concerned with lava flow hazards on Mauna Loa, the largest of the island shield volcanoes. Hilo lies 58 km from the summit of Mauna Loa, the Kona coast 33 km, and the southernmost point of the island 61 km. Hawaiian volcanoes erupt two morphologically distinct types of lava, aa and pahoehoe. The surfaces of pahoehoe flows are rather smooth and undulating. Pahoehoe flows are commonly fed by lava tubes, which are well insulated, lava-filled conduits contained within the flows. The surfaces of aa flows are extremely rough and composed of lava fragments. Aa flows usually form lava channels rather than lava tubes. In Hawaii, lava flows are known to reach distances of 50 km or more. The flows usually advance slowly enough that people can escape from their paths. Anything overwhelmed by a flow will be damaged or destroyed by burial, crushing, or ignition. Mauna Loa makes up 51 percent of the surface area of the Island of Hawaii. Geologic mapping shows that lava flows have covered more than 40 percent of the surface every 1,000 years. Since written descriptions of its activity began in A.D. 1832, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times. Some eruptions begin with only brief seismic unrest, whereas others start several months to a year following increased seismic activity. Once underway, the eruptions can produce lava flows that reach the sea in less than 24 hours, severing roads and utilities. For example, the 1950 flows from the southwest rift zone reached the ocean in approximately three hours. The two longest flows of Mauna Loa are pahoehoe flows from the 50-kilometer-long 1859 and the 48-kilometer-long 1880-81 eruptions. Mauna Loa will undoubtedly erupt again. When it does, the first critical question that must be answered is: Which areas are threatened with inundation? Once the threatened areas are

  15. The giant submarine alika debris slide, Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Normark, W.R.; Moore, J.G.; Wilson, J.B.; Gutmacher, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A 4000-km2 area of submarine slump and slide deposits along the W flank of Mauna Loa volcano has been mapped with GLORIA side-scan sonar images, seismic reflection profiles, and new bathymetry. The youngest deposits are 2 debris avalanche lobes that travelled from their breakaway area near the present shoreline as much as 100 km into the Hawaiian Deep at water depths of 4800 m. The 2 lobes partly overlap and together are designated the Alika slide. They were derived from the same source area and probably formed in rapid succession. Slumping on Mauna Loa has been most intense adjacent to the large arcuate bend in its SW rift zone, as the rift zone migrated westward away from the growing Kilauea volcano. Slumping events were probably triggered by seismic activity accompanying dike injection along the rift zone. Such massive slumps, landslides and distal submarine turbidity flows appear to be widespread on the flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes.-from Authors

  16. SBAS-InSAR analysis of a decade of surface deformation at Mauna Loa (Hawai'i): Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Marra, Daniele; Poland, Michael; Miklius, Asta; Acocella, Valerio

    2015-04-01

    The Big Island of Hawai`i consists five coalesced volcanoes: Hualālai, Mauna Loa, Kilauea, Mauna Kea, Kohala. Mauna Loa, the largest, has erupted 39 times since 1832, with the last eruption in 1984. The volcano summit hosts the Moku'aweoweo caldera from which two volcanic rift zones radiate: the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) and Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ). These rifts are the reflection of past dike intrusions combined with instability of the SE flank of the volcano, possibly related to slip along a low angle decollement thrust fault 12-14 km beneath the volcano. Geodetic (InSAR, GPS) and seismic data have been used to characterize recent periods of unrest at Mauna Loa. InSAR studies spanning the period between 2002 and 2005 suggest a magma chamber 4.7-km depth below the summit, with a radius of 1.1 km, and a dike intrusion at 4 to 8-km depth and 8 km-long. These studies, however, are focused on relatively short-term processes (up to a few years), and a longer-term reconstruction of the volcano's evolution is lacking. In this work, we use SAR data, exploiting the SBAS technique, to study deformation of Mauna Loa from 2003 to 2014, and we try to relate this overall evolution to that the neighboring Kilauea. We use acquisitions from two satellites: ENVISAT (descending track 200 and ascending track 365), spanning from 2003 to the end of 2010, and COSMO-SkyMed (descending and ascending orbits), spanning from 2012 to the middle of 2014. These data are merged time series data from 24 continuously operating GPS stations, which allows us to calibrate the InSAR SBAS time series. Results show an overall good agreement between the InSAR and GPS time series. The displacement of each portion of the volcano between 2003-2014 has been thus constrained in detail. The summit area of Mauna Loa has under gone a long-term inflation from 2003 to 2014, with a peak of about 8 cm of vertical deformation between mid-2004 to mid-2005, especially on the summit. Part of this deformation may be

  17. Solar radiation: absence of air pollution trends at Mauna Loa.

    PubMed

    Ellis, H T; Pueschel, R F

    1971-05-21

    Measurements of solar radiation made at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, over a period of 13 years give no evidence that human activities affect atmospheric turbidity on a global scale. Short-term fluctuations in insolation appear to be associated with naturally produced tropospheric aerosols. The intrusion of volcanic dust into the stratosphere results in prolonged increases in atmospheric opacity due to the extended residence times of aerosols in the stratosphere. PMID:5572907

  18. Filarial antigenemia and Loa loa night blood microfilaremia in an area without bancroftian filariasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Bakajika, Didier K; Nigo, Maurice M; Lotsima, Jean Pierre; Masikini, Germain A; Fischer, Kerstin; Lloyd, Melanie M; Weil, Gary J; Fischer, Peter U

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been delayed in central Africa because of incomplete mapping and coendemic loiasis. We mapped two regions in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo that were suspected to have LF. Night blood samples were collected from 2,724 subjects in 30 villages. Filarial antigenemia rates by card test exceeded 1% in 28 villages (range = 0-14%). Prevalence rates for large sheathed microfilariae (Mf) ranged from 4% to 40%; Mansonella perstans rates ranged from 22% to 98%. Large Mf were exclusively Loa loa by microscopy, and only 1 of 337 samples tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was positive for Wuchereria bancrofti DNA. Filarial antigen positivity was strongly associated with high L. loa Mf counts. Periodicity studies revealed atypical patterns, with no significant diurnal periodicity in some individuals. Thus, methods routinely used for LF mapping may not be reliable in areas in central Africa that are highly endemic for loiasis. PMID:25223938

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Blood-Borne Human Parasites in a Loa loa-, Mansonella perstans-, and Plasmodium falciparum-Endemic Region of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Papa M.; Montavon, Céline; Pion, Sébastien D.; Kubofcik, Joseph; Fay, Michael P.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    The study of the interactions among parasites within their hosts is crucial to the understanding of epidemiology of disease and for the design of effective control strategies. We have conducted an assessment of infections with Loa loa, Mansonella perstans, Wuchereria bancrofti, and Plasmodium falciparum in eastern Cameroon using a highly sensitive and specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay using archived dried whole blood spots. The resident population (N = 1,085) was parasitized with M. perstans (76%), L. loa (39%), and P. falciparum (33%), but not with W. bancrofti. Compared with single infections (40.1%), coinfection was more common (48.8%): 21.0% had L. loa–M. perstans (Ll+/Mp+/Pf−), 2.7% had L. loa–P. falciparum (Ll+/Pf+/Mp−), 15.1% had M. perstans–P. falciparum (Mp+/Pf+/Ll−), and 10.0% had L. loa–M. perstans–P. falciparum (Ll+/Mp+/Pf+). Interestingly, those with all three infections (Ll+/Mp+/Pf+) had significantly higher L. loa microfilaria (mf) counts than either single Ll+ (P = 0.004) or double Ll+/Mp+ (P = 0.024) infected individuals. Of those infected with L. loa, the mean estimated counts of L. loa mf varied based on location and were positively correlated with estimated intensities of M. perstans mf. Finally, at a community level, heavy L. loa infections were concentrated in a few individuals whereby they were likely the major reservoir for infection. PMID:27044568

  20. Crystallization and vesiculation of the 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, James K.

    1987-12-01

    Calculations based on existing thermodynamic models for silicate melts are used to model the physical and chemical evolution of the 1984 Mauna Loa magma. Specifically, the calculations simulate the vesiculation-induced crystallization of the ascending magma. The calculations provide a physiochemical model to explain the increase in crystallization under isothermal conditions. The evolution of the Mauna Loa magma is modeled in three separate stages corresponding to (1) the subsurface crystallization of the phenocryst assemblage, (2) the crystallization and vesiculation of the magma during its ascent from depth, and (3) the crystallization and vesiculation of the lavas at the surface. The preeruptive crystallization of olivine and orthopyroxene phenocrysts began at ≃ 1155°C and 0.2 GPa. Olivine and plagioclase alone crystallized during the ascent of the magma. The bulk of the crystallization and vesiculation of the Mauna Loa magma occurred at pressures less than 20 MPa. Under lithostatic pressures this corresponds to depths as shallow as 600-700 m. Ancillary calculations have established the net heat effect of the prescribed ascent path and demonstrate that the heat associated with vesiculation easily compensates for the heats of crystallization. The calculations suggest that the near-surface processes can be quite endothermic depending on the initial H2O content of the magma. For a magma with 1 wt % dissolved H2O the heat balance demands approximately 5-10°C cooling. Further calculations predict the liquid line of descent for this ascent path and document the corresponding variations in the physical properties of the melt phase.

  1. First results from new Earthshine telescope on Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejll, P.; Flynn, C.; Schwarz, H.; Gleisner, H.; Owner-Petersen, M.; Darudi, A.; Andersen, T.

    2012-04-01

    Terrestrial albedo is an important factor in the radiative budget of the Earth's climate system. Albedo can be measured from satellites, but so far only terrestrial earthshine observations offer an alternative. Methods are based on observing the earthshine to moonshine ratio on the Moon, followed by analysis and modelling. We have designed, built and installed a new earthshine observing system at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory on Hawaii, and in this poster we present observations from the startup phase of operations. A comparison is made between data-reduction methods which yield earthshine intensity relative to moonshine intensity, or, directly, estimates of terrestrial albedo.

  2. The 1950 sulfur flow of Mauna Loa: Considerations for Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Theilig, E.; Christensen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the geological relationships observed in the Mauna Loa sulfur flow may apply in considering volcanic processes on Io. Given the presence of sulfur/sulfur compounds in the eruption plumes and on the surface of Io, it is likely that extensive secondary deposits of sulfur exist, some of which may be of fumarolic origin and analogous to the Mauna Loa deposit. Given the likelihood of silicate volcanism of Io based on the inferred material properties of some flows, and the attendant high temperatures for silicate volcanism, it is likely that the secondary surface deposits of sulfur would have been mobilized without being heated to the high viscosity stage. Mobilized sulfur flows on Io may flow long distances as a result of: (1) low viscosities in the melting range; (2) sustained effusion resulting from continued heating source area; (3) continued remobilization within the flow as a consequence of surges from the source; and (4) extension via lava tubes, or similar conduits through which there is little heat loss. Sulfur flows may form a relatively thin veneer over silicate flows and other surface units, given their fluidity and low mobilization temperature. Active splashing and splattering may spread sulfur over a wider area contributing the bright blooms observed in association with some Ionian flows.

  3. Boundary Layer Observations at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, John; Sharma, Nimmi

    2016-04-01

    The NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory is an atmospheric monitoring station on the North side of Mauna Loa Volcano (4169 m summit) located at an altitude of 3396 m. The bright sun, dark lava surface, and the seven percent grade of the mountain create a surface radiation wind that changes from upslope in the daytime to downslope after sunset. The radiation wind has a magnitude of 2.5-3.0 m/s. The off-island wind interacts with the mountain to create a barrier wind. The radiation wind dominates when the off-island winds are low and opposite is true when the off-island winds are strong. Temperature inversions form at sunset in the first 50 meters above the ground. Aerosol profiles, measured with a unique technique called CLidar or camera lidar, often increase and show a peak between 60 and 160 meters. The aerosol generally decreases to upper tropospheric values with a distinct change in the rate of decrease at 600 m above the ground. At night the region between the aerosol peak and 600 m is often flowing upslope, counter to the downslope surface flow. The source of the air in this counter flow region is not well understood, but appears to come from levels below the station altitude at least occasionally. This possibly would impact the interpretation of some of the air samples taken during this period.

  4. Analysis of the atmospheric aerosol size distribution information retrievable from near-limb angular radiance measurements taken on Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.

    1981-12-01

    Angular radiance measurements of the near-limb solar aureole were analyzed for information regarding the light-scattering aerosol particles in the atmospheric column above Mauna Loa, Hawaii. The Mauna Loa Observatory, located at 19/sup 0/ 33' N latitude, 155/sup 0/ 35' W longitude, and 3460 metres elevation, is in unpolluted air above the easterly trade wind inversion and has been designated as a site for the Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) program. Circumsolar radiance and polarization measurements have been collected on Mauna Loa since 1963 by the High Altitude Observatory (HAO), National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) as part of a program for the daily observation of the solar corona. Strip charts containing radiance measurements made from January 1976 through June 1978 were made available for this study. By the use of Mie scattering theory, generalized to treat the sun as a finite diameter light source with limb-darkening, a theoretical scattering matrix was calculated for observation angles between 17' and 300' measured from the center of the solar disk, and aerosol size parameters (2..pi..r/lambda) between 10 and 300. An information content criterion is presented, based on the expected relative norm of the measurement errors and on the eigenvalues of the radiance covariance matrix of the scattering matrix. The observed aureole radiance gradients and two test gradients were inverted to obtain aerosol size distributions using a constrained linear inversion algorithm.

  5. Coastal lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes, Kona, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.

    1987-01-01

    A major carbonate reef which drowned 13 ka is now submerged 150 m below sea level on the west coast of the island of Hawaii. A 25-km span of this reef was investigated using the submersible Makali'i. The reef occurs on the flanks of two active volcanoes, Mauna Loa and Hualalai, and the lavas from both volcanoes both underlie and overlie the submerged reef. Most of the basaltic lava flows that crossed the reef did so when the water was much shallower, and when they had to flow a shorter distance from shoreline to reef face. Lava flows on top of the reef have protected it from erosion and solution and now occur at seaward-projecting salients on the reef face. These relations suggest that the reef has retreated shoreward as much as 50 m since it formed. A 7-km-wide "shadow zone" occurs where no Hualalai lava flows cross the reef south of Kailua. These lava flows were probably diverted around a large summit cone complex. A similar "shadow zone" on the flank of Mauna Loa volcano in the Kealakekua Bay region is downslope from the present Mauna Loa caldera, which ponds Mauna Loa lava and prevents it from reaching the coastline. South of the Mauna Loa "shadow zone" the - 150 m reef has been totally covered and obscured by Mauna Loa lava. The boundary between Hualalai and Mauna Loa lava on land occurs over a 6-km-wide zone, whereas flows crossing the - 150 m reef show a sharper boundary offshore from the north side of the subaerial transition zone. This indicates that since the formation of the reef, Hualalai lava has migrated south, mantling Mauna Loa lava. More recently, Mauna Loa lava is again encroaching north on Hualalai lava. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Mt. Pinatubo SO2 Column Measurements From Mauna Loa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Blatherwick, R. D.; David, S. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption features of the nu(sub 1) band of SO2 have been identified in high resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, on July 9 and 12, 1991, shortly after the arrival of the first eruption plume from the Mt. Pinatubo volcano in the Phillipines. A total SO2 vertical column amount of (5.1 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 16) molecules/sq cm on July 9 has been retrieved based on nonlinear least- squares spectral fittings of 9 selected SO2 absorption features with an updated set of SO2 spectral parameters. A SO2 total column upper limit of 0.9 x 10(esp 16) molecules/sq cm deduced from measurements on September 20-24, 1991, is consistent with the dispersion of the SO2 cloud and the rapid conversion of the SO2 vapor into volcanic aerosol particles.

  7. The 1984 Mauna Loa eruption and planetary geolgoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Henry J.

    1987-01-01

    In planetary geology, lava flows on the Moon and Mars are commonly treated as relatively simple systems. Some of the complexities of actual lava flows are illustrated using the main flow system of the 1984 Mauna Loa eruption. The outline, brief narrative, and results given are based on a number of sources. The implications of the results to planetary geology are clear. Volume flow rates during an eruption depend, in part, on the volatile content of the lava. These differ from the volume flow rates calculated from post eruption flow dimensions and the duration of the eruption and from those using models that assume a constant density. Mass flow rates might be more appropriate because the masses of volatiles in lavas are usually small, but variable and sometimes unknown densities impose severe restrictions on mass estimates.

  8. Snow on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    With summits of 13,792 ft (4,205 m) and 13,674 ft (4,169 m), it's not unusual for the Mauna Kea (north) and Mauna Loa (south) volcanoes on Hawaii's Big Island to get wintertime snowfall. In this true-color MODIS image from February 28, 2002, a late winter snow has settled on the volcanoes' flanks, creating large white circles in the north and central portions of the island. The white patchy areas along the west coast are clouds, and not snow, which is more evident in the false color image, in which ice crystals on the ground appear solid red and clouds appear peach. Don't be fooled by the red outlines on the eastern coast. They aren't snow, but rather are used to mark locations where MODIS detected the thermal signature of the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The dark streaks and patches reveal the location of lava flows.

  9. Bathymetry of the southwest flank of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1994-01-01

    Much of the seafloor topography in the map area is on the southwest submarine flank of the currently active Mauna Loa Volcano. The benches and blocky hills shown on the map were shaped by giant landslides that resulted from instability of the rapidly growing volcano. These landslides were imagined during a 1986 to 1991 swath sonar program of the United States Hawaiian Exclusive Economic Zone, a cooperative venture by the U.S. Geological Survey and the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (Lipman and others, 1988; Moore and others, 1989). Dana Seamount (and probably also the neighboring Day Seamount) are apparently Cretaceous in age, based on paleomagnetic studies, and predate the growth of the Hawaiian Ridge volcanoes (Sager and Pringle, 1990).

  10. Dueling Volcanoes: How Activity Levels At Kilauea Influence Eruptions At Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusdell, F.

    2011-12-01

    The eruption of Kilauea at Pu`u `O`o is approaching its 29th anniversary. During this time, Mauna Loa has slowly inflated following its most recent eruption in 1984. This is Mauna Loa's longest inter-eruptive interval observed in HVO's 100 years of operation. When will the next eruption of Mauna Loa take place? Is the next eruption of Mauna Loa tied to the current activity at Kilauea? Historically, eruptive periods at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes appear to be inversely correlated. In the past, when Mauna Loa was exceptionally active, Kilauea Volcano was in repose, recovery, or in sustained lava lake activity. Swanson and co-workers (this meeting) have noted that explosive activity on Kilauea, albeit sporadic, was interspersed between episodes of effusive activity. Specifically, Swanson and co-workers note as explosive the time periods between 300 B.C.E.-1000 C.E and 1500-1800 C.E. They also point to evidence for low magma supply to Kilauea during these periods and few flank eruptions. During the former explosive period, Mauna Loa was exceedingly active, covering approximately 37% of its surface or 1882 km2, an area larger than Kilauea. This period is also marked by summit activity at Mauna Loa sustained for 300 years. In the 1500-1800 C.E. period, Mauna Loa was conspicuously active with 29 eruptions covering an area of 446 km2. In the late 19th and early 20th century, Kilauea was dominated by nearly continuous lava-lake activity. Meanwhile Mauna Loa was frequently active from 1843 C.E. to 1919 C.E., with 24 eruptions for an average repose time of 3.5 years. I propose that eruptive activity at one volcano may affect eruptions at the other, due to factors that impact magma supply, volcanic plumbing, and flank motion. This hypothesis is predicated on the notion that when the rift zones of Kilauea, and in turn its mobile south flank, are active, Mauna Loa's tendency to erupt is diminished. Kilauea's rift zones help drive the south flank seaward, in turn, as Mauna

  11. Seismic detection of a low-velocity layer beneath the southeast flank of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, C.H.; Li, Yingping ); Johnson, C.

    1989-07-01

    The authors have identified seismic phases reflected off the top and bottom of a low velocity layer (LVL) by analysis of seismograms from six small earthquakes in Hawaii. These events occurred almost directly beneath station AIN of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismic network, located within the Kaoiki seismic zone on the southeast flank of Mauna Loa. The polarity reversals of the first reflected phases provide clear evidence for the existence of a LVL beneath this station. The LVL is estimated to be at a depth of about 11.5 km, with a thickness of about 800 m. The estimated depth to the top of the LVL is consistent with the depth distribution of low-angle thrust faulting events from the aftershock sequence of the 1983 Kaoiki earthquake. Presumably, this zone is the marine sediment layer buried beneath the volcanic pile, along which the volcanic edifice may slip easily to cause large earthquakes. Mapping the interface between the volcanic pile and oceanic crust and thus determining the depth and thickness of the buried sediment layer is essential for understanding the tectonics of large earthquakes in Hawaii.

  12. A geologic evaluation of proposed lava diversion barriers for the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory, Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Lava flow diversion barriers should protect the Mauna Loa Observatory from flows of reasonable magnitude if properly constructed. The a'a flow upon which the observatory is constructed represents a flow of reasonable magnitude. Proper construction of the barriers includes obtaining riprap from a zone exterior to the proposed V-shaped barrier so as to produce an exterior relief near 9.2 m for most of the barrier, construction of a channel about 8 m deep and 40 m wide along the east part of the barrier, and proper positioning of an isolated initiating barrier. Calculations suggest that the barriers should be able to handle peak volume flow rates near 800 m/s and possibly larger ones. Peak volume flow rates for the a'a flow upon which the observatory is constructed are estimated.

  13. A Step Toward Eradication of Human Filariases in Areas Where Loa Is Endemic.

    PubMed

    Geary, Timothy G

    2016-01-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) programs have achieved remarkable success in limiting the pathology and transmission of the human parasitic infections onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. The full implementation of MDA campaigns for filariasis elimination has been stymied by the unacceptable incidence of severe adverse events observed following drug treatment of a subset of individuals who harbor high loads of Loa loa microfilaria. Extending MDA strategies to regions where loiasis is coendemic could be done confidently if a simple, inexpensive, and rapid diagnostic method was available that could accurately identify individuals who have L. loa microfilarial loads above the risk threshold and could thus be excluded from treatment. A recent paper in mBio reports the discovery of an antigen unique to L. loa microfilaria that can be detected in blood and urine and may form the basis for such an assay. Further work will reveal whether this discovery will smooth the path to achieve filariasis eradication. PMID:27073095

  14. A Step Toward Eradication of Human Filariases in Areas Where Loa Is Endemic

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mass drug administration (MDA) programs have achieved remarkable success in limiting the pathology and transmission of the human parasitic infections onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. The full implementation of MDA campaigns for filariasis elimination has been stymied by the unacceptable incidence of severe adverse events observed following drug treatment of a subset of individuals who harbor high loads of Loa loa microfilaria. Extending MDA strategies to regions where loiasis is coendemic could be done confidently if a simple, inexpensive, and rapid diagnostic method was available that could accurately identify individuals who have L. loa microfilarial loads above the risk threshold and could thus be excluded from treatment. A recent paper in mBio reports the discovery of an antigen unique to L. loa microfilaria that can be detected in blood and urine and may form the basis for such an assay. Further work will reveal whether this discovery will smooth the path to achieve filariasis eradication. PMID:27073095

  15. Inter-annual and seasonal variability of the diurnal behavior of aureole scattering phase function at the aerosol monitoring station of LOA IAO SB RAS in 2010-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkin, Vas. V.; Polkin, Vic. V.

    2015-11-01

    Inter-annual and seasonal variability of diurnal variations of the aureole scattering phase functions is analyzed. The data obtained by means of the completely automated aureole photometer with a closed scattering volume. Regular round-the-clock hourly measurements of the aureole scattering phase function were carried out in 2010-2014 at the Aerosol monitoring station of LOA IAO SB RAS in the region of scattering angles φ = 1.2 - 20° at the wavelength of 650 nm.

  16. Detection and discrimination of Loa loa, Mansonella perstans and Wuchereria bancrofti by PCR-RFLP and nested-PCR of ribosomal DNA ITS1 region.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Maribel; González, Luis Miguel; Carranza, Cristina; Bailo, Begoña; Pérez-Ayala, Ana; Muro, Antonio; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Gárate, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) of two filarial nematodes, Loa loa and Mansonella perstans, was amplified and further sequenced to develop an species-specific polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol for the differentiation of both species from Wuchereria bancrofti, three filarial nematodes with blood circulating microfilariae. The ITS1-PCR product digested with the restriction endonuclease Ase I generated an specific diagnostic pattern for each of the three species. Moreover, three new specific nested-PCRs, targeting the ITS1 region, for differential detection of L. loa, M. perstans and W. bancrofti were developed and used when the ITS1-PCR products were insufficient for the Ase I enzymatic digestion. These filarial species-specific molecular protocols were evaluated in forty blood samples from African adult immigrants attending in the Hospital Insular of Gran Canaria, Canarias, Spain. PMID:20599994

  17. Report of a Scientific Working Group on Serious Adverse Events following Mectizan(R) treatment of onchocerciasis in Loa loa endemic areas.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of Serious Adverse Experiences (SAEs) following Mectizan(R) treatment of onchocerciasis in Loa loa endemic areas has been increasingly reported over the past decade. These SAEs include a severely disabling, and potentially fatal, encephalopathy, which appears to correlate with a high load of L. loa microfilariae (> 30,000 mf/ml).Previous consultations organized by the Mectizan(R) Donation Program (MDP) in 1995 and 1999 have developed useful "case" definitions of encephalopathic SAEs following Mectizan(R) treatment and have summarized available evidence on its pathogenesis and optimal clinical management. At both meetings, the need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of the encephalopathy was emphasized, including the need for biological and autopsy specimens from the affected cases.Following a recommendation at the Joint Action Forum of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control in December 2001, the MDP, on behalf of the Mectizan(R) Expert Committee, organized a Scientific Working Group on L. loa associated SAEs following Mectizan(R) treatment in May 2002. The present report includes the background, new evidence, conclusions and recommendations from that Scientific Working Group. The following points represent a summary of the present status:1. Although there are more and better quality clinical and epidemiological data on L. loa, the pathogenesis of the Mectizan(R)-related L. loa encephalopathy remains obscure.2. Very limited progress has been made in research on the pathogenesis of encephalopathy, because of the lack of specimens from cases, and the lack of animal models.3. There has been no particular breakthrough in terms of the medical management of patients with L. loa encephalopathy; however, a favorable outcome usually results from prompt general nursing and nutritional care which remain the major interventions.The main recommendations for future actions are as follows:1. Validate and update the mapping of L. loa with a

  18. What’s New at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkepile, Joan; de Toma, Giuliana; Galloy, Michael; Kolinski, Don; Berkey, Ben; Stueben, Allen; Tomczyk, Steven; De Wijn, Alfred; Casini, Roberto; Card, Greg; Larson, Brandon; Stanger, Andrew; Oakley, Phil; Gallagher, Dennis; Waters, Lisa; Rose, Greg; Sewell, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) is located at 3440 meters on the island of Hawaii. The site provides the dark, clear skies required for observing the solar corona. The National Center for Atmosphere Research (NCAR) High Altitude Observatory (HAO) operates two coronagraphs at the site: the Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter (CoMP) and the COSMO K-Coronagraph (K-Cor). CoMP is designed to study coronal magnetic fields by observing full Stokes polarimetry of two forbidden emission lines of FeXIII at 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm. CoMP also observes active and erupting prominences over the solar limb in neutral Helium emission at 1083.nm. The K-Cor is designed to study the onset and early evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It is the only white light coronagraph to routinely view the low corona down to 1.05 solar radii in order to capture the formation of CMEs. Information is provided on new Helium data products of active and erupting prominences observed by the CoMP instrument as well as results from the K-Cor observations of CMEs. Information on current and upcoming upgrades to the MLSO facility, instrument hardware, and calibrations are reported along with an accounting of new data products, tools and services from the MLSO website.

  19. The Mauna Loa environmental matrix: foliar and soil nutrients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vitousek, P.M.; Aplet, G.; Turner, D.; Lockwood, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of total carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in soils, available soil nutrients, and foliar nutrients in the native dominant Metrosideros polymorpha were determined across a wide elevational range on 9 lava flows on Mauna Loa, Hawai'i. The flows included a young (2800 y) a??a?? (rough surface texture) and pa??hoehoe (smooth) flow on the wet east and dry northwest side of the mountain. Soil element pools and nutrient availability increased with flow age independent of climate. The dry sites accumulated organic matter and nutrients more slowly than comparable wet sites, but relative nutrient availability to plants (as indicated by soil assays and foliar nutrients) was greater in the dry sites. Accumulation of soil organic matter and nutrients occurred most rapidly in lowerelevation sites on the young flows, but the largest accumulations occurred at higher elevations on old flows. The range of sites sampled represents a complete and largely independent matrix of major factors governing ecosystem structure and function. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  20. The changing carbon cycle at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Buermann, Wolfgang; Lintner, Benjamin R; Koven, Charles D; Angert, Alon; Pinzon, Jorge E; Tucker, Compton J; Fung, Inez Y

    2007-03-13

    The amplitude of the CO(2) seasonal cycle at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) increased from the early 1970s to the early 1990s but decreased thereafter despite continued warming over northern continents. Because of its location relative to the large-scale atmospheric circulation, the MLO receives mainly Eurasian air masses in the northern hemisphere (NH) winter but relatively more North American air masses in NH summer. Consistent with this seasonal footprint, our findings indicate that the MLO amplitude registers North American net carbon uptake during the warm season and Eurasian net carbon release as well as anomalies in atmospheric circulation during the cold season. From the early 1970s to the early 1990s, our analysis was consistent with that of Keeling et al. [Keeling CD, Chin JFS, Whorf TP (1996) Nature 382:146-149], suggesting that the increase in the MLO CO(2) amplitude is dominated by enhanced photosynthetic drawdown in North America and enhanced respiration in Eurasia. In contrast, the recent decline in the CO(2) amplitude is attributed to reductions in carbon sequestration over North America associated with severe droughts from 1998 to 2003 and changes in atmospheric circulation leading to decreased influence of Eurasian air masses. With the return of rains to the U.S. in 2004, both the normalized difference vegetation index and the MLO amplitude sharply increased, suggesting a return of the North American carbon sink to more normal levels. These findings indicate that atmospheric CO(2) measurements at remote sites can continue to play an important role in documenting changes in land carbon flux, including those related to widespread drought, which may continue to worsen as a result of global warming. PMID:17360510

  1. Crystallization history of the 1984 Mauna Loa lava flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, Joe; Cashman, Katharine V.; Bonini, Jennifer A.; Hougen, Sarah B.; Pieri, David C.

    1994-01-01

    During a 3-week eruption in 1984, Mauna Loa produced vent lavas that increased in crystallinity from less than 1 to 30%, and 27-km-long flows that increased in crystallinity as they moved downstream. We examined the crystallization history of these lavas using crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis to study the rates of crystallization, viscosity increase, and latent heating. Typical average growth and nucleation rates were 5 x 10(exp -9) cm/s and 5/cu cm/s for microphenocrysts (20- to 500-micron size crystals nucleated in the rift zone) and 5 x 10(exp -8) cm/s and 5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm/s for microlites (1- to 20-micron size crystals nucleated in the channel). These crystallization rates are high compared with those found in other CSD studies of igneous rocks, probably due to highly nonequilibrium conditions brought on by rapid degassing in the rift zone and cooling in the lava channel. Growth and nucleation rates decreased with time at the vent and with distance downstream. The maximum downstream total crystallinity measured is 39% (25% microlites, 14% microphenocrysts) in a quenched sample 14 km from the vent. Growth and nucleation rates cannot be calculated for postemplacement samples, but they place upper limits of 53-58% on the amount of crystallization in the channel 9-20 km from the vent. Crystallization could have been mostly responsible for the 10(exp 5)-fold downstream increase in apparent viscosity, although degassing and increasing incorporation of solid lava fragments also contributed. Another effect of crystallization on the lava flow was the sizeable latent heating (0.01 J/g/s over the first half of the flow length, if the crystallinity of downstream quench samples is representative of the hot fluid core), which may have been counteracted by entrainment of cooler material. Measurements of crystallization are shown to be crucial in the study of lava flow emplacement dynamics.

  2. Copper-carbohydrate interaction in the pig: effects on lysyl oxidase activities (LOA)

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Steele, N.; Richards, M.; Darcey, S.; Fields, M.; Scholfield, D.; Smith, J.; Reiser, S.

    1986-03-01

    Fructose (FR) has been reported to aggravate copper (Cu) deficiency disorders in the rat. Weanling pigs, 21 days of age, were fed diets containing FR or glucose monohydrate (GL), each providing 20% of total calories. Diets were either unsupplemented (-, 1.5 ppm) or fortified (+, 40 ppm) with Cu. Following 10 weeks of dietary treatment, plasma and aortic LOA were appraised. Dietary Cu deficiency reduced LOA in both plasma and aortic tissue. Furthermore, feeding FR in conjunction with low Cu intake resulted in a greater reduction of aortic tissue LOA, implying that connective tissue metabolism and cardiac muscle integrity could be affected adversely. In that these effects were noted at a modest level of dietary FR, this pig model may be useful for the study of copper-carbohydrate interactions as relevant to the human population.

  3. Volcanically related secular trends in atmospheric transmission at mauna loa observatory, hawaii.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, B G; Hanson, K J; Deluisi, J J

    1978-11-01

    Twenty years of atmospheric transmission data from Mauna Loa Observatory show secular decreases at irregular intervals. In addition, a regular annual variation is present during unperturbed as well as perturbed periods. These variations in transmission can be measured to a few tenths of a percent from the data record. Transient decreases in transmission are strongly correlated with explosive volcanic eruptions that inject effluent into the stratosphere. Recovery from these ejections takes as much as 8 years and the recovery curve is linear. Observations in 1977 at Mauna Loa show that, for the first time since the Mount Agung eruption in 1963, the atmospheric transmission of direct-incidence solar irradiation at Mauna Loa returned to values measured in 1958 to 1962. PMID:17813489

  4. The geochemical components that distinguish Loa- and Kea-trend Hawaiian shield lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Frederick A.; Huang, Shichun; Xu, Guangping; Jochum, Klaus P.

    2016-07-01

    Recent (<5 Ma) Hawaiian volcanoes define two sub-parallel spatial trends, Loa and Kea. Despite the short distance (∼30 km) between adjacent volcanoes on these trends, most of the Loa-trend shield lavas are geochemically distinct from most of the Kea-trend shield lavas. These geochemical differences arise from small amounts of the LOA component in the source of Loa-trend shield lavas. This component is most prominent in the uppermost shield lavas of Koolau, Lanai and Kahoolawe volcanoes. Correlations between abundance ratios of incompatible elements and isotopic ratios of Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb in Hawaiian shield lavas indicate that the LOA component consists of three geochemically distinct materials formed by diverse processes. A gabbroic adcumulate (i.e. no trapped melt) with abundant cumulus plagioclase is responsible for the high Sr/Nd, La/Th and La/Nb in Loa-trend shield lavas relative to Kea-trend shield lavas. Also it has relatively low 206Pb/204Pb and high 208Pb/204Pb at a given 206Pb/204Pb, consistent with the low U/Pb and Th/Pb that are characteristic of plagioclase; these distinctive Pb isotope ratios require a long-time interval, ∼3 Ga, to develop. This material is most abundant in the uppermost shield lavas of Koolau volcano. Possible origins of adcumulate gabbros with abundant cumulus plagioclase are the lower oceanic and continental crust. A second material in the LOA component is distinctive because it is offset from the linear trend of 176Hf/177Hf versus 143Nd/144Nd, known as the terrestrial array, to high 176Hf/177Hf at low 143Nd/144Nd. This offset requires an ancient material with high Lu/Hf. It is equally abundant in the shield lavas at Koolau, Lanai and Kahoolawe volcanoes. Possible origins of this material are ancient pelagic sediment or ancient depleted lithosphere. A third material in the LOA component is characterized by relatively high 87Sr/86Sr, but the Rb/Sr of this material is too low to explain the high 87Sr/86Sr in 4.5 Ga. A relatively

  5. Disruption of the mauna loa magma system by the 1868 Hawaiian earthquake: Geochemical evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.; Michael, Rhodes J.; Sparks, J.W.; Lockwood, J.P.; Lipman, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    To test whether a catastrophic earthquake could affect an active magma system, mean abundances (adjusted for "olivine control") of titanium, potassium, phosphorus, strontium, zirconium, and niobium of historic lavas erupted from Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, after 1868 were analyzed and were found to decrease sharply relative to lavas erupted before 1868. This abrupt change in lava chemistry, accompanied by a halved lava-production rate for Mauna Loa after 1877, is interpreted to reflect the disruptive effects of a magnitude 7.5 earthquake in 1868. This interpretation represents a documentable case of changes in magmatic chemical variations initiated or accelerated by a major tectonic event.

  6. Disruption of the mauna loa magma system by the 1868 hawaiian earthquake: geochemical evidence.

    PubMed

    Tilling, R I; Rhodes, J M; Sparks, J W; Lockwood, J P; Lipman, P W

    1987-01-01

    To test whether a catastrophic earthquake could affect an active magma system, mean abundances (adjusted for "olivine control") of titanium, potassium, phosphorus, strontium, zirconium, and niobium of historic lavas erupted from Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, after 1868 were analyzed and were found to decrease sharply relative to lavas erupted before 1868. This abrupt change in lava chemistry, accompanied by a halved lava-production rate for Mauna Loa after 1877, is interpreted to reflect the disruptive effects of a magnitude 7.5 earthquake in 1868. This interpretation represents a documentable case of changes in magmatic chemical variations initiated or accelerated by a major tectonic event. PMID:17778633

  7. Summary of solar activity observed in the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, 1980 - 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, K.; Fisher, R.; Garcia, C.; Yasukawa, E.

    1983-11-01

    The following technical note summarizes solar activity observed during the first four years operation of the experiment systems of the Coronal Dynamics Project, which are located at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory. This short report has been produced with the general aim of providing users of Mauna Loa observations with a summary of data for specific events. So that this table might be as useful as possible, a comprehensive review of three sources was performed. The plain language logs, identified as the so-called observer's logs, the now-discontinued activity logs, and the prominence monitor quality control logs were the sources from which the information in the following tables was obtained.

  8. Piggyback tectonics: Long-term growth of Kilauea on the south flank of Mauna Loa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Sisson, T.W.; Coombs, M.L.; Calvert, A.; Kimura, Jun-Ichi

    2006-01-01

    Compositional and age data from offshore pillow lavas and volcaniclastic sediments, along with on-land geologic, seismic, and deformation data, provide broad perspectives on the early growth of Kilauea Volcano and the long-term geometric evolution of its rift zones. Sulfur-rich glass rinds on pillow lavas and volcaniclastic sediments derived from them document early underwater growth of a large compositionally diverse alkalic edifice. The alkalic rocks yield 40Ar/39Ar ages as old as about 275 ka; transitional-composition lavas, which mark beginning of the shield stage while most or all the edifice remained below sea level, probably first erupted after about 150 ka, and tholeiitic lavas of present-day type are probably younger than 100 ka. Breccia clasts from Papau Seamount and along the lower southwest corner of the Hilina bench are derived from subaerial Mauna Loa, requiring that Mauna Loa's flank underlies western parts of Kilauea at shallow depth. The volume of the Kilauea edifice is therefore smaller (???10,000 km3) than previous estimates (15-40,000 km3); lava-thickness accumulation rates appear to have remained nearly constant during edifice growth, as effusion rates increased from ???25 ?? 106 m3/yr at end of the alkalic stage to the present-day tholeiite rate of ???100 ?? 106 m3/yr. Seismic and gravity data show that the deep plumbing system for Kilauea's magma supply extends nearly vertically through the oceanic crust at least to mantle depths of 30-35 km, directly below its present-day caldera. Proximity of Kilauea's caldera to the surface boundary with Mauna Loa and the presence of Mauna Loa rocks at shallow depth beneath the south flank are difficult to reconcile with a submarine origin for early Kilauea alkalic lavas, unless geometric relations between the two volcanoes have changed substantially during growth of the Kilauea shield. Seismic and ground deformation data suggest seaward spreading of the entire south flank of Hawaii Island, independently

  9. Geochemical evidence for invasion of Kilauea's plumbing system by Mauna Loa magma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, J.M.; Wenz, K.P.; Neal, C.A.; Sparks, J.W.; Lockwood, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    From the beginning of the study of Hawaiian volcanism there has been controversy over possible relationships between the neighbouring active volcanoes Mauna Loa and Kilauea1-5. Seismic activity, thought to reflect upward migration of magma, reveals that the magmatic plumbing systems apparently converge at depth to form a broad funnel within the mantle6. Although on rare occasions they have erupted concurrently, the brief historical eruptive record appears to show that when Kilauea is most active, Mauna Loa is in repose and vice versa, suggesting that they may be competing for the same magma supply5,7. Petrological, geochemical and isotope data, however, require a diametrically opposite conclusion. Distinct differences in major-element, trace-element and isotope compositions of lavas are regarded as compelling evidence that the two volcanoes have separate magmatic plumbing systems, supplied by parental magmas from physically and geochemically distinct mantle sources8-13. Here we present preliminary geochemical data which show that in the past 2,000 years Kilauea has erupted a spectrum of lava compositions resembling historical Kilauea lavas at one end and Mauna Loa lavas at the other. We discuss the cause of this diversity, and speculate that magma from Mauna Loa may have invaded Kilauea's 'high-level' magmatic plumbing system. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Sea surface temperature variation linked to elemental mercury concentrations measured on Mauna Loa

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hg0 time series recorded at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii between 2002 and 2009 has been analyzed using Empirical Mode Decomposition. This technique has been used in numerous contexts in order to identify periodical variations in time series data. The periodicitie...

  11. Coupling at Mauna Loa and Kīlauea by stress transfer in an asthenospheric melt layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonnermann, Helge M.; Foster, James H.; Poland, Michael; Wolfe, Cecily J.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Miklius, Asta

    2012-01-01

    The eruptive activity at the neighbouring Hawaiian volcanoes, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa, is thought to be linked despite both having separate lithospheric magmatic plumbing systems. Over the past century, activity at the two volcanoes has been anti-correlated, which could reflect a competition for the same magma supply. Yet, during the past decade Kīlauea and Mauna Loa have inflated simultaneously. Linked activity between adjacent volcanoes in general remains controversial. Here we present a numerical model for the dynamical interaction between Kīlauea and Mauna Loa, where both volcanoes are coupled by pore-pressure diffusion, occurring within a common, asthenospheric magma supply system. The model is constrained by measurements of gas emission rates indicative of eruptive activity, and it is calibrated to match geodetic measurements of surface deformation at both volcanoes, inferred to reflect changes in shallow magma storage. Although an increase in the asthenospheric magma supply can cause simultaneous inflation of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa, we find that eruptive activity at one volcano may inhibit eruptions of the adjacent volcano, if there is no concurrent increase in magma supply. We conclude that dynamic stress transfer by asthenospheric pore pressure is a viable mechanism for volcano coupling at Hawai‘i, and perhaps for adjacent volcanoes elsewhere.

  12. The Ninole Basalt - Implications for the structural evolution of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Rhodes, J.M.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    Lava flows of the Ninole Basalt, the oldest rocks exposed on the south side of the island of Hawaii, provide age and compositional constraints on the evolution of Mauna Loa volcano and the southeastward age progression of Hawaiian volcanism. Although the tholeiitic Ninole Basalt differs from historic lavas of Mauna Loa volcano in most major-element contents (e.g., variably lower K, Na, Si; higher Al, Fe, Ti, Ca), REE and other relatively immobile minor elements are similar to historic and prehistoric Mauna Loa lavas, and the present major-element differences are mainly due to incipient weathering in the tropical environment. New K-Ar whole-rock ages, from relatively fresh roadcut samples, suggest that the age of the Ninole Basalt is approximately 0.1-0.2 Ma, although resolution is poor because of low contents of K and radiogenic Ar. Originally considered the remnants of a separate volcano, the Ninole Hills are here interpreted as faulted remnants of the old south flank of Mauna Loa. Deep canyons in the Ninole Hills, eroded after massive landslide failure of flanks of the southwest rift zone, have been preserved from burial by younger lava due to westward migration of the rift zone. Landslide-induced depressurization of the southwest rift zone may also have induced phreatomagmatic eruptions that could have deposited widespread Basaltic ash that overlies the Ninole Basalt. Subaerial presence of the Ninole Basalt documents that the southern part of Hawaii Island had grown to much of its present size above sea level by 0.1-0.2 Ma, and places significant limits on subsequent enlargement of the south flank of Mauna Loa. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Swarms of similar long-period earthquakes in the mantle beneath Mauna Loa Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, P.G.; Wolfe, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present analyses of two swarms of long-period (LP) earthquakes at > 30??km depth that accompanied the geodetically observed 2002-2005 Mauna Loa intrusion. The first LP earthquake swarm in 2002 consisted of 31 events that were precursory and preceded the start of Mauna Loa inflation; the second LP swarm of two thousand events occurred from 2004-2005. The rate of LP earthquakes slowed significantly coincident with the occurrence of the December 26, 2004 Mw 9.3 Sumatra earthquake, suggesting that the seismic waves from this great earthquake may have had a dynamic triggering effect on the behavior of Mauna Loa's deep magma system. Using waveform cross correlation and double difference relocation, we find that a large number of earthquakes in each swarm are weakly similar and can be classified into two families. The relocated hypocenters for each family collapse to compact point source regions almost directly beneath the Mauna Loa intrusion. We suggest that the observed waveform characteristics are compatible with each family being associated with the resonance of a single fluid filled vertical crack of fixed geometry, with differences in waveforms between events being produced by slight variations in the trigger mechanism. If these LP earthquakes are part of the primary magma system that fed the 2002-2005 intrusion, as indicated by the spatial and temporal associations between mantle seismicity and surface deformation, then our results raise the possibility that this magma system may be quite focused at these depths as opposed to being a diffuse network. It is likely that only a few locations of Mauna Loa's deep magma system met the geometric and fluid dynamic conditions for generating LP earthquakes that were large enough to be recorded at the surface, and that much of the deep magma transfer associated with the 2002-2005 intrusion occurred aseismically. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Fissure distribution at Mauna Loa (Hawaii) as an example to understand shallow magma transfer at volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Marra, Daniele; Acocella, Valerio; Trusdell, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Mauna Loa (Hawaii) is the largest active shield volcano on the Island of Hawai'i, covering more than half of it and rising to 4,169 meters above sea level. The volcano hosts the Moku'aweoweo summit caldera, from which two elongated rift zones depart: the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) and the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ). Most of Mauna Loa's eruptions begin with lava fountains from a series of fissure vents in the summit region and then often migrate to vents down either rift zone. Mauna Loa volcano shows a distinctive feature, being characterized by minor radial eruptive fissures (not related to the two main rifts) on the NW flank only. This study tries to explain such a selective distribution of vents, and thus of shallow magma transfer. To this aim, we run numerical models with different amount of opening of the two rift zones of Mauna Loa, as well as different amount of slip on its SE flank. Our results suggest that the selective occurrence of the radial fissures may be explained by the competition between two processes: a) rift intrusion (especially along the NERZ), promoting the development of radial dikes along the NW flank; b) flank slip, inhibiting the development of the radial dikes on the SE flank. The opening of the two non-parallel main rift zones of Mauna Loa promotes the local extension necessary to develop the radial dikes on the NW flank. A general model for the development of a third branch of radial rift, which may be also applied to Mt. Etna and some volcanoes on the Canary Islands, is proposed.

  15. What's Your Angle on Angles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Christine A.; Garza-Kling, Gina; Sundling, Elizabeth Hill

    2007-01-01

    Although the nature of the research varies, as do concepts of angle, research in general supports the supposition that angle is a complex idea, best understood from a variety of perspectives. In fact, the concept of angle tends to be threefold, consisting of: (1) the traditional, static notion of two rays meeting at a common vertex; (2) the idea…

  16. Macrofilaricidal Activity after Doxycycline Only Treatment of Onchocerca volvulus in an Area of Loa loa Co-Endemicity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joseph D.; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Esum, Mathias; Johnston, Kelly L.; Langley, R. Stuart; Ford, Louise; Faragher, Brian; Specht, Sabine; Mand, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim; Enyong, Peter; Wanji, Samuel; Taylor, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The risk of severe adverse events following treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin in areas co-endemic with loiasis currently compromises the development of control programmes and the treatment of co-infected individuals. We therefore assessed whether doxycycline treatment could be used without subsequent ivermectin administration to effectively deliver sustained effects on Onchocerca volvulus microfilaridermia and adult viability. Furthermore we assessed the safety of doxycycline treatment prior to ivermectin administration in a subset of onchocerciasis individuals co-infected with low to moderate intensities of Loa loa microfilaraemia. Methods A double-blind, randomized, field trial was conducted of 6 weeks of doxycycline (200 mg/day) alone, doxycycline in combination with ivermectin (150 µg/kg) at +4 months or placebo matching doxycycline + ivermectin at +4 months in 150 individuals infected with Onchocerca volvulus. A further 22 individuals infected with O. volvulus and low to moderate intensities of Loa loa infection were administered with a course of 6 weeks doxycycline with ivermectin at +4 months. Treatment efficacy was determined at 4, 12 and 21 months after the start of doxycycline treatment together with the frequency and severity of adverse events. Results One hundred and four (60.5%) participants completed all treatment allocations and follow up assessments over the 21-month trial period. At 12 months, doxycycline/ivermectin treated individuals had lower levels of microfilaridermia and higher frequency of amicrofilaridermia compared with ivermectin or doxycycline only groups. At 21 months, microfilaridermia in doxycycline/ivermectin and doxycycline only groups was significantly reduced compared to the ivermectin only group. 89% of the doxycycline/ivermectin group and 67% of the doxycycline only group were amicrofilaridermic, compared with 21% in the ivermectin only group. O. volvulus from doxycycline groups were depleted of Wolbachia

  17. Effect of Two or Six Doses 800 mg of Albendazole Every Two Months on Loa loa Microfilaraemia: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kamgno, Joseph; Nguipdop-Djomo, Patrick; Gounoue, Raceline; Téjiokem, Mathurin; Kuesel, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Loiasis is a parasitic infection endemic in the African rain forest caused by the filarial nematode Loa loa. Loiasis can be co-endemic with onchocerciasis and/or lymphatic filariasis. Ivermectin, the drug used in the control of these diseases, can induce serious adverse reactions in patients with high L loa microfilaraemia (LLM). A drug is needed which can lower LLM below the level that represents a risk so that ivermectin mass treatment to support onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis elimination can be implemented safely. Methodology Sixty men and women from a loiasis endemic area in Cameroon were randomized after stratification by screening LLM (≤30000, 30001–50000, >50000) to three treatment arms: two doses albendazole followed by 4 doses matching placebo (n = 20), six doses albendazole (n = 20) albendazole or 6 doses matching placebo (n = 20) administered every two months. LLM was measured before each treatment and 14, 18, 21 and 24 months after the first treatment. Monitoring for adverse events occurred three and seven days as well as 2 months after each treatment. Principal Findings None of the adverse events recorded were considered treatment related. The percentages of participants with ≥ 50% decrease in LLM from pre-treatment for ≥ 4 months were 53%, 17% and 11% in the 6-dose, 2-dose and placebo treatment arms, respectively. The difference between the 6-dose and the placebo arm was significant (p = 0.01). The percentages of participants with LLM < 8100 mf/ml for ≥4 months were 21%, 11% and 0% in the 6-dose, 2-dose and placebo treatment arms, respectively. Conclusions/ Significance The 6-dose regimen reduced LLM significantly, but the reduction was insufficient to eliminate the risk of severe and/or serious adverse reactions during ivermectin mass drug administration in loiasis co-endemic areas. PMID:26967331

  18. Innovative tools for assessing risks for severe adverse events in areas of overlapping Loa loa and other filarial distributions: the application of micro-stratification mapping

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The wide distribution of Loa loa infection (loiasis) throughout the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a major obstacle to the plans to eliminate onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (LF) because the standard drug regime is dependent on ivermectin, which cannot be used in co-endemic areas due to the risk of severe adverse events (SAEs). A better understanding of the micro-epidemiology, overlapping low and high risk areas, and how they relate to SAEs is critical to ensure safe and effective treatment. Findings Based on published data from the Bas Congo Province in DRC, this study used geographical information systems (GIS) to re-map and analyse onchocerciasis and loiasis prevalence (<20%, 20 to 40%, >40%) at 144 sites in relation to health district areas reporting SAEs. The new maps highlighted the contrasting patterns of the high prevalence sites, and significant geographical overlap between low onchocerciasis and high loiasis sites. Statistical analyses found that sites with medium to high loiasis prevalence were 10 to 16 times more likely to be in a SAE area than those with low prevalence of loiasis. Sites where both onchocerciasis and loiasis prevalence was >20% were also associated with SAE areas. Conclusions Collaborative efforts between the national onchocerciasis and LF programmes are critical as plans to scale interventions are moving forward and thus, alternative strategies needed in loiasis co-endemic areas which may include the new L. loa test and treat strategy using the Cellscope, or interventions such as integrated vector management, or anti Wolbachia therapy using doxycycline. PMID:24992829

  19. Seismic and Geodetic Observations of Recent Unrest at Mauna Loa Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth, has exhibited signs of unrest consisting of increased seismicity beginning in March 2013 and slow inflation starting in early 2014. A previous episode of unrest occurred during 2002-2009, with swarms of deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes at >30 km depth and inflationary deformation. Mauna Loa is currently in the longest period of repose in the last 200 years, its last eruption having occurred in 1984. Seismic precursors to eruptions of Mauna Loa eruptions in 1975 and 1984 included episodic volcano-tectonic (VT) events centered northwest of the summit at depths of ~7 km and to the south of the caldera at <5 km depth. Current seismic activity, which has also been episodic, has also consisted of VT events occurring in similar locations, but with much lower energy release than the 1975 and 1984 seismic activity. Beginning in late May 2014, there was also an increase in the occurrence of DLP events. While approaching the numbers of earthquakes seen during the 2002 swarm (31 events) the current number of DLPs thus far pales in comparison to the 2004-2005 swarm (2000 events). As of July 2014, subtle inflationary deformation is apparent in both InSAR and GPS data, although inflation rates are much less than those observed in the several years preceding and following the 1984 eruption, and also far less than during the height of the 2002-2009 unrest. The inflation is consistent with pressurization of the known 3-5-km-deep magma storage area beneath Mauna Loa's caldera. Seismic event rates and deformation, though smaller in magnitude, are similar to the precursory activity seen in 1975 and 1984. Careful tracking of the current unrest by recently upgraded seismic and geodetic monitoring, regardless of whether or not it culminates in eruption, offers excellent prospects for unraveling Mauna Loa's magma plumbing system and structure. In this presentation we will give a synoptic view of unrest associated with Mauna Loa as recorded

  20. SBAS-InSAR analysis of surface deformation at Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casu, F.; Lanari, Riccardo; Sansosti, E.; Solaro, G.; Tizzani, Pietro; Poland, M.; Miklius, Asta

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes, Hawai'i, by exploiting the advanced differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm. In particular, we present time series of line-of-sight (LOS) displacements derived from SAR data acquired by the ASAR instrument, on board the ENVISAT satellite, from the ascending (track 93) and descending (track 429) orbits between 2003 and 2008. For each coherent pixel of the radar images we compute time-dependent surface displacements as well as the average LOS deformation rate. Our results quantify, in space and time, the complex deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes. The derived InSAR measurements are compared to continuous GPS data to asses the quality of the SBAS-InSAR products. ??2009 IEEE.

  1. Mauna Loa--history, hazards and risk of living with the world's largest volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Mauna Loa on the Island Hawaiʻi is the world’s largest volcano. People residing on its flanks face many hazards that come with living on or near an active volcano, including lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and local tsunami (giant seawaves). The County of Hawaiʻi (Island of Hawaiʻi) is the fastest growing County in the State of Hawaii. Its expanding population and increasing development mean that risk from volcano hazards will continue to grow. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) closely monitor and study Mauna Loa Volcano to enable timely warning of hazardous activity and help protect lives and property.

  2. Summary of solar activity observed at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory: 1980-1983. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, K.; Fisher, R.; Garcia, C.; Yasukawa, E.

    1983-11-01

    The following technical note summarizes solar activity observed during the first four years operation of the experiment systems of the Coronal Dynamics Project, which are located at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory. This short report has been produced with the general aim of providing users of Mauna Loa observations with a summary of data for specific events. So that this table might be as useful as possible, a comprehensive review of three sources was performed. The plain language logs, identified as the so-called observer's logs, the now-discontinued activity logs, and the prominence monitor quality control logs were the sources from which the information in the following tables was obtained. It is expected that this review will be of particular use to those investigators who intend to use both the K-coronameter data base and the SMM Coronagraph-Polarimeter data for the study of coronal transient events.

  3. The Mauna Loa carbon dioxide record: lessons for long-term Earth observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundquist, Eric T.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2009-01-01

    The Mauna Loa carbon dioxide record is an iconic symbol of the human capacity to alter the planet. Yet this record would not have been possible without the remarkable work of one man, Charles David Keeling. We describe three emergent themes that characterized his work: (1) his desire to study and understand the processes that control atmospheric CO2 and the global carbon cycle, (2) his campaign to identify and minimize systematic measurement error, and (3) his tenacious efforts to maintain continuous funding despite changing government priorities and institutions. In many ways, the story of the Mauna Loa record demonstrates that distinctions between research and “routine” measurements are not very useful in long-term monitoring of Earth properties and processes.

  4. Volume predictability of historical eruptions at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1989-01-01

    Cumulative volumes of eruptions at the Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes in Hawaii appear to fit a volume-predictable model (i.e., the volume of an eruption episode is approximately proportional to the time since the previous episode) for many larger episodes during long periods of time (decades). This observation suggests that the magmatic pressure of each volcano tends to drop to a common level at the end of these episodes during each such period. ?? 1989.

  5. Rates of volcanic activity along the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    Flow-by-flow mapping of the 65 km long subaerial part of the southwest rift zone and adjacent flanks of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, and about 50 new 14C dates on charcoal from beneath these flows permit estimates of rates of lava accumulation and volcanic growth over the past 10 000 years. The sequence of historic eruptions along the southwest rift zone, beginning in 1868, shows a general pattern of uprift migration and increasing eruptive volume, culminating in the great 1950 eruption. No event comparable to 1950, in terms of volume or vent length, is evident for at least the previous 1000 years. Rates of lava accumulation along the zone have been subequal to those of Kilauea Volcano during the historic period but they were much lower in late prehistoric time (unpubl. Kilauea data by R. T. Holcomb). Rates of surface covering and volcanic growth have been markedly asymmetric along Mauna Loa's southwest rift zone. Accumulation rates have been about half again as great on the northwest side of the rift zone in comparison with the southeast side. The difference apparently reflects a westward lateral shift of the rift zone of Mauna Loa away from Kilauea Volcano, which may have acted as a barrier to symmetrical growth of the rift zone. -Author

  6. Tholeiitic basalt magmatism of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.

    1970-01-01

    The primitive magmas of Kilauca and Mauna Loa are generated by partial melting of mantle peridotite at depths of -60 km or more. Results of high-pressure melting experiments indicate that the primitive melt must contain at least 20% MgO in order to have olivine as a liquidus mineral. The least fractionated lavas of both volcanoes have olivine (Fa13) on the liquidus at 1 atmosphere, suggesting that the only substance lost from the primitive melt, during a rather rapid ascent to the surface, is olivine. This relation allows the primitive composition to be computed by adding olivine to the composition of an erupted lava until total MgO is at least 20 percent. Although roughly similar, historic lavas of the two volcanoes show a consistent difference in composition. The primitive melt of Mauna Loa contains 20% more dissolved orthopyroxene, a high-temperature melting phase in the mantle, and is deficient in elements such as potassium, uranium, and niobium, which presumably occur in minor low-melting phases. Mauna Loa appears to be the older volcano, deriving its magma at higher temperature and greater depth from a more depleted source rock. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Perception of Lava Flow Hazards and Risk at Mauna Loa and Hualalai Volcanoes, Kona, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, C. E.; Houghton, B. F.; Johnston, D. M.; Paton, D.; Swanson, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    The island of Hawaii is composed of five sub-aerially exposed volcanoes, three of which have been active since 1801 (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai). Hawaii has the fastest population growth in the state and the local economy in the Kona districts (i.e., western portion of the island) is driven by tourism. Kona is directly vulnerable to future lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes, as well as indirectly from the effects of lava flows elsewhere that may sever the few roads that connect Kona to other vital areas on the island. A number of factors such as steep slopes, high volume eruptions, and high effusion rates, combine to mean that lava flows from Hualalai and Mauna Loa can be fast-moving and hence unusually hazardous. The proximity of lifelines and structures to potential eruptive sources exacerbates societies' risk to future lava flows. Approximately \\$2.3 billion has been invested on the flanks of Mauna Loa since its last eruption in 1984 (Trusdell 1995). An equivalent figure has not yet been determined for Hualalai, but an international airport, several large resort complexes, and Kailua-Kona, the second largest town on the island, are down-slope and within 15km of potential eruptive Hualalai vents. Public and perhaps official understanding of specific lava flow hazards and the perceptions of risk from renewed volcanism at each volcano are proportional to the time lapsed since the most recent eruption that impacted Kona, rather than a quantitative assessment of risk that takes into account recent growth patterns. Lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai last directly impacted upon Kona during the notorious 1950 and circa 1801 eruptions, respectively. Various non-profit organizations; local, state and federal government entities; and academic institutions have disseminated natural hazard information in Kona but despite the intuitive appeal that increased hazard understanding and risk perception results in increased hazard adjustment adoption, this

  8. The Kea- and Loa- trends and magma genesis in the Hawaiian mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z.; Ingle, S.; Takahashi, E.; Hirano, N.; Hirata, T.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic island and seamount chain has been created by a hot mantle plume located beneath the Pacific lithosphere. The shield volcanoes of the Hawaiian islands are distributed in two curvilinear parallel trends, termed _eKea_Eand _eLoa_E(Jackson et al., 1972). Lavas from these two trends are commonly believed to have different geochemical characteristics (Tatsumoto, 1978; Frey et al., 1994; Hauri, 1996; Lassiter et al., 1996; Abouchami et al., 2005). The Kea- and Loa- geochemical trends within the Hawaiian shield volcanoes have been interpreted to reflect melting above a compositionally concentrically zoned (Hauri, 1996; Lassiter et al., 1996; Kurz et al., 1996; DePaolo et al., 2001) or compositionally left-right asymmetrically zoned mantle plume (Abouchami et al., 2005). In order to evaluate the homogeneity of the mantle plume source sampled by the Kea- and Loa- trends, we analyzed major and trace element compositions of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Hawaiian shield lavas, using EPMA and Laser ICP-MS. We selected lava samples form submarine Hana Ridge, Haleakala volcano (Kea trend) and submarine exposures of the Makapuu stage, Koolau volcano (Loa trend), respectively. We found both Kea- and Loa-like major and trace element compositions from olivine-hosted melt inclusions in individual, shield-stage Hawaiian volcanoes, even within single rock samples. We infer from these data that although one mantle source component may dominate a single lava flow, the two (or more) mantle source components are consistently represented to some extent in all lavas, regardless of the specific geographic location of the volcano. On the basis of whole rock geochemical characteristics (Ren et al., J. pet., 2004; 2005) combined with the melt inclusion data (Ren et al., 2005, Nature), we propose a Hawaiian mantle plume characterized by more random heterogeneity than would be present in a simple compositionally zoned mantle plume. The geochemical differences in

  9. What do Kauai's dikes tell us about the Loa and Kea trends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, S.; Weis, D.; Garcia, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Kauai, the northernmost of the main Hawaiian Islands, is dominated (>98%) by shield stage volcanism, which is predominantly exposed on its western and northern flanks. Surface exposures of shield stage volcanism (Waimea Canyon Basalts, WCB) on Kauai have been dated from 5.1 to 4.0 Ma [1]. Numerous steeply dipping dikes cut the Napali Member of the WCB along the Waimea Canyon and Napali Coast [2]. We present results of major and trace element, and Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characterization of 11 whole-rocks and 13 glasses from WCB dikes. All rocks and glasses are tholeiitic basalts. Major element compositions reflect mostly olivine fractionation and accumulation. Trace element patterns for the samples are typical of ocean island basalts (OIB), with moderate enrichment in high field strength and large ion lithophile elements. C1 chondrite normalized (La/Yb)n vary from 2.76 to 4.75. Dikes plot comparably with shield stage Kauai lavas on the Nb-Zr-Y plot, with Nb/Y = 0.373-0.713 and Zr/Y = 3.93-6.18 [1,3]. Hence dikes plot above and along the lower boundary of the Iceland array [4] with other Hawaiian shield lavas [1,5]. Pb isotopic ratios are intermediate (206Pb/204Pb = 37.99-38.02; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.45-15.47; 208Pb/204Pb = 37.86-38.10) and straddle along the Kea and Loa boundary [6,7] with 208Pb*/206Pb* = 0.9428-0.9492 i.e. non-diagnostic of either trend. Sr, Nd and Hf isotopic compositions are also intermediate, even in binary plots, and fall at the intersection of the Loa and Kea fields. Variations in Zr/Nb and 208Pb*/206Pb* show apparent eastward enrichment from Kauai towards the younger West Kaena Ridge [5]. These observations appear to suggest the presence of the Loa enriched signature until the emergence of Waianae, which has a Kea signature [6]. These results confirm the re-emergence of the Loa component in Hawaiian lavas (previously found in a few south Kauai lavas [1] and in two lavas from the Daikakuji Seamount [8] located just south of the Bend in the Hawaiian

  10. Tropospheric ozone trends at Mauna Loa Observatory tied to decadal climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meiyun; Horowitz, Larry W.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Fan, Songmiao

    2014-02-01

    A potent greenhouse gas and biological irritant, tropospheric ozone is also the primary source of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals, which remove numerous hazardous trace gases from the atmosphere. Tropospheric ozone levels have increased in spring at remote sites in the mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere over the past few decades; this increase has been attributed to a growth in Asian precursor emissions. In contrast, 40 years of continuous measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii reveal little change in tropospheric ozone levels during spring (March-April), but a rise in autumn (September-October). Here we examine the contribution of decadal shifts in atmospheric circulation patterns to decadal variability in tropospheric ozone levels at Mauna Loa using a suite of chemistry-climate model simulations. We show that the flow of ozone-rich air from Eurasia towards Hawaii during spring weakened in the 2000s as a result of La-Niña-like decadal cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. During autumn, in contrast, the flow of ozone-rich air from Eurasia to Hawaii strengthened in the mid-1990s onwards, coincident with the positive phase of the Pacific-North American pattern. We suggest that these shifts in atmospheric circulation patterns can reconcile observed trends in tropospheric ozone levels at Mauna Loa and the northern mid-latitudes in recent decades. We conclude that decadal variability in atmospheric circulation patterns needs to be considered when attributing observed changes in tropospheric ozone levels to human-induced trends in precursor emissions.

  11. Temporal helium isotopic variations within Hawaiian volcanoes: Basalts from Mauna Loa and Haleakala

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, M.D.; O'Brien, P.A. ); Garcia, M.O. ); Frey, F.A. )

    1987-11-01

    Helium isotope ratios in basalts spanning the subaerial eruptive history of Mauna Loa and Haleakala vary systematically with eruption age. In both volcanoes, olivine mineral separates from the oldest samples have the highest {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratios. The Haleakala samples studied range in age from roughly one million years to historic time, while the Mauna Loa samples are radiocarbon dated flows younger than 30,000 years old. The Honomanu tholeiites are the oldest samples from Haleakala and have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratios that range from 13 to 16.8X atmospheric, while the younger Kula and Hana series alkali basalts all have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He close to 8X atmospheric. A similar range is observed on Manua Loa; the oldest samples have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of 15 to 20X atmospheric, with a relatively smooth decrease to 8X atmospheric with decreasing age. The consistent trend of decreasing {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratio with time in both volcanoes, coherence between the helium and Sr and Nd isotopes (for Haleakala), and the similarity of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He in the late stage basalts to depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) helium, argue against the decrease being the result of radiogenic ingrowth of {sup 4}He. The data strongly suggest an undegassed mantle source for the early shield building stages of Hawaiian volcanism, and are consistent with the hotspot/mantle plume model. The data are difficult to reconcile with models for Hawaiian volcanism that require recycled oceanic crust or derivation from a MORB-related upper mantle source. The authors interpret the decrease in {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He with volcano evolution to result from an increasing involvement of depleted mantle and/or lithosphere during the late stages of Hawaiian volcanism.

  12. IR Temperatures of Mauna Loa Caldera Obtained with Multispectral Thermal Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2001-07-18

    A survey of surface temperatures of the Mauna Loa caldera during 7/14/00 and 7/15/00 was made by SRTC in conjunction with a MTI satellite image collection. The general variation of surface temperature appears quite predictable responding to solar heating. The analysis of detailed times series of temperature indicates systematic variations in temperature of 5 C corresponding to time scales of 3-5 minutes and space scales of 10-20 m. The average temperature patterns are consistent with those predicted by the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS).

  13. Interannual variation in the seasonal cycle of carbon dioxide concentration at Mauna Loa

    SciTech Connect

    Enting, I.G.

    1987-05-20

    A band-pass filter is used to obtain an estimate of the seasonal CO/sub 2/ cycle at Mauna Loa from monthly mean concentration data. The signal that is extracted shows interannual variations in the amplitude with, as has frequently been noted, a preponderance of larger amplitudes in recent years. An interesting feature of the signal is that abnormally small amplitude peaks in the (northern) spring are almost always followed by small-amplitude troughs in the following fall but that there is no similar correlation between the amplitudes of peaks in fall and the following spring. This suggests that the amplitude variations reflect changes in individual northern growth seasons.

  14. Stress control of deep rift intrusion at Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Amelung, Falk; Yun, Sang-Ho; Walter, Thomas R; Segall, Paul; Kim, Sang-Wan

    2007-05-18

    Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, deforms by a combination of shallow dike intrusions in the rift zones and earthquakes along the base of the volcano, but it is not known how the spreading is accommodated in the lower part of the volcanic edifice. We present evidence from interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for secular inflation of a dike-like magma body at intermediate depth in the southwest rift zone during 2002 to 2005. Magma accumulation occurred in a section of the rift zone that was unclamped by previous dikes and earthquakes, suggesting that stress transfer plays an important role in controlling subsurface magma accumulation. PMID:17510364

  15. The effect of the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol on the NHO3 column over Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Shelle J.; Murcray, Frank J.; Goldman, Aaron; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Murcray, David G.

    1994-01-01

    A very high resolution infrared solar spectrometer system for the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change has been routinely operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii since November, 1991. Solar absorption spectra are normally taken one day a week at sunrise. We report the analysis of these spectra for the vertical column amount of nitric acid (HNO3) vapor. The observations began four months after the arrival of volcanic aerosols from Mt. Pinatubo over the site. Although quite variable, total HNO3 columns were initially about 7 x 10(exp 15) molecules/sq cm and have decreased about 30% in the following two years.

  16. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  17. Cross-Reactivity of Filariais ICT Cards in Areas of Contrasting Endemicity of Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in Cameroon: Implications for Shrinking of the Lymphatic Filariasis Map in the Central African Region

    PubMed Central

    Wanji, Samuel; Koudou, Benjamin; Chounna Ndongmo, Patrick W.; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A.; Datchoua-Poutcheu, Fabrice R.; Fovennso, Bridget Adzemye; Tayong, Dizzle Bita; Fombad, Fanny Fri; Fischer, Peter U.; Enyong, Peter I.; Bockarie, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunochromatographic card test (ICT) is a tool to map the distribution of Wuchereria bancrofti. In areas highly endemic for loaisis in DRC and Cameroon, a relationship has been envisaged between high L. loa microfilaria (Mf) loads and ICT positivity. However, similar associations have not been demonstrated from other areas with contrasting levels of L. loa endemicity. This study investigated the cross-reactivity of ICT when mapping lymphatic filariasis (LF) in areas with contrasting endemicity levels of loiasis and mansonellosis in Cameroon. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence and intensity of W. bancrofti, L. loa and M. perstans was carried out in 42 villages across three regions (East, North-west and South-west) of the Cameroon rainforest domain. Diurnal blood was collected from participants for the detection of circulating filarial antigen (CFA) by ICT and assessment of Mf using a thick blood smear. Clinical manifestations of LF were also assessed. ICT positives and patients clinically diagnosed with lymphoedema were further subjected to night blood collection for the detection of W. bancrofti Mf. Overall, 2190 individuals took part in the study. Overall, 24 individuals residing in 14 communities were tested positive by ICT, with prevalence rates ranging from 0% in the South-west to 2.1% in the North-west. Lymphoedema were diagnosed in 20 individuals with the majority of cases found in the North-west (11/20), and none of them were tested positive by ICT. No Mf of W. bancrofti were found in the night blood of any individual with a positive ICT result or clinical lymphoedema. Positive ICT results were strongly associated with high L. loa Mf intensity with 21 subjects having more than 8,000 L. loa Mf ml/blood (Odds ratio = 15.4; 95%CI: 6.1–39.0; p < 0.001). Similarly, a strong positive association (Spearman’s rho = 0.900; p = 0.037) was observed between the prevalence of L. loa and ICT positivity by area

  18. Absence of an association between Plasmodium falciparum infection and post-ivermectin Loa-related non-neurologic serious adverse events.

    PubMed

    Fokom-Domgue, Joël; Pion, Sébastien D; Gounoue, Raceline; Akame, Julie; Nguipdop-Djomo, Patrick; Twum-Danso, Nana A Y; Thylefors, Björn; Boussinesq, Michel; Kamgno, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Although ivermectin treatment can induce serious adverse events (SAEs) in individuals harboring high Loa loa microfilaremia (mf), not all patients with high mf levels develop such reactions, suggesting that cofactors may be involved. A study was conducted in Cameroon to investigate the possible role of Plasmodium coinfection at the time of ivermectin treatment in the development of SAEs. Before their first ivermectin treatment, thick smears were obtained from 4,175 individuals to determine the burden of Plasmodium sp., L. loa, and Mansonella perstans. After treatment, 18 (4.3 per 1,000) patients developed a non-neurologic SAE. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, P. falciparum infection, and M. perstans infection intensities, confirmed that L. loa mf was the main risk factor for SAEs. We found no evidence that coinfection with P. falciparum at the time of ivermectin treatment was associated with the occurrence of Loa-related SAEs in this population. PMID:24420781

  19. Chlorine-36 Exposure Dating of Recent Explosive Events on Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungerford, J. D.; Stone, J. O.; Fifield, K.; Trusdell, F. A.

    2002-12-01

    We have dated lavas and explosive debris from around the summit caldera of Mauna Loa using in-situ produced cosmogenic Cl-36. Explosive deposits occur as three debris aprons of blocks up to 2 meters. Within the ejecta debris are intrusive rocks (gabbros, pyroxenites), and vesicular and dense basalts. The pahoehoe substrate of the northwest fan has an apparent exposure age of 970 +/- 120 years, in good agreement with radiocarbon ages that range in age from 1090 - 1200 yr B.P. Three clasts from the NW fan have exposure ages ranging from 930+/-120 to 1140+/-120 years, indicating an explosive eruption occured very shortly after emplacment of the underlying flow. These ages should be regarded as upper limits until we have confirmed that Cl-36/Cl ratios are low in freshly erupted Mauna Loa basalt. Low initial ratios (<1e-15) are anticipated based on magmatic U, Th and Cl concentrations and likely magma chamber residence times. Low ratios would also result from assimilation of marine chloride with Cl-36/Cl <1e-15. However, assimilation of surficial material, or magmatic interaction with Cl-36 bearing groundwater might result in higher initial values. We are measuring samples from the 1975 and 1984 eruptions to investigate these possibilities.

  20. "The upper limits of vegetation on Mauna Loa, Hawaii": a 50th-anniversary reassessment.

    PubMed

    Juvik, James O; Rodomsky, Brett T; Price, Jonathan P; Hansen, Eric W; Kueffer, Christoph

    2011-02-01

    In January 1958, a survey of alpine flora was conducted along a recently constructed access road across the upper volcanic slopes of Mauna Loa, Hawaii (2525-3397 m). Only five native Hawaiian species were encountered on sparsely vegetated historic and prehistoric lava flows adjacent to the roadway. A resurvey of roadside flora in 2008 yielded a more than fourfold increase to 22 species, including nine native species not previously recorded. Eight new alien species have now invaded this alpine environment, although exclusively limited to a few individuals in ruderal habitat along the roadway. Alternative explanations for species invasion and altitudinal change over the past 50 years are evaluated: (1) changes related to continuing primary succession on ameliorating (weathering) young lava substrates; (2) local climate change; and (3) road improvements and increased vehicular access which promote enhanced car-borne dispersal of alien species derived from the expanding pool of potential colonizers naturalized on the island in recent decades. Unlike alpine environments in temperate latitudes, the energy component (warming) in climate change on Mauna Loa does not appear to be the unequivocal driver of plant invasion and range extension. Warming may be offset by other climate change factors including rainfall and evapotranspiration. PMID:21618930

  1. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Brown, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of “reactant” concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q10 values of ≈7–50, compared with typical Q10 values of 1.5–3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly. PMID:18156366

  2. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Vitousek, Peter M; Brown, James H

    2008-01-01

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of "reactant" concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q(10) values of approximately 7-50, compared with typical Q(10) values of 1.5-3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly. PMID:18156366

  3. Imaging the crustal magma sources beneath Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, P.G.; Benz, H.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional seismic P-wave traveltime tomography is used to image the magma sources beneath Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, Hawaii. High-velocity bodies (>6.4 km/s) in the upper 9 km of the crust beneath the summits and rift zones of the volcanoes correlate with zones of high magnetic intensities and are interpreted as solidified gabbro-ultramafic cumulates from which the surface volcanism is derived. The proximity of these high-velocity features to the rift zones is consistent with a ridge-spreading model of the volcanic flank. Southeast of the Hilina fault zone, along the south flank of Kilauea, low-velocity material (<6.0 km/s) is observed extending to depths of 9-11 km, indicating that the Hilina fault may extend possibly as deep as the basal decollement. Along the southeast flank of Mauna Loa, a similar low -velocity zone associated with the Kaoiki fault zone is observed extending to depths of 6-8 km. These two upper crustal low-velocity zones suggest common stages in the evolution of the Hawaiian shield volcanoes in which these fault systems are formed as a result of upper crustal deformation in response to magma injection within the volcanic edifice.

  4. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations -- Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii 1958--1986

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, T.A.

    1986-09-01

    Since 1958, CO{sub 2} concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory have been obtained using a nondispersive, dual detector, infrared gas analyzer. Air samples are obtained from air intakes at the top of four 7m towers and one 27m tower. Those involved in the monitoring project have attempted to improving sampling techniques, reduce possible contamination sources, and adjust data to represent uncontaminated, true conditions throughout the twenty-eight year sampling period. The gas analyzer is calibrated by standardized CO{sub 2}-in-nitrogen reference gases twice daily. Flask samples are taken twice a month for comparison to the data recorded using the infrared gas analyzer. Data are scrutinized daily for possible contamination and archived on magnetic tape for further scrutiny and adjustment. Daily, monthly, and annual averages are computed for the Mauna Loa data after deletion of contaminated samples and readjustment of the data. These averages have shown a steady rise in annual average concentration from 316 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1959 to 346 ppmv in 1986.

  5. The origin of Mauna Loa's Nīnole Hills: Evidence of rift zone reorganization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Jeffrey; Williams-Jones, Glyn; Trusdell, Frank; Martin, Simon

    2015-10-01

    In order to identify the origin of Mauna Loa volcano's Nīnole Hills, Bouguer gravity was used to delineate density contrasts within the edifice. Our survey identified two residual anomalies beneath the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and the Nīnole Hills. The Nīnole Hills anomaly is elongated, striking northeast, and in inversions both anomalies merge at approximately -7 km above sea level. The positive anomaly, modeled as a rock volume of ~1200 km3 beneath the Nīnole Hills, is associated with old eruptive vents. Based on the geologic and geophysical data, we propose that the gravity anomaly under the Nīnole Hills records an early SWRZ orientation, now abandoned due to geologically rapid rift-zone reorganization. Catastrophic submarine landslides from Mauna Loa's western flank are the most likely cause for the concurrent abandonment of the Nīnole Hills section of the SWRZ. Rift zone reorganization induced by mass wasting is likely more common than currently recognized.

  6. Lidar Observations of the Middle Atmospheric Thermal Tides at Mauna Loa (19.5 Comparison with HRDI and GSWM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermid, I.; Leblanc, T.; Ortland, D.

    1998-01-01

    The tidal signature in the middle atmospheric thermal structure (15-95 km) at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, (19.5is investigated using more than 145 hours of nighttime lidar measurements obtained during October 3-16, 1996 and October 2-11, 1997.

  7. Long, paired A'A/Pahoehoe flows of Mauna Loa: Volcanological significance and insights they provide into volcano plumbing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Scott K.; Walker, George P. L.

    1987-01-01

    The long lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawaii have been cited as Earth's closed analogs to the large Martian flows. It is therefore important to understand the flow mechanics and characteristics of the Mauna Loa flows and to make use of these in an attempt to gain insights into Martian eruptive processes. Two fundamentally different kinds of long lava flows can be distinguished on Hawaiian volcanoes as in Martian flows. The two kinds may have identical initial viscosities, chemical compositions, flow lengths, and flow volumes, but their flow mechanisms and thermal energy budgets are radically different. One travels a distance set by the discharge rate as envisaged by Walker and Wadge, and the other travels a distance set mainly by the eruption duration and ground slope. In the Mauna Loa lavas, yield strength becomes an important flow morphology control only in the distal part of a'a lavas. The occurrence of paired flows on Mauna Loa yields insights into the internal plumbing systems of the volcano, and it is significant that all of the volume of the a'a flow must be stored in a magma chamber before eruption, while none of the volume of the pahoehoe needs to be so stored. Differentiation between the two kinds of flows on images of Martian volcanoes is possible and hence an improved understanding of these huge structures is acquired.

  8. Atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa Observatory 2. Analysis of the NOAA GMCC data, 1974--1985

    SciTech Connect

    Thoning, K. W.; Tans, P. P.; Komhyr, W. D.

    1989-06-20

    The first 12 years (1974--1985) of continuous atmospheric CO/sub 2/ measurements from the NOAA GMCC programs at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii are analyzed. Hourly and daily variations in the concentration of CO/sub 2/ due to local sources and sinks are described, with subsequent selection of data representing background concentrations. A digital filtering technique using the fast Fourier transform and low-pass filters was used to smooth the selected data and to separate the seasonal cycle from the long-term increase in CO/sub 2/. The amplitude of the seasonal cycle was found to be increasing at a rate of 0.05/plus minus/0.02 ppm yr/sup /minus/1/. The average growth rate of CO/sub 2/ was 1.42/plus minus/0.02 ppm yr/sup /minus/1/, and the fraction of CO/sub 2/ remaining in the atmosphere from fossil fuel combustion was 59%. A comparison between the Mauna Loa continuous CO/sub 2/ data and the CO/sub 2/ flask sample data from the sea level site at Cape Kumukahi, Hawaii, showed that the amplitude of the seasonal cycle at Cape Kumakahi was 23% larger than at Mauna Loa, with the phase of the cycle at Mauna Loa lagging the cycle at Cape Kumukahi by about 1-2 weeks. /copyright/ American Geophysical Union 1989

  9. MULTISCALE THERMAL-INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF THE MAUNA LOA CALDERA, HAWAII

    SciTech Connect

    L. BALICK; A. GILLESPIE; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Until recently, most thermal infrared measurements of natural scenes have been made at disparate scales, typically 10{sup {minus}3}-10{sup {minus}2} m (spectra) and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} m (satellite images), with occasional airborne images (10{sup 1} m) filling the gap. Temperature and emissivity fields are spatially heterogeneous over a similar range of scales, depending on scene composition. A common problem for the land surface, therefore, has been relating field spectral and temperature measurements to satellite data, yet in many cases this is necessary if satellite data are to be interpreted to yield meaningful information about the land surface. Recently, three new satellites with thermal imaging capability at the 10{sup 1}-10{sup 2} m scale have been launched: MTI, TERRA, and Landsat 7. MTI acquires multispectral images in the mid-infrared (3-5{micro}m) and longwave infrared (8-10{micro}m) with 20m resolution. ASTER and MODIS aboard TERRA acquire multispectral longwave images at 90m and 500-1000m, respectively, and MODIS also acquires multispectral mid-infrared images. Landsat 7 acquires broadband longwave images at 60m. As part of an experiment to validate the temperature and thermal emissivity values calculated from MTI and ASTER images, we have targeted the summit region of Mauna Loa for field characterization and near-simultaneous satellite imaging, both on daytime and nighttime overpasses, and compare the results to previously acquired 10{sup {minus}1} m airborne images, ground-level multispectral FLIR images, and the field spectra. Mauna Loa was chosen in large part because the 4x6km summit caldera, flooded with fresh basalt in 1984, appears to be spectrally homogeneous at scales between 10{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup 2} m, facilitating the comparison of sensed temperature. The validation results suggest that, with careful atmospheric compensation, it is possible to match ground measurements with measurements from space, and to use the Mauna Loa validation

  10. A possible mechanism to produce the 'Loa' and 'Kea' trends at Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W. J.; Morgan, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    The subparallel ‘Loa’ and ‘Kea’ lineaments of recent Hawaiian volcanism may provide a clue to the rheological changes associated with plume melt-extraction. Elastic gravitational stresses from pre-existing edifices were used to explain the geometry of Hawaiian rift zones with Fiske and Jackson's (1972) elegant analog jello model (and with more recent numerical treatments, c.f. Bianco et al. and Hieronymus and Bercovici). However, the idea of a top-down control of the intrusion geometry by gravitational stresses doesn’t explain why the ‘Loa’ and ‘Kea’ volcanic trends should be associated with distinct geochemical signals. At face value, this suggests that there has been a persistent difference between the deep mantle sources of the Loa and Kea trends. Two ideas have been proposed to create the chemical contrast between the Loa and Kea sources: (1) a ‘spaghetti’ plume model with persistent lateral compositional ‘stripes’ within the plume, and (2) zoned melting between a hot-plume-center and cooler-plume-rim. Here we propose a different mechanical mechanism for this phenomenon, where a spaghetti-like column is buckling back and forth to produce the separate volcanic trends. We have earlier proposed that melt-extraction in the central (hot) region of a rising plume leads to the formation of dessicated restite that is more viscous and less dense than surrounding asthenosphere. Many features of the Hawaiian swell and the subsidence of this swell with age are explained by this carrot-shaped (or for a moving plate, blade-shaped) column as it spreads outward in the asthenosphere when it reaches the base of the lithosphere. Ribe (Phys. Rev. E, vol. 68(3), 2003) examined the periodic buckling of a stiff, dense sheet of viscous material when it encounters a rigid surface, and proposed this explains the broadening of a subducted slab when it strikes the 660 boundary. We use his results upside-down - a lighter but stiffer (because of melt extraction

  11. Results of a Longer Term NDACC Measurements Comparison Campaign at Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Twigg, Laurence W.; Sumnicht, Grant K.; Leblanc, Thierry; Barnes, John

    2016-06-01

    Between November, 2015 and January, 2015, the Goddard Space Flight Center operated a pair of lidar instruments at the NOAA facility at Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii (Lat. 19.5N, Lon. 155.5 W, Altitude 3.397 km). Measurements were made during six different four week periods during this time period by both the NASA GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar (STROZ) and the Aerosol and Temperature (ATL) lidar. Also making measurements were the JPL Stratospheric Ozone Lidar and the NOAA Aerosol and Water Vapor Lidar. All instruments participate and archive data with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. Measurement comparisons were made among various instruments in accordance with the standard intercomparison protocols of the NDACC.

  12. Infrared Measurements of Atmospheric Gases Above Mauna Loa, Hawaii, in February 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.02/ cm resolution from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geophysical Monitoring for Climate Change (GMCC) program station at Mauna Loa, Hawaii (latitude 19.5 deg N, longitude 155.6 deg W, elevation 3.40 km), in February 1997 have been analyzed to determine simultaneous total vertical column amounts for 13 atmospheric gases. Average tropospheric concentrations of CO2, N2O, CH4, and CHCIF2 and the daytime diurnal variations or the total columns of NO and NO2 have also been inferred. The retrieved total columns (in molecules /sq cm) of the nondiurnally varying gases are 1.6 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 15) for HCl, 5.9 +/- 1.2 x 10(exp 15) for HNO3, 2.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 21) for H2O16, 4.4 +/- 0.7 x 10(exp 18) for H2O18, 2.7 +/- 0.1 x 10(exp 17) for HDO, 2.3 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 19) for CH4, 5.0 +/- 0.5 x 10(exp 21) for CO2, 6.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(exp 18) for O3, 4.3 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp 18) for N2O, 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 16) for C2H6, and 9.7 +/- 2.5 x 10(exp 14) for CHClF2. We compare the total column measurements of HCl and HNO3 with previously reported ground-based, aircraft, and satellite measurements. The results for HCl are or particular interest because of the expected temporal increase in the concentration of this gas in the stratosphere. However, systematic differences among stratospheric HCl total column measurements from 1978 to 1980 and the absence of observations of free tropospheric HCl above Mauna Loa make it impossible to obtain a reliable estimate of the trend in the total burden of HCl. The measured HNO3 total column is consistent with aircraft measurements from approx. 12 km altitude. The O3 total column deduced from the IR spectra agrees with correlative Mauna Loa Umkehr measurements within the estimated error limits. The column-averaged D/H ratio of water vapor is (68 +/- 9) x- 10(exp -6), which is 0.44 +/- 0.06 times the reference value of 155.76 x 10(exp -6) for standard mean ocean water (SMOW). This

  13. Sea surface temperature variation linked to elemental mercury concentrations measured on Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, F.; Landis, M. S.; Gencarelli, C. N.; Naccarato, A.; Sprovieri, F.; De Simone, F.; Hedgecock, I. M.; Pirrone, N.

    2016-07-01

    The Hg0 time series recorded at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii between 2002 and 2009 has been analyzed using Empirical Mode Decomposition. This technique has been used in numerous contexts in order to identify periodical variations in time series data. The periodicities observed in the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST), through the data collected from five buoys, are also observed in Hg0 concentrations and the relative humidity measured at the MLO. The lag times in the observed periodicities are related to the position of the buoys with respect to the measurement site. This demonstrates a direct link between climatological phenomena, in this case SST, and measured Hg0 and reflects the influence of ocean SST on Hg0 evasion. This is the first long-term experimental evidence of such a direct effect on Hg0 evasion from the oceanic surface driven by temperature.

  14. Effects of surface reflectance on skylight polarization measurements at the Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Andrew R; Pust, Nathan J; Shaw, Joseph A

    2011-08-15

    An all-sky imaging polarimeter was deployed in summer 2008 to the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii to study clear-sky atmospheric skylight polarization. The imager operates in five wavebands in the visible and near infrared spectrum and has a fisheye lens for all-sky viewing. This paper describes the deployment and presents comparisons of the degree of skylight polarization observed to similar data observed by Coulson with a principal-plane scanning polarimeter in the late 1970s. In general, the results compared favorably to those of Coulson. In addition, we present quantitative results correlating a variation of the maximum degree of polarization over a range of 70-85% to fluctuation in underlying surface reflectance and upwelling radiance data from the GOES satellite. PMID:21934965

  15. Orographic cloud over the eastern slopes of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, related to insolation and wind

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.J.

    1980-07-01

    During the period 1 to 11 June 1978, solar radiation and other meteorological data were gathered at eight stations arranged in a nearly linear transection extending from the coast at Hilo, Hawaii to Mauna Loa Observatory, 60 km inland and 3400 m higher. Solar radiation distributions followed climatological rainfall patterns; the driest areas were sunniest. At the wettest sites, underneath the orographic cloud, measured global solar radiation was only 50% of clear-sky potential, and the diffuse component probably accounted for more than 50% of the global radiation. The orographic cloud developed during the day in upslope winds, and sharply reduced afternoon solar radiation at all sites. Total cloudiness, and hence insolation, varied greatly from day to day due to the passage of trade wind cloud masses and jet stream cirrus.

  16. Diurnal variability of atmospheric methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide at Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. P.; Zimmerman, P. R.; Pollock, W. F.; Lueb, R. A.; Heidt, L. E.

    1992-06-01

    Results are presented on measurements of atmospheric CH4, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and CO, made in May-June 1988 at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO). The results pointed to marine sources for ethylene and propylene and island sources for isoprene. The mixing ratio of ethylene and propylene measured at the MLO location (3.4 km elevation) were consistent with previously reported boundary layer values and flux estimates. It is suggested that oxidation of ethylene and propylene may represent a significant source of CO in the marine boundary layer. Isoprene fluxes from major flora on Hawaii were low compared to continental emissions from several species of oak reported by Zimmerman (1979). A comparison of in situ sampling and canister sampling techniques for measurements of CH4, CO, ethane, and propane yielded good agreement.

  17. Differentiation in the cumulates from a Mauna Loa, Hawaii magma chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Schwindinger, K.R.; Anderson, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The interstitial glass in cognate nodules from Mauna Loa, has by chemical diffusion or convective fluid transport, remained in equilibrium with the overlying magma. The glass bearing nodules were collected from Damona Cone on the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loas. The nodules have approximately 15% olivine, 40% orthopyroxene plus clinopyroxene (3-20%), and 85% plagioclase plus vescicular glass (2-25%). Olivine norites have anhedral olivine mantled with anhedral orthopyroxene, subhedral to euhedral pyroxene, anhedral plagioclase, and 20 to 25% glass. Olivine gabbros have anhedral olivine, subequant, anhedral to subhedral pyroxene and plagioclase and less than 10% glass. The bulk composition of greater than 15%, MgO, with the textures, indicate the nodules are an accumulative origin. Thus these nodules are partially solidified pieces of crystal/liquid accumulative mush. The compositions of the olivines are Fa 18 to 25 mole percent, of the plagioclases are An 70 to 80 mole percent. The composition of the orthopyroxene is En76 Fs19 Wo5, and of the clinopyroxene is En50 Fall Wo30. The composition of the interstitial glasses is: SiO2 52.54, TiO2 2.04, Al2O3 14.39, FeO 11.47, MgO 7.15, CaO 10.28, Na20 1.42, K2O 0.39, P2O5 0.21. The low Na2O is from two nodules that may have experienced high temperature alteration. The uniformity of the glass composition, in contrast to its large variation in the mode, suggests the interstitial liquid in the mush has remained in equilibrium with some large reservoir of MgO rich liquid, such as the magma above the mush. Two possible mechanisms of cation exchange between the magma and the interstitial liquid of the mush are chemical diffusion and convective fluid transport.

  18. Clinical picture, epidemiology and outcome of Loa-associated serious adverse events related to mass ivermectin treatment of onchocerciasis in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Boussinesq, Michel; Gardon, Jacques; Gardon-Wendel, Nathalie; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe

    2003-01-01

    In August 2002, 65 cases of Loa-associated neurological Serious Adverse Events were reported after ivermectin treatment. The first signs, occurring within the 12–24 hours following treatment, included fatigue, generalized arthralgia, and sometimes agitation, mutism, and incontinence. Disorders of consciousness, including coma, generally appeared between 24 and 72 hours, and showed a rapid variation with time. The most frequent objective neurological signs were extrapyramidal. The patients presented with haemorrhages of the conjunctiva and of the retina. Biological examinations showed a massive Loa microfilaruria, the passage of Loa microfilariae into the cerebrospinal fluid, haematuria, and an increase in the C-reactive protein, all of which have been correlated with the high intensity of the initial Loa microfilaraemia. Eosinophil counts decreased dramatically within the first 24 hours, and then rose again rapidly. Electroencephalograms suggested the existence of a diffuse pathological process within the first weeks; the abnormalities disappearing after 3–6 months. Death may occur when patients are not properly managed, i.e. in the absence of good nursing. However, some patients who recovered showed sequelae such as aphasia, episodic amnesia, or extrapyramidal signs. The main risk factor for these encephalopathies is the intensity of the initial Loa microfilaraemia. The disorders of consciousness may occur when there are >50,000 Loa microfilariae per ml. The possible roles of co-factors, such as Loa strains, genetic predisposition of individuals, co-infestations with other parasites, or alcohol consumption, seem to be minor but they should be considered. The mechanisms of the post-ivermectin Loa-related encephalopathies should be investigated to improve the management of patients developing the condition. PMID:14975061

  19. The LOSS OF APOMEIOSIS (LOA) locus in Hieracium praealtum can function independently of the associated large-scale repetitive chromosomal structure.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Yoshiko; Henderson, Steven T; Suzuki, Go; Johnson, Susan D; Okada, Takashi; Siddons, Hayley; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Koltunow, Anna M G

    2014-02-01

    Apomixis or asexual seed formation in Hieracium praealtum (Asteraceae) is controlled by two independent dominant loci. One of these, the LOSS OF APOMEIOSIS (LOA) locus, controls apomixis initiation, mitotic embryo sac formation (apospory) and suppression of the sexual pathway. The LOA locus is found near the end of a hemizygous chromosome surrounded by extensive repeats extending along the chromosome arm. Similar apomixis-carrying chromosome structures have been found in some apomictic grasses, suggesting that the extensive repetitive sequences may be functionally relevant to apomixis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to examine chromosomes of apomeiosis deletion mutants and rare recombinants in the critical LOA region arising from a cross between sexual Hieracium pilosella and apomictic H. praealtum. The combined analyses of aposporous and nonaposporous recombinant progeny and chromosomal karyotypes were used to determine that the functional LOA locus can be genetically separated from the very extensive repeat regions found on the LOA-carrying chromosome. The large-scale repetitive sequences associated with the LOA locus in H. praealtum are not essential for apospory or suppression of sexual megasporogenesis (female meiosis). PMID:24400904

  20. Condensation nuclei and aerosol-scattering extinction measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory: 1974-1985. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, D.M.; Quakenbush, T.K.; Bodhaine, B.A.

    1987-07-01

    The observatory at Mauna Loa, Hawaii measures the characteristics of surface aerosols under background conditions. The instruments provide data that are representative of the background-aerosol climatology at Mauna Loa. These data can also be used to identify potential local contamination periods. The nephelometer's light-scattering measurements show an annual cycle: a maximum in April and a minimum in November, with a variation of a factor of 5.5. The Condensation Nucleus (CN) counter shows a much smaller annual cycle: a maximum in September and a minimum in March, with a variation of a factor of 1.5. A local decrease in CN concentration occurs in August. The Angstrom exponent minimum occurs in May. This indicates larger aerosol particles within the month as compared with the remainder of the year.

  1. The Paradox of Consistency in the Major Element Compositions of Mauna Loa Magmas Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The vast majority of Mauna Loa lavas plot on well-defined olivine-control trends. When normalized to a constant MgO content (16%) their major element compositions (SiO2 = 48.86 +/- 0.30; Al2O3 = 10.58 +/- 0.17; FeO = 9.83 +/- 0.23; CaO = 8.31 +/- 0.19 (all at 1 sigma)) have remained remarkably constant for over 600 ka. This observation is distinctly at odds with what we think we know about melting processes and source components in the Hawaiian plume. Given a 9-10 cm/yr northwesterly movement of the Pacific plate, Mauna Loa will have traversed about two thirds of the plume melting zone (~ 60 km) over 600 ka. It should, therefore, have sampled magmas of varying compositions produced by melting at different temperatures and depths within the plume. Additionally, in contrast with the major elements, the isotopic ratios of these lavas over 600 ka are highly variable (Sr and Pb 39% and Pb 43% of the entire range for Hawaiian shield lavas). This implies varying contributions of plume (Loihi) and recycled crustal (Koolau) components which should also strongly influence the major element compositions of the magmas. What is the explanation for this paradox? Two ubiquitous processes, one deep the other shallow, are thought to be responsible. First, diverse magma compositions are produced, as anticipated, by melting at varying T and P, and from mixtures of different source components. On ascent, these melts react with overlying depleted harzburgite residue produced by prior melting in the plume. The resulting magma composition will reflect the depth at which it finally segregates from this residue. The silica geobarometer indicates that this depth is relatively shallow (~45 - 60 km), resulting in comparatively uniform high SiO2 and other major element constituents of the parental magmas. Secondly, these parental magmas mix into a magma reservoir at shallow levels within the volcano. This reservoir magma is 'perched' at the end of the olivine-control trend at the pigeonite

  2. Trace element abundances of high-MgO glasses from Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala volcanoes, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, T.P.; Clague, D.A.; Hauri, E.H.; Grove, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    We performed an ion-microprobe study of eleven high-MgO (6.7-14.8 wt%) tholeiite glasses from the Hawaiian volcanoes Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala. We determined the rare earth (RE), high field strength, and other selected trace element abundances of these glasses, and used the data to establish their relationship to typical Hawaiian shield tholeiite and to infer characteristics of their source. The glasses have trace element abundance characteristics generally similar to those of typical shield tholeiites, e.g. L(light)REE/H(heavy)REE(C1) > 1. The Kilauea and Mauna Loa glasses, however, display trace and major element characteristics that cross geochemical discriminants observed between Kilauea and Mauna Loa shield lavas. The glasses contain a blend of these discriminating chemical characteristics, and are not exactly like the typical shield lavas from either volcano. The production of these hybrid magmas likely requires a complexly zoned source, rather than two unique sources. When corrected for olivine fractionation, the glass data show correlations between CaO concentration and incompatible trace element abundances, indicating that CaO may behave incompatibly during melting of the tholeiite source. Furthermore, the tholeiite source must contain residual garnet and clinopyroxene to account for the variation in trace element abundances of the Kilauea glasses. Inversion modeling indicates that the Kilauea source is flat relative to C1 chondrites, and has a higher bulk distribution coefficient for the HREE than the LREE.

  3. Tracking the nature and duration of magma transfer beneath Mauna Loa using a crystal population and kinetic modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, M.; Morgan, D. J.; Thornber, C. R.; Trusdell, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Deep long period (DPL) seismic swarms recently detected beneath Mauna Loa fuel speculation whether the volcano could enter a renewed phase of unrest. To mitigate threats from future eruptions, a better understanding of how and over which timescales magma moves within Mauna Loa is required. We present a novel approach linking the compositions preserved in the chemical stratigraphy of 158 olivine crystals with kinetic modelling to provide timescales and routes of magma migration beneath Mauna Loa prior to the voluminous (376 million m3, [1]) 1950 eruption of Mauna Loa. We have studied a total of 8 near-vent samples erupted from fissures that opened progressively at elevations from 12,000ft to 8,500ft within the first 24h of the eruption (June 1-23, 1950). The samples contain olivine crystals with different populations of core (Fo89, Fo87-88, Fo85-86, Fo82-84), and rim compositions (majority Fo78-81) and zoning patterns (normal, reverse and complex). The diverging compositional and zoning record can be best explained as the product of magma evolution in five distinct magmatic environments (MEs): M0 (=Fo89), M1 (=Fo87-88), M2 (=Fo85-86), M3 (=Fo82-84), M4 (=Fo78-81) with melt transfer and mixing among them. Modelling the diffusive relaxation of the compositional zoning profiles constrains the timescales and durations over which crystals (and melt) are transferred between the different MEs. Diffusion models were performed at temperatures of 1133-1168°C and fO2 at ∆NNO -0.55 [2]. The derived timescales range from ~20 days up to 11 months, with the majority of the timescales being shorter than 4 months. The nature and duration of magma transfer beneath Mauna Loa prior to the catastrophic 1950 eruption is interpreted as follows: (i) Three dominant magma migration pathways connecting the environments M1:M4, M3:M4 and M2:M4 can be identified; and (ii) transfer of magma along these routes occurs in multiples pulses commencing up to 8 months before, and becoming more

  4. COR1 Engineering Test Unit Measurements at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, September 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William; Reginald, Nelson; Streander, Kim

    2003-01-01

    The COR1 Engineering Test Unit (ETU), which had been previously tested at the NCAR/HAO and NRL test facilities, was modified into an instrument capable of observing the Sun. It was then taken to the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory to observe the corona. The changes made to observe the Sun were as follows: 1. The plate scale was changed to accommodate the smaller Apogee camera. This change had already been made for the NRL tests. 2. The previous Oriel polarizer was replaced with a commercial Polarcor polarizer from Newport to be more flight-like. However, because of cost and availability considerations, this polarizer was smaller than those which will be used for flight. 3. A structure was placed around the back section of the instrument, to protect it from stray light. 4. A pointing spar borrowed from HAO was used to track the Sun. A few days into the test, it became evident that some artifacts were appearing in the data, and these artifacts were changing as the polarizer was rotated. It was decided to test two other polarizers, the Oriel polarizer which had been used in the previous tests at HAO and NRL, and a Nikon polarizer which was borrowed from a camera belonging to one of the observatory staff members. These three polarizers had much different qualities are shown.

  5. Recycled oceanic crust observed in 'ghost plagioclase' within the source of Mauna Loa lavas

    PubMed

    Sobolev; Hofmann; Nikogosian

    2000-04-27

    The hypothesis that mantle plumes contain recycled oceanic crust is now widely accepted. Some specific source components of the Hawaiian plume have been inferred to represent recycled oceanic basalts, pelagic sediments or oceanic gabbros. Bulk lava compositions, however, retain the specific trace-element fingerprint of the original crustal component in only a highly attenuated form. Here we report the discovery of exotic, strontium-enriched melt inclusions in Mauna Loa olivines. Their complete trace-element patterns strongly resemble those of layered gabbros found in ophiolites, which are characterized by cumulus plagioclase with very high strontium abundances. The major-element compositions of these melts indicate that their composition cannot be the result of the assimilation of present-day oceanic crust through which the melts have travelled. Instead, the gabbro has been transformed into a (high-pressure) eclogite by subduction and recycling, and this eclogite has then been incorporated into the Hawaiian mantle plume. The trace-element signature of the original plagioclase is present only as a 'ghost' signature, which permits specific identification of the recycled rock type. The 'ghost plagioclase' trace-element signature demonstrates that the former gabbro can retain much of its original chemical identity through the convective cycle without completely mixing with other portions of the former oceanic crust. PMID:10801125

  6. Receptor modeling of globally circulating airborne particles collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Weekly airborne particle samples were collected at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii from February 1979 through May 1985. Receptor models were used to identify sources of airborne particles at MLO, determine compositions of particles from these sources, and assess the relative impacts of them. Major sources of ambient particles at MLO include Asian continental material, oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} species, marine particles, Asian anthropogenic material, local volcanic emissions, and basalt. Source composition profiles were developed for each component. The Asian continental component represents particles transported from Eastern Asia to the North Pacific, and the component consists of crustal material contaminated by anthropogenic emissions. To account for variations in the relative strengths of anthropogenic and crustal sources, a separate Asian anthropogenic component was also developed. During the dust season, Asian continental material accounts for 80% of total suspended particulate material (TSP) at MLO, oceanic productions of Se and SO{sub 4} 11%, marine particles 2.8%, basalt 1.9%, volcanic emissions 1.7%, and Asian anthropogenic material in excess of Asian continental material 3.2%. During the clean season, the oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} contributes 62% of TSP at MLO. Continental material contributes 22%, marine particles 6.4%, basalt 2.7%, volcanic emissions 2.4%, and anthropogenic materials in excess of continental material 4.3%.

  7. Coronal evolution during the sunspot cycle: Coronal holes observed with the Mauna Loa K-coronameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hundhausen, A.J.; Hansen, R.T.; Hansen, S.F.

    1981-04-01

    The white-light corona was observed regularly at the Mauna Loa Observatory during the years 1965--1967 and 1969--1978. Display of the measured polarization brightness in the form of synoptic maps permits the identification of large coronal holes and the study of their slow evolution during the sunspot cycle. The polar coronal holes were clearly seen to shrink in size during the ascending phase of cycle 20 (1965--1967), to be absent during a two-year period (1969--1970) just after sunspot maximum, to reappear near the end of 1970, and to remain as prominent features of the corona for the years 1971--1978. During the sunspot maximum epoch the corona was dominated by 'mid-latitude' holes, elongated in the direction parallel to the solar equator. Large equatorial holes or equatorward extensions of the polar holes were observed during the ascending, maximum, and descending phases of cycle 20 and appear to be sources of solar wind streams with maximum speeds over 600 km s/sup -1/ at all of these epochs. The lifetimes of these holes and streams were greatest during the descending phase of the cycle, or in 1974--1975.

  8. Reef growth and volcanism on the submarine southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Normark, W.R.; Szabo, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    A marine sampling program, utilizing the PISCES-5 submersible operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (NOAA), has confirmed the presence of a major submerged coral reef offshore from Ka Lae (South Point), Hawaii. The top of the reef is now 150-160 m below sea level. Radiocarbon and Useries dating indicates that it drowned about 13.9 ka by the combined effects of island subsidence (2.5 mm/year) and the rapid rise of sea level at the end of the last glaciation so that the relative submergence rate of more than 10 mm/year exceeded the upward growth rate of the reef. The submerged reef caps the offshore part of the southwest rift-zone ridge of Mauna Loa, which has apparently undergone little volcanic activity offshore since 170 ka, and possibly since 270 ka. This fact suggests that rift zone activity is becoming increasingly restricted toward the upper part of the volcano, a condition possibly heralding the end of the shield-building stage. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Chemistry of background atmospheric particles collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Parrington, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, was selected as a remote northern hemisphere site from which to collect atmospheric particles for chemical analyses of background aerosols in the free troposphere of the northern hemisphere. An automatic digital sampling controller was designed and installed at this site to aid in the isolation of uncontaminated particles of the free troposphere, based on wind direction and speed, time-of-day and particle characteristics at the observatory. The three primary components measured on these background particles between 1979 and 1982 were sulfates, continentally derived crustal material and marine particles with average geometric mean concentrations of 240 ng/m/sup 3/, and 15 ng/m/sup 3/, respectively, during the months of July to mid-February. Other months showed a ten-fold increase in continental crustal material, geometric avg = 730 ng/m/sup 3/, (which has been traced to Asian deserts) and doubling of sulfate mass to 480 ng/m/sup 3/ while the marine mass showed no significant changes. The average geometric mean concentration of local basalt was determined to be 15 ng/m/sup 3/ in down-slope winds and, thus, does not represent a major interference to most studies at MLO as a majority of the crustal dust in the atmosphere, even in relatively clean periods, is transported over thousands of kilometers to the islands from continents surrounding the Pacific Ocean.

  10. Population structure in the endangered Mauna Loa silversword, Argyroxiphium kauense (Asteraceae), and its bearing on reintroduction.

    PubMed

    Friar, E A; Boose, D L; LaDoux, T; Roalson, E H; Robichaux, R H

    2001-07-01

    Reintroduction of populations of endangered species is a challenging task, involving a number of environmental, demographic and genetic factors. Genetic parameters of interest include historical patterns of genetic structure and gene flow. Care must be taken during reintroduction to balance the contrasting risks of inbreeding and outbreeding depression. The Mauna Loa silversword, Argyroxiphium kauense, has experienced a severe decline in population size and distribution in the recent past. Currently, three populations with a total of fewer than 1000 individuals remain. We measured genetic variation within and among the remnant populations using seven microsatellite loci. We found significant genetic variation remaining within all populations, probably related to the recent nature of the population impact, the longevity of the plants, and their apparent self-incompatibility. We also found significant genetic differentiation among the populations, reinforcing previous observations of ecological and morphological differentiation. With respect to reintroduction, the results suggest that, in the absence of additional data to the contrary, inbreeding depression may not be a substantial risk as long as propagules for the founding of new populations are adequately sampled from within each source population before additional inbreeding takes place. The results further suggest that if mixing of propagules from different source populations is not required to increase within-population genetic variation in the reintroduced populations, it may best be avoided. PMID:11472534

  11. A descriptive atmospheric transport climatology for the Mauna Loa Observatory, using clustered trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.M.; Kahl, J.D. )

    1990-08-20

    The climatology of long-range atmospheric transport to the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) is examined through an analysis of 10-day isobaric back trajectories for the period 1981-1988, computed using the National Meteorological Centers analyzed gridded winds. The trajectories are classified into distinct transport patterns through the use of cluster analysis, a procedure that avoids the somewhat arbitrary classification by compass sector and instead searches for meaningful groupings within the data themselves. The clustering procedure is performed separately for yearly and monthly sets of 500- and 700-hPa trajectories to examine both year-to-year and month-to-month variability in flow characteristics. The dominant transport features are quite similar from year to year, and include frequent summertime easterly flow associated with the trade winds and strong, wintertime westerly flow close to the mean axis of the subtropical jet stream. Veering westerly patterns that approach MLO from the north and northeast dominate during winter/summer transition periods. Other noteworthy features include recurring air mass transport from Saharan and Asian desert regions, infrequent interhemispheric flow from as far as 10{degree}S, and occasional flow from high northern latitudes. Ten-day back trajectories that pass over anthropogenic pollution source regions in western North America are rare.

  12. Spectroradiometer with wedge interference filters (SWIF): measurements of the spectral optical depths at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, O B; Leyva, A; Muhila, A; Valdes, M; Peralta, R; Kovalenko, A P; Welch, R M; Berendes, T A; Isakov, V Y; Kulikovskiy, Y P; Sokolov, S S; Strepanov, N N; Gulidov, S S; von Hoyningen-Huene, W

    1995-07-20

    A spectroradiometer with wedge interference filters (SWIF) (the filters were produced by Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany) and a CCD matrix (which was of Russian production) that functions as the sensor has been designed and built for use in ground-based optical sensing of the atmosphere and the Earth's surface in the spectral range of 0.35-1.15 µm. Absolute calibration of this instrument was performed through a series of observations of direct solar radiation at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii in May and June 1993. Spectral optical depth (SOD) measurements that were made during these field experiments provided detailed spectral information about both aerosol extinction (scattering plus absorption) and molecular absorption in the atmosphere above the site at MLO. The aerosol-SOD measurements were compared with narrow-band radiometer measurements at wavelengths of 380, 500, and 778 nm The SWIF and narrow-band radiometer measurements are in agreement to within the experimental error. At a wavelength of 500 nm, the aerosol SOD was found to be approximately 0.045. Adescription of the SWIF instrument, its absolute calibration, and the determination of atmospheric SOD's at MLO are presented. PMID:21052277

  13. Composition and spectral characteristics of ambient aerosol at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R. )

    1991-03-20

    Ambient aerosol particles were sampled continuously with a time resolution of {approximately}4 hours for a period of 8 days at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, in August 1986. The samples were analyzed on-site for their chemical composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption spectra of the samples also provided data on aerosol light absorbance characteristics at 9.1 and 10.6 {mu}m - wavelengths of interest in determining aerosol backscatter coefficients for CO{sub 2} lidars. The chemical species in the ambient aerosol varied considerably during this 8-day period. The aerosol was acidic ((NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}, or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) rather than neutral ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) for a major fraction of the sampling time. The samples generally showed much higher absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m than at 10.6 {mu}m. Changes in the chemical composition between (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and the more acidic forms were accompanied by substantial changes in the sample's absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m but lesser changes in the absorbance at 10.6 {mu}m. These variations could have a profound effect on backscatter coefficients of atmospheric aerosol particles at CO{sub 2} wavelengths.

  14. Variation of free tropospheric total nitrate at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.; Merrill, J.T.; Huebert, B.J.

    1994-06-01

    We measured total nitrate (TN) concentrations (defined as nitric acid vapor plus nitrate aerosol) nightly at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) from September 1988 to September 1991. Using three meteorological criteria, (condensation nuclei, wind direction, and dew point) we selected samples that represented the free troposphere. The 3-year mean and median of TN mixing ratios were 113 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) and 93 pptv, respectively. Each year the TN concentrations at MLO during the spring and summer were larger by more than a factor of 2 than those during the fall and winter. The springtime peak TN corresponded to incidents of increased Asian dust over the northern Pacific Ocean. Isentropic back trajectories confirmed that spring air masses with high TN originated over the Asian continent. Back trajectories also indicated that the North American continent was often the source of high TN during the summer. Air mass source regions and flow patterns to MLO were classified into five distinct groups of trajectories by cluster analysis. Despite the different source regions for each of the clusters the distributions of TN were very similar. This suggests that the source region may be less important for determining TN at MLO than such factors as the degree of vertical mixing over source regions, stratospheric injection, and wet removal rates.

  15. Comparison of Inflation Processes at the 1859 Mauna Loa Flow, HI, and the McCartys Flow Field, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Zimbelman, James R.; Crumpler, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic lavas typically form channels or tubes during flow emplacement. However, the importance of sheet flow in the development of basalt ic terrains received recognition over the last 15 years. George Walke r?s research on the 1859 Mauna Loa Flow was published posthumously in 2009. In this paper he discusses the concept of endogenous growth, or inflation, for the distal portion of this otherwise channeldominated lava flow. We used this work as a guide when visiting the 1859 flow to help us better interpret the inflation history of the McCartys flow field in NM. Both well preserved flows display similar clues about the process of inflation. The McCartys lava flow field is among the you ngest (approx.3000 yrs) basaltic lava flows in the continental United States. It was emplaced over slopes of <1 degree, which is similar to the location within the 1859 flow where inflation occurred. Although older than the 1859 flow, the McCartys is located in an arid environ ment and is among the most pristine examples of sheet flow morphologies. At the meter scale the flow surface typically forms smooth, undula ting swales that create a polygonal terrain. The literature for simil ar features includes multiple explanatory hypotheses, original breakouts from adjacent lobes, or inflation related upwarping of crust or sa gging along fractures that enable gas release. It is not clear which of these processes is responsible for polygonal terrains, and it is po ssible that one explanation is not the sole cause of this morphology between all inflated flows. Often, these smooth surfaces within an inflated sheet display lineated surfaces and occasional squeeze-ups alon g swale contacts. We interpret the lineations to preserve original fl ow direction and have begun mapping these orientations to better interpret the emplacement history. At the scale of 10s to 100s of meters t he flow comprises multiple topographic plateaus and depressions. Some depressions display level floors with

  16. Factors structuring the phytoplankton community in the upwelling site off El Loa River in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Liliana; Escribano, Ruben

    2006-06-01

    Understanding processes affecting the structure of the autotrophic community in marine ecosystems is relevant because species-dependent characters may affect productivity and carbon fluxes of the ocean. In this work, we studied the influence of oceanographic variability on phytoplankton species composition at a coastal upwelling site off northern Chile. Four seasonal cruises carried out during 2003 off El Loa River (21°S) showed that upwelling occurs year-round supporting a large number of diatoms, dinoflagellates, naked nanoflagellates, and silicoflagellates. The analysis of species composition showed that changes in the structure of the autotrophic community are expressed both in abundance and in differences in species assemblages. These changes occurred not only over the seasonal scale but also over the spatial pattern of distribution, and they correlated well to temporal variability of upwelling and spatial variation of upwelling conditions over the cross-shelf axis. A K-means clustering and principal component analyses showed that species assemblages can be represented by few dominant species strongly coupled to alternate upwelling vs. non-upwelling conditions. Both conditions are well defined, and mostly explained by changes in depth of the upper boundary of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) (a prominent feature in northern Chile), surface temperature and water column stratification. Abundance of dominant phytoplankton species were strongly correlated to both OMZ depth and water column stratification. Processes through which OMZ depth might influence species abundance and composition are unknown, although they may relate to changes in redox conditions which affect the nutrient field. Another explanation may relate to changes in grazing pressure derived from the effect of low oxygen water on zooplankton vertical distribution.

  17. Atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii 1958-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, C.D.

    1984-09-01

    Carbon dioxide concentrations have been obtained throughout the sampling period using a nondispersive, dual detector, infrared gas analyzer. Air samples are obtained via air intakes at the top of 7m towers. Four of these towers exist, along with a 27m tower. The highest intake along with one of the lower intakes take four samples per hour. Air is sampled from one intake for 10 minutes, then from the second for 10 minutes, and then from a reference gas for 10 minutes. The intakes are actually maintained continuously, but are shunted when not being analyzed by the infrared gas analyzer. The air flow registers a voltage on the analyzer which then records the concentrations on a strip chart recorder. Two intakes are used to detect possible contamination. A sign of contamination, whether ambient or instrument, is evidenced by significant differences in CO/sub 2/ concentrations between the two paired intakes. Efforts to calibrate equipment, reduce the possibility of contamination, and to adjust data to represent uncontaminated, true conditions have been done and updated throughout the course of the project. Calibration of the gas analyzer by standardized CO/sub 2/-in-nitrogen reference gases is done twice daily. Flask samples are taken twice monthly to give a comparison to the data recorded using the infrared gas analyzer. Data is scrutinized daily for possible contamination and archived and magnetic tape for possible further scrutiny and adjustment. Daily, monthly, and annual averages are computed for the Mauna Loa data after deletion of con taminated samples and readjustment. These averages have shown a steady rise in the annual average concentration, from 316 ppmv in 1959 to 342 ppmv in 1983.

  18. Forecast, Measurement, and Modeling of an Unprecedented Polar Ozone Filament Event over Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Om Prakash; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart; Lefevre, Frank; Marchand, Marion; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2006-01-01

    In mid-March 2005 the northern lower stratospheric polar vortex experienced a severe stretching episode, bringing a large polar filament far south of Alaska toward Hawaii. This meridional intrusion of rare extent, coinciding with the polar vortex final warming and breakdown, was followed by a zonal stretching in the wake of the easterly propagating subtropical main flow. This caused polar air to remain over Hawaii for several days before diluting into the subtropics. After being successfully forecasted to pass over Hawaii by the high-resolution potential vorticity advection model Modele Isentrope du transport Meso-echelle de l'Ozone Stratospherique par Advection (MIMOSA), the filament was observed on isentropic surfaces between 415 K and 455 K (17-20 km) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stratospheric ozone lidar measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, between 16 and 19 March 2005. It was materialized as a thin layer of enhanced ozone peaking at 1.6 ppmv in a region where the climatological values usually average 1.0 ppmv. These values were compared to those obtained by the three dimensional Chemistry-Transport Model MIMOSA-CHIM. Agreement between lidar and model was excellent, particularly in the similar appearance of the ozone peak near 435 K (18.5 km) on 16 March, and the persistence of this layer at higher isentropic levels for the following three days. Passive ozone, also modeled by MIMOSA-CHIM, was at about 3-4 ppmv inside the filament while above Hawaii. A detailed history of the modeled chemistry inside the filament suggests that the air mass was still polar ozone- depleted when passing over Hawaii. The filament quickly separated from the main vortex after its Hawaiian overpass. It never reconnected and, in less than 10 days, dispersed entirely in the subtropics.

  19. Remote-controlled pan, tilt, zoom cameras at Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoblitt, Richard P.; Orr, Tim R.; Castella, Frederic; Cervelli, Peter F.

    2008-01-01

    Lists of important volcano-monitoring disciplines usually include seismology, geodesy, and gas geochemistry. Visual monitoring - the essence of volcanology - is usually not mentioned. Yet, observations of the outward appearance of a volcano provide data that is equally as important as that provided by the other disciplines. The eye was almost certainly the first volcano monitoring-tool used by early man. Early volcanology was mostly descriptive and was based on careful visual observations of volcanoes. There is still no substitute for the eye of an experienced volcanologist. Today, scientific instruments replace or augment our senses as monitoring tools because instruments are faster and more sensitive, work tirelessly day and night, keep better records, operate in hazardous environments, do not generate lawsuits when damaged or destroyed, and in most cases are cheaper. Furthermore, instruments are capable of detecting phenomena that are outside the reach of our senses. The human eye is now augmented by the camera. Sequences of timed images provide a record of visual phenomena that occur on and above the surface of volcanoes. Photographic monitoring is a fundamental monitoring tool; image sequences can often provide the basis for interpreting other data streams. Monitoring data are most useful when they are generated and are available for analysis in real-time or near real-time. This report describes the current (as of 2006) system for real-time photograph acquisition and transmission from remote sites on Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes to the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). It also describes how the photographs are archived and analyzed. In addition to providing system documentation for HVO, we hope that the report will prove useful as a practical guide to the construction of a high-bandwidth network for the telemetry of real-time data from remote locations.

  20. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2016-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  1. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2014-05-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  2. Type D Personality Associated With Health and Mental Health Problems: A Comment on Lussier and Loas (2015).

    PubMed

    Gawda, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Lussier and Loas examined relationship between anhedonia, depression, and type D personality. The aim of this commentary is to extend the discussion to four aspects not considered in the original article: association of type D personality with problems other than those of cardiovascular health, inconsistent findings in these associations, data on association between type D personality and mental problems, and an attempt to interpret their main findings. The proposed interpretation refers to trait anxiety as is partially incorporated into the type D personality. PMID:27173852

  3. Using an artificial neural network approach to estimate surface-layer optical turbulence at Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Basu, Sukanta

    2016-05-15

    In this Letter, an artificial neural network (ANN) approach is proposed for the estimation of optical turbulence (Cn2) in the atmospheric surface layer. Five routinely available meteorological variables are used as the inputs. Observed Cn2 data near the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii are utilized for validation. The proposed approach has demonstrated its prowess by capturing the temporal evolution of Cn2 remarkably well. More interestingly, this ANN approach is found to outperform a widely used similarity theory-based conventional formulation for all the prevalent atmospheric conditions (including strongly stratified conditions). PMID:27176996

  4. Hawaiian double volcanic chain triggered by an episodic involvement of recycled material: Constraints from temporal Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic trend of the Loa-type volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryoji; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2008-01-01

    The two parallel loci of recent Hawaiian volcanoes, Kea and Loa, have been regarded as the best targets to interpret the chemical structure of an upwelling mantle plume derived from the lower mantle. Here we show that the Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic data of the shield-building lavas along the Loa locus form a systematic trend from the main shield stage of Koolau (> 2.9 Ma) to the active Loihi volcanoes. During the growth of the Koolau volcano, the dominant material in the melting region successively changed from the proposed KEA, DMK (depleted Makapuu), to EMK (enriched Makapuu) components. The proportion of EMK, dominated by a recycled mafic component, is typified by some Koolau Makapuu-stage and some Lanai lavas. Subsequently, the EMK component decreased and LOIHI component increased toward the Loihi lavas. The temporal coincidence between the episodically elevated magma production rate and the abrupt appearance of the typical Loa-type lavas that is restricted to the last 3 Myr should be linked to magma genesis. We suggest that the abrupt appearance of Loa-type magmatism should be attributed to the transient incorporation of the relatively dense recycled material and surrounding less degassed lower mantle material that accumulated near the core-mantle boundary into the upwelling plume. This episodic involvement could have been trigged by episodic thermal pulses and buoyancy increases in the plume. The continuous appearance of Kea-type lavas during the long history of Hawaiian-chain magmatism and the larger magma volume of Kea-type lavas relative to that of the Loa-type lavas in the last 3 Myr indicate that the Kea locus is closer to the thermal centre of the Hawaiian plume relative to that of the Loa locus.

  5. Electron Microanalysis of Aerosols Collected at Mauna Loa Observatory During an Asian Dust Storm Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Willis, R. D.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Colton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Located in the remote marine free troposphere, the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) represents a clean airshed that can be used to study anthropogenic pollution influences and long-range transport of aerosol particles from the Asian mainland. Because of the global nature of Asian dust storms, the radiative properties of these particles transported long-range can significantly impact global climate. It has been proposed that aerosols transported to MLO during upslope wind conditions (typically daytime) are local in origin while aerosols transported during downslope conditions (typically nighttime) represent long-range transport in the free troposphere. Twelve PM10 samples (six daytime/nightime pairs) were collected on polycarbonate filters for 72 hours each between March 15 and April 26, 2011. Bulk samples of dust from local sources (road dust, parking lot, lava fields) were collected as well in order to assess the PM10 contribution from local dusts. On March 19-20 the Korea Meteorological Administration documented a significant dust event over the Korean peninsula. Back-trajectory analyses from MLO coupled with local wind speed and wind direction data suggest that this dust event may have been captured during the MLO sampling campaign. MLO samples were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and particles were sorted into compositionally-distinct particle types which were then compared across the sample set. Concentrations of particle types expected to be associated with Asian dust were observed to peak in one pair of daytime/nighttime samples collected between March 22 and March 28. Manual microscopic characterization of suspected Asian dust particles and local dust particles was carried out using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in conjunction with EDX and focussed ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) in an effort to characterize differences in physicochemical or radiative properties of

  6. Using Mauna Loa Atmospheric CO2 Data in Large General Education Geoscience Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; Kapp, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    We have been using the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 dataset (http://scrippsco2.ucsd.edu/data/in_situ_co2/monthly_mlo.csv) in a large (up to 300) General Education Geoscience course, primarily in small breakout groups (30 students). The exercise is designed to address quantitative literacy including percentages, slopes and linear trends, issues of data completeness and bias, quality of extrapolations, as well as implications for climate change. We are significantly revising the course, which serves 600 students a semester, with help from a curriculum grant. A major goal is to improve student learning by incorporating inquiry based activities in the large lecture setting. Lectures now incorporate several activities throughout a given class period, in which students are asked to use critical thinking skills such as interpreting patterns in data and graphs, analyzing a scientific hypothesis for its coherence with the scientific method, and answering higher order synthesis questions in both verbal and written form. This differs from our past format where class periods were dominated by lecture, with a single short activity done individually about every other lecture. To test the effectiveness of the new course format we will give students the same atmospheric CO2 exercise in the lecture setting that they were given previously in breakout groups. Students will work in small groups in lecture after receiving a short introduction to the exercise by the instructor. They will plot CO2 concentrations, make extrapolations, and interpret patterns in the data. We will compare scores on the exercise with previous semesters. We expect that students will do better having had more experience with interpreting scientific data and practicing higher order thinking skills. We also expect working in small groups will foster better learning through peer teaching and discussion. We will incorporate responses from students who took part in the exercises from current and previous semesters. We

  7. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO sub 2 backscatter at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.D.; Porter, J.N. )

    1991-03-20

    Continuous measurements of aerosol size distributions were obtained during Jan-Mar and Nov-Dec periods of 1988 at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. These periods were chosen in order to characterize aerosol physiochemistry during periods representative of low-dust atmospheric conditions and periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site. Size distributions for particles with diameters between 0.15 and 7.6 {mu}m were accumulated in 256 size bins of a laser optical particle counter for 3-hour intervals during most of the period. The aerosol sample stream was heated to selected temperatures in order to provide size-discriminated measurements of aerosol volatility. Resulting data were used to assess the variability in aerosol concentrations and properties related to aerosol backscatter values at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m, {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}}, in the mid-troposphere. Low aerosol concentrations, considered representative of mid-tropospheric air, occurred in downslope flow between midnight and sunrise. Measurements for these time periods suggest that {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} varied from a low of about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} to a high of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1}. Coarse particles with diameters between 1.0 and 5.0 {mu}m account for most of the derived values of {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at all but the highest and lowest aerosol mass concentrations. Volatile aerosol appears to dominate aerosol mass during the cleanest periods but was a small fraction of the total during dust events. The authors estimate that minimum values for {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at about 8 km should usually fall in the range of 1-3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} and be dominated by a sulfate aerosol.

  8. Increase in background stratospheric aerosol observed with lidar at Mauna Loa Observatory and Boulder, Colorado - article no. L15808

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.; Barnes, J.; O'Neill, M.; Trudeau, M.; Neely, R.

    2009-08-15

    The stratospheric aerosol layer has been monitored with lidars at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii and Boulder in Colorado since 1975 and 2000, respectively. Following the Pinatubo volcanic eruption in June 1991, the global stratosphere has not been perturbed by a major volcanic eruption providing an unprecedented opportunity to study the background aerosol. Since about 2000, an increase of 4-7% per year in the aerosol backscatter in the altitude range 20-30 km has been detected at both Mauna Loa and Boulder. This increase is superimposed on a seasonal cycle with a winter maximum that is modulated by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in tropical winds. Of the three major causes for a stratospheric aerosol increase: volcanic emissions to the stratosphere, increased tropical upwelling, and an increase in anthropogenic sulfur gas emissions in the troposphere, it appears that a large increase in coal burning since 2002, mainly in China, is the likely source of sulfur dioxide that ultimately ends up as the sulfate aerosol responsible for the increased backscatter from the stratospheric aerosol layer. The results are consistent with 0.6-0.8% of tropospheric sulfur entering the stratosphere.

  9. Implications of historical eruptive-vent migration on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, J.P. )

    1990-07-01

    Five times within the past 138 yr (1852, 1855-1856, 1880-1881, 1942, and 1984), lava flows from vents on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano have reached within a few kilometres of Hilo (the largest city on the Island of Hawaii). Most lavas erupted on this right zone in historical time have traveled northeastward (toward Hilo), because their eruptive vents have been concentrated north of the rift zone's broad topographic axis. However, with few exceptions each successive historical eruption on the northeast rift zone has occurred farther southeast than the preceding one. Had the 1984 eruptive vents (the most southeasterly yet) opened less than 200 m farther southeast, the bulk of the 1984 lavas would have flowed away from Hilo. If this historical vent-migration pattern continues, the next eruption on the northeast rift zone could send lavas to the southeast, toward less populated areas. The historical Mauna Loa vent-migration patterns mimic southeastern younging of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain and may be cryptically related to northwestward movement of the Pacific plate. Systematic temporal-spatial vent-migration patterns may characterize eruptive activity at other volcanoes with flank activity and should be considered as an aid to long-term prediction of eruption sites.

  10. Ups and downs on spreading flanks of ocean-island volcanoes: evidence from Mauna Loa and Kīlauea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.; Eakins, Barry W.; Yokose, Hisayoshi

    2003-01-01

    Submarine-flank deposits of Hawaiian volcanoes are widely recognized to have formed largely by gravitationally driven volcano spreading and associated landsliding. Observations from submersibles show that prominent benches at middepths on flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea consist of volcaniclastic debris derived by landsliding from nearby shallow submarine and subaerial flanks of the same edifice. Massive slide breccias from the mature subaerial tholeiitic shield of Mauna Loa underlie the frontal scarp of its South Kona bench. In contrast, coarse volcaniclastic sediments derived largely from submarine-erupted preshield alkalic and transitional basalts of ancestral Kilauea underlie its Hilina bench. Both midslope benches record the same general processes of slope failure, followed by modest compression during continued volcano spreading, even though they record development during different stages of edifice growth. The dive results suggest that volcaniclastic rocks at the north end of the Kona bench, interpreted by others as distal sediments from older volcanoes that were offscraped, uplifted, and accreted to the island by far-traveled thrusts, alternatively are a largely coherent stratigraphic assemblage deposited in a basin behind the South Kona bench.

  11. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  12. Perception of Perspective Angles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  13. KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Wilbur A.; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing. PMID:20007845

  14. Reproducibility and Agreement Between 2 Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices for Anterior Chamber Angle Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Kenneth M.; Maram, Jyotsna; Pan, Xiaojing; Dastiridou, Anna; Zhang, ZhouYuan; Ho, Alex; Francis, Brian A.; Sadda, Srinivas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare anterior chamber angle parameters based on the location of Schwalbe line (SL) from 2 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) instruments and to measure their reproducibility. Methods: Forty-two eyes from 21 normal, healthy participants underwent imaging of the inferior irido-corneal angle with the Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCT under tightly controlled low-light conditions. SL-angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL-trabecular iris space area (SL-TISA) were measured by masked, certified graders at the Doheny Imaging Reading Center using customized grading software. Interinstrument and intrainstrument, as well as interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of SL-AOD and SL-TISA measurements were evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots with limits of agreement (LoA). Results: The mean SL-AOD was 0.662±0.191 mm in Spectralis and 0.677±0.213 mm in Cirrus. The mean SL-TISA was 0.250±0.073 mm2 in Spectralis and 0.256±0.082 mm2 in Cirrus. The agreement for intrainstrument (ICCs>0.979), intragrader (ICCs>0.992), and intergrader (ICCs>0.929) was excellent. Excellent agreement between the 2 devices was also documented with a mean difference of −0.016 (LoA −0.125 to 0.092) mm for SL-AOD and −0.007 (LoA −0.056 to 0.043) mm2 in SL-TISA. Conclusions: Both SD-OCTs provided comparable measurements and permitted calculation of SL-based angle metrics. There was excellent interinstrument and intrainstrument and intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility for Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCTs, suggesting true interchangeability between SD-OCT devices. This has the potential to lead to development of standardized grading assessments and quantification of angle parameters that would be valid across various SD-OCT devices. PMID:26200742

  15. Circuitry for Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Angle resolver pulsed and read under microprocessor control. Pulse generator excites resolver windings with dual slope pulse. System sequentially reads sine and cosine windings. Microprocessor determines angle through which resolver shaft turned from reference angle. Suitable applications include rate tables, antenna direction controllers, and machine tools.

  16. Lidar Observations of the Middle Atmospheric Thermal Tides and Comparison with HRDI and GSWM. Part II: October Observations at Mauna Loa (19.5 degrees North)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, T.; McDermid, I. S.; Ortland, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Using more than 145 hours of nighttime lidar measurements obtained during October 1-16, 1996 and October 2-11, 1997, the tidal signature in the middle atmopheric thermal structure (15-95 km) at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, is investigated.

  17. Olivine-rich submarine basalts from the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano: Implications for magmatic processes and geochemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael O.; Hulsebosch, Thomas P.; Rhodes, J. Michael

    The east Ka Lae landslide on the submarine south flank of Mauna Loa exposed a 1.3 km thick section into the interior of its southwest rift zone. We sampled this section in four dredge hauls and four submersible dives and made a multibeam survey of the rift zone. New magnetic data and our observations and bathymetric results indicate that the axis of the southwest rift is two to three kilometers west of the present topographic high. Our submersible observations of old beach deposits and the low sulfur content of pillow-rim glasses indicate that this portion of the southwest rift zone has subsided >400 m. Olivine-rich basalts are extremely abundant along the submarine portion of Mauna Loa's southwest rift zone but their abundance decreases significantly in the upper parts of the two sections examined. This change probably occurred, ˜60 ka when Mauna Loa's eruption rate slowed and was unable to keep up with its subsidence rate. The dense magmas for these olivine-rich basalts were probably intruded into the deeper portions of the rift zones and erupted from its distal regions during periods of high magma supply. The preferential eruption of olivine-rich lavas on the flanks of Mauna Loa and other Hawaiian volcanoes is a strong indication that a density filter operates within these volcanoes. These lavas contain abundant euhedral, undeforrned olivine with high forsterite contents (typically 90%). Some of these olivines grew in magmas with 17.5 wt% MgO at temperatures of 1415°C, indicating that Hawaiian tholeiitic magmas are some of the most mafic and hottest magmas erupted during the Cenozoic. All of the submarine lavas have major element contents typical of Mauna Loa, but unlike its subaerial lavas, some of the submarine lavas have trace element and isotope ratios that overlap with those of Kilauea lavas. Thus, the source for Mauna Loa contained a Kilauea-like component that has been consumed during the last hundred thousand years, but the melt extraction conditions

  18. Ground Water in Kilauea Volcano and Adjacent Areas of Mauna Loa Volcano, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takasaki, Kiyoshi J.

    1993-01-01

    About 1,000 million gallons of water per day moves toward or into ground-water bodies of Kilauea Volcano from the lavas of Mauna Loa Volcano. This movement continues only to the northern boundaries of the east and southwest rift zones of Kilauea, where a substantial quantity of ground water is deflected downslope to other ground-water bodies or to the ocean. In the western part of Kilauea, the kaoiki fault system, which parallels the southwest rift zone, may be the main barrier to ground-water movement. The diversion of the ground water is manifested in the western part of Kilauea by the presence of large springs at the shore end of the Kaoiki fault system, and in the eastern part by the apparently large flow of unheated basal ground water north of the east rift zone. Thus, recharge to ground water in the rift zones of Kilauea and to the areas to the south of the rift zones may be largely by local rainfall. Recharge from rainfall for all of Kilauea is about 1,250 million gallons per day. Beneath the upper slopes of the Kilauea rift zones, ground-water levels are 2,000 feet or more above mean sea level, or more than 1,000 feet below land surface. Ground-water levels are at these high altitudes because numerous and closely spaced dikes at depth in the upper slopes impound the ground water. In the lower slopes, because the number of dikes decreases toward the surface, the presence of a sufficient number of dikes capable of impounding ground water at altitudes substantially above sea level is unlikely. In surrounding basal ground-water reservoirs, fresh basal ground water floats on seawater and, through a transition zone of mixed freshwater and seawater, discharges into the sea. The hydraulic conductivity of the dike-free lavas ranges from about 3,000 to about 7,000 feet per day. The conductivity in the upper slopes of the rift ranges from about 5 to 30 feet per day and that of the lower slopes of the east rift zone was calculated at about 7,000 feet per day. The

  19. Koolau Scientific Drilling Project: A transition from typical Koolau to Mauna Loa-like compositions at ˜325 mbsl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Frey, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The well established geochemical differences between adjacent Hawaiian shields provide important constraints on the sources and processes involved in Hawaiian hotspot volcanism. Recent studies of lavas forming the Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea shields show that there are important geochemical variations during the growth of individual Hawaiian shields. Koolau volcano is significant because the surficially exposed shield lavas define endmember geochemical characteristics for major and trace elements, radiogenic and oxygen isotopic ratios in Hawaiian shield lavas. There is strong evidence that these extreme geochemical characteristics reflect a source component derived from recycled oceanic crust including abyssal sediment. Is this endmember composition characteristic of the entire Koolau shield? Studies of lavas and glasses exposed in the Nuuanu landslide block suggest that older Koolau lavas were unlike the subaerially exposed Koolau lavas; however, stratigraphy of blocks within the landslide is complex. With the objective of directly defining temporal geochemical variations during growth of the Koolau shield, the Koolau Scientific Drilling Project (KSDP) penetrated the shield to a depth of 679m. Only chips are available from the upper part of the hole that was rotary drilled, but coring of the lower 328m recovered 103 lava flows. Based on petrography and major element compositions, Haskins and Garcia (submitted) argue that the distinctive Koolau lavas defining endmember geochemical characteristics "form only a veneer with maximum thickness of ˜400m in the volcano's summit region." We have determined trace element abundances in cored KSDP lavas from 304m to 625m and find that a gradual transition from Koolau-like to Mauna Loa-like lavas occurs at ~325m in the core. For example, Frey et al. (1994) showed that among Hawaiian shield lavas, subaerially exposed Koolau lavas have the highest La/Nb and Sr/Nb. In the KSDP core with decreasing age these ratios show a

  20. Pinatubo and pre-Pinatubo optical-depth spectra: Mauna Loa measurements, comparisons, inferred particle size distributions, radiative effects, and relationship to lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Dutton, E. G.; Pueschel, R. F.; Reagan, J. A.; Defoor, T. E.; Box, M. A.; Allen, D.; Pilewskie, P.; Herman, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Ames airborne tracking sunphotometer was operated at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in 1991 and 1992 along with the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) automated tracking sunphotometer and lidar. June 1991 measurements provided calibrations, optical-depth spectra, and intercomparisons under relatively clean conditions; later measurements provided spectra and comparisons for the Pinatubo cloud plus calibration checks. June 1991 results are similar to previous MLO springtime measurements, with midvisible particle optical depth at the near-background level of 0.012 +/- 0.006 and no significant wavelength dependence in the measured range (lambda = 0.38 to 1.06 micrometers). The arrival of the Pinatubo cloud in July 1991 increased midvisible particle optical depth by more than an order of magnitude and changed the spectral shape of to an approximate power law with an exponent of about -1.4. By clearly September 1991, the spectrum was broadly peaked near 0.5 micrometers, and by July 1992, it was peaked near 0.8 micrometers. Our optical-depth spectra include corrections for diffuse light. NOAA- and Ames Research Center (ARC)-measured spectra are in good agreement. Columnar size distributions inverted from the spectra show that the initial (July 1991) post-Pinatubo cloud was relatively rich in small particles (r less than 0.25 micrometers), which were progressively depleted in the August-September 1991 and July 1992 periods. Conversely, both of the later periods had more of the optically efficient medium-sized particles (0.25 less than r less than 1 micrometers) than did the fresh July 1991 cloud. These changes are consistent with particle growth by condensation and coagulation. Photometer-inferred column backscatter values agree with those measured by the CMDL lidar on nearby nights. Combining lidar-measured backscatter profiles with photometer-derived backscatter-to-area ratios gives peak

  1. Marine and terrestrial influences on interannual CO{sub 2} variations at Mauna Loa and the South Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Dettinger, M.D.; Ghil, M.

    1997-11-01

    Data are presented and very briefly discussed regarding interannual variations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations. Interannual variations are isolated from monthly concentrations by using singular-spectrum analysis of CO{sub 2} and atmospheric carbon isotopic ratios at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, United States and at the South Pole. Interannual variations are shared at the two sites, and can be used to differentiate between marine and land-surface responses to different interannual climate variations on global scales. Two time-scales are compared: (1) quasi-quadrennial (QQ) and (2) 3-year. Phase relations indicate that QQ variations are dominated by terrestrial influences, whereas the 3-year variations reflect marine (upwelling) influences in the eastern Pacific. The contrasting CO{sub 2} responses on these two time scales thus provide a useful measure of differences in global climate responses, and especially in terrestrial-ecosystem responses to different tropical forcings. 1 fig.

  2. Perspectives on basaltic magma crystallization and differentiation: Lava-lake blocks erupted at Mauna Loa volcano summit, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarter, R.L.; Fodor, R.V.; Trusdell, F.

    2006-01-01

    Explosive eruptions at Mauna Loa summit ejected coarse-grained blocks (free of lava coatings) from Moku'aweoweo caldera. Most are gabbronorites and gabbros that have 0-26??vol.% olivine and 1-29??vol.% oikocrystic orthopyroxene. Some blocks are ferrogabbros and diorites with micrographic matrices, and diorite veins (??? 2??cm) cross-cut some gabbronorites and gabbros. One block is an open-textured dunite. The MgO of the gabbronorites and gabbros ranges ??? 7-21??wt.%. Those with MgO > 10??wt.% have some incompatible-element abundances (Zr, Y, REE; positive Eu anomalies) lower than those in Mauna Loa lavas of comparable MgO; gabbros (MgO < 10??wt.%) generally overlap lava compositions. Olivines range Fo83-58, clinopyroxenes have Mg#s ??? 83-62, and orthopyroxene Mg#s are 84-63 - all evolved beyond the mineral-Mg#s of Mauna Loa lavas. Plagioclase is An75-50. Ferrogabbro and diorite blocks have ??? 3-5??wt.% MgO (TiO2 3.2-5.4%; K2O 0.8-1.3%; La 16-27??ppm), and a diorite vein is the most evolved (SiO2 59%, K2O 1.5%, La 38??ppm). They have clinopyroxene Mg#s 67-46, and plagioclase An57-40. The open-textured dunite has olivine ?????Fo83.5. Seven isotope ratios are 87Sr/86Sr 0.70394-0.70374 and 143Nd/144Nd 0.51293-0.51286, and identify the suite as belonging to the Mauna Loa system. Gabbronorites and gabbros originated in solidification zones of Moku'aweoweo lava lakes where they acquired orthocumulate textures and incompatible-element depletions. These features suggest deeper and slower cooling lakes than the lava lake paradigm, Kilauea Iki, which is basalt and picrite. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests crystallization at < 1??kbar P. Highly evolved mineral Mg#s, < 75, are largely explained by cumulus phases exposed to evolving intercumulus liquids causing compositional 'shifts.' Ferrogabbro and diorite represent segregation veins from differentiated intercumulus liquids filter pressed into rigid zones of cooling lakes. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests < 300??bar P

  3. The effect of the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol on the HNO{sub 3} column over Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.J.; Murcray, F.J.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D.G.; Rinsland, C.P.

    1994-06-01

    A very high resolution infrared solar spectrometer system for the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change has been routinely operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii since November, 1991. Solar absorption spectra are normally taken one day a week at sunrise. The authors report the analysis of these spectra for the vertical column amount of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) vapor. The observations began four months after the arrival of volcanic aerosols from Mt. Pinatubo over the site. Although quite variable, total HNO{sub 3} columns were initially about 7{times}10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2} and have decreased about 30% in the following two years. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Seasonal amplitude increase in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, 1959-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bacastow, R.B.; Keeling, C.D.; Whorf, T.P.

    1985-10-20

    The concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa Observatory exhibits a seasonal pattern that repeats with striking regularity from year to year. The amplitude of this seasonal signal, expressed either by peak-to-peak changes in concentration or as a series of harmonic terms, increased at an average rate of about 0.7% per year from 1958 to 1982. The estimated standard error in the linear coefficient of increase is 0.09%. Thus the increase appears to be highly significant statistically. A detailed examination of methods of calibration and of data analysis during this long record do not reveal any inconsistencies large enough to be responsible for the increase. Because the seasonal cycle of CO/sub 2/ in the northern hemisphere is thought to be due principally to the metabolic activity of terrestrial vegetation, it is likely that at least part of the increase is a result of increasing plant activity.

  5. Inflation Features of the Distal Pahoehoe Portion of the 1859 Mauna Loa Flow, Hawaii; Implications for Evaluating Planetary Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Crumpler, L S.

    2011-01-01

    The 1859 eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, resulted in the longest subaerial lava flow on the Big Island. Detailed descriptions were made of the eruption both from ships and following hikes by groups of observers; the first three weeks of the eruption produced an `a`a flow that reached the ocean, and the following 10 months produced a pahoehoe flow that also eventually reached the ocean. The distal portion of the 1859 pahoehoe flow component includes many distinctive features indicative of flow inflation. Field work was conducted on the distal 1859 pahoehoe flow during 2/09 and 3/10, which allowed us to document several inflation features, in or-der evaluate how well inflated landforms might be detected in remote sensing data of lava flows on other planets.

  6. Comparison of airborne CO2 flask samples and measurements from the Mauna Loa Observatory during the HAMEC Project (June 1980)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, G. A.; Harris, T. B.; Chin, J. F. S.

    1983-08-01

    A P3 aircraft has been used to measure meteorological variables upwind and downwind of the island of Hawaii in order to provide data for the evaluation of mesoscale models of airflow and cloud physics. An attempt was made to obtain flask samples upwind of the island which might confirm that the CO2 values gathered at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) are representative of the free air at comparable altitudes. CO2 flask samples exposed aboard the aircraft at the altitude of the observatory and immediately above the trade inversion yielded flask pairs which were in reasonable agreement. The average difference between the aircraft measurements at the observatory altitude and the continuous CO2 record from the observatory over the same period was 0.8 mole fraction in ppm. Attention is given to measurement differences in light of prevailing meteorological conditions.

  7. Solar angle reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sibson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The introduction is the only text in the volume; the rest of the book contains easy-to-use graphical methods for building design and construction using solar energy. Isogonic charts and solar angle diagrams are included. Isogonic charts. Solar angle diagrams.

  8. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  9. Mauna Loa lava accumulation rates at the Hilo drill site: Formation of lava deltas during a period of declining overall volcanic growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Moore, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Accumulation rates for lava flows erupted from Mauna Loa, as sampled in the uppermost 280 m of the Hilo drill hole, vary widely for short time intervals (several thousand years), but overall are broadly similar to those documented elsewhere on this volcano since 100 ka. Thickness variations and accumulation rates for Mauna Loa lavas at the Hilo drill site have been strongly affected by local paleotopography, including funneling and ponding between Mauna Kea and Kilauea. In addition, gentle submerged slopes of Mauna Kea in Hilo Bay have permitted large shoreline displacements by Mauna Loa flows. Ages of eruptive intervals have been determined from published isotopic data and from eustatic sea level curves modified to include the isostatic subsidence of the island of Hawaii at 2.2-2.6 mm/yr. Prior to 10 ka, rates of Mauna Loa lava accumulation at the drill site varied from 0.6 to 4.3 mm/yr for dateable intervals, with an overall rate of 1.8 mm/yr. Major eruptive pulses at about 1.3 and 10 ka, each probably representing a single long-lived eruption based on lack of weathering between flow units, increase the overall accumulation rate to 2.4 mm/yr. The higher rate since 10 ka reflects construction of thick near-shoreline lava deltas as postglacial sea levels rose rapidly. Large lava deltas form only along coastal segments where initially subaerial slopes have been submerged by the combined effects of eustatic sea level rise, isostatic subsidence, or spreading of volcano flanks. Overall accumulation of 239 m of lava at the drill site since 100-120 ka closely balances submergence of the Hilo area, suggesting that processes of coastal lava deposition have been modulated by rise in sea level. The Hilo accumulation rate is slightly higher than average rates of 1-2 mm/yr determined elsewhere along the Mauna Loa coast, based on rates of shoreline coverage and dated sea cliff and fault scarp exposures. Low rates of coastal lava accumulation since 100 ka, near or below the rate

  10. Photoelectric angle converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  11. Reading Angles in Maps

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15–53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare 2D to 3D angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to 2D and 3D displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  12. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  13. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  14. Measurements of solar radiation at Mauna Loa Observatory, 1978-1985, with emphasis on the effects of the eruption of El Chichon. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, E.G.; DeLuisi, J.J.; Austring, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Results from three different projects that involved either absolute or relative measurement of solar radiation at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory are reported. Included are measurements, in summary form, of broadband solar irradiance, spectral aerosol optical depth, and spectral diffuse-sky irradiance. Each data set includes the influence of the stratospheric debris from the eruption of El Chichon. Procedures that were used to acquire and finalize the observational records are documented.

  15. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  16. Community preparedness for lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes, Kona, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, Chris E.; Houghton, Bruce F; Paton, Douglas; Swanson, Donald A.; Johnston, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Lava flows from Mauna Loa and Huala??lai volcanoes are a major volcanic hazard that could impact the western portion of the island of Hawai'i (e.g., Kona). The most recent eruptions of these two volcanoes to affect Kona occurred in A.D. 1950 and ca. 1800, respectively. In contrast, in eastern Hawai'i, eruptions of neighboring Ki??lauea volcano have occurred frequently since 1955, and therefore have been the focus for hazard mitigation. Official preparedness and response measures are therefore modeled on typical eruptions of Ki??lauea. The combinations of short-lived precursory activity (e.g., volcanic tremor) at Mauna Loa, the potential for fast-moving lava flows, and the proximity of Kona communities to potential vents represent significant emergency management concerns in Kona. Less is known about past eruptions of Huala??lai, but similar concerns exist. Future lava flows present an increased threat to personal safety because of the short times that may be available for responding. Mitigation must address not only the specific characteristics of volcanic hazards in Kona, but also the manner in which the hazards relate to the communities likely to be affected. This paper describes the first steps in developing effective mitigation plans: measuring the current state of people's knowledge of eruption parameters and the implications for their safety. We present results of a questionnaire survey administered to 462 high school students and adults in Kona. The rationale for this study was the long lapsed time since the last Kona eruption, and the high population growth and expansion of infrastructure over this time interval. Anticipated future growth in social and economic infrastructure in this area provides additional justification for this work. The residents of Kona have received little or no specific information about how to react to future volcanic eruptions or warnings, and short-term preparedness levels are low. Respondents appear uncertain about how to respond

  17. Ashra (All-sky Survey High Resolution Air-shower detector)Current Status on Mauna Loa, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, John; Fox, R. A.; Sasaki, M.; Asaoka, Y.; Ashra Collaboration

    2008-09-01

    Now in its third year of on-site activities, Ashra is commencing full testing of its array of Cherenkov and Nitrogen Fluorescence detectors. The All-sky Survey High Resolution Air-shower detector is located on the northern upper slopes of Mauna Loa at the 11,000 ft elevation level. Utilizing a clear view of 80% of the sky and an unobstructed view of Mauna Kea, anglular resolution of 1.2 arcmin, sensitive to the blue to UV light with the use of image intensifier and CMOS technology, Ashra is in a unique position for studying the sources of High Energy Cosmic Ray sources (GRB, etc) as well as potential observations of earth-grazing neutrino interactions. 2004 saw the successful deployment of a prototype detector on Haleakala, with confirmed detection of several GRBs. Since the summer of 2005, steady progress was made in constructing and installation of detectors and their weather-proofed housings. UH-Hilo undergraduate students provided summer interns for this international collaboration between ICRR Univ. Tokyo, Univ. Hawai`i-Hilo, Univ Hawai`i-Manoa, Ibaraki Univ., Toho Univ. Chiba Univ., Kanagawa Univ., Nagoya Univ. & Tokyo Institute of Technology.

  18. Technical note: A 23-year record of twice-weekly aerosol composition measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyslop, N. P.; Trzepla, K.; Wallis, C. D.; Matzoll, A. K.; White, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a newly compiled data set of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) measurements from 1988 through 2010 at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii, USA. The data are from two samplers: one running only during nighttime hours over multiple days and another running continuously over the same days. The objective of the night-only schedule is to capture samples from Pacific background air masses transported in the free troposphere with minimal contamination from local and marine emissions. Elements characteristic of soils generally exhibit similar concentrations between the continuous and night-only samples, which suggests Pacific background air masses are responsible for the majority of the fine soil aerosol observed at MLO. Sulfur concentrations in the continuous samples often substantially exceed those in night-only samples, suggesting that local sources contribute to the daytime S concentrations at MLO. Trends estimated from Thiel-Sen regression for all 23 years are 1.3% and -1.7% per year for S and Fe (significant at p = 0.05) in the night-only samples; S and Fe trends in the last 10 years are in the same directions and stronger (4.2% and -4.4% per year).

  19. Pinatubo and Pre-Pinatubo Optical-Depth Spectra: Mauna Loa Measurements, Comparisons, Inferred Particle Size Distributions, Radiative Effects, and Relationship to Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Dutton, E. G.; Pueschel, R. F.; Reagan, J. A.; DeFoor, T. E.; Box, M. A.; Pilewskie, P.; Herman, B. M.; Kinne, S. A.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Ames airborne tracking sunphotometer was operated at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in 1991 and 1992 along with the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) automated tracking sunphotometer and lidar. June 1991 measurements provided calibrations, optical-depth spectra, and intercomparisons under relatively clean conditions; later measurements provided spectra and comparisons for the Pinatubo cloud plus calibration checks. June 1991 results are similar to previous MLO springtime measurements, with midvisible particle optical depth tau(sub p)(lambda = 0.526 microns) at the near-background level of 0.012 +/- 0.006 and no significant wavelength dependence in the measured range (lambda = 0.38 to 1.06 microns). The arrival of the Pinatubo cloud in July 1991 increased midvisible particle optical depth by more than an order of magnitude and changed the spectral shape of tau(sub p)(lambda) to an approximate power law with an exponent of about -1.4. By early September 1991, the spectrum was broadly peaked near 0.5 microns, and by July 1992, it was peaked near 0.8 microns. Our optical-depth spectra include corrections for diffuse light which increase postvolcanic midvisible tau(sub p) values by 1 to 3% (i.e., 0.0015 to 0.0023). NOAA- and Ames Research Center (ARC)-measured spectra are in good agreement. Columnar size distributions inverted from the spectra show that the initial (July 1991) post-Pinatubo cloud was relatively rich in small particles (r less than 0.25 microns), which were progressively depleted in the August-September 1991 and July 1992 periods. Conversely, both of the later periods had more of the optically efficient medium-sized particles (0.25 less than r less than 1 micron) than did the fresh July 1991 cloud. These changes are consistent with particle growth by condensation and coagulation. The effective, or area-weighted, radius increased from 0.22 +/- 0.06 micron in July 1991 to 0

  20. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  1. The Rainbow Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, B.

    1978-01-01

    Two articles in the "Scientific American" form the background of this note. The rainbow angle for the primary bow of a monochromatic Cartesian rainbow is calculated. Special projects for senior high school students could be patterned after this quantitative study. (MP)

  2. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  3. Yaw Angle Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) is a 5 degree-of -freedom repulsive force magnetic suspension system designed to study the control of objects over large magnetic gaps. A digital control algorithm uses 6 sets of laser-sheet sensors and 5 control coils to position a cylinder 3' above the plane of electromagnetics

  4. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  5. Estimating mutation rate: how to count mutations?

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun-Xin; Huai, Haying

    2003-01-01

    Mutation rate is an essential parameter in genetic research. Counting the number of mutant individuals provides information for a direct estimate of mutation rate. However, mutant individuals in the same family can share the same mutations due to premeiotic mutation events, so that the number of mutant individuals can be significantly larger than the number of mutation events observed. Since mutation rate is more closely related to the number of mutation events, whether one should count only independent mutation events or the number of mutants remains controversial. We show in this article that counting mutant individuals is a correct approach for estimating mutation rate, while counting only mutation events will result in underestimation. We also derived the variance of the mutation-rate estimate, which allows us to examine a number of important issues about the design of such experiments. The general strategy of such an experiment should be to sample as many families as possible and not to sample much more offspring per family than the reciprocal of the pairwise correlation coefficient within each family. To obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of mutation rate, the number of sampled families needs to be in the same or higher order of magnitude as the reciprocal of the mutation rate. PMID:12807798

  6. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  7. The perception of volcanic risk in Kona communities from Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, Chris E.; Houghton, B.F.; Johnston, David M.; Paton, Douglas; Swanson, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Volcanic hazards in Kona (i.e. the western side of the island of Hawai'i) stem primarily from Mauna Loa and Huala??lai volcanoes. The former has erupted 39 times since 1832. Lava flows were emplaced in Kona during seven of these eruptions and last impacted Kona in 1950. Huala??lai last erupted in ca. 1800. Society's proximity to potential eruptive sources and the potential for relatively fast-moving lava flows, coupled with relatively long time intervals since the last eruptions in Kona, are the underlying stimuli for this study of risk perception. Target populations were high-school students and adults ( n =462). Using these data, we discuss threat knowledge as an influence on risk perception, and perception as a driving mechanism for preparedness. Threat knowledge and perception of risk were found to be low to moderate. On average, fewer than two-thirds of the residents were aware of the most recent eruptions that impacted Kona, and a minority felt that Mauna Loa and Huala??lai could ever erupt again. Furthermore, only about one-third were aware that lava flows could reach the coast in Kona in less than 3 h. Lava flows and ash fall were perceived to be among the least likely hazards to affect the respondent's community within the next 10 years, whereas vog (volcanic smog) was ranked the most likely. Less than 18% identified volcanic hazards as amongst the most likely hazards to affect them at home, school, or work. Not surprisingly, individual preparedness measures were found on average to be limited to simple tasks of value in frequently occurring domestic emergencies, whereas measures specific to infrequent hazard events such as volcanic eruptions were seldom adopted. Furthermore, our data show that respondents exhibit an 'unrealistic optimism bias' and infer that responsibility for community preparedness for future eruptions primarily rests with officials. We infer that these respondents may be less likely to attend to hazard information, react to warnings as

  8. The perception of volcanic risk in Kona communities from Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes, Hawai‵i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, C. E.; Houghton, B. F.; Johnston, D. M.; Paton, D.; Swanson, D. A.

    2004-02-01

    Volcanic hazards in Kona (i.e. the western side of the island of Hawai‵i) stem primarily from Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes. The former has erupted 39 times since 1832. Lava flows were emplaced in Kona during seven of these eruptions and last impacted Kona in 1950. Hualālai last erupted in ca. 1800. Society's proximity to potential eruptive sources and the potential for relatively fast-moving lava flows, coupled with relatively long time intervals since the last eruptions in Kona, are the underlying stimuli for this study of risk perception. Target populations were high-school students and adults ( n=462). Using these data, we discuss threat knowledge as an influence on risk perception, and perception as a driving mechanism for preparedness. Threat knowledge and perception of risk were found to be low to moderate. On average, fewer than two-thirds of the residents were aware of the most recent eruptions that impacted Kona, and a minority felt that Mauna Loa and Hualālai could ever erupt again. Furthermore, only about one-third were aware that lava flows could reach the coast in Kona in less than 3 h. Lava flows and ash fall were perceived to be among the least likely hazards to affect the respondent's community within the next 10 years, whereas vog (volcanic smog) was ranked the most likely. Less than 18% identified volcanic hazards as amongst the most likely hazards to affect them at home, school, or work. Not surprisingly, individual preparedness measures were found on average to be limited to simple tasks of value in frequently occurring domestic emergencies, whereas measures specific to infrequent hazard events such as volcanic eruptions were seldom adopted. Furthermore, our data show that respondents exhibit an 'unrealistic optimism bias' and infer that responsibility for community preparedness for future eruptions primarily rests with officials. We infer that these respondents may be less likely to attend to hazard information, react to warnings as

  9. Prevalence of pox-like lesions and malaria in forest bird communitites on leeward Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, C.T.; Lease, J.K.; Dusek, R.J.; Samuel, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Introduced avian pox virus and malaria have had devastating impacts on native Hawaiian forest birds, yet little has been published about their prevalence and distribution in forest bird communities outside of windward Hawaii Island. We surveyed native and non-native forest birds for these two diseases at three different elevations on leeward Mauna Loa Volcano at the Kona Forest Unit of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge. Prevalence of malaria by both serology and microscopy varied by elevation and ranged from 28% at 710 m to 13% at 1830 m. Prevalence of pox-like lesions also varied by altitude, ranging in native species from 10% at 710 m to 2% at 1830 m. Native species at all elevations had the highest prevalence of malarial antibody and pox-like lesions. By contrast, pox-like lesions were not detected in individuals of four non-native species and only 5% of Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) was positive for malaria. A significantly high proportion of birds with pox-like lesions also had serological evidence of concurrent, chronic malarial infections, suggesting an interaction between these diseases, dual transmission of both diseases by the primary mosquito vector (Culex quinquefasciatus) or complete recovery of some pox-infected birds without loss of toes. Results from this study document high prevalence of malaria and pox at this refuge. Development of effective disease control strategies will be important for restoration of remnant populations of the endangered 'Akiapola'au (Hemignathus munroi), Hawaii Creeper (Oreomystis mana), and Hawaii 'Akepa (Loxops coccineus coccineus) that still occur on the refuge.

  10. A quantitative analysis of phenotypic variations of Metrosideros polymorpha within and across populations along environmental gradients on Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Yuki; Onoda, Yusuke; Izuno, Ayako; Isagi, Yuji; Kitayama, Kanehiro

    2016-04-01

    Metrosideros polymorpha, a dominant tree species in the Hawaiian Islands, shows an extreme phenotypic polymorphism both across gradients of climatic/edaphic conditions and within populations, making it a potentially useful model species for evolutionary study. In order to understand how the phenotypic diversity is maintained within populations as well as across populations, we examined the diversities of several leaf and stem functional traits across five elevations and two soil substrates on the volcanic mountain of Mauna Loa, on the island of Hawaii. Leaf dry mass per area (LMA), a key leaf functional trait, was particularly focused on and analyzed in relation to its underlying components-namely, tissue LMA and trichome LMA (LMA = tissue LMA + trichome LMA). Across populations, tissue LMA increased linearly with elevation while trichome LMA showed unimodal patterns with elevation, which were better correlated with temperature and rainfall, respectively. Substantial phenotypic variations were also found within populations. Interestingly, the variations of tissue LMA were often negatively correlated to trichome LMA within populations, which contrasts with the cross-populations pattern, where a strong positive correlation between tissue LMA and trichome LMA was found. This suggests that phenotypic variations within populations were substantially influenced by local ecological processes. Soil depth (an indicator of local water availability) and tree size (an indicator of colonized timing) modestly explained the within-population variations, implying other local environmental factors and/or random processes are also important in local phenotypic diversity. This study provides an insight about how phenotypic diversity of plant species is maintained from local to landscape levels. PMID:26260167

  11. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  12. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  13. Angle states in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A. C.; Iguain, J. L.

    1998-12-01

    Angle states and angle operators are defined for a system with arbitrary angular momentum. They provide a reasonable formalization of the concept of angle provided that we accept that the angular orientation is quantized. The angle operator is the generator of boosts in angular momentum and is, almost everywhere, linearly related to the logarithm of the shift operator. Angle states for fermions and bosons behave differently under parity transformation.

  14. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  15. Radiocarbon dates for lava flows from northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hilo 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan-Banks, J. M.; Lockwood, J.P.; Rubin, M.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight 14C analyses are reported for carbonized roots and other plant material collected from beneath 15 prehistoric lava flows erupted from the northeast rift zone (NERZ) of Mauna Loa Volcano (ML). The new 14C dates establish ages for 13 previously undated lava flows, and correct or add to information previously reported. Limiting ages on other flows that lie either above or below the dated flows are also established. These dates help to unravel the eruptive history of ML's NERZ. -from Authors

  16. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  17. Laser angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.; Wilbert, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a laser angle measurement system is described. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the mode. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. Optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures are included, and the results of a demonstration test are given.

  18. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: Plenary lectures; Brook mutational mechanisms; Adduction and DNA damage; Recombination and gene conversion; Repair: Prokoyote mechanisms and induction; Repair: Lower eukaryote and plant mechanisms; Repair: Higher eukaryote mechanisms and selectivity; Repair: Human genes and mechanisms; Mutation: Spectra and mechanisms; Mutation: Shuttle vectors; Mutation: Transgenic animals; New methods: Polymerase chain reaction.

  19. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  20. Measures on mixing angles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Gielen, Steffen; Pope, C. N.; Turok, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of the apparently very small magnitude of CP violation in the standard model, measured by the Jarlskog invariant J. In order to make statements about probabilities for certain values of J, we seek to find a natural measure on the space of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices, the double quotient U(1){sup 2}/SU(3)/U(1){sup 2}. We review several possible, geometrically motivated choices of the measure, and compute expectation values for powers of J for these measures. We find that different choices of the measure generically make the observed magnitude of CP violation appear finely tuned. Since the quark masses and the mixing angles are determined by the same set of Yukawa couplings, we then do a second calculation in which we take the known quark mass hierarchy into account. We construct the simplest measure on the space of 3x3 Hermitian matrices which reproduces this known hierarchy. Calculating expectation values for powers of J in this second approach, we find that values of J close to the observed value are now rather likely, and there does not seem to be any fine-tuning. Our results suggest that the choice of Kobayashi-Maskawa angles is closely linked to the observed mass hierarchy. We close by discussing the corresponding case of neutrinos.

  1. A Note on Angle Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1978-01-01

    The author investigates the construction of angles (using Euclidean tools) through a numerical approach. He calls attention to the surprising impossibility of constructing the conventional units of angle measure--the degree, minute, second, radian, and mil. (MN)

  2. Controls on Synoptic Scale Variability in Atmospheric Water Vapor Stable Isotopologues from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, J. V.; Galewsky, J.; Noone, D. C.; Worden, J.; Johnson, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Havaiki campaign, 9 October to 6 November, 2008, included continuous (6 seconds) in-situ measurement of water vapor stable isotopic ratios at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii. δD correlates with water vapor mixing ratios, and is characterized by both diurnal fluctuations and synoptic scale variability. Daily fluctuations are related to day-time lifting and night-time compression of the trade inversion. We focus on the synoptic variability of night-time δD values, which is more representative of the free troposphere. To do so, we determined last saturation conditions for air at MLO using both Lagrangian back-trajectory and Eulerian GCM-based techniques. Last saturation of air at MLO occurs primarily in the extra-tropical middle-upper troposphere, along mid-latitude baroclinic zones, and secondarily near Hawaii within mesoscale convective systems. Synoptic-scale periods of lower (elevated) δD values at MLO correspond to extra-tropical (near-Hawaii) last saturation. To assess the influence of mixing on water vapor δD at MLO, we reconstructed Havaiki humidity and δD values from both our Lagrangian and Eulerian last saturation model results. The Eulerian based reconstructions, which account for mixing, better represent the observed Havaiki δD values. The Lagrangian approach does not account for mixing and overestimates the observed variability. These results suggest that mixing plays a critical role in setting the water vapor δD of sub-saturated air in the subtropical free tropopshere. To weigh the influences that large-scale circulation or the pre-saturation water vapor δD values have on the observed synoptic variability of δD at MLO, we conducted δD reconstruction experiments. First, we held constant the pre-saturation water vapor δD, varied the last saturation distributions, and were able to reproduce the observed synoptic variability. In the second experiment, we held last saturation distributions constant, varied the pre-saturation

  3. Li, Be, and B Concentrations in Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea Lavas from the HSDP-2 Drill Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, V. P.; Ryan, J.; McSween, H. Y.

    2004-12-01

    Continuous core samples collected during Phase 2 of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP-2) provide the most complete time sequence stratigraphy for a hotspot volcano. 43 samples, representing 245 m of Mauna Loa (ML) tholeiitic lavas and 2853 m of Mauna Kea post shield (MKPS) and main shield (MKMS) alkaline and tholeiitic lavas, were analyzed for whole-rock Li, Be, and B abundances to determine how these elements vary as the volcano samples the Hawaiian plume. Anomalous Sr/MgO variations indicate that MKPS lavas have experienced alteration. Highly scattered B abundances (1.1-9.4 ppm), B/K ratios (0.0002-0.008), and B/Be ratios (1-25) suggest substantial remobilization of this H2O-soluble element. Regular correlations between Be and MgO, Zr and Nd indicate that Be behaves incompatibly in HSDP lavas. Be ranges from 0.28-0.54 ppm in ML, 0.52-0.97 ppm in MKPS, and 0.23-0.71 ppm in MKMS lavas. Be/Nd = 0.03±0.005, slightly lower than MORBs or chondrites. Li ranges from 2.5-6.1 ppm and does not vary among lava types. Li/V ( ˜0.02) and Li/Y ( ˜0.18) ratios are similar to MORBs, but Li/Yb (2.3) ratios are higher than MORBs. Despite evidence for weathering in MKPS lavas, Li correlates well with Be, Nb, Zr, Y, Yb, and V, suggesting Li was not mobilized with alteration. However, such correlations do not occur in ML or MKMS lavas, indicating Li modification. The lack of change in Be/Nd, Li/V and Li/Yb shows abundances of these elements are governed largely by extent of melting and/or crystallization. Mantle compositions for these species do not seem to vary on the timescale of shield development. B and (to a lesser extent) Li are useful indicators for alteration and/or hydrothermal activity within shield edifices. Lentz et al. (2001) used variations in B and Li content in pyroxenes of some Martian meteorites to suggest these elements were lost (along with H2O and CO2) as the magma degassed during ascent. Since mantle plumes were the primary means for Mars volcanism

  4. Angle performance on optima MDxt

    SciTech Connect

    David, Jonathan; Kamenitsa, Dennis

    2012-11-06

    Angle control on medium current implanters is important due to the high angle-sensitivity of typical medium current implants, such as halo implants. On the Optima MDxt, beam-to-wafer angles are controlled in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal direction, the beam angle is measured through six narrow slits, and any angle adjustment is made by electrostatically steering the beam, while cross-wafer beam parallelism is adjusted by changing the focus of the electrostatic parallelizing lens (P-lens). In the vertical direction, the beam angle is measured through a high aspect ratio mask, and any angle adjustment is made by slightly tilting the wafer platen prior to implant. A variety of tests were run to measure the accuracy and repeatability of Optima MDxt's angle control. SIMS profiles of a high energy, channeling sensitive condition show both the cross-wafer angle uniformity, along with the small-angle resolution of the system. Angle repeatability was quantified by running a channeling sensitive implant as a regular monitor over a seven month period and measuring the sheet resistance-to-angle sensitivity. Even though crystal cut error was not controlled for in this case, when attributing all Rs variation to angle changes, the overall angle repeatability was measured as 0.16 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}). A separate angle repeatability test involved running a series of V-curves tests over a four month period using low crystal cut wafers selected from the same boule. The results of this test showed the angle repeatability to be <0.1 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}).

  5. Properties of air mass mixing and humidity in the subtropics from measurements of the D/H isotope ratio of water vapor at the Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noone, David; Galewsky, Joseph; Sharp, Zachary D.; Worden, John; Barnes, John; Baer, Doug; Bailey, Adriana; Brown, Derek P.; Christensen, Lance; Crosson, Eric; Dong, Feng; Hurley, John V.; Johnson, Leah R.; Strong, Mel; Toohey, Darin; van Pelt, Aaron; Wright, Jonathon S.

    2011-11-01

    Water vapor in the subtropical troposphere plays an important role in the radiative balance, the distribution of precipitation, and the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere. Measurements of the water vapor mixing ratio paired with stable isotope ratios provide unique information on transport processes and moisture sources that is not available with mixing ratio data alone. Measurements of the D/H isotope ratio of water vapor from Mauna Loa Observatory over 4 weeks in October-November 2008 were used to identify components of the regional hydrological cycle. A mixing model exploits the isotope information to identify water fluxes from time series data. Mixing is associated with exchange between marine boundary layer air and tropospheric air on diurnal time scales and between different tropospheric air masses with characteristics that evolve on the synoptic time scale. Diurnal variations are associated with upslope flow and the transition from nighttime air above the marine trade inversion to marine boundary layer air during daytime. During easterly trade wind conditions, growth and decay of the boundary layer are largely conservative in a regional context but contribute ˜12% of the nighttime water vapor at Mauna Loa. Tropospheric moisture is associated with convective outflow and exchange with drier air originating from higher latitude or higher altitude. During the passage of a moist filament, boundary layer exchange is enhanced. Isotopic data reflect the combination of processes that control the water balance, which highlights the utility for baseline measurements of water vapor isotopologues in monitoring the response of the hydrological cycle to climate change.

  6. Health hazard evaluation determination report no. HE 79-31-699, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Mauna Loa Observatory, Hilo, Hawaii 96720

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, P.L.

    1980-06-01

    An environmental survey was conducted from September 24 to 26, 1979 at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (SIC-8922). An authorized employer representative requested the evaluation to determine whether solar observers and engineers working at the observatory were exposed to toxic chemicals emanating from the Mauna Loa volcano five miles away. Personal breathing zone and area air samples were collected to measure concentrations of methyl chloride (74873), methyl iodide (74884), inorganic mercury (7439976), sulfur dioxide (7446095), hydrogen sulfide (7783064), and selenium (7782492) and other metals in the telescope control room and telescope room. Airborne concentrations of methyl iodide, mercury, sulfuric acid, trace metals and hydrogen sulfide were below the limits of detection. Airborne concentrations of methyl chloride ranged from 0.02 to 0.08 parts per million (ppm) and were well below the OSHA standard of 100ppm as an 8 hour time weighted average (TWA). Sulfur dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 0.05ppm were all below or equal to NIOSH recommended criterion of 0.50ppm. The authors conclude that no hazard existed from exposure to any of the compounds.

  7. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  8. Sun angle calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flippin, A.; Schmitt, A. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A circular computer and system is disclosed for determining the sun angle relative to the horizon from any given place and at any time. The computer includes transparent, rotatably mounted discs on both sides of the circular disc member. Printed on one side of the circular disc member are outer and inner circular sets of indicia respectively representative of site longitude and Greenwich Mean Time. Printed on an associated one of the rotatable discs is a set of indicia representative of Solar Time. Printed on the other side of the circular disc member are parallel lines representative of latitude between diametral representations of North and South poles. Elliptical lines extending between the North and South poles are proportionally disposed on the surface to scale Solar Time in hours.

  9. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  10. CF Mutation Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Cystic Fibrosis Genotyping; CF DNA Analysis; CF Gene Mutation Panel; CF Molecular Genetic Testing Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation Panel Related tests: Sweat Test ; Trypsinogen ; ...

  11. Colorectal cancer prognosis: is it all mutation, mutation, mutation?

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A B; Paraskeva, C

    2005-01-01

    For the 500 000 new cases of colorectal cancer in the world each year, identification of patients with a worse prognosis and those who are more likely to respond to treatment is a challenge. There is an increasing body of evidence correlating genetic mutations with outcome in tumours derived from human colorectal cancer cohorts. K-ras, but not p53 or APC, mutations appear to be associated with poorer overall survival in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:16099785

  12. Characterizing the influence of anthropogenic emissions and transport variability on sulfate aerosol concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Lauren E.

    Sulfate aerosol in the atmosphere has substantial impacts on human health and environmental quality. Most notably, atmospheric sulfate has the potential to modify the earth's climate system through both direct and indirect radiative forcing mechanisms (Meehl et al., 2007). Emissions of sulfur dioxide, the primary precursor of sulfate aerosol, are now globally dominated by anthropogenic sources as a result of widespread fossil fuel combustion. Economic development in Asian countries since 1990 has contributed considerably to atmospheric sulfur loading, particularly China, which currently emits approximately 1/3 of global anthropogenic SO2 (Klimont et al., 2013). Observational and modeling studies have confirmed that anthropogenic pollutants from Asian sources can be transported long distances with important implications for future air quality and global climate change. Located in the remote Pacific Ocean (19.54°N, 155.58°W) at an elevation of 3.4 kilometers above sea level, Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) is an ideal measurement site for ground-based, free tropospheric observations and is well situated to experience influence from springtime Asian outflow. This study makes use of a 14-year data set of aerosol ionic composition, obtained at MLO by the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Daily filter samples of total aerosol concentrations were made during nighttime downslope (free-tropospheric) transport conditions, from 1995 to 2008, and were analyzed for aerosol-phase concentrations of the following species: nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42-), methanesulfonate (MSA), chloride (Cl-), oxalate, sodium (Na+), ammonium (NH 4+), potassium (K+), magnesium (Mg 2+), and calcium (Ca2+). An understanding of the factors controlling seasonal and interannual variations in aerosol speciation and concentrations at this site is complicated by the relatively short lifetimes of aerosols, compared with greenhouse gases which have also been sampled over long time periods at MLO. Aerosol filter

  13. Lack of Correlated Isotopic and Compositional Variations in Mauna Loa Lavas: A Serious Problem for Pyroxenite/Eclogite Plume Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Weis, D.; Norman, M. D.; Garcia, M. O.

    2007-12-01

    The long held notion that basaltic magmas are produced by decompressional melting of peridotite is under challenge. Recent models for the Hawaiian and other plumes argue that they consist of a heterogeneous mix of peridotite and discrete eclogite blobs, the latter derived from recycled subducted crust. Eclogite melting produces relatively siliceous magmas (dacite to andesite) which either mix with picritic melts from the peridotite, or, more plausibly, react with the peridotite to produce pyroxenite. Melting of varying proportions of the peridotite/pyroxenite mix is thought to produce the correlated compositional and isotopic characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes. Magmas from Mauna Loa and Koolau volcanoes are thought to contain more of the recycled component; those from Loihi and Kilauea volcanoes contain less. A simple test of these mixed source models examines whether isotopic changes within the long magmatic history of a single volcano are accompanied by corresponding changes in major and trace element characteristics. Mauna Loa, where we have sampled around 400 - 500 ka of the volcano's eruptive history, provides an excellent opportunity for such a test. During this time, Mauna Loa will have traversed almost half the Hawaiian plume. According to the models, it should have erupted magmas produced from a range of pyroxenite/peridotite mixes with corresponding differences in both isotopic ratios and major and trace elements. Our data show that there is only minor isotopic (Sr, Pb, Nd, Hf) diversity in young lavas (<100 ka), but older lavas are highly diverse, ranging from modern values to those that are close to, and overlap with, those of Loihi volcano. If this isotopic diversity is a consequence of different proportions of pyroxenite and peridotite in the plume source, as the new models predict, we should expect to see correlated changes in bulk composition, particularly. in normalized SiO2, CaO/Al2O3, FeO/MgO and Ni - MgO relationships, as well as changes in

  14. Generalization of the Euler Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor); Shuster, Malcolm D.; Markley, F. Landis

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the Euler angles can be generalized to axes other than members of an orthonormal triad. As first shown by Davenport, the three generalized Euler axes, hereafter: Davenport axes, must still satisfy the constraint that the first two and the last two axes be mutually perpendicular if these axes are to define a universal set of attitude parameters. Expressions are given which relate the generalized Euler angles, hereafter: Davenport angles, to the 3-1-3 Euler angles of an associated direction-cosine matrix. The computation of the Davenport angles from the attitude matrix and their kinematic equation are presented. The present work offers a more direct development of the Davenport angles than Davenport's original publication and offers additional results.

  15. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  16. [Angle-closure chronic glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of chronic angle closure glaucoma is considerably greater than the incidence of the acute type. This type of glaucoma may mimic primary open angle glaucoma with visual field deterioration, optic nerve alteration and intraocular pressure elevation with a quiet painless eye. Its diagnosis is based on indentation gonioscopy showing peripheral anterior synechiae. The mechanisms of angle closure are the pupillary block, the plateau iris configuration and the creeping form. The treatment of chronic angle closure glaucoma is based on laser peripheral iridotomy. PMID:14646832

  17. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  18. Observation of the middle atmospheric thermal tides using lidar measurements over Mauna Loa Observatory (19.5 deg N, 155.6 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Temperature measurements in the middle atmosphere using Rayleigh lidars have been performed for several decades now. The high accuracy and vertical resolution provided by lidars allow to study the temperature variability at various scales with high confidence levels. One of the numerous applications is the study of the middle atmospheric thermal tides. Although Rayleigh lidar measurements are basically possible only at nighttime, diurnal and semidiurnal components can often be extracted if the results are taken with care and correctly interpreted. Using results from more than 200 hours of nighttime measurements obtained by lidar in October 1996 and 1997 at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, a study of the middle atmospheric (25-90 km) thermal tides is presented in this paper. The amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components were calculated for some altitudes where the fits converged significantly, and compared to that of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM).

  19. An application of the lottery competition model to a montane rainforest community of two canopy trees, ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha) and koa (Acacia koa) on Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, J.S.; Link, W.A.; Dawson, D.K.; Lindquist, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    This rainforest occurs on Mauna Loa at 1500-2000 m elevation. Earthwatch volunteers, studying the habitat of 8 native forest bird species (3 endangered), identified 2382 living canopy trees, and 99 dead trees, on 68 study plots, 400 m2 each. Ohia made up 88% of the canopy; koa was 12%. The two-species lottery competition model, a stochastic model in which coexistence of species results from variation in recruitment and death rates, predicts a quadratic-beta distribution for the proportion of space occupied by one species. A discrete version was fit to the live tree data and a likelihood ratio test (p=0.02) was used to test if the mean death rates were equal. This test was corroborated by a contingency table analysis (p=0.03) based on dead trees. Parameter estimates from the two analyses were similar.

  20. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  1. Water vapor isotopes measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Comparison of laser spectroscopy and remote sensing with traditional methods, and the need for ongoing monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.; Noone, D.; Sharp, Z.; Worden, J.

    2009-04-01

    The isotopic composition of water vapor (2H/1H and 18O/16 ratios) provides unique information on the transport pathways that link water sources to regional sinks, and thus proves useful in understanding large scale atmospheric humidity budgets. Recent advances in measurement technology allow the monitoring of water vapor isotope composition in ways which has can revolutionize investigations of atmospheric hydrology. Traditional measurement of isotopic composition requires trapping of samples with either large volume vacuum flasks or by trapping liquid samples with cryogens for later analyses using mass spectrometry, and are laborious and seldom span more than just short dedicated observational periods. On the other hand, laser absorption spectroscopy can provide almost continuous and autonomous in situ measurements of isotope abundances with precision almost that of traditional mass spectrometry, and observations from spacecraft can make almost daily maps of the global isotope distributions. In October of 2008 three laser based spectrometers were deployed at the Mauna Loa Laboratory in Hawaii to make continuous measurement of the 2H and 18O abundance of free tropospheric water vapor. These results are compared with traditional measurements and with measurements from two satellite platforms. While providing field validation of the new methodologies, the data show variability which captures the transport processes in the region. The data are used to characterize the role of large scale mixing of dry air, the influence of the boundary layer and the importance of moist convection in controlling the low humidity of subtropical air near Hawaii. Although the record is short, it demonstrates the usefulness of using robust isotope measurements to understand the budgets of the most important greenhouse gas. This work motivates establishing a continuous record of isotopes measurement at baseline sites, like Mauna Loa, such that the changes in water cycle can be understood and

  2. Water vapor isotopes measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Comparison of laser spectroscopy and remote sensing with traditional methods, and the need for ongoing monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noone, D.; Galewsky, J.; Sharp, Z.; Worden, J.

    2008-12-01

    The isotopic composition of water vapor (2H/1H and 18O/16 ratios) provides unique information on the transport pathways that link the water sources to regional sinks, and thus proves useful in understanding the large scale humidity budgets. Recent advances in measurement technology allow the monitoring of water vapor isotope composition in ways which has can revolutionize investigations of atmospheric hydrology. Traditional measurement of isotopic composition requires trapping of samples with either large volume vacuum flasks or by trapping liquid samples with cryogens for later analyses using mass spectrometry, and are laborious and seldom span more than just short dedicated observational periods. On the other hand, laser absorption spectroscopy can provide almost continuous and autonomous in situ measurements of isotope abundances with precision almost that of traditional mass spectrometry, and observations from spacecraft can make almost daily maps of the global isotope distributions. In October of 2008 three laser based spectrometers were deployed at the Mauna Loa Laboratory in Hawaii to make continuous measurement of the 2H and 18O abundance of free tropospheric water vapor. These results are compared with traditional measurements and with measurements from two satellite platforms. While providing field validation of the new methodologies, the data show variability which captures the transport processes in the region. The data are used to characterize the role of large scale mixing of dry air, the influence of the boundary layer and the importance of moist convection in controlling the low humidity of subtropical air near Hawaii. Although the record is short, it demonstrates the usefulness of using robust isotope measurements to understand the budgets of the most important greenhouse gas. This work motivates establishing a continuous record of isotopes measurement at baseline sites, like Mauna Loa, such that the changes in water cycle can be understood and

  3. Impact of Asian emissions on the remote North Pacific atmosphere: Interpretation of CO data from Shemya, Guam, Midway and Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Daniel; Mahura, Alexander; Kelley, Jennifer; Atkins, John; Novelli, Paul C.; Merrill, John

    1997-12-01

    In this study we look at the concentration of CO at four remote stations in the North Pacific to evaluate the impact of Asian industrial emissions on the remote atmosphere. Using a locally weighted smoothing technique to identify individual data outliers from the seasonal cycle, we have identified 22-92 outliers or "events" (greater than 5 ppbv above the seasonal cycle) at each site for the 3-6 year data records. Using isentropic back trajectories, we identify a possible source region for each event and present a distribution of the trajectory types. For the events at Midway, Mauna Loa, Guam, and Shemya, we are able to identify a source region for the elevated CO in 82, 72, 65, and 50% of the events, respectively. At Mauna Loa and Midway a majority of the events occur during spring and are usually associated with transport from Asia. These events bring the highest CO mixing ratios observed at any time during the year to these sites, with CO enhancements up to 46 ppb. At Guam, easterly trade winds are the norm, but occasionally synoptic events bring Asian emissions to the island, generally during late summer and fall, from either East Asia or Southeast Asia (e.g., Indonesia). These events bring with them the largest CO enhancements of any of the four sites considered in this paper, up to 58 ppb. Finally, to examine the robustness of our conclusions, we redo our analysis using the more stringent definition that an event must be either 10 or 15 ppb above the seasonal cycle. Although this reduces the number of events identified at each site, it does not significantly change the fraction of events which can be attributed to a known source.

  4. Diurnal variations of stratospheric ozone measured by ground-based microwave remote sensing at the Mauna Loa NDACC site: measurement validation and GEOSCCM model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, A.; Boyd, I. S.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Frith, S. M.; Kramarova, N. A.; Connor, B. J.; Bodeker, G. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Shiotani, M.; Sakazaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    There is presently renewed interest in diurnal variations of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone for the purpose of supporting homogenization of records of various ozone measurements that are limited by the technique employed to being made at certain times of day. We have made such measurements for 18 yr using a passive microwave remote sensing technique at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, which is a primary station in the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). We have recently reprocessed these data with hourly time resolution to study diurnal variations. We inspected differences between pairs of the ozone spectra (e.g. day and night) from which the ozone profiles are derived to determine the extent to which they may be contaminated by diurnally varying systematic instrumental or measurement effects. These are small, and we have reduced them further by selecting data that meet certain criteria that we established. We have calculated differences between profiles measured at different times: morning-night, afternoon-night, and morning-afternoon and have intercompared these with like profiles derived from Aura-MLS, UARS-MLS, SMILES, and SBUV/2 measurements. Differences between averages of coincident profiles are typically <1.5% of typical nightime values over most of the covered altitude range with some exceptions. We calculated averages of ozone values for each hour from the Mauna Loa microwave data, and normalized these to the average for the first hour after midnight for comparison with corresponding values calculated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We found that the measurements and model output mostly agree to better than 1.5% of the midnight value, with one noteworthy exception: the measured morning-night values are significantly (2-3%) higher than the modeled ones from 3.2 to 1.8 hPa (~39-43 km), and there is evidence that the measured values are increasing compared to the modeled values

  5. Near-real time infrared observations of acidic sulfates in /open quotes/clean/close quotes/ air at Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfuric acid and its partially or completely neutralized salts with ammonia are believed to result from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in cloud water and in other heterogeneous media present in the atmosphere. Due to the natural abundance of ammonia and the ubiquitous presence of sulfur in the atmosphere, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ is commonly the dominant chemical species in the ambient aerosol. The amounts of ammonium sulfates are expected to be very low in areas far removed from anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide. The chemical composition of submicrometer aerosol particles was determined at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) on Mauna Loa in Hawaii during an eight-day period in August 1986. The MLO site was selected for this measurement because it is the only ground-based aerosol observatory in the remote Pacific Ocean that allows extended sampling of aerosols in the free troposphere. Measurements were made using an attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) impactor system. The impactor collects size-fractionated submicrometer particles for analysis by ATR infrared spectroscopy. The collected samples were analyzed using an on-site Perkin Elmer dispersive infrared spectrophotometer. Infrared absorption spectra (4000 to 250 cm/sup /minus/1/) of the samples were obtained within minutes after the ATR substrates were removed from the impactor. Absorbances were measured for sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium. Acidic sulfate showed infrared absorbances at 600 cm/sup /minus/1/ and 1210 cm/sup /minus/1/ in addition. Results showed that ammonium sulfate was the dominant chemical species in the submicrometer particles. Over half of the nearly 40 samples collected showed an acidic sulfate component. Consecutive samples were found to change from completely neutralized ammonium sulfate to acidic ammonium sulfates in a two-hour time interval. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Project Ahupua'a: solar meteorological field measurements on the Island of Hawaii, Summer 1978. 5. Southern flank of Mauna Loa

    SciTech Connect

    Ekern, P.C.; Becker, R.J.

    1982-10-01

    Between 12-21 June 1978, four instrumented vans were deployed in a nearly linear transect above Na'alehu, along the steep southeastern slope of Mauna Loa. The transect, traversing a pronounced rainfall and insolation gradient, was designed to monitor sunlight and other meteorological variables related to solar energy. Surprisingly, many locations here receive more insolation during winter than during summer. Stronger than normal trade wind conditions prevailed during the period. A minor distrubance moved eastward to the north of the Island of Hawaii on 20 June, weakened the trade winds for nearly 24 h, and offered the opportunity to examine the development of island-generated circulations unhindered by the large scale flow. The amount of insolation recieved at the transect stations was less than the long-term mean. Persistent cloudiness attenuated insolation. Orographic cloud limited morning insolation while a sea breeze-anabatic cloud depleted afternoon insolation. Peak sunlight values were recorded during the mid-morning transition. This pattern occurred on all nine trade wind days. On 20 June, no orographic cloud formed and maximum values of insolation were received at three of the four transect sites. Strong gusty surface winds recorded along the transect may have been associated with a low level jet stream with Mauna Loa acting as a western boundary to the trade wind current. All transect stations experienced nocturnal wind pulses. Wind speed fluctuations, occasionally exceeding 5 m s/sup -1/, occurred with pronounced changes in wind direction. Increasing winds veered toward the prevailing trade wind direction, decreasing winds backed. Low level jet stream instabilities were a likely cause of these fluctuations.

  7. Goniometer-rotation-angle recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Shchagin, A.V.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a goniometer-rotation-angle recorder with a discrete drive. The rotation angle in a given plane is recorded by bidirectional sign counter of positive and negative drive-actuation numbers for rotations in positive and negative directions. The maximum capacity of the counter is + or - 9 decimal digits.

  8. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  9. UV signature mutations.

    PubMed

    Brash, Douglas E

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations—deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen—and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the nontranscribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; UV's nonsignature mutations may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  10. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle. PMID:20060981

  11. Stationary mutation models.

    PubMed

    Simonsson, Ivar; Mostad, Petter

    2016-07-01

    Probability calculations for relationship inference based on DNA tests are often performed with computer packages such as Familias. When mutations are assumed to be a possibility, one may notice a curious and problematic effect of including untested parents: results tend to change slightly. In this paper, we trace this effect back to fundamental model-formulating issues which can only be resolved by using stationary mutation models. We present several methods for obtaining such stationary mutation matrices from original mutation matrices, and evaluate essential properties of these methods. Our conclusion is that typically, stationary mutation models can be obtained, but for many types of markers, it may be impossible to combine specific biologically reasonable requirements for a mutation matrix with the requirement of stationarity. PMID:27231805

  12. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  13. Management of mandibular angle fracture.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Daniel Cameron; Abubaker, A Omar

    2013-11-01

    Fractures through the angle of the mandible are one of the most common facial fractures. The management of such fractures has been controversial, however. This controversy is related to the anatomic relations and complex biomechanical aspects of the mandibular angle. The debate has become even more heated since the evolution of rigid fixation and the ability to provide adequate stability of the fractured segments. This article provides an overview of the special anatomic and biomechanical features of the mandibular angle and their impact on the management of these fractures. PMID:24183373

  14. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  15. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  16. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  17. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  18. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations can make profound impact on the evolution and improvement of a self-pollinated crop such as lettuce. Since it is nontransgenic, mutation breeding is more acceptable to consumers. Combined with genomic advances in new technologies like TILLING, mutagenesis is becoming an even more powerfu...

  19. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  20. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  1. Diurnal variations of stratospheric ozone measured by ground-based microwave remote sensing at the Mauna Loa NDACC site: measurement validation and GEOSCCM model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, A.; Boyd, I. S.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Frith, S. M.; Kramarova, N. A.; Connor, B. J.; Bodeker, G. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Shiotani, M.; Sakazaki, T.

    2014-07-01

    There is presently renewed interest in diurnal variations of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone for the purpose of supporting homogenization of records of various ozone measurements that are limited by the technique employed to being made at certain times of day. We have made such measurements for 19 years using a passive microwave remote sensing technique at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii, which is a primary station in the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). We have recently reprocessed these data with hourly time resolution to study diurnal variations. We inspected differences between pairs of the ozone spectra (e.g., day and night) from which the ozone profiles are derived to determine the extent to which they may be contaminated by diurnally varying systematic instrumental or measurement effects. These are small, and we have reduced them further by selecting data that meet certain criteria that we established. We have calculated differences between profiles measured at different times: morning-night, afternoon-night, and morning-afternoon and have intercompared these with like profiles derived from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (Aura-MLS), the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS-MLS), the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES), and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet version 2 (SBUV/2) measurements. Differences between averages of coincident profiles are typically < 1.5% of typical nighttime values over most of the covered altitude range with some exceptions. We calculated averages of ozone values for each hour from the Mauna Loa microwave data, and normalized these to the average for the first hour after midnight for comparison with corresponding values calculated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We found that the measurements and model output mostly agree to better than 1.5% of the midnight value, with one noteworthy exception

  2. Metrology of angles in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    2004-10-01

    In astronomy, measurements of angles play a major role. After defining the units in use in astronomy, three methods of measuring angles are presented, with an application to the transit instrument. The interferometric techniques for measuring large angles are described in optical and radio wavelengths. Due to the atmospheric and mechanical limitation on ground, space astrometry has multiple advantages. The satellite Hipparcos is described and the data reduction procedures and results obtained are sketched. In the future, two new astrometric space missions are approved: GAIA, based on Hipparcos principles and SIM, a space interferometer. They are described and the expected accuracies are presented. To cite this article: J. Kovalevsky, C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  3. Critical rolling angle of microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzi, Bahman; Vallabh, Chaitanya K. P.; Stephens, James D.; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    At the micrometer-scale and below, particle adhesion becomes particularly relevant as van der Waals force often dominates volume and surface proportional forces. The rolling resistance of microparticles and their critical rolling angles prior to the initiation of free-rolling and/or complete detachment are critical in numerous industrial processes and natural phenomenon involving particle adhesion and granular dynamics. The current work describes a non-contact measurement approach for determining the critical rolling angle of a single microparticle under the influence of a contact-point base-excitation generated by a transient displacement field of a prescribed surface acoustic wave pulse and reports the critical rolling angle data for a set of polystyrene latex microparticles.

  4. Systematic variations in divergence angle.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takuya

    2012-11-21

    Practical methods for quantitative analysis of radial and angular coordinates of leafy organs of vascular plants are presented and applied to published phyllotactic patterns of various real systems from young leaves on a shoot tip to florets on a flower head. The constancy of divergence angle is borne out with accuracy of less than a degree. It is shown that apparent fluctuations in divergence angle are in large part systematic variations caused by the invalid assumption of a fixed center and/or by secondary deformations, while random fluctuations are of minor importance. PMID:22906592

  5. Recombinant Antigens rLipL21, rLoa22, rLipL32 and rLigACon4-8 for Serological Diagnosis of Leptospirosis by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Cuilian; Yan, Weiwei; Xiang, Hua; He, Hongxuan; Yang, Maosheng; Ijaz, Muhammad; Useh, Nicodemus; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; McDonough, Patrick L.; McDonough, Sean P.; Mohamed, Hussni; Yang, Zhibang; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Animal leptospirosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases in the United States and around the world. In a previous study, we applied four recombinant antigens, rLipL21, rLoa22, rLipL32 and rLigACon4-8 of Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans) for the serological diagnosis of equine leptospirosis (Ye et al, Serodiagnosis of equine leptospirosis by ELISA using four recombinant protein markers, Clin. Vaccine. Immunol. 21:478–483). In this study, the same four recombinant antigens were evaluated for their potential to diagnose canine leptospirosis by ELISA. A total of 305 canine sera that were Leptospira microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-negative (n = 102) and MAT-positive (n = 203) to 5 serovars (Pomona, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Canicola and Hardjo) were tested. When individual recombinant antigens were used, the sensitivity and specificity of ELISA were 97.5% and 84.3% for rLigACon4-8; 89.7% and 81.4% for rLoa22; 92.6% and 84.3% for rLipL32 and 99.5% and 84.3% for rLipL21, respectively compared to the MAT. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA were, 92.6% and 91.2% for rLigACon4-8 and rLipL32, 97.5% and 84.3% for rLigACon4-8 and rLipL21, 89.7% and 87.3% for rLigACon4-8 and rLoa22, 89.7% and 87.3% to rLipL21 and rLoa22, 92.6% and 91.2% for rLipL21 and rLipL32 and 89.2% and 94.1% for rLoa22 and rLipL32 when one of the two antigens was test positive. The use of all four antigens in the ELISA assay was found to be sensitive and specific, easy to perform, and agreed with the results of the standard Leptospira Microscopic Agglutination test (MAT) for the diagnosis of canine leptospirosis. PMID:25526513

  6. Recombinant antigens rLipL21, rLoa22, rLipL32 and rLigACon4-8 for serological diagnosis of leptospirosis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cuilian; Yan, Weiwei; Xiang, Hua; He, Hongxuan; Yang, Maosheng; Ijaz, Muhammad; Useh, Nicodemus; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; McDonough, Patrick L; McDonough, Sean P; Mohamed, Hussni; Yang, Zhibang; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Animal leptospirosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases in the United States and around the world. In a previous study, we applied four recombinant antigens, rLipL21, rLoa22, rLipL32 and rLigACon4-8 of Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans) for the serological diagnosis of equine leptospirosis (Ye et al, Serodiagnosis of equine leptospirosis by ELISA using four recombinant protein markers, Clin. Vaccine. Immunol. 21:478-483). In this study, the same four recombinant antigens were evaluated for their potential to diagnose canine leptospirosis by ELISA. A total of 305 canine sera that were Leptospira microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-negative (n = 102) and MAT-positive (n = 203) to 5 serovars (Pomona, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Canicola and Hardjo) were tested. When individual recombinant antigens were used, the sensitivity and specificity of ELISA were 97.5% and 84.3% for rLigACon4-8; 89.7% and 81.4% for rLoa22; 92.6% and 84.3% for rLipL32 and 99.5% and 84.3% for rLipL21, respectively compared to the MAT. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA were, 92.6% and 91.2% for rLigACon4-8 and rLipL32, 97.5% and 84.3% for rLigACon4-8 and rLipL21, 89.7% and 87.3% for rLigACon4-8 and rLoa22, 89.7% and 87.3% to rLipL21 and rLoa22, 92.6% and 91.2% for rLipL21 and rLipL32 and 89.2% and 94.1% for rLoa22 and rLipL32 when one of the two antigens was test positive. The use of all four antigens in the ELISA assay was found to be sensitive and specific, easy to perform, and agreed with the results of the standard Leptospira Microscopic Agglutination test (MAT) for the diagnosis of canine leptospirosis. PMID:25526513

  7. Comparison of airborne CO/sub 2/ flask samples and measurements from the Mauna Loa Observatory during the HAMEC project (June 1980)

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, G.A.; Harris, T.B.; Chin, J.F.S.

    1983-08-20

    During June 1980, the Hawaii Mesoscale Energy and Climate Project (HAMEC) field program was conducted in the vicinity of the island of Hawaii. The objective of the program was to use the NOAA P3 aircraft to measure meteorological variables upwind and downwind of the island to provide data to evaluate mesoscale models of airflow and cloud physics. One specific objective was to obtain flask samples upwind of the island to confirm that the CO/sub 2/ values observed at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) are representative of the free air at comparable altitudes. On 2 days, carbon dioxide flask samples were exposed aboard the aircraft at the altitude of the observatory and immediately above the trade inversion. Flask pairs in reasonable agreement were obtained on both occasions. During the same period the sampling conditions at MLO were free of obvious local contamination. The average difference between the aircraft measurements at the altitude of the observatory and the continuous CO/sub 2/ record from the observatory over the same period of time was 0.8 mole fraction in ppM. Differences in the individual measurements are discussed with respect to prevailing meteorological conditions. 11 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Deformation history of Mauna Loa (Hawaii) from 2003 to 2014 through InSAR data: understanding the shorter-term processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Marra, Daniele; Poland, Michael P.; Acocella, Valerio; Battaglia, Maurizio; Miklius, Asta

    2016-04-01

    Geodesy allows detecting the deformation of volcanoes, thus understanding magmatic processes. This becomes particularly efficient when time series are available and volcanoes can be monitored on the mean-term (decades), and not only during a specific event. Here we exploit the SBAS technique, using SAR images from ENVISAT (descending and ascending orbits; 2003 - 2010) and COSMO-SkyMed (descending and ascending orbits; 2012 - 2014), to study a decade of deformation at Mauna Loa (Hawaii). These data are merged time series data from 24 continuously operating GPS stations, which allows us to calibrate the InSAR time series. Our results show a long-term inflation of the volcano from 2003 to 2014, reaching a peak of ~11 cm/yr on the summit area between mid-2004 to mid-2005 and then slowing down. Within this frame, we were able to identify five main periods with approximately linear deformation behavior. The inversion of the deformation data in the first four periods suggests the repeated, though not constant, intrusion of one or more dikes below the summit caldera and the upper Southwest Rift Zone. Moreover, the dike intrusion coincides with minor acceleration of flank slip. Such a behavior is distinctive and, with the exception of the nearby Kilauea, has not been observed at any other volcano on the mean term. It is proposed that continuous, even though not constant flank instability of the SE flank may promote semi-continuous intrusions in a volcano with a ready magma supply.

  9. Occurrence of arsenic species in algae and freshwater plants of an extreme arid region in northern Chile, the Loa River Basin.

    PubMed

    Pell, Albert; Márquez, Anna; López-Sánchez, José Fermín; Rubio, Roser; Barbero, Mercedes; Stegen, Susana; Queirolo, Fabrizio; Díaz-Palma, Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study reports data on arsenic speciation in two green algae species (Cladophora sp. and Chara sp.) and in five aquatic plants (Azolla sp., Myriophyllum aquaticum, Phylloscirpus cf. desserticola, Potamogeton pectinatus, Ruppia filifolia and Zannichellia palustris) from the Loa River Basin in the Atacama Desert (northern Chile). Arsenic content was measured by Mass spectrometry coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-MS), after acidic digestion. Liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation, using both anionic and cationic chromatographic exchange systems. Inorganic arsenic compounds were the main arsenic species measured in all samples. The main arsenic species in the extracts of freshwater algae and plants were arsenite and arsenate, whereas glycerol-arsenosugar (gly-sug), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and methylarsonic acid (MA) were present only as minor constituents. Of the samples studied, algae species accumulated more arsenic than aquatic plants. Total arsenic content ranged from 182 to 11100 and from 20 to 248 mg As kg(-1) (d.w.) in algae and freshwater plants, respectively. In comparison with As concentration in water samples, there was hyper-accumulation (>0.1% d.w.) in Cladophora sp. PMID:22981629

  10. sup 222 Rn, sup 222 Rn progeny and sup 220 Rn progeny as atmospheric tracers of air masses at the Mauno Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Hutter, A.R.; George, A.C.; Maiello, M.L.; Fisenne, I.M.; Larsen, R.J.; Beck, H.L.; Wilson, F.C.

    1990-03-01

    {sup 222}Rn, {sup 222}Rn progeny and {sup 220}Rn progeny concentrations in air were measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii during March 1989 in order to investigate the feasibility of using them as atmospheric tracers to help determine local air mass flow patterns. Charcoal traps, cooled to dry ice temperatures, were used to collect {sup 222}Rn, which was subsequently measured in pulse ionization chambers at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML). {sup 222}Rn progeny and {sup 220}Rn progeny for 37 samples were measured at the Observatory by sampling high volumes of air through filters, which were counted for up to 11 h in alpha scintillation counters. Individual progeny concentrations were calculated using both least squares and maximum likelihood techniques. In general, {sup 222}Rn progeny and {sup 220}Rn progeny concentrations were low when free tropospheric air was present (downslope and tradewind conditions), and consistently higher when surface air from the island broke through the trade wind inversion layer (upslope conditions). The data suggest that {sup 222}Rn, {sup 222}Rn progeny, or {sup 220}Rn progeny monitoring may provide new and useful information to help indicate the different air flow patterns present at MLO. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Shifts in bryophyte carbon isotope ratio across an elevation × soil age matrix on Mauna Loa, Hawaii: do bryophytes behave like vascular plants?

    PubMed

    Waite, Mashuri; Sack, Lawren

    2011-05-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of vascular plant leaf tissue is determined by isotope discrimination, primarily mediated by stomatal and mesophyll diffusion resistances and by photosynthetic rate. These effects lead to predictable trends in leaf δ(13)C across natural gradients of elevation, irradiance and nutrient supply. Less is known about shifts in δ(13)C for bryophytes at landscape scale, as bryophytes lack stomata in the dominant gametophyte phase, and thus lack active control over CO(2) diffusion. Twelve bryophyte species were sampled across a matrix of elevation and soil ages on Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island. We tested hypotheses based on previous findings for vascular plants, which tend to have less negative δ(13)C at higher elevations or irradiances, and for leaves with higher leaf mass per area (LMA). Across the matrix, bryophytes spanned the range of δ(13)C values typical of C(3) vascular plants. Bryophytes were remarkably similar to vascular plants in exhibiting less negative δ(13)C with increasing elevation, and with lower overstory cover; additionally δ(13)C was related to bryophyte canopy projected mass per area, a trait analogous to LMA in vascular plants, also correlated negatively with overstory cover. The similarity of responses of δ(13)C in bryophytes and vascular plants to environmental factors, despite differing morphologies and diffusion pathways, points to a strong direct role of photosynthetic rate in determining δ(13)C variation at the landscape scale. PMID:21279387

  12. Estimate of the biotic contribution to the atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increase based on direct measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, W.P.; Machta, L.; Keeling, C.D.

    1985-04-20

    The CO/sub 2/ concentrations recorded at Mauna Loa Observatory from 1958-1983 were examined to detect the existence of any significant sources of CO/sub 2/ other than fossil fuel combustion. The observed annual CO/sub 2/ concentrations were compared with concentrations calculated assuming a number of hypothetical constant, nonfossil fuel emission scenarios added to the fossil fuel emissions. It was found that constant nonfossil fuel sources must have been 10% or less of the fossil fuel sources. This conclusion assumes that a constant fraction of the total emissions went into the oceans and that the nonfossil fuel emissions were invariant from year to year. When this latter restriction was relaxed, almost any nonfossil fuel source was possible if its history closely matched that of the fossil fuel emissions. We conclude that it is unlikely that biotic or other nonfossil fuel sources could have exceeded about 0.5 GT of carbon per year except in the unlikely event that they grew at a rate close to that of the fossil fuel emissions.

  13. Atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa Observatory 1. NOAA global monitoring for climatic change measurements with a nondispersive infrared analyzer, 1974--1985

    SciTech Connect

    Komhyr, W. D.; Harris, T. B.; Waterman, L. S.; Chin, J. F. S.; Thoning, K. W.

    1989-06-20

    Atmospheric CO/sub 2/ measurements made with a nondispersive infrared analyzer during 1974--1985 at Mauna Lao Observatory, Hawaii, are described, with emphasis on the measurement methodology, calibrations, and data accuracy. Monthly mean CO/sub 2/ data, representative of global background conditions, are presented for the period of record. The monthly means were derived from an all-data base of CO/sub 2/ hourly averged archived at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) facility in Boulder, Colorado; at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and in the microfiche version of this paper. Flags in the all-data base identify CO/sub 2/ hourly averages that have been deemed unreliable because of sampling and analysis problems or that are unrepresentative of clean background air because of influences of the local environment, for example, CO/sub 2/ uptake by nearby vegetation or contamination and pollution effects. The select NOAA GMCC monthly mean data are compared with similar data obtained independently at Mauna Loa Observatory by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The averge difference of corresponding monthly mean CO/sub 2/ values for the two data sets is 0.15/plus minus/0.18 ppm, where the indicated variability is the standard deviation. Careful scrutiny of the NOAA GMCC measurement, calibration, and data processing procedures that might have caused the small bias in the data has revealed no unusual errors. /copyright/ American Geophysical Union 1989

  14. A Comparison of Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, During GTE PEM-West and MLOPEX 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, E.; Ridley, B.; Walega, J.; Greenberg, J.; Kok, G.; Staffelbach, T.; Schauffler, S.; Lind, J.; Huebler, G.; Norton, R.

    1996-01-01

    During October 19-20, 1991, one flight of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM-West A) mission was conducted near Hawaii as an intercomparison with ground-based measurements of the Mauna Loa Observatory Photochemistry Experiment (MLOPEX 2) and the NOAA Climate Modeling and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL). Ozone, reactive nitrogen species, peroxides, hydrocarbons, and halogenated hydrocarbons were measured by investigators aboard the DC-8 aircraft and at the ground site. Lidar cross sections of ozone revealed a complex air mass structure near the island of Hawaii which was evidenced by large variation in some trace gas mixing ratios. This variation limited the time and spatial scales for direct measurement intercomparisons. Where differences occurred between measurements in the same air masses, the intercomparison suggested that biases for some trace gases was due to different calibration scales or, in some cases, instrumental or sampling biases. Relatively large uncertainties were associated with those trace gases present in the low parts per trillion by volume range. Trace gas correlations were used to expand the scope of the intercomparison to identify consistent trends between the different data sets.

  15. Strong Saharan Dust Event Detected at Lalinet LOA-UNAL Station, over Medellín, Colombia by Active and Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya, Andrés; Nisperuza, Daniel; Alegría, Dairo; Múnera, Mauricio; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Zapata, Carmen E.; Jiménez, Jose F.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Bastidas, Álvaro

    2016-06-01

    Passive and active remote sensing techniques are well used for understanding optical and microphysical characteristics of aerosol layers. Lidar has the ability to resolve stratifications of the complex vertical structures in the atmosphere and determine the existence of aerosols which has been transported for long-ranges through the evaluation of the optical properties such as particle backscatter and extinction coefficients, among others. CIMEL sunphotometer data (AERONET network) give information about optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA), and Angström Exponent (AE) and microphysical properties such as size distribution. The LOA-UNAL lidar station as part of the LALINET (Latin American LIdar NETwork) [1], involves an elastic coaxial system operating in zenith mode used for monitoring the atmosphere at Medellín-Colombia (6.26°N, 75.58°W, 1470 m asl). This work presents a Saharan dust even over Medellín, Colombia, 27th June, 2014, observed simultaneously with lidar, sun-photometer and complementary global mass transport model HYSPLIT.

  16. Discovering the Inscribed Angle Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Matt B.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to play tennis is difficult. It takes practice, but it also helps to have a coach--someone who gives tips and pointers but allows the freedom to play the game on one's own. Learning to act like a mathematician is a similar process. Students report that the process of proving the inscribed angle theorem is challenging and, at times,…

  17. Angle between principal axis triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Walter; Tape, Carl

    2012-09-01

    The principal axis angle ξ0, or Kagan angle, is a measure of the difference between the orientations of two seismic moment tensors. It is the smallest angle needed to rotate the principal axes of one moment tensor to the corresponding principal axes of the other. This paper is a conceptual review of the main features of ξ0. We give a concise formula for calculating ξ0, but our main goal is to illustrate the behaviour of ξ0 geometrically. When the first of two moment tensors is fixed, the angle ξ0 between them becomes a function on the unit ball. The level surfaces of ξ0 can then be depicted in the unit ball, and they give insights into ξ0 that are not obvious from calculations alone. We also include a derivation of the known probability density inline image of ξ0. The density inline image is proportional to the area of a certain surface inline image. The easily seen variation of inline image with t then explains the rather peculiar shape of inline image. Because the curve inline image is highly non-uniform, its shape needs to be considered when analysing distributions of empirical ξ0 values. We recall an example of Willemann which shows that ξ0 may not always be the most appropriate measure of separation for moment tensor orientations, and we offer an alternative measure.

  18. Mutations in man

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections that cover some of the following topics: DNA repair, gene or point mutations, aspects of nondisjunction, origin and significance of chromosomal alterations, structure and organization of the human genome, and mutagenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  19. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  20. Supercritical Angle Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Jonas; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Verdes, Dorinel; Schwille, Petra

    2008-01-01

    We explore the potential of a supercritical angle (SA) objective for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This novel microscope objective combines tight focusing by an aspheric lens with strong axial confinement of supercritical angle fluorescence collection by a parabolic mirror lens, resulting in a small detection volume. The tiny axial extent of the detection volume features an excellent surface sensitivity, as is demonstrated by diffusion measurements in model membranes with an excess of free dye in solution. All SA-FCS measurements are directly compared to standard confocal FCS, demonstrating a clear advantage of SA-FCS, especially for diffusion measurements in membranes. We present an extensive theoretical framework that allows for accurate and quantitative evaluation of the SA-FCS correlation curves. PMID:17827221

  1. HIV-1 protease mutations and protease inhibitor cross-resistance.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  2. Light Scattering at Various Angles

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Paul; Pyle, B. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Mie theory of scattering is used to provide new information on how changes in particle volume, with no change in dry weight, should influence light scattering for various scattering angles and particle sizes. Many biological cells (e.g., algal cells, erythrocytes) and large subcellular structures (e.g., chloroplasts, mitochondria) in suspension undergo this type of reversible volume change, a change which is related to changes in the rates of cellular processes. A previous study examined the effects of such volume changes on total scattering. In this paper scattering at 10° is found to follow total scattering closely, but scattering at 45°, 90°, 135°, and 170° behaves differently. Small volume changes can cause very large observable changes in large angle scattering if the sample particles are uniform in size; however, the natural particle size heterogeneity of most samples would mask this effect. For heterogeneous samples of most particle size ranges, particle shrink-age is found to increase large angle scattering. PMID:4556610

  3. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  4. Study of extreme-ultraviolet emission and properties of a coronal streamer from PROBA2/SWAP, HINODE/EIS and Mauna Loa Mk4 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Goryaev, F.; Slemzin, V.; Vainshtein, L.; Williams, David R.

    2014-02-01

    Wide-field extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) telescopes imaging in spectral bands sensitive to 1 MK plasma on the Sun often observe extended, ray-like coronal structures stretching radially from active regions to distances of 1.5-2 R {sub ☉}, which represent the EUV counterparts of white-light streamers. To explain this phenomenon, we investigated the properties of a streamer observed on 2010 October 20 and 21, by the PROBA2/SWAP EUV telescope together with the Hinode/EIS (HOP 165) and the Mauna Loa Mk4 white-light coronagraph. In the SWAP 174 Å band comprising the Fe IX-Fe XI lines, the streamer was detected to a distance of 2 R {sub ☉}. We assume that the EUV emission is dominated by collisional excitation and resonant scattering of monochromatic radiation coming from the underlying corona. Below 1.2 R {sub ☉}, the plasma density and temperature were derived from the Hinode/EIS data by a line-ratio method. Plasma conditions in the streamer and in the background corona above 1.2 R {sub ☉} from the disk center were determined by forward-modeling the emission that best fit the observational data in both EUV and white light. It was found that the plasma in the streamer above 1.2 R {sub ☉} is nearly isothermal, with a temperature of T = 1.43 ± 0.08 MK. The hydrostatic scale-height temperature determined from the evaluated density distribution was significantly higher (1.72 ± 0.08 MK), which suggests the existence of outward plasma flow along the streamer. We conclude that, inside the streamer, collisional excitation provided more than 90% of the observed EUV emission, whereas, in the background corona, the contribution of resonance scattering became comparable with that of collisions at R ≳ 2 R {sub ☉}.

  5. Study of Extreme-ultraviolet Emission and Properties of a Coronal Streamer from PROBA2/SWAP, Hinode/EIS and Mauna Loa Mk4 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryaev, F.; Slemzin, V.; Vainshtein, L.; Williams, David R.

    2014-02-01

    Wide-field extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) telescopes imaging in spectral bands sensitive to 1 MK plasma on the Sun often observe extended, ray-like coronal structures stretching radially from active regions to distances of 1.5-2 R ⊙, which represent the EUV counterparts of white-light streamers. To explain this phenomenon, we investigated the properties of a streamer observed on 2010 October 20 and 21, by the PROBA2/SWAP EUV telescope together with the Hinode/EIS (HOP 165) and the Mauna Loa Mk4 white-light coronagraph. In the SWAP 174 Å band comprising the Fe IX-Fe XI lines, the streamer was detected to a distance of 2 R ⊙. We assume that the EUV emission is dominated by collisional excitation and resonant scattering of monochromatic radiation coming from the underlying corona. Below 1.2 R ⊙, the plasma density and temperature were derived from the Hinode/EIS data by a line-ratio method. Plasma conditions in the streamer and in the background corona above 1.2 R ⊙ from the disk center were determined by forward-modeling the emission that best fit the observational data in both EUV and white light. It was found that the plasma in the streamer above 1.2 R ⊙ is nearly isothermal, with a temperature of T = 1.43 ± 0.08 MK. The hydrostatic scale-height temperature determined from the evaluated density distribution was significantly higher (1.72 ± 0.08 MK), which suggests the existence of outward plasma flow along the streamer. We conclude that, inside the streamer, collisional excitation provided more than 90% of the observed EUV emission, whereas, in the background corona, the contribution of resonance scattering became comparable with that of collisions at R >~ 2 R ⊙.

  6. Stratospheric ozone interannual variability (1995-2011) as observed by lidar and satellite at Mauna Loa Observatory, HI and Table Mountain Facility, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirgis, G.; Leblanc, T.; McDermid, I. S.; Walsh, T. D.

    2013-05-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) lidars, at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (MLO, 19.5° N, 155.6° W) and the JPL Table Mountain Facility (TMF, California, 34.5° N, 117.7° W), have been measuring vertical profiles of stratospheric ozone routinely since the early 1990's and late-1980s respectively. Interannual variability of ozone above these two sites was investigated using a multi-linear regression analysis on the deseasonalised monthly mean lidar and satellite time-series at 1 km intervals between 20 and 45 km from January 1995 to April 2011, a period of low volcanic aerosol loading. Explanatory variables representing the 11 yr solar cycle, the El Niño Southern Oscillation, the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, the Eliassen-Palm flux, and horizontal and vertical transport were used. A new proxy, the mid-latitude Ozone Depleting Gas Index, which shows a decrease with time as an outcome of the Montreal Protocol, was introduced and compared to the more commonly used linear trend method. The analysis also compares the lidar time-series and a merged time-series obtained from the space-borne Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II, Halogen Occultation Experiment, and Aura-Microwave Limb Sounder instruments. The results from both lidar and satellite measurements are consistent with recent model simulations which propose changes in tropical upwelling. Additionally, at TMF the Ozone Depleting Gas Index explains as much variance as the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation in the upper stratosphere. Over the past 17 yr a diminishing downward trend in ozone was observed before 2000 and a net increase, and sign of ozone recovery, is observed after 2005. Our results which include dynamical proxies suggest possible coupling between horizontal transport and the 11 yr solar cycle response, although a dataset spanning a period longer than one solar cycle is needed to confirm this result.

  7. Hydrogen isotope correction for laser instrument measurement bias at low water vapor concentration using conventional isotope analyses: application to measurements from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Sharp, Z D; Galewsky, J; Strong, M; Van Pelt, A D; Dong, F; Noone, D

    2011-03-15

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water vapor can be measured with commercially available laser spectroscopy analyzers in real time. Operation of the laser systems in relatively dry air is difficult because measurements are non-linear as a function of humidity at low water concentrations. Here we use field-based sampling coupled with traditional mass spectrometry techniques for assessing linearity and calibrating laser spectroscopy systems at low water vapor concentrations. Air samples are collected in an evacuated 2 L glass flask and the water is separated from the non-condensable gases cryogenically. Approximately 2 µL of water are reduced to H(2) gas and measured on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In a field experiment at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), we ran Picarro and Los Gatos Research (LGR) laser analyzers for a period of 25 days in addition to periodic sample collection in evacuated flasks. When the two laser systems are corrected to the flask data, they are strongly coincident over the entire 25 days. The δ(2)H values were found to change by over 200‰ over 2.5 min as the boundary layer elevation changed relative to MLO. The δ(2)H values ranged from -106 to -332‰, and the δ(18)O values (uncorrected) ranged from -12 to -50‰. Raw data from laser analyzers in environments with low water vapor concentrations can be normalized to the international V-SMOW scale by calibration to the flask data measured conventionally. Bias correction is especially critical for the accurate determination of deuterium excess in dry air. PMID:21290447

  8. Mutations in lettuce improvement.

    PubMed

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  9. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  10. 30 CFR 56.19037 - Fleet angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fleet angles. 56.19037 Section 56.19037 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Sheaves § 56.19037 Fleet angles. Fleet angles on hoists installed after November 15, 1979, shall not...

  11. 30 CFR 57.19037 - Fleet angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fleet angles. 57.19037 Section 57.19037 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Sheaves § 57.19037 Fleet angles. Fleet angles on hoists installed after November 15, 1979, shall not...

  12. 30 CFR 57.19037 - Fleet angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fleet angles. 57.19037 Section 57.19037 Mineral... Sheaves § 57.19037 Fleet angles. Fleet angles on hoists installed after November 15, 1979, shall not be greater than one and one-half degrees for smooth drums or two degrees for grooved drums....

  13. [Chronic closed-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2004-06-01

    Five times more frequent than the acute form, chronic closed-angle glaucoma often goes unrecognized for a long time, resulting in considerable visual field deficiencies, even in loss of the eye. It is sometimes confused with chronic glaucoma and treated as such, which is inadequate to halt the progression of the disease. Only gonioscopy can diagnose it. If doubt persists, UBM (ultrasound biomicroscopy) can detect goniosynechiae, a malposition of the ciliary body or of the lens, or the existence of iridociliary cysts. Nine times out of ten, pupillary block initiates the process and an iridotomy should always be done to remediate it, even if this procedure alone does not always suffice to solve the problem. PMID:15319750

  14. Lengths and hazards from channel-fed lava flows on Mauna Loa, Hawai`i, determined from thermal and downslope modeling with FLOWGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Scott K.; Garbeil, Harold; Harris, Andrew J. L.

    2005-08-01

    Using the FLOWGO thermo-rheological model we have determined cooling-limited lengths of channel-fed (i.e. ‘a‘ā) lava flows from Mauna Loa. We set up the program to run autonomously, starting lava flows from every 4th line and sample in a 30-m spatial-resolution SRTM DEM within regions corresponding to the NE and SW rift zones and the N flank of the volcano. We consider that each model run represents an effective effusion rate, which for an actual flow coincides with it reaching 90% of its total length. We ran the model at effective effusion rates ranging from 1 to 1,000 m3 s-1, and determined the cooling-limited channel length for each. Keeping in mind that most flows extend 1 2 km beyond the end of their well-developed channels and that our results are non-probabilistic in that they give all potential vent sites an equal likelihood to erupt, lava coverage results include the following: SW rift zone flows threaten almost all of Mauna Loa’s SW flanks, even at effective effusion rates as low as 50 m3 s-1 (the average effective effusion rate for SW rift zone eruptions since 1843 is close to 400 m3 s-1). N flank eruptions, although rare in the recent geologic record, have the potential to threaten much of the coastline S of Keauhou with effective effusion rates of 50 100 m3 s-1, and the coast near Anaeho‘omalu if effective effusion rates are 400 500 m3 s-1 (the 1859 ‘a‘ā flow reached this coast with an effective effusion rate of ˜400 m3 s-1). If the NE rift zone continues to be active only at elevations >2,500 m, in order for a channel-fed flow to reach Hilo the effective effusion rate needs to be ≥400 m3 s-1 (the 1984 flow by comparison, had an effective effusion rate of 200 m3 s-1). Hilo could be threatened by NE rift zone channel-fed flows with lower effective effusion rates but only if they issue from vents at ˜2,000 m or lower. Populated areas on Mauna Loa’s SE flanks (e.g. Pāhala), could be threatened by SW rift zone eruptions with effective

  15. Diagnostic problems in a patient with amicrofilaremic Loa loa.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masahide; Ouji, Yukiteru; Hayashi, Noriko; Moriya, Kei; Nishiofuku, Mariko; Ishizaka, Shigeaki; Itoh, Makoto; Kimura, Eisaku; Nakamura, Fukumi; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2008-01-01

    We report a Japanese patient with loiasis who became infected in Cameroon. Despite the clinical history and laboratory data providing adequate evidence for suspecting loiasis, microfilariae were not detected in the blood. It is important to note that most infected travelers whose home countries are in nonendemic regions are amicrofilaremic. PMID:18217871

  16. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  17. Mutation detection by chemical cleavage.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R G

    1999-02-01

    Detection and amplification of mutations in genes in a cheap, 100% effective manner is a major objective in modern molecular genetics. This ideal is some way away and many methods are used each of which have their own particular advantages and disadvantages. Sequencing is often thought of as the 'gold standard' for mutation detection. This perception is distorted due to the fact that this is the ONLY method of mutation identification but this does not mean it is the best for mutation detection. The fact that many scanning methods detect 5-10% of mutant molecules in a wild type environment immediately indicates these methods are advantageous over sequencing. One such method, the Chemical Cleavage method, is able to cut the costs of detecting a mutation on order of magnitude and guarantees mutation detection as evidenced by track record and the fact that each mutation has two chances of being detected. PMID:10084109

  18. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  19. Calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-10-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph(-) MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  20. Angled Layers in Super Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers used a special imaging technique with the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to get as detailed a look as possible at a target region near eastern foot of 'Burns Cliff.' The intervening terrain was too difficult for driving the rover closer. The target is the boundary between two sections of layered rock. The layers in lower section (left) run at a marked angle to the layers in next higher section (right).

    This view is the product of a technique called super resolution. It was generated from data acquired on sol 288 of Opportunity's mission (Nov. 14, 2004) from a position along the southeast wall of 'Endurance Crater.' Resolution slightly higher than normal for the panoramic camera was synthesized for this view by combining 17 separate images of this scene, each one 'dithered' or pointed slightly differently from the previous one. Computer manipulation of the individual images was then used to generate a new synthetic view of the scene in a process known mathematically as iterative deconvolution, but referred to informally as super resolution. Similar methods have been used to enhance the resolution of images from the Mars Pathfinder mission and the Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. Large Angle Satellite Attitude Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E.; Junkins, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Two methods are proposed for performing large angle reorientation maneuvers. The first method is based upon Euler's rotation theorem; an arbitrary reorientation is ideally accomplished by rotating the spacecraft about a line which is fixed in both the body and in space. This scheme has been found to be best suited for the case in which the initial and desired attitude states have small angular velocities. The second scheme is more general in that a general class of transition trajectories is introduced which, in principle, allows transfer between arbitrary orientation and angular velocity states. The method generates transition maneuvers in which the uncontrolled (free) initial and final states are matched in orientation and angular velocity. The forced transition trajectory is obtained by using a weighted average of the unforced forward integration of the initial state and the unforced backward integration of the desired state. The current effort is centered around practical validation of this second class of maneuvers. Of particular concern is enforcement of given control system constraints and methods for suboptimization by proper selection of maneuver initiation and termination times. Analogous reorientation strategies which force smooth transition in angular momentum and/or rotational energy are under consideration.

  2. [Screening in open angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Carmen; Mocanu, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) represents the second cause of mondial cecity, after retinal diabetes complications, with extremely severe implications in quality of life. Screening testing for glaucoma is justified, because only the diagnosis in very incipient stage will preserve the visual function; any treatment will not assure the reversibility of pre-existent optic nerve lesions. Screening of glaucoma, will take into a consideration the costs, the time of investigation, the adverse effects, and the sensitivity and specificity of tests; the last parameter also will strongly influence the positive predictive value. An ideal screening identifies all subjects that present the disease (sensitivity) and will exclude all healthy subjects (specificity). In this moment, in Dolj district, the diagnosis is based on active diagnosis of new cases of glaucoma on the high risk level population, therefore in a 210000 habitants. 4723 patients with glaucoma are diagnosed, screened and follow-up on medical cabinets and on Center of Glaucoma, which coordinates their activity. To better monitored patients, automatized programs with acquisition and storage for different types of medical imaging facilities had become indispensable to any routine practice. PMID:23755511

  3. Chronic open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Adatia, Feisal A.; Damji, Karim F.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide, including in Canada. It presents a challenge in diagnosis, as disease often progresses without symptoms; an estimated 50% of cases are undetected. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE searches, reference lists of articles, and expert knowledge from one of the authors (K.F.D.), a glaucoma specialist, were used. MAIN MESSAGE A casefinding approach using early referral to optometrists and ophthalmologists for early detection of COAG is helpful for patients with risk factors such as age above 50, a positive family history, black race, and myopia. Moderate evidence for referral also exists for the following risk factors: hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and sleep apnea. Treatment with intraocular pressure–lowering medication can arrest or slow the course of the disease, permitting patients to retain good visual function. Family physicians should be aware that some intraocular pressure–lowering medications, particularly topical beta-blockers, can pose iatrogenic harm to patients and result in or exacerbate such conditions as asthma, cardiovascular disturbances, depression, and sexual dysfunction. CONCLUSION Appropriate referral patterns and an understanding of common as well as serious side effects of glaucoma medications are important in optimizing management of patients at risk of developing, or who have, COAG. PMID:16190176

  4. A Clinical Study of Mandibular Angle Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Wook-Jae; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Lim, Kyung-Seop; Shin, Seung-Min; Kim, Cheol-Man

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To establish management protocol for mandibular angle fracture, we describe pertinent factors including cause, impacted third molar and recent treatment tendency. Methods: We examined the records of 62 patients who had unilateral mandibular angle fracture. Sixty patients who had open reduction surgery were examined at postoperative weeks 1, 4, 8, 12, and 28. Results: Left mandibular angle fracture is frequent in younger males. Presence of the mandibular third molar can increase fracture risk. Because of attached muscle, favorable fractures occurred primarily in the mandibular angle area. Conclusion: Extracting the mandibular third molar can prevent angle fractures, and open reduction with only one plate adaptation is generally the proper treatment method for mandibular angle fracture. PMID:27489834

  5. Signature extension for sun angle, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A. (Principal Investigator); Berry, J. K.; Heimes, F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Within a restricted zenith sun angle range of 35 - 50 degrees, it was empirically observed that canopy reflectance is mainly Lambertian. Reflectance changes with crop stage were simple shifts in scale in the sun angle range. It was noted that sun angle variations depend on canopy characteristics. Effects of the vegetative canopy were most pronounced at the larger solar zenith angles (20 %). The linear sun angle correction coefficients demonstrate a dependency on both crop stage (15-20 %) and crop type (10-20 %). The use of canopy reflectance modeling allowed for the generation of a simulated data set over an extremely broad envelope of sun angles.

  6. Best Angle to Orient Two Intersecting Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S; Ferguson, S W; Shull, P B

    2006-07-25

    Fiducials in the form of intersecting straight lines are used to align the target in the final target chamber of the National Ignition Facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. One of the techniques used to locate these lines is the Hough transform. When two lines intersect at a 90 degree angle, it is tempting to orient the lines to horizontal and vertical directions. There are other possible angles at which the lines may be oriented. One question that arises while designing the fiducials is whether there is a preferred angle or range of angles that leads to higher accuracy. This work attempts to answer this question through detailed computer simulation.

  7. High-speed pitch angle sorter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, John W.; Torbert, R. B.; Vandiver, James

    1991-01-01

    A high-speed method was developed to compress the two-dimensional angular distribution of space particles gathered by space plasma instrumentation into the angle distribution, where the pitch angle is polar angle with respect to the ambient magnetic field. The pitch angle sorter can handle rates of up to 2 MHz and it is designed to accommodate high angular resolution plasma analyzers that are placed on a rotating spacecraft. This compression is achieved by relying on digitally encoded lookup tables to eliminate all arithmetic operations while applying the high symmetry of this compression to reduce the amount of digital memory.

  8. Pitch angle of galactic spiral arms

    SciTech Connect

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    One of the key parameters that characterizes spiral arms in disk galaxies is a pitch angle that measures the inclination of a spiral arm to the direction of galactic rotation. The pitch angle differs from galaxy to galaxy, which suggests that the rotation law of galactic disks determines it. In order to investigate the relation between the pitch angle of spiral arms and the shear rate of galactic differential rotation, we perform local N-body simulations of pure stellar disks. We find that the pitch angle increases with the epicycle frequency and decreases with the shear rate and obtain the fitting formula. This dependence is explained by the swing amplification mechanism.

  9. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  10. Two new Gaucher disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Beutler, E; Gelbart, T

    1994-02-01

    Recently, a mutation at nucleotide 1193 of the glucocerebrosidase gene was described in a patient with type 1 Gaucher disease. This mutation destroys a TaqI site in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified fragment. We used digestion with this enzyme to screen DNA samples from Gaucher disease patients representing 23 previously unidentified alleles and discovered that this site had been destroyed in three samples. However, the mutation that caused this change proved to be a CT substitution at cDNA nucleotide 1192 (Genomic 5408; 359Arg-->End). Fortuitously, another TaqI site was destroyed by a different mutation, a GA mutation at nt 1312 (Genomic 5927; 399AspAsn). Both of these mutations were functionally severe in that they were associated with type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease. PMID:8112750

  11. Speed of evolution with spatial structure and interacting mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otwinowski, Jakub

    Perhaps the simplest question about long term evolutionary adaptation is how quickly do populations adapt to a new environment by incorporating mutations? This question is approached from several different angles. Chapter 1 investigates the speed of evolution when there is a large supply of beneficial mutations and the population has spatial structure. For large system sizes, a speed limit is found on the rate adaptation. The model is analyzed as a surface growth model in physics, which reveals universal properties of the model, such as the distribution of fitnesses. However, neglecting spatial structure, the speed of evolution also depends on how mutations interact with each other. This may be quantified by a fitness landscape, or a genotype-phenotype-fitness map. In chapter 2, the fitness landscape and genotype-phenotype map of an E. coli lac promoter is inferred from a large dataset with 100,000 sequences and fluorescence measurements. The interactions between mutations are quantified using a simple quadratic model, similar to a spin glass Hamiltonian. Chapter 3 describes a toy model based on an overdamped particle in a potential, which demonstrates how a fitness landscape with time dependent interactions between mutations determines the speed of evolution.

  12. Divergent-ray projection method for measuring the flapping angle, lag angle, and torsional angle of a bumblebee wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lijiang; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Kawachi, Keiji

    1996-11-01

    A divergent-ray projection (DRP) method was developed for measuring the flapping angle, lag angle, and torsional angle of bumblebee wing during beating motion. This new method can measure the spatial coordinates of an insect wing by digitizing the images that are projected by two divergent laser rays from different directions. The advantage of the DRP method is its ability to measure those three angles simultaneously using only one high-speed camera. The resolution of the DRP method can be changed easily by adjusting system parameters to meet the needs of different types of objects. The measurement results for these angles of a bumblebee wing probe the effectiveness of the DRP method in studying the flight performance of insects.

  13. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G.; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers. PMID:26053201

  14. Automatic star-horizon angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, K.; Koso, D. A.; Nardella, P. C.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic star horizontal angle measuring aid for general navigational use incorporates an Apollo type sextant. The eyepiece of the sextant is replaced with two light detectors and appropriate circuitry. The device automatically determines the angle between a navigational star and a unique point on the earths horizon as seen on a spacecraft.

  15. Tree branch angle: maximizing effective leaf area.

    PubMed

    Honda, H; Fisher, J B

    1978-02-24

    In a computer simulation of branching pattern and leaf cluster in Terminalia catappa, right and left branch angles were varied, and the effective leaf surface areas were calculated. Theoretical branch angles that result in maximum effective leaf area are close to the values observed in nature. PMID:17757590

  16. Experimental study of crossing angle collision

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Rice, D.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Tigner, M.

    1993-05-01

    The non-linear coupling due to the beam-beam interaction with crossing angle has been studied. The major effect of a small ({approximately}12mrad) crossing angle is to excite 5Q{sub x}{plus_minus}Q{sub s}=integer coupling resonance family on large amplitude particles, which results in bad lifetime. On the CESR, a small crossing angle ({approximately}2.4mr) was created at the IP and a reasonable beam-beam tune-shift was achieved. The decay rate of the beam is measured as a function of horizontal tune with and without crossing angle. The theoretical analysis, simulation and experimental measurements have a good agreement. The resonance strength as a function of crossing angle is also measured.

  17. Let's Do It! Using Geostrips and "Angle-Fixers" to Develop Ideas About Shapes and Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, James V.; Silverman, Helene

    1975-01-01

    Homemade geostrips, "angle-fixers" (cardboard circular sectors) and brass fasteners can be used by students to explore properties of angles, triangles and other polygons. Several games and other activities are suggested. (SD)

  18. Driver Mutations in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Decatur, Christina L.; Ong, Erin; Garg, Nisha; Anbunathan, Hima; Bowcock, Anne M.; Field, Matthew G.; Harbour, J. William

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Frequent mutations have been described in the following 5 genes in uveal melanoma (UM): BAP1, EIF1AX, GNA11, GNAQ, and SF3B1. Understanding the prognostic significance of these mutations could facilitate their use in precision medicine. OBJECTIVE To determine the associations between driver mutations, gene expression profile (GEP) classification, clinicopathologic features, and patient outcomes in UM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective study of patients with UM treated by enucleation by a single ocular oncologist between November 1, 1998, and July 31, 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinicopathologic features, patient outcomes, GEP classification (class 1 or class 2), and mutation status were recorded. RESULTS The study cohort comprised 81 participants. Their mean age was 61.5 years, and 37% (30 of 81) were female. The GEP classification was class 1 in 35 of 81 (43%), class 2 in 42 of 81 (52%), and unknown in 4 of 81 (5%). BAP1 mutations were identified in 29 of 64 (45%), GNAQ mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), GNA11 mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), SF3B1 mutations in 19 of 81 (24%), and EIF1AX mutations in 14 of 81 (17%). Sixteen of the mutations in BAP1 and 6 of the mutations in EIF1AX were previously unreported in UM. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations were mutually exclusive. BAP1, SF3B1, and EIF1AX mutations were almost mutually exclusive with each other. Using multiple regression analysis, BAP1 mutations were associated with class 2 GEP and older patient. EIF1AX mutations were associated with class 1 GEP and the absence of ciliary body involvement. SF3B1 mutations were associated with younger patient age. GNAQ mutations were associated with the absence of ciliary body involvement and greater largest basal diameter. GNA11 mutations were not associated with any of the analyzed features. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, class 2 GEP was the prognostic factor most strongly associated with metastasis (relative risk, 9.4; 95% CI, 3.1–28.5) and

  19. Analysis of factors affecting angle ANB.

    PubMed

    Hussels, W; Nanda, R S

    1984-05-01

    Cephalometric analyses based on angular and linear measurements have obvious fallacies, which have been discussed in detail by Moyers and Bookstein. However, the clinical application of such an analysis by the orthodontic profession in treatment planning is widely accepted. Variations of angle ANB are commonly used to determine relative jaw relationships in most of the cephalometric evaluations. Several authors, including points A and B influences angle ANB, as does rotational growth of the upper and lower jaws. In addition, the authors point out that growth in a vertical direction (distance N to B) and an increase of the dental height (distance A to B) may contribute to changes in angle ANB. For a Class I relation (Wits = 0 mm), a mathematical formula has been developed which enables the authors to study the geometric influence of angle ANB caused by the following four effects: (1) rotation of the jaws and/or occlusal plane relative to the anterior cranial base; (2) anteroposterior position of N relative to point B, (3) vertical growth (distance N to B); (4) increase in dental height (distance A to B). It was observed that, contrary to the common belief that an ANB angle of 2 +/- 3.0 degrees is considered normal for a skeletal Class I relation, the calculated values of angle ANB will vary widely with changes in these four controlling factors under the same skeletal Class I conditions (Wits = 0 mm). Therefore, in a case under consideration, angle ANB must be corrected for these geometric effects in order to get a proper perspective of the skeletal discrepancy. This is facilitated by comparing the measured ANB angle with the corresponding ANB angle calculated by a formula for a Class I relationship. The corresponding calculated angle ANB can be taken from the tables which are based upon the formula using the same values for SNB, omega (angle between occlusal plane and anterior cranial base), b (which is distance N to B) and a (dental height measured as perpendicular

  20. Ramifications of four concurrent thrombophilic mutations and one hypofibrinolytic mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping; Aregawi, Dawit

    2004-10-01

    A kindred was examined in which the 48-year-old white female proband with three deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary emboli events had four thrombophilic and one hypofibrinolytic mutations, and in which her 14-year-old asymptomatic daughter had four thrombophilic mutations. The proband was heterozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden, G20210A prothrombin, and platelet glycoprotein IIIa PL A1/A2 mutations, had high factor VIII (221%), and was homozygous for the 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene mutation, with high plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (23.7 U/mL). Her 14-year-old daughter was homozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2/A2 mutations, compound heterozygous for the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations, and heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin mutation, a combination with an estimated likelihood of 1.6 x 10(-7). In 247 white healthy controls, there was no V Leiden homozygosity and no V Leiden-prothrombin gene compound heterozygosity. Heterozygosity for the V Leiden and prothrombin gene mutations was 3.2% and 4.1%, respectively. Homozygosity for the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2A2, PAI-1 gene 4G4G, and C677T MTHFR mutations was 3.2%, 22.7%, and 12%, respectively. The proband will receive anticoagulation therapy for life. Beyond aspirin, avoidance of exogenous estrogens, and enoxaparin prophylaxis during pregnancy, it is not known whether the proband's daughter should have lifelong anticoagulation therapy, or only after her first thrombotic event. PMID:15497023

  1. [Open-angle glaucoma clinical presentation and management].

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Y

    2001-12-01

    in NTG patients. 6. Serum antigen titer to hsps(hsp 27, alpha B crystallin, human & bacterial hsp 60) was higher in both POAG and NTG patients than in normal subjects. None of the hsp-antigens was correlated to any morphometric parameters of the optic disk or any global indices of the visual field. 7. Myocilin mutation was noted in only 0.5% of POAG patients and 2.37% of NTG patients. The very low rate of occurrence precludes the value of mutation of the gene as a prognostic factor in open-angle glaucoma(OAG). 8. IOP reduction achieved by mitomycin-C trabeculectomy is effective in maintaining visual function in OAG eyes. 9. Brovincamine fumarate is effective in inhibiting the progression of glaucomatous field loss in NTG. PMID:11802456

  2. Branes at angles from worldvolume actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaspur, Reza

    2016-05-01

    We investigate possible stable configurations of two arbitrary branes at general angles using the dynamics of DBI + WZ action. The analysis naturally reveals two types of solutions which we identify as the "marginal" and "non-marginal" configurations. We characterize possible configurations of a pair of identical or non-identical branes in either of these two classes by specifying their proper intersection rules and allowed intersection angles. We also perform a partial analysis of configurations with multiple angles of a system of asymptotically flat curved branes.

  3. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Frosch, R.A.; McDougal, A.R.

    1980-12-23

    A first embodiment incorporating an actuator including a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine is described. The restraint link is releasably supported against axial displacement by releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft and a second embodiment incorporating a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crankshafts for a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  4. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An actuator includes a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a Stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine. The restraint link is releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft. A second embodiment incorporates a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crank fpr a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  5. Wide-angle vision for road views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Fehrs, K.-K.; Hartmann, G.; Klette, R.

    2013-03-01

    The field-of-view of a wide-angle image is greater than (say) 90 degrees, and so contains more information than available in a standard image. A wide field-of-view is more advantageous than standard input for understanding the geometry of 3D scenes, and for estimating the poses of panoramic sensors within such scenes. Thus, wide-angle imaging sensors and methodologies are commonly used in various road-safety, street surveillance, street virtual touring, or street 3D modelling applications. The paper reviews related wide-angle vision technologies by focusing on mathematical issues rather than on hardware.

  6. Parkinsonism Associated with Glucocerebrosidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Min; Lee, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher's disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). There is increasing evidence that GBA mutations are a genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report herein a family of Koreans exhibiting parkinsonism-associated GBA mutations. Case Report A 44-year-old woman suffering from slowness and paresthesia of the left arm for the previous 1.5years, visited our hospital to manage known invasive ductal carcinoma. During a preoperative evaluation, she was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease and double mutations of S271G and R359X in GBA. Parkinsonian features including low amplitude postural tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and shuffling gait were observed. Genetic analysis also revealed that her older sister, who had also been diagnosed with PD and had been taking dopaminergic drugs for 8-years, also possessed a heterozygote R359X mutation in GBA. 18F-fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane positron-emission tomography in these patients revealed decreased uptake of dopamine transporter in the posterior portion of the bilateral putamen. Conclusions This case study demonstrates Korean familial cases of PD with heterozygote mutation of GBA, further supporting the association between PD and GBA mutation. PMID:21779299

  7. SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This final research report summarizes the scientific work performed by The Aerospace Corporation on SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions. The period of performance was from June 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001.

  8. Gonioscopy in primary angle closure glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Christina A; Alward, Wallace L M

    2002-06-01

    Primary angle closure is a condition characterized by obstruction to aqueous humor outflow by the peripheral iris, and results in changes in the iridocorneal angle that are visible through gonioscopic examination. Gonioscopy in these eyes, however, can be difficult. This chapter discusses techniques that might help in the examination. These include beginning the examination with the inferior angle, methods to help in looking over the iris, cycloplegia, locating the corneal wedge, indentation, van Herick estimation, examining the other eye, and topical glycerin. Finally, there is a discussion about the pathology associated with the closed angle, with emphasis on the appearance of iris bombé, plateau iris, and the distinction between iris processes and peripheral anterior synechiae. PMID:15513458

  9. The solid angle through the isosceles triangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    We want to determine the solid angle through the isosceles triangle. We use the cosine law for sides and the spherical law of sines. The relation to luminous flux(radiant flux or radiant power) is shown.

  10. The solid angle through the inclined rectangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    We want to determine the solid angle through the inclined rectangle. We use the cosine law for sides and the spherical law of sines. The relation to luminous flux(radiant flux or radiant power) is shown.

  11. The solid angle through the vertical rectangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    We want to determine the solid angle through the vertical rectangle. We use the cosine law for sides and the spherical law of sines. The relation to luminous flux (radiant flux or radiant power) is shown.

  12. Solar Cell Angle of Incidence Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission has three different solar arrays each of which sees changes in incidence angle during normal operation. When solar array angle of incidence effects was researched little published data was found. The small amount of-published data created a need to obtain and evaluate such data. The donation of the needed data, which was taken in the fall of 1994, was a major factor in the preparation of this paper.

  13. Nucleation of small-angle boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N. |; Wilsdorf, D.K.

    1996-12-01

    The internal stresses induced by the strain gradients in an array of lattice cells delineated by low-angle dislocation boundaries are partially relieved by the creation of new low-angle boundaries. This is shown to be a first-order transition, the new boundaries having finite misorientations. The calculated misorientations both of the new boundaries and of the existing boundaries which provoke the transition agree well with observations.

  14. The magic angle: a solved mystery.

    PubMed

    Jouffrey, B; Schattschneider, P; Hébert, C

    2004-12-01

    We resolve the long-standing mysterious discrepancy between the experimental magic angle in EELS--approximately 2theta(E)--and the quantum mechanical prediction of approximately 4theta(E). A relativistic approach surpassing the usually applied kinematic correction yields a magic angle close to the experimental value. The reason is that the relativistic correction of the inelastic scattering cross section in anisotropic systems is significantly higher than in isotropic ones. PMID:15556701

  15. Angle only tracking with particle flow filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2011-09-01

    We show the results of numerical experiments for tracking ballistic missiles using only angle measurements. We compare the performance of an extended Kalman filter with a new nonlinear filter using particle flow to compute Bayes' rule. For certain difficult geometries, the particle flow filter is an order of magnitude more accurate than the EKF. Angle only tracking is of interest in several different sensors; for example, passive optics and radars in which range and Doppler data are spoiled by jamming.

  16. CKM angle γ measurements at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallier, Alexis

    2014-11-01

    The CKM angle γ remains the least known parameter of the CKM mixing matrix. The precise measurement of this angle, as a Standard Model benchmark, is a key goal of the LHCb experiment. We present four recent CP violation studies related to the measurement of γ, including amplitude analysis of B± → DK± decays, the ADS/GLW analysis of B± → DK*0 decays and the time-dependent analysis of B± → DK±sK± decays.

  17. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  18. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  19. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, E.; Demina, A.; Gelbart, T.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thirty-six mutations that cause Gaucher disease, the most common glycolipid storage disorder, are known. Although both alleles of most patients with the disease contain one of these mutations, in a few patients one or both disease-producing alleles have remained unidentified. Identification of mutations in these patients is useful for genetic counseling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The DNA from 23 Gaucher disease patients in whom at least one glucocerebrosidase allele did not contain any of the 36 previously described mutations has been examined by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, followed by sequencing of regions in which abnormalities were detected. RESULTS: Eight previously undescribed mutations were detected. In exon 3, a deletion of a cytosine at cDNA nt 203 was found. In exon 6, three missense mutations were identified: a C-->A transversion at cDNA nt 644 (Ala176-->Asp), a C-->A transversion at cDNA nt 661 that resulted in a (Pro182-->Thr), and a G-->A transition at cDNA nt 721 (Gly202-->Arg). Two missense mutations were found in exon 7: a G-->A transition at cDNA nt 887 (Arg257-->Gln) and a C-->T at cDNA nt 970 (Arg285-->Cys). Two missense mutations were found in exon 9: a T-->G at cDNA nt 1249 (Trp378-->Gly) and a G-->A at cDNA nt 1255 (Asp380-->Asn). In addition to these disease-producing mutations, a silent C-->G transversion at cDNA nt 1431, occurring in a gene that already contained the 1226G mutation, was found in one family. CONCLUSIONS: The mutations described here and previously known can be classified as mild, severe, or lethal, on the basis of their effect on enzyme production and on clinical phenotype, and as polymorphic or sporadic, on the basis of the haplotype in which they are found. Rare mutations such as the new ones described here are sporadic in nature. PMID:8790604

  20. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  1. Viewing angle analysis of integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Wu, Chun-Hong; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Lan

    2007-12-01

    Integral imaging (II) is a technique capable of displaying 3D images with continuous parallax in full natural color. It is becoming the most perspective technique in developing next generation three-dimensional TV (3DTV) and visualization field due to its outstanding advantages. However, most of conventional integral images are restricted by its narrow viewing angle. One reason is that the range in which a reconstructed integral image can be displayed with consistent parallax is limited. The other is that the aperture of system is finite. By far many methods , an integral imaging method to enhance the viewing angle of integral images has been proposed. Nevertheless, except Ren's MVW (Maximum Viewing Width) most of these methods involve complex hardware and modifications of optical system, which usually bring other disadvantages and make operation more difficult. At the same time the cost of these systems should be higher. In order to simplify optical systems, this paper systematically analyzes the viewing angle of traditional integral images instead of modified ones. Simultaneously for the sake of cost the research was based on computer generated integral images (CGII). With the analysis result we can know clearly how the viewing angle can be enhanced and how the image overlap or image flipping can be avoided. The result also promotes the development of optical instruments. Based on theoretical analysis, preliminary calculation was done to demonstrate how the other viewing properties which are closely related with the viewing angle, such as viewing distance, viewing zone, lens pitch, and etc. affect the viewing angle.

  2. Primary angle-closure glaucoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Wright, Carrie; Tawfik, Mohammed A; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, Leslie J

    2016-05-01

    Primary angle-closure glaucoma is potentially a devastating disease, responsible for half of glaucoma-related blindness worldwide. Angle closure is characterized by appositional approximation or contact between the iris and trabecular meshwork. It tends to develop in eyes with shallow anterior chambers, anteriorly positioned or pushed lenses, and angle crowding. Risk of primary angle-closure glaucoma is high among women, the elderly and the hyperopic, and it is most prevalent in Asia. Investigation into genetic mechanisms of glaucoma inheritance is underway. Diagnosis relies on gonioscopy and may be aided by anterior segment optical coherence tomography and ultrasound biomicroscopy. Treatment is designed to control intraocular pressure while monitoring changes to the angle and optic nerve head. Treatment typically begins with medical management through pressure-reducing topical medications. Peripheral iridotomy is often performed to alleviate pupillary block, while laser iridoplasty has been found effective for mechanisms of closure other than pupillary block, such as plateau iris syndrome. Phacoemulsification, with or without goniosynechialysis, both in eyes with existing cataracts and in those with clear lenses, is thus far a viable treatment alternative. Long-term research currently underway will examine its efficacy in cases of angle closure in early stages of the disease. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation is another treatment option, which can be combined with cataract surgery. Trabeculectomy remains effective therapy for more advanced cases. PMID:26119516

  3. Solar cell angle of incidence corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on solar array angle of incidence corrections was found to be sparse and contained no tabular data for support. This lack along with recent data on 27 GaAs/Ge 4 cm by 4 cm cells initiated the analysis presented in this paper. The literature cites seven possible contributors to angle of incidence effects: cosine, optical front surface, edge, shadowing, UV degradation, particulate soiling, and background color. Only the first three are covered in this paper due to lack of sufficient data. The cosine correction is commonly used but is not sufficient when the incident angle is large. Fresnel reflection calculations require knowledge of the index of refraction of the coverglass front surface. The absolute index of refraction for the coverglass front surface was not known nor was it measured due to lack of funds. However, a value for the index of refraction was obtained by examining how the prediction errors varied with different assumed indices and selecting the best fit to the set of measured values. Corrections using front surface Fresnel reflection along with the cosine correction give very good predictive results when compared to measured data, except there is a definite trend away from predicted values at the larger incident angles. This trend could be related to edge effects and is illustrated by a use of a box plot of the errors and by plotting the deviation of the mean against incidence angle. The trend is for larger deviations at larger incidence angles and there may be a fourth order effect involved in the trend. A chi-squared test was used to determine if the measurement errors were normally distributed. At 10 degrees the chi-squared test failed, probably due to the very small numbers involved or a bias from the measurement procedure. All other angles showed a good fit to the normal distribution with increasing goodness-of-fit as the angles increased which reinforces the very small numbers hypothesis. The contributed data only went to 65 degrees

  4. Longitudinal Changes of Angle Configuration in Primary Angle-Closure Suspects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuzhen; Chang, Dolly S.; Zhu, Haogang; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Aung, Tin; Huang, Shengsong; Chen, Qianyun; Munoz, Beatriz; Grossi, Carlota M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine longitudinal changes in angle configuration in the eyes of primary angle-closure suspects (PACS) treated by laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) and in untreated fellow eyes. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Participants Primary angle-closure suspects aged 50 to 70 years were enrolled in a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Methods Each participant was treated by LPI in 1 randomly selected eye, with the fellow eye serving as a control. Angle width was assessed in a masked fashion using gonioscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) before and at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 18 months after LPI. Main Outcome Measures Angle width in degrees was calculated from Shaffer grades assessed under static gonioscopy. Angle configuration was also evaluated using angle opening distance (AOD250, AOD500, AOD750), trabecular-iris space area (TISA500, TISA750), and angle recess area (ARA) measured in AS-OCT images. Results No significant difference was found in baseline measures of angle configuration between treated and untreated eyes. At 2 weeks after LPI, the drainage angle on gonioscopy widened from a mean of 13.5° at baseline to a mean of 25.7° in treated eyes, which was also confirmed by significant increases in all AS-OCT angle width measures (P<0.001 for all variables). Between 2 weeks and 18 months after LPI, a significant decrease in angle width was observed over time in treated eyes (P<0.001 for all variables), although the change over the first 5.5 months was not statistically significant for angle width measured under gonioscopy (P = 0.18), AOD250 (P = 0.167) and ARA (P = 0.83). In untreated eyes, angle width consistently decreased across all follow-up visits after LPI, with a more rapid longitudinal decrease compared with treated eyes (P values for all variables ≤0.003). The annual rate of change in angle width was equivalent to 1.2°/year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8–1.6) in treated eyes and 1.6°/year (95% CI, 1

  5. Intermittent acute angle closure glaucoma and chronic angle closure following topiramate use with plateau iris configuration

    PubMed Central

    Rajjoub, Lamise Z; Chadha, Nisha; Belyea, David A

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report describing recurrent intermittent acute angle closure episodes in the setting of topiramate use in a female suffering from migraines. Despite laser peripheral iridotomy placement for the pupillary block component, and the discontinuation of topiramate, the acute angle closure did not resolve in the left eye with chronic angle closure and the patient required urgent trabeculectomy. The right eye responded to laser peripheral iridotomy immediately and further improved after the cessation of topiramate. While secondary angle closure glaucoma due to topiramate use has been widely reported, its effects in patients with underlying primary angle closure glaucoma have not been discussed. Our report highlights the importance of recognizing the often multifactorial etiology of angle closure glaucoma to help guide clinical management. PMID:25114497

  6. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  7. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  8. Comparative morphometry of coxal joint angles.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, S; Fujiwara, K

    1997-10-01

    The angles related to the coxal joints were comparatively studied in four-limbed walking animals and two-limbed ones including man and birds. Between animals with both types of walking, no significant difference was observed in the neck-shaft angles (NSA), which was equivalent to the acetabulum angles (ACA) at the connection of the femoral head with the acetabulum. The anteversion angles (AVA) were equivalent to the horizontal ACA. Canine species showed two different forms of the femoral neck with or without modification by the femoral AVA, probably being breed-specific and nutrition-dependent. In the narrow-striped wallaby as well as avian species, the femoral head showed a postversion with a minus-version angle for lifting the body axis in the frontal and upward direction to hold the whole body weight on the hind-limbs, in particular at the anterior part of the acetabulum. In man, the connection between the femur and acetabulum greatly varied among individuals, possibly according to differences in the life style. PMID:9353634

  9. A Viewpoint on the Quantity "Plane Angle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of the quantity "plane angle" are explored under the hypothesis that it is a dimensional quantity. The exploration proceeds especially with respect to the physical concept, its mathematical treatment, vector concepts, measurement theory, units of related quantities, engineering pragmatism, and SI. An attempt is made to bring these different relations into a rational, logical and consistent framework, and thus to justify the hypothesis. Various types of vectorial quantities are recognized, and their properties described with an outline of the necessary algebraic manipulations. The concept of plane angle is amplified, and its interdependence with the circular arc is explored. The resulting units of plane angle form a class of similar scales of measurement. Consequences of the confirmed hypothesis are developed for mathematical expressions involving trigonometric functions, rotational volumes and areas, mathematical limits, differentiation and series expansion. Consequences for mechanical rotational quantities are developed, with proposals for revisions to a number of expressions for derived units within SI. A revised definition for the quantity "plane angle" is stated to take account of the developed insights. There is a clear need to reconsider the status of plane angle and some other quantities within the international framework of SI.

  10. Moment-angle relations after specific exercise.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, B; Kleinöder, H; Brüggemann, G P

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the amount and time-course of shifts in the moment-knee angle relation of the quadriceps (QF) and hamstring (HAM) muscles in response to different length-restricted strength training regimens. Thirty-two athletes were divided into three different training groups (G1-3): G1 performed isometric training at knee joint angles corresponding to long muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length for QF and HAM; G2 conducted concentric-eccentric contraction cycles that were restricted to a knee joint range of motion corresponding to predominantly long MTU length for QF and HAM; G3 combined the protocols of G1 and G2. Moment-knee angle and EMG-knee angle relations of QF and HAM were measured on five different occasions: two times before, after five and eight weeks of training and four weeks post training. Moments and EMG-data of each subject were normalized to the largest value produced at any knee joint position [% Max.]. Obtained by curve fitting, the optimal knee joint angle for QF moment production was significantly (P<0.05) shifted to longer MTU length in G1 and G3 after 5 weeks of training and in G2 after 8 weeks of training. Contrary, no significant shifts were detected for HAM. Our data suggest that the predominant MTU length during loading is a major trigger for human force-length adaptations. PMID:19199195

  11. NORAD LOOK ANGLES AND PIO SATELLITE PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ANONYMOUS

    1994-01-01

    This program package consists of two programs. First is the NORAD Look Angles Program, which computes satellite look angles (azimuth, elevation, and range) as well as the subsatellite points (latitude, longitude, and height). The second program in this package is the PIO Satellite Program, which computes sighting directions, visibility times, and the maximum elevation angle attained during each pass of an earth-orbiting satellite. Computations take into consideration the observing location and the effect of the earth's shadow on the satellite visibility. Input consists of a magnetic tape prepared by the NORAD Look Angles Program and punched cards containing reference Julian date, right ascension, declination, mean sidereal time at zero hours universal time of the reference date, and daily changes of these quantities. Output consists of a tabulated listing of the satellite's rise and set times, direction, and the maximum elevation angle visible from each observing location. This program has been implemented on the GE 635. The program Assembler code can easily be replaced by FORTRAN statements.

  12. Immunotherapy with mutated onchocystatin fails to enhance the efficacy of a sub-lethal oxytetracycline regimen against Onchocerca ochengi.

    PubMed

    Bah, Germanus S; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2015-08-15

    Human onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, has been successfully controlled by a single drug, ivermectin, for over 25 years. Ivermectin prevents the disease symptoms of severe itching and visual impairment by killing the microfilarial stage, but does not eliminate the adult parasites, necessitating repeated annual treatments. Mass drug administration with ivermectin does not always break transmission in forest zones and is contraindicated in individuals heavily co-infected with Loa loa, while reports of reduced drug efficacy in Ghana and Cameroon may signal the development of resistance. An alternative treatment for onchocerciasis involves targeting the essential Wolbachia symbiont with tetracycline or its derivatives, which are adulticidal. However, implementation of antibiotic therapy has not occurred on a wide scale due to the prolonged treatment regimen required (several weeks). In the bovine Onchocerca ochengi system, it has been shown previously that prolonged oxytetracycline therapy increases eosinophil counts in intradermal nodules, which kill the adult worms by degranulating on their surface. Here, in an "immunochemotherapeutic" approach, we sought to enhance the efficacy of a short, sub-lethal antibiotic regimen against O. ochengi by prior immunotherapy targeting onchocystatin, an immunomodulatory protein located in the adult female worm cuticle. A key asparagine residue in onchocystatin was mutated to ablate immunomodulatory activity, which has been demonstrated previously to markedly improve the protective efficacy of this vaccine candidate when used as an immunoprophylactic. The immunochemotherapeutic regimen was compared with sub-lethal oxytetracycline therapy alone; onchocystatin immunotherapy alone; a gold-standard prolonged, intermittent oxytetracycline regimen; and no treatment (negative control) in naturally infected Cameroonian cattle. Readouts were collected over one year and comprised adult

  13. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  14. On the dip angle of subducting plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsui, Albert T.; Tang, Xiao-Ming; Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1990-01-01

    A new approximate analytic model is developed for the thermal structure of a subducting plate with a finite length. This model provides the capability of easily examining the thermal and mechanical structure of a subducting plate with different lengths and at different angles. Also, the torque balance of a descending plate can be examined, and effects such as the leading edge effect, the adiabatic compression effect, and the phase change effect can be incorporated. A comparison with observed data indicates that short slabs are likely under torque equilibrium at present, while long slabs are probably dominated by their gravitational torques such that their dip angles are transient, moving toward a steeper dip angle similar to that of the Mariana slab.

  15. Data for phase angle shift with frequency.

    PubMed

    Paul, T; Banerjee, D; Kargupta, K

    2016-06-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  16. Data for phase angle shift with frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paul, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kargupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  17. Advancing contact angles on large structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Yumiko; Itakura, Yoshinori; Gobo, Junichi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To understand wetting phenomena on complex surfaces, simple modeling experiments in two-dimension system would be one of the most efficient approaches. We develop a new experimental method for wetting dynamics using a large pseudo two- dimensional droplet. This method is useful to examine theoretical studies developed in two dimensional systems. In this study, we examine a pinning and depinning phenomena on millimeter-size structured surface to explain the origin of contact angle hysteresis. Contact lines of the droplet are pinned and deppined at the edge of surface texture. The contact lines can move when the contact angle is equal to the Young's contact angle which are determined by the balance of the surface and interfacial tension immediate vicinity of the contact lines, which is different from the Wenzel's low. Our approach enables to realize a macroscopic modelling experiment of wetting on complex surfaces, which opens a path to design functional surfaces with chemical and physical structure.

  18. Flocking and invariance of velocity angles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Le; Huang, Lihong; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-04-01

    Motsch and Tadmor considered an extended Cucker-Smale model to investigate the flocking behavior of self-organized systems of interacting species. In this extended model, a cone of the vision was introduced so that outside the cone the influence of one agent on the other is lost and hence the corresponding influence function takes the value zero. This creates a problem to apply the Motsch-Tadmor and Cucker-Smale method to prove the flocking property of the system. Here, we examine the variation of the velocity angles between two arbitrary agents, and obtain a monotonicity property for the maximum cone of velocity angles. This monotonicity permits us to utilize existing arguments to show the flocking property of the system under consideration, when the initial velocity angles satisfy some minor technical constraints. PMID:27105986

  19. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  20. A heterodyne interferometer for angle metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, M.; Wang, X.; Goullioud, R.

    2010-04-15

    We have developed a compact, high-resolution, angle measurement instrument based on a heterodyne interferometer. Common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer set up, an optical mask is used to sample the laser beam reflecting back from four areas on a target surface. From the relative displacement measurements of the target surface areas, we can simultaneously determine angular rotations around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement beam propagation direction. The device is used in a testbed for a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw angle measurements of a flat mirror are performed. Angle noise measurement of the device shows 0.1 nrad/{radical}(Hz) at 1 Hz, at a working distance of 1 m. The operation range and nonlinearity of the device when used with a flat mirror is approximately {+-}0.15 mrad, and 3 {mu}rad rms, respectively.

  1. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three- dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  2. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FbG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three-dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  3. Photometric theory for wide-angle phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1990-01-01

    An examination is made of the problem posed by wide-angle photographic photometry, in order to extract a photometric-morphological history of Comet P/Halley. Photometric solutions are presently achieved over wide angles through a generalization of an assumption-free moment-sum method. Standard stars in the field allow a complete solution to be obtained for extinction, sky brightness, and the characteristic curve. After formulating Newton's method for the solution of the general nonlinear least-square problem, an implementation is undertaken for a canonical data set. Attention is given to the problem of random and systematic photometric errors.

  4. Ship wakes: Kelvin or Mach angle?

    PubMed

    Rabaud, Marc; Moisy, Frédéric

    2013-05-24

    From the analysis of a set of airborne images of ship wakes, we show that the wake angles decrease as U(-1) at large velocities, in a way similar to the Mach cone for supersonic airplanes. This previously unnoticed Mach-like regime is in contradiction with the celebrated Kelvin prediction of a constant angle of 19.47° independent of the ship's speed. We propose here a model, confirmed by numerical simulations, in which the finite size of the disturbance explains this transition between the Kelvin and Mach regimes at a Froude number Fr=U/√[gL]~/=0.5, where L is the hull ship length. PMID:23745883

  5. Taper Angle Evolution in Taiwan Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    Liwen Chena,b, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan The critical taper model, originally developed using onland Taiwan as an example, is governed by force balance of a horizontal compressional wedge. This model has been successfully applied to many mountainous regions around the world. Among them, Taiwan is located in an oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and the Chinese Passive margin. Previous critical taper angle studies of Taiwan are mainly focusing on utilizing land data. In this study we want to extend these studies to offshore region from the subduction zone to collision zone. Here we study the varying taper angles of the double-vergent wedge derived from 1,000 km of reflection seismic profiles in both the pro-wedge and retro-wedge locations. These profiles were collected in the last two decades. For the retro-wedge, the topography slope angle changes from 2 to 8.8 degrees; some of the steep slope suggests that some part of the retrowedge is currently in a super-critical angle state. Such dramatic changes in taper angle probably strongly affect regional sedimentary processes, including slumping, in addition to structural deformation. These complex processes might even help develop a mélange or re-open a closed basin. We are currently working on studying the taper angle evolution of the pro-wedge from subduction to arc-continent collision zone in the offshore region. Though further works are needed, our preliminary results show that the evolution of wedge angles and the geometry of the wedge are closely linked and inseparable. The structures of the subducting plate might have strong influence on the deformation style of the over-riding plate. It would be interesting to combine the angle variation with the structure interpretation of the accretionary wedge

  6. Airfoil Lift with Changing Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1927-01-01

    Tests have been made in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effects of pitching oscillations upon the lift of an airfoil. It has been found that the lift of an airfoil, while pitching, is usually less than that which would exist at the same angle of attack in the stationary condition, although exceptions may occur when the lift is small or if the angle of attack is being rapidly reduced. It is also shown that the behavior of a pitching airfoil may be qualitatively explained on the basis of accepted aerodynamic theory.

  7. HIV-1 Protease Mutations and Protease Inhibitor Cross-Resistance▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  8. Characteristics of phenotype and genetic mutations in rice after spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Wu, H.; Wei, L. J.; Cheng, Z. L.; Xin, P.; Huang, C. L.; Zhang, K. P.; Sun, Y. Q.

    To investigate the mechanism of spaceflight induced mutations, seeds of 11 pure rice varieties carried by Shenzhou-3 spaceship of China in 2002 for six-day flight were planted and investigated. Results showed that mutations could be induced in the first generation (M 1). Five tall mutants were found in DongnongV7 variety, and the average height of the mutants was 31% taller than that of the control. Other traits such as the panicle length were also remarkably different from the control. In the second generation (M 2), various changes of traits were observed in all 11 varieties, including the height, heading date, leaf color, leaf shape, flag leaf angle, awns, panicle length, panicle type, rice shape (length-width ratio), and maturity. The mutation rate for the changes of the plant height and of the rice color (purple) varied from 0.05% to 0.52% among ten varieties except Xixuan-1. Changes of the height, fresh weight, dry weight, and culm width of the five DongnongV7 tall mutants were observed in the progeny individually. By using the AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) method, 21 pairs of primers were employed and the mutated loci rate of the genome in 10 M 2 mutants from 10 varieties was found between 1.7% and 6.2%. In the third generation (M 3), many traits, such as the awn length, main panicle exertion date and plant height, were still segregated widely and diversely. In addition, the leaf color and awn color varied in the progenies of purple rice mutants. Our study suggested that spaceflight induced mutations were dependent on different rice varieties.

  9. IDH1 R132H mutation generates a distinct phospholipid metabolite profile in glioma.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Morteza; Hamans, Bob C; Navis, Anna C; van Horssen, Remco; Bathen, Tone F; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Leenders, William P; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-09-01

    Many patients with glioma harbor specific mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene IDH1 that associate with a relatively better prognosis. IDH1-mutated tumors produce the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate. Because IDH1 also regulates several pathways leading to lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that IDH1-mutant tumors have an altered phospholipid metabolite profile that would impinge on tumor pathobiology. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed (31)P-MRS imaging in mouse xenograft models of four human gliomas, one of which harbored the IDH1-R132H mutation. (31)P-MR spectra from the IDH1-mutant tumor displayed a pattern distinct from that of the three IDH1 wild-type tumors, characterized by decreased levels of phosphoethanolamine and increased levels of glycerophosphocholine. This spectral profile was confirmed by ex vivo analysis of tumor extracts, and it was also observed in human surgical biopsies of IDH1-mutated tumors by (31)P high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy. The specificity of this profile for the IDH1-R132H mutation was established by in vitro (31)P-NMR of extracts of cells overexpressing IDH1 or IDH1-R132H. Overall, our results provide evidence that the IDH1-R132H mutation alters phospholipid metabolism in gliomas involving phosphoethanolamine and glycerophosphocholine. These new noninvasive biomarkers can assist in the identification of the mutation and in research toward novel treatments that target aberrant metabolism in IDH1-mutant glioma. PMID:25005896

  10. Gain-Of-Function Mutational Activation of Human TRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.L.; Kapoor, M.; Otero, F.J.; Slike, B.M.; Tsuruta, H.; Frausto, R.; Bates, A.; Ewalt, K.L.; Cheresh, D.A.; Schimmel, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases.

  11. Computational Characterization of Mutations in Cardiac Troponin T Known to Cause Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Guinto, Pia J.; Manning, Edward P.; Schwartz, Steven D.; Tardiff, Jil C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) is a central modulator of thin filament regulation of myofilament activation. The lack of structural data for the TNT1 tail domain, a proposed α-helical region, makes the functional implications of the FHC mutations difficult to determine. Studies have suggested that flexibility of TNT1 is important in normal protein-protein interactions within the thin filament. Our groups have previously shown through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations that some FHC mutations, Arg92Leu(R92L) and Arg92Trp(R92W), result in increased flexibility at a critical hinge region 12 residues distant from the mutation. To explain this distant effect and its implications for FHC mutations, we characterized the dynamics of wild type and mutational segments of cTnT using MD. Our data shows an opening of the helix between residues 105–110 in mutants. Consequently, the dihedral angles of these residues correspond to non-α-helical regions on Ramachandran plots. We hypothesize the removal of a charged residue decreases electrostatic repulsion between the point mutation and surrounding residues resulting in local helical compaction. Constrained ends of the helix and localized compaction results in expansion within the nearest non-polar helical turn from the mutation site, residues 105–109. PMID:26500385

  12. Gain-of-Function Mutational Activation of Human tRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang-Lei; Kapoor, Mili; Otero, Francella J.; Slike, Bonnie M.; Tsuruta, Hiro; Frausto, Ricardo; Bates, Alison; Ewalt, Karla L.; Cheresh, David A.; Schimmel, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Summary Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain-of-function. Native tRNA synthetases, like TyrRS and TrpRS, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical ELR motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases. PMID:18096501

  13. Gain-of-function mutational activation of human tRNA synthetase procytokine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Lei; Kapoor, Mili; Otero, Francella J; Slike, Bonnie M; Tsuruta, Hiro; Frausto, Ricardo; Bates, Alison; Ewalt, Karla L; Cheresh, David A; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases. PMID:18096501

  14. Understanding Angle and Angle Measure: A Design-Based Research Study Using Context Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies are quickly becoming tools found in the educational environment. The researchers in this study use a form of mobile learning to support students in learning about angle concepts. Design-based research is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated local instruction theory about students' develop of angle and…

  15. A fringe shadow method for measuring flapping angle and torsional angle of a dragonfly wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lijiang; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Kawachi, Keiji

    1996-05-01

    A fringe shadow (FS) method was developed for measuring the flapping angle and torsional angle of a dragonfly wing during beating motion. This new method involves two sets of fringe patterns projected onto the wing from orthogonal directions. The torsional angle is determined using the length of the shadow of the wing chord that is cast by the two sets of fringe patterns. The flapping angle is determined using the shadowgraph of the wing projected by a laser. The advantages of the FS method are its capability (i) to measure the flapping angle and torsional angle of a dragonfly wing simultaneously using only one high-speed camera and (ii) to recognize the spanwise position of a section from the number of fringes, without having to use diffuse marks that are common in current methods. The resolution of the FS method can be changed easily by adjusting the fringe spacing. The measurement results for the torsional angle and flapping angle of a dragonfly wing prove the effectiveness of the FS method in studying the flight performance of dragonflies.

  16. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 2: Openings and Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Ever wondered how to use technology to teach angles? This article follows on from an earlier article published last year, providing a range of ideas for integrating technology and concrete materials with the teaching of angle concepts. The authors also provide a comprehensive list of free online games and learning objects that can be used to teach…

  17. Angle at the Medial Border: The Spinovertebra Angle and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Oladipo, G. S.; Aigbogun, E. O.; Akani, G. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The evolution from quadrupedalism to bipedalism has adjusted the balance of the upper limb to extensive movement at the shoulder. The scapular angles provide the point of attachment and control to various muscles and have been associated with the different movements of the shoulder girdle and joint. This has made the morphometric and anthropometric study of scapula a subject of extensive investigation. Aim. In the present study, the angle at the medial border was measured in the South-Southern Nigerian population and an anatomical name was ascribed to the angle. Method. The study was conducted on 173 scapulae (75 right and 98 left) obtained from various Anatomy Department of South-Sothern Nigerian Universities. The angle at medial border was obtained by pinning the edge of the superior and inferior angles, the lined traced out, and the angle measured using a protractor. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the data. t-test was used to determine mean angular difference in the sides. Result. The mean ± SD of the medial angle was observed to be 136.88 ± 7.70° (R = 138.13 ± 7.06° : L = 135.92 ± 8.05°). Statistical analysis using the Z-test for mean difference showed the medial angle was found to be higher in the right side of the scapula (mean difference of 2.214 ± 1.152°), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The above findings have adjusted the scapula from three to four angles (lateral, superior, inferior, and medial) formed from four borders (lateral, superior, inferior, and superomedial and inferomedial). The medial angle because of its anatomical location was named “spinovertebral” angle, owing to its position at the scapulae spine, and located in medial proximity to the vertebra column. Conclusion. The medial angle (now referred to as the spinovertebral angle) of the right side of the scapula is wider than the left. The representation of the spinovertebral angle is very important, as the

  18. Angle at the Medial Border: The Spinovertebra Angle and Its Significance.

    PubMed

    Oladipo, G S; Aigbogun, E O; Akani, G L

    2015-01-01

    Background. The evolution from quadrupedalism to bipedalism has adjusted the balance of the upper limb to extensive movement at the shoulder. The scapular angles provide the point of attachment and control to various muscles and have been associated with the different movements of the shoulder girdle and joint. This has made the morphometric and anthropometric study of scapula a subject of extensive investigation. Aim. In the present study, the angle at the medial border was measured in the South-Southern Nigerian population and an anatomical name was ascribed to the angle. Method. The study was conducted on 173 scapulae (75 right and 98 left) obtained from various Anatomy Department of South-Sothern Nigerian Universities. The angle at medial border was obtained by pinning the edge of the superior and inferior angles, the lined traced out, and the angle measured using a protractor. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the data. t-test was used to determine mean angular difference in the sides. Result. The mean ± SD of the medial angle was observed to be 136.88 ± 7.70° (R = 138.13 ± 7.06° : L = 135.92 ± 8.05°). Statistical analysis using the Z-test for mean difference showed the medial angle was found to be higher in the right side of the scapula (mean difference of 2.214 ± 1.152°), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The above findings have adjusted the scapula from three to four angles (lateral, superior, inferior, and medial) formed from four borders (lateral, superior, inferior, and superomedial and inferomedial). The medial angle because of its anatomical location was named "spinovertebral" angle, owing to its position at the scapulae spine, and located in medial proximity to the vertebra column. Conclusion. The medial angle (now referred to as the spinovertebral angle) of the right side of the scapula is wider than the left. The representation of the spinovertebral angle is very important, as the directional

  19. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Scheetz, Todd E.; Roos, Ben R.; Solivan-Timpe, Frances; Miller, Kathy; DeLuca, Adam P.; Stone, Edwin M.; Kwon, Young H.; Alward, Wallace L. M.; Wang, Kai; Fingert, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG) occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN) and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1), cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1) gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308) and matched controls (n = 157) using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05). These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG. PMID:27275741

  20. [Founder mutation in Lynch syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cajal, Andrea R; Piñero, Tamara A; Verzura, Alicia; Santino, Juan Pablo; Solano, Angela R; Kalfayan, Pablo G; Ferro, Alejandra; Vaccaro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent syndrome in hereditary colorectal cancer, a family-specific deleterious mutations in genes encoding DNA reparation proteins: MLH1 (mutL homolog 1), MSH2, MSH6 (mutS homolog 2 y 6, respectively), PMS2 (PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component) y MUTYH (mutY DNA glycosylase). The c.2252_2253delAA, p.Lys751Serfs*3 mutation in MLH1 gene segregates with a haplotype reported in the northern region of Italy and whose origin was attributed to a founder effect. This mutation co-segregates with typical characteristics of Lynch syndrome, including early age at onset and multiple primary tumors in the same individual, a high frequency of pancreatic cancer, high microsatellite instability and lack of PMS2 expression. This report describes a mutation in an Argentinian patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of uterus. Her first-degree relatives had a history of colon cancer diagnosed before 50 years, fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria I and Lynch syndrome II. The high pathogenicity associated to this mutation makes necessary the study of all members from families with hereditary cancer, allowing pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis, early assessment and the instauration of preventive treatments. PMID:27295708

  1. Driver mutations of cancer epigenomes.

    PubMed

    Roy, David M; Walsh, Logan A; Chan, Timothy A

    2014-04-01

    Epigenetic alterations are associated with all aspects of cancer, from tumor initiation to cancer progression and metastasis. It is now well understood that both losses and gains of DNA methylation as well as altered chromatin organization contribute significantly to cancer-associated phenotypes. More recently, new sequencing technologies have allowed the identification of driver mutations in epigenetic regulators, providing a mechanistic link between the cancer epigenome and genetic alterations. Oncogenic activating mutations are now known to occur in a number of epigenetic modifiers (i.e. IDH1/2, EZH2, DNMT3A), pinpointing epigenetic pathways that are involved in tumorigenesis. Similarly, investigations into the role of inactivating mutations in chromatin modifiers (i.e. KDM6A, CREBBP/EP300, SMARCB1) implicate many of these genes as tumor suppressors. Intriguingly, a number of neoplasms are defined by a plethora of mutations in epigenetic regulators, including renal, bladder, and adenoid cystic carcinomas. Particularly striking is the discovery of frequent histone H3.3 mutations in pediatric glioma, a particularly aggressive neoplasm that has long remained poorly understood. Cancer epigenetics is a relatively new, promising frontier with much potential for improving cancer outcomes. Already, therapies such as 5-azacytidine and decitabine have proven that targeting epigenetic alterations in cancer can lead to tangible benefits. Understanding how genetic alterations give rise to the cancer epigenome will offer new possibilities for developing better prognostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24622842

  2. {l_angle}110{r_angle} dendrite growth in aluminum feathery grains

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, S.; Rappaz, M.; Jarry, P.

    1998-11-01

    Automatic indexing of electron backscattered diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy observations have been carried out on aluminum-magnesium-silicon, aluminum-copper, and aluminum-silicon alloys directionally solidified or semicontinuously cast using the direct chill casting process. From these combined observations, it is shown that the feathery grains are made of {l_angle}110{r_angle} primary dendrite trunks (e.g., [011{bar 1}]) split in their centers by a coherent (111) twin plane. The average spacing of the dendrite trunks in the twin plane (about 10 to 20 {micro}m) is typically one order of magnitude smaller than that separating successive rows of trunks (or twin planes). The [011{bar 1}] orientation of these trunks is close to the thermal gradient direction (typically within 15 deg)--a feature probably resulting from a growth competition mechanism similar to that occurring during normal <100> columnar dendrite growth. On both sides of these trunks, secondary dendrite arms also grow along {l_angle}110{r_angle} directions. Their impingement creates wavy noncoherent twin boundaries between the coherent twin planes. In the twin plane, evidence is shown that {l_angle}110{r_angle} branching mechanisms lead to the propagation of the twinned regions, to the regular arrangement of the primary dendrite trunks along a [{bar 2}11] direction, and to coherent planar twin boundaries. From these observations, it is concluded that the feathery grains are probably the result of a change from a normal <100> to a {l_angle}110{r_angle} surface tension/attachment kinetics anisotropy growth mode. Finally, the proposed mechanisms of leathery grain growth are further supported by the observation of {l_angle}110{r_angle} dendrite growth morphologies in thin aluminum-zinc coatings.

  3. Recent Results on the CKM Angle Alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalyi, A.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-10-18

    The method to measure the CKM angle {alpha} and the modes sensitive to it are discussed. It is shown that the B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays provide the most stringent constraint on {alpha}, which is found to be {alpha} = 96{sup o} {+-} 10{sup o}(stat) {+-} 4{sup o}(syst){+-} 13{sup o}(penguin).

  4. Nonschwannoma tumors of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, David R; Grobelny, Bartosz; Golfinos, John G; Roland, J Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although the preponderance of cerebellopontine angle lesions are schwannomas, focused attention to patient clinical history, imaging studies, and tissue biopsies when indicated will aid in detection of less common lesions that might otherwise be misdiagnosed. This is most critical for pathologies that dictate different management paradigms be undertaken. PMID:26043142

  5. Looking at Faces from a New Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulkey, Mary McNamara; Malm, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Describes a fifth grade art activity inspired by a restaurant logo that consisted of angled faces fragmented down the middle, with geometric profiles, in bold colors. Explains the process of creating the abstract split faces, from the initial drawing to adding colors. (CMK)

  6. Transmitting rotary motion at an angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T.

    1979-01-01

    Transmission consisting of corrugated metal tube that can bend along its axis can transmit torques in range of 100 to 1000 pound-inches at corner angles as great as 180 deg. Possible uses include submerged mechanisms and food processing machinery where sealed drive line without contaminating lubricants is required.

  7. Spirality: Spiral arm pitch angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L.; Hartley, Matthew; Pour Imani, Hamed; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Spirality measures spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Written in MATLAB, the code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  8. Timolol in operated closed-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, C I

    1980-01-01

    Tonometry in 9 eyes (7 patients) provides some evidence that timolol eye drops are useful in improving control of pressure in eyes operated for closed-angle glaucoma. In cases 1 and 2 (Figs, 1 and 2) this beta 1 and 2 blocker reduced pressure consistently. Case 3 (Fig. 3) showed that timolol 0.5% twice daily was as effective as pilocarpine 2% or 4% with adrenaline 1%. The effect of timolol 0.5% in case 4 (Fig. 4) and case 6 (Fig. 6) was additive to pilocarpine and adrenaline; in case 5 (Fig. 5) it probably improved the effect of adrenaline, but in cases 4 and 5 there may have been some loss of effect with time. Case 7 (Fig. 7) showed a good effect of timolol, reversed on withdrawal, but pressure fell again in spite of continued withholding of timolol. Timolol will be especially valuable in the control of pressure if an operation involving iridectomy has not been completely successful in open-angle glaucoma or more especially in closed-angle glaucoma because it has no effect on the pupil. Miotics will tend to produce posterior pupillary synechiae because aqueous humour will go through the iridectomy, not under the edge of the pupil. The danger will be greater in eyes with closed-angle glaucoma because the pupil is closely applied to the anterior lens surface, which will also tend to produce irritative iridocyclitis. PMID:7387959

  9. Mixed glioma of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Millen, S J; Campbell, B H; Meyer, G A; Ho, K C

    1985-11-01

    A rare case of mixed ependymoma and astrocytoma of the cerebellopontine angle is reported. Its clinical presentation, characteristics on evaluation, and prognosis are compared with those of the acoustic neuroma and glioma. The central form of von Recklinghausen's disease and familial multiple lipomatosis as it applies to the patient is also discussed. PMID:3878094

  10. Improved Beam Angle Control with SPV Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeples, K.; Tsidilkovski, E.; Bertuch, A.; Ishida, E.; Agarwal, A.

    2008-11-01

    A method of real-time monitoring of implant angle for state-of-the-art ion implant doping in integrated circuit manufacturing has been developed using Surface Photo Voltage measurements on conventional monitor wafers. Measurement results are analyzed and compared to other techniques.

  11. Instrument accurately measures weld angle and offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, W. G.

    1967-01-01

    Weld angle is measured to the nearest arc minute and offset to one thousandth of an inch by an instrument designed to use a reference plane at two locations on a test coupon. A special table for computation has been prepared for use with the instrument.

  12. Wide-Angle, Flat-Field Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, K. L.; Howell, B. J.; Wilson, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    All-reflective system unvignetted. Wide-angle telescope uses unobstructed reflecting elements to produce flat image. No refracting elements, no chromatic aberration, and telescope operates over spectral range from infrared to far ultraviolet. Telescope used with such image detectors as photographic firm, vidicons, and solid-state image arrays.

  13. Association between Bolton discrepancy and Angle malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Cançado, Rodrigo Hermont; Gonçalves Júnior, Waldir; Valarelli, Fabrício Pinelli; Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore de; Crêspo, Janaina Aparecida Lima

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the overall and anterior ratios of tooth size discrepancies in all Angle malocclusion groups. The following null hypothesis (H0) was tested: no difference between tooth size discrepancies (overall and anterior) would be observed among Angle malocclusion groups. The sample comprised of 711 pre-orthodontic treatment study casts of Brazilian patients with a mean age of 17.42 years selected from private practices in Brazil. The casts were divided into 3 groups according to the type of malocclusion: Class I (n = 321), Class II (n = 324), and Class III patients (n = 66). The measurement of the greatest mesiodistal width of the teeth was performed using a centesimal precision digital caliper directly on the study casts, from the distal surface of the left first molar to the distal surface of the right first molar. The overall and anterior ratios between the maxillary and mandibular teeth were evaluated using Bolton's method. The following statistical tests were applied: chi-square, independent t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results showed that all Angle malocclusions groups exhibited a ratio compatible with those recommended by Bolton. With respect to the overall and anterior ratios among the malocclusion groups, no statistically significant differences were found. The null hypothesis was accepted because the results showed no differences in the overall and anterior ratios of tooth size discrepancies among different Angle malocclusion groups. PMID:26486769

  14. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  15. Partitioning Pythagorean Triangles Using Pythagorean Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Carl E.; Yandl, Andre L.

    2012-01-01

    Inside any Pythagorean right triangle, it is possible to find a point M so that drawing segments from M to each vertex of the triangle yields angles whose sines and cosines are all rational. This article describes an algorithm that generates an infinite number of such points.

  16. Ischemia detection from morphological QRS angle changes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Daniel; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an ischemia detector is presented based on the analysis of QRS-derived angles. The detector has been developed by modeling ischemic effects on the QRS angles as a gradual change with a certain transition time and assuming a Laplacian additive modeling error contaminating the angle series. Both standard and non-standard leads were used for analysis. Non-standard leads were obtained by applying the PCA technique over specific lead subsets to represent different potential locations of the ischemic zone. The performance of the proposed detector was tested over a population of 79 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in one of the major coronary arteries (LAD (n  =  25), RCA (n  =  16) and LCX (n  =  38)). The best detection performance, obtained for standard ECG leads, was achieved in the LAD group with values of sensitivity and specificity of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], followed by the RCA group with [Formula: see text], Sp  =  94.4 and the LCX group with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], notably outperforming detection based on the ST series in all cases, with the same detector structure. The timing of the detected ischemic events ranged from 30 s up to 150 s (mean  =  66.8 s) following the start of occlusion. We conclude that changes in the QRS angles can be used to detect acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:27243441

  17. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single

  18. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  19. Probe Without Moving Parts Measures Flow Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Vachon, M. Jake

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of local flow angle is critical in many fluid-dynamic applications, including the aerodynamic flight testing of new aircraft and flight systems. Flight researchers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center have recently developed, flight-tested, and patented the force-based flow-angle probe (FLAP), a novel, force-based instrument for the measurement of local flow direction. Containing no moving parts, the FLAP may provide greater simplicity, improved accuracy, and increased measurement access, relative to conventional moving vane-type flow-angle probes. Forces in the FLAP can be measured by various techniques, including those that involve conventional strain gauges (based on electrical resistance) and those that involve more advanced strain gauges (based on optical fibers). A correlation is used to convert force-measurement data to the local flow angle. The use of fiber optics will enable the construction of a miniature FLAP, leading to the possibility of flow measurement in very small or confined regions. This may also enable the tufting of a surface with miniature FLAPs, capable of quantitative flow-angle measurements, similar to attaching yarn tufts for qualitative measurements. The prototype FLAP was a small, aerodynamically shaped, low-aspect-ratio fin about 2 in. (approximately equal to 5 cm) long, 1 in. (approximately equal to 2.5 cm) wide, and 0.125 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) thick (see Figure 1). The prototype FLAP included simple electrical-resistance strain gauges for measuring forces. Four strain gauges were mounted on the FLAP; two on the upper surface and two on the lower surface. The gauges were connected to form a full Wheatstone bridge, configured as a bending bridge. In preparation for a flight test, the prototype FLAP was mounted on the airdata boom of a flight-test fixture (FTF) on the NASA Dryden F-15B flight research airplane.

  20. Stratospheric Ozone Climatology from Lidar Measurements at Table Mountain (34.0 deg N, 117.7 deg W) and Mauna Loa (19.5 deg N, 155.6 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, T.; McDermid, I. S.

    2000-01-01

    Using more than 1600 nighttime profiles obtained by the JPL differential absorption lidars (DIAL) located at Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.4 N) and Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO, 19.5 N) is presented in this paper. These two systems have been providing high-resolution vertical profiles of ozone number density between 15-50 km, several nights a week since 1989 (TMF) and 1993 (MLO). The climatology presented here is typical of early night ozone values with only a small influence of the Pinatubo aerosols and the 11-year solar cycle. The observed seasonal and vertical structure of the ozone concentration at TMF is consistent with that typical of mid- to subtropical latitudes. A clear annual cycle in opposite phase below and above the ozone concentration peak is observed. The observed winter maximum below the ozone peak is associated with a maximum day-to-day variability, typical of a dynamically driven lower stratosphere. The maximum concentration observed in summer above the ozone peak emphasizes the more dominant role of photochemistry. Unlike TMF, the ozone concentration observed at MLO tends to be higher during the summer months and lower during the winter months throughout the entire stratospheric ozone layer. Only a weak signature of the extra-tropical latitudes is observed near 19-20 km, with a secondary maximum in late winter. The only large variability observed at MLO is associated with the natural variability of the tropical tropopause.

  1. Optimal Number of Angle Images for Calculating Anterior Angle Volume and Iris Volume Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Blieden, Lauren S.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Baker, Laura A.; Bell, Nicholas P.; Fuller, Timothy S.; Mankiewicz, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We determined the optimal number of angle images required to obtain reliable measurements of trabecular-iris circumferential volume (TICV) and iris volume (IV) using swept-source Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SSFD-ASOCT) scans in narrow angle eyes. Methods. Scleral spur landmarks (SSL) were manually identified on ASOCT angle images from 128 meridians from each of 24 eyes with chronic primary angle closure (PAC) spectrum of disease. The anterior and posterior corneal curves, and the anterior and posterior iris surfaces were identified automatically by the anterior chamber analysis and interpretation (ACAI) software, then manually examined and edited by the reader if required. Trabecular-iris circumferential volume at 750 μm from SSL (TICV750) and IV were subsequently calculated using varying numbers of angle images. Threshold error was determined to be less than the lower 95% confidence limit of mean absolute percent error (MAPE) of the change in TICV or IV resulting from laser peripheral iridotomy, which would be 17% for TICV and 5% for IV, based on previous studies. The optimal number of angle images was the smallest number of images where MAPE was less than this threshold for TICV and IV. Results. A total of 32 equally-spaced angle images (16 meridians) was required to estimate TICV750 and 16 angle images (8 meridians) to estimate IV. Both were within 4.6% and 1.6% of MAPE, respectively. Conclusions. It is possible to determine TICV and IV parameters reliably in narrow angles without evaluating all 128 meridians obtained with SSFD-ASOCT. PMID:25829412

  2. 14 CFR 29.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... angle is within a cone whose apex is at the rear position light and whose elements make an angle of 30... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 29... Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section,...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... angle is within a cone whose apex is at the rear position light and whose elements make an angle of 30... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 25... light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, each forward...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... angle is within a cone whose apex is at the rear position light and whose elements make an angle of 30... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 23... Equipment Lights § 23.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e)...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... angle is within a cone whose apex is at the rear position light and whose elements make an angle of 30... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 27... light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, each forward...

  6. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  7. Divert visual angle through eyeball recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Cao; Qiao, Yi; Cheng, Yuan; Cui, Honglu; Sun, Li

    2009-10-01

    Thanks to the development of network, video devices are used in various aspects of our lives such as video conference, video call, etc. It is, however, very common that people tend to look at the computer screen instead of the video capture device, which can affect the communication. We present a novel approach to solve this problem. Through estimating the divert head angle and eyeball location recognition, we can estimate the visual angle. By moving the eyeball to adjust visual line, it looks like that we're looking at each other. Our work is on the basis of face alignment and there is a geometric 3D model and novel R -α, K -β relationship analysis methods adopted in this paper.

  8. Fan Stagger Angle for Dirt Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Rose, Becky E. (Inventor); Brilliant, Lisa I. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, a propulsor coupled to be rotated about an axis by the turbine through the spool, and a gear assembly coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extend from the hub. Each of the propulsor blades has a span between a root at the hub and a tip, and a chord between a leading edge and a trailing edge. The chord forms a stagger angle alpha with the axis, and the stagger angle alpha is less than 15 deg. at a position along the propulsor blade that is within an inboard 20% of the span.

  9. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  10. Choroidal physiology and primary angle closure disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiulan; Wang, Wei; Aung, Tin; Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ningli

    2015-01-01

    Primary angle closure disease (PACD), prevalent in Asian countries, is generally associated with a shallower anterior chamber, a shorter axial length, thicker lens, hyperopia, and female sex. Other physiologic factors, however, may be important, especially with regard to triggering acute primary angle closure. Thickening of the choroid has been demonstrated in untreated and treated, acute and chronic PACD eyes. Recently, there has been growing interest in studying the role of the choroid in the pathophysiology of PACD. The emergence of new imaging technology such as the enhanced depth imaging mode of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and swept-source optical coherence tomography has contributed to understanding PACD pathologies. We summarize the functions of the choroid and choroidal changes in the pathogenesis of PACD, and discuss potential future developments. PMID:26164737

  11. Sun angle, view angle, and background effects on spectral response of simulated balsam fir canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment is described that examines the effects of solar zenith angle and background reflectance on the composite scene reflectance of small balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) arranged in different densities. In this study, the shape, density, and, consequently, the needle area index and phytomass of the canopies, as well as the background reflectance, were controlled. The effects of sun angle, view angle, and background reflectance on the multispectral response of small balsam fir trees were significant. Regression models relating spectral vegetation indices (i.e., normalized difference (ND) and greenness (GR) to phytomass) showed very poor relationships for balsam fir canopies with a grass background. However, strong linear relationships were found for ND and GR with phytomass for a background that simulated the reflectance of snow. Changing solar zenith angle significantly affected the models relating ND to phytomass for the snow background, but was not significant in the model relating GR to phytomass for the snow background

  12. Wireless Orbiter Hang-Angle Inclinometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Perotti, Jose; Green, Eric; Byon, Jonathan; Burns, Bradley; Mata, Carlos; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman

    2011-01-01

    A document describes a system to reliably gather the hang-angle inclination of the orbiter. The system comprises a wireless handheld master station (which contains the main station software) and a wireless remote station (which contains the inclinometer sensors, the RF transceivers, and the remote station software). The remote station is designed to provide redundancy to the system. It includes two RF transceivers, two power-management boards, and four inclinometer sensors.

  13. Low angle resistivity anomaly in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A.E. |; Vinokur, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    The pinning effect of vortex lines by the layered structure (intrinsic pinning) on resistivity of high-T{sub c}, superconductors in the mixed state is investigated by means of perturbation theory. A sharp drop in the resistivity at small angles for which vortex lines are almost aligned with the ab-planes is shown to occur even in a high-temperature region where the pinning potential is reduced by thermal fluctuations.

  14. The DELPHI small angle tile calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1995-08-01

    The Small angle TIle Calorimeter (STIC) provides calorimetric coverage in the very forward region for the DELPHI experiment at the CERN LEP collider. A veto system composed of two scintillator layers allows to trigger on single photon events and provides e{minus}{gamma} separation. The authors present here some results of extensive measurements performed on part of the calorimeter and the veto system in the CERN test beams prior to installation and report on the performance achieved during the 1994 LEP run.

  15. Experimental Status of the CKM Angle β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, James F.

    2009-12-01

    We summarize measurements of the CKM angle β at the B-factories emphasizing a comparison of β measured in the B0→cc¯K(*)0 decay channels and βeff measured in b→qq¯s decay channels, such as B0→ωKS0, B0→η'K0, B0→π0KS0, and B0→S0KS0KS0.

  16. Shuttle Program. Euler angles, quaternions, and transformation matrices working relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A brief mathematical development of the relationship between the Euler angles and the transformation matrix, the quaternion and the transformation matrix, and the Euler angles and the quaternion is presented. The analysis and equations presented apply directly to current space shuttle problems. The twelve three-axis Euler transformation matrices are given as functions of the Euler angles, the equations for the quaternion as a funtion of the Euler angles, and the Euler angles as a function of the transformation matrix elements.

  17. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  18. Off-Angle Iris Correction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph T; Karakaya, Mahmut; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2016-01-01

    In many real world iris recognition systems obtaining consistent frontal images is problematic do to inexperienced or uncooperative users, untrained operators, or distracting environments. As a result many collected images are unusable by modern iris matchers. In this chapter we present four methods for correcting off-angle iris images to appear frontal which makes them compatible with existing iris matchers. The methods include an affine correction, a retraced model of the human eye, measured displacements, and a genetic algorithm optimized correction. The affine correction represents a simple way to create an iris image that appears frontal but it does not account for refractive distortions of the cornea. The other method account for refraction. The retraced model simulates the optical properties of the cornea. The other two methods are data driven. The first uses optical flow to measure the displacements of the iris texture when compared to frontal images of the same subject. The second uses a genetic algorithm to learn a mapping that optimizes the Hamming Distance scores between off-angle and frontal images. In this paper we hypothesize that the biological model presented in our earlier work does not adequately account for all variations in eye anatomy and therefore the two data-driven approaches should yield better performance. Results are presented using the commercial VeriEye matcher that show that the genetic algorithm method clearly improves over prior work and makes iris recognition possible up to 50 degrees off-angle.

  19. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhyuk Johnson, Ben Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-08

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  20. Effect of impact angle on vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter H.

    1996-09-01

    Impacts into easily vaporized targets such as dry ice and carbonates generate a rapidly expanding vapor cloud. Laboratory experiments performed in a tenuous atmosphere allow deriving the internal energy of this cloud through well-established and tested theoretical descriptions. A second set of experiments under near-vacuum conditions provides a second measure of energy as the internal energy converts to kinetic energy of expansion. The resulting data allow deriving the vaporized mass as a function of impact angle and velocity. Although peak shock pressures decrease with decreasing impact angle (referenced to horizontal), the amount of impact-generated vapor is found to increase and is derived from the upper surface. Moreover, the temperature of the vapor cloud appears to decrease with decreasing angle. These unexpected results are proposed to reflect the increasing roles of shear heating and downrange hypervelocity ricochet impacts created during oblique impacts. The shallow provenance, low temperature, and trajectory of such vapor have implications for larger-scale events, including enhancement of atmospheric and biospheric stress by oblique terrestrial impacts and impact recycling of the early atmosphere of Mars.

  1. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A. PMID:27612817

  2. Prediction of lower extremities' movement by angle-angle diagrams and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kutilek, Patrik; Farkasova, Barbora

    2011-01-01

    In contemporary science, the analysis of human walking is extensively used. The prediction of leg motion, as well as rehabilitation, can be usable for orthosis and prosthesis programing. Our work is focused on predicting of human walking by angle-angle diagrams, also called cyclograms. The applications of cyclograms in conjunction with artificial intelligence offers wide area of applications in medicine. But until now, this approach has not been studied or applied in practice. PMID:22097908

  3. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods. PMID:26470038

  4. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  5. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  6. Manifold angles, the concept of self-similarity, and angle-enhanced bifurcation diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beims, Marcus W.; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Chaos and regularity are routinely discriminated by using Lyapunov exponents distilled from the norm of orthogonalized Lyapunov vectors, propagated during the temporal evolution of the dynamics. Such exponents are mean-field-like averages that, for each degree of freedom, squeeze the whole temporal evolution complexity into just a single number. However, Lyapunov vectors also contain a step-by-step record of what exactly happens with the angles between stable and unstable manifolds during the whole evolution, a big-data information permanently erased by repeated orthogonalizations. Here, we study changes of angles between invariant subspaces as observed during temporal evolution of Hénon’s system. Such angles are calculated numerically and analytically and used to characterize self-similarity of a chaotic attractor. In addition, we show how standard tools of dynamical systems may be angle-enhanced by dressing them with informations not difficult to extract. Such angle-enhanced tools reveal unexpected and practical facts that are described in detail. For instance, we present a video showing an angle-enhanced bifurcation diagram that exposes from several perspectives the complex geometrical features underlying the attractors. We believe such findings to be generic for extended classes of systems.

  7. Manifold angles, the concept of self-similarity, and angle-enhanced bifurcation diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Beims, Marcus W.; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Chaos and regularity are routinely discriminated by using Lyapunov exponents distilled from the norm of orthogonalized Lyapunov vectors, propagated during the temporal evolution of the dynamics. Such exponents are mean-field-like averages that, for each degree of freedom, squeeze the whole temporal evolution complexity into just a single number. However, Lyapunov vectors also contain a step-by-step record of what exactly happens with the angles between stable and unstable manifolds during the whole evolution, a big-data information permanently erased by repeated orthogonalizations. Here, we study changes of angles between invariant subspaces as observed during temporal evolution of Hénon’s system. Such angles are calculated numerically and analytically and used to characterize self-similarity of a chaotic attractor. In addition, we show how standard tools of dynamical systems may be angle-enhanced by dressing them with informations not difficult to extract. Such angle-enhanced tools reveal unexpected and practical facts that are described in detail. For instance, we present a video showing an angle-enhanced bifurcation diagram that exposes from several perspectives the complex geometrical features underlying the attractors. We believe such findings to be generic for extended classes of systems. PMID:26732416

  8. Implant Angle Monitor System of MC3-II

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Fumiaki; Sano, Makoto; Nakaoka, Hiroaki; Fujii, Yoshito; Kudo, Tetuya; Nakanishi, Makoto; Koike, Masazumi; Fujino, Yasushi

    2008-11-03

    Precise implant angle control is required for the latest generation of ion implanters to meet further shrink semiconductor device requirements. Especially, the highest angle accuracy is required for Halo implant process of Logic devices. The Halo implant angle affects the device performance, because slight differences of beam divergence change the overlap profile towards the extension. Additionally, twist angle accuracy is demanded in case of channeling angle implant. Therefore monitoring beam angles and wafer twist angles is important. A new monitoring system for the MC3-II, SEN Corp.'s single wafer type medium current implanter has been developed. This paper describes the angle control performance and monitoring system of the MC3-II. For the twist angle control, we developed a wafer notch angle monitor. The system monitors the wafer notch image on the platen. And the notch angle variation is calculated by using image processing method. It is also able to adjust the notch angle according to the angle error. For the tilt angle control, we developed a vertical beam profile monitor. The monitor system can detect beam profile of vertical directions with horizontally scanning beam. It also measures beam angles of a tilt direction to a wafer. The system configuration and sample beam data are presented.

  9. Mutational Heterogeneity in Melanoma: An Inconvenient Truth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gregory A; Polsky, David

    2015-12-01

    Identification of oncogenic BRAF mutations in primary and metastatic melanomas supports a linear model of clonal evolution in cancer. Some mutational studies, however, have failed to identify BRAF mutations in metastatic tumors from patients with BRAFmutant primary melanomas. Using a combination of methods, Riveiro-Falkenbach et al. (2015) assert that technical issues, and not clonal heterogeneity, may explain prior discordant mutational results. PMID:26569584

  10. Wall Angle Effects on Nozzle Separation Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaie, A.; Taylor, N.

    The presence of asymmetric side loads due to unstable separation within over-expanded rocket nozzles is well documented. Although progress has been made in developing understanding of this phenomenon through numerical and experimental means, the causes of these side loads have yet to be fully explained. The hypothesis examined within this paper is that there is a relationship between nozzle wall angle at the point of separation, and the stability of the flow separation. This was achieved through an experimental investigation of a series of subscale over-expanded conical nozzles with half-angles of 8.3°, 10.4°, 12.6° and 14.8°. All had overall area ratios of 16:1, with separation occurring at approximately half the nozzle length (i.e. area ration of 4:1) under an overall pressure ratio of approximately 7:1 using air as the working fluid. The structure of exhaust flow was observed and analysed by use of an optimised Schlieren visualisation system, coupled with a high speed digital camera. The 12.6° and 14.8° nozzles exhaust flow were seen to be stable throughout the recorded test period of 10 seconds. However, a small number of large fluctuations in the jet angle were seen to be present within the flowfield of the 10.4° nozzle, occurring at apparently random intervals through the test period. The flowfield of the 8.3° nozzle demonstrated near continuous, large angle deviations in the jet, with flow patterns containing thickened shear layers and apparent reattachment to the wall, something not previously identified in conical nozzles. These results were used to design a truncated ideal contour with an exit angle of over 10 degrees, in order to assess the possibility of designing conventional nozzles that separate stably over a wide range of pressure ratios. These tests were successful, potentially providing a simpler, cheaper alternative to altitude compensating nozzle devices. However, more work determining the nature of the separation and its causes is

  11. MECHANISMS OF STATIONARY PHASE MUTATION: A Decade of Adaptive Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    A decade of research on adaptive mutation has revealed a plethora of mutagenic mechanisms that may be important in evolution. The DNA synthesis associated with recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation in cells that are not proliferating. The movement of insertion elements can be responsive to environmental conditions. Insertion elements not only activate and inactivate genes, they also provide sequence homology that allows large-scale genomic rearrangements. Some conjugative plasmids can recombine with their host’s chromosome, and may acquire chromosomal genes that could then spread through the population and even to other species. Finally, a subpopulation of transient hypermutators could be a source of multiple variant alleles, providing a mechanism for rapid evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10690404

  12. Tracking Down Mutations Cell by Cell.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-03-16

    Using somatic cell nuclear transfer, Hazen et al. (2016) examined clonally expanded single neurons for mutations and found ∼100 mutations from a variety of classes. Post-mitotic mutations in individual neurons represent an exploratory direction for finding fundamental origins of neurodegeneration. PMID:26985720

  13. Mutation analysis in patients with Wilson disease: identification of 4 novel mutations. Mutation in brief no. 250. Online.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Gutierrez-Rivero, B; Knoche, J; Böker, K; Manns, M P; Schmidt, H H

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain novel mutations in the recently discovered Wilson disease gene, we screened 5 unrelated German individuals for mutations in the 21 exons and their flanking intronic sequences. We detected 9 mutations affecting the Wilson disease gene. Four of those, designated 802-808delTGTAAGT, 2008-2013delTATATG, Cys985Thr, and Ile1148Thr have not yet been reported. One patient had a homozygous mutation whereas the remaining four subjects were compound heterozygous. Therefore these data confirm, that mutations causing Wilson disease are frequently found in affected subjects and they are very heterogenous. PMID:10447265

  14. Plastome Mutations and Recombination Events in Barley Chloroplast Mutator Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Landau, Alejandra; Lencina, Franco; Pacheco, María G; Prina, Alberto R

    2016-05-01

    The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions. The detected polymorphisms can be accounted for by at least 61 independent mutational events. The vast majority of the polymorphisms originated in substitutions and small indels (insertions/deletions) in microsatellites. The rpl23 and the rps16 genes were the most polymorphic. Interestingly, the variation observed in the rpl23 gene consisted of several combinations of 5 different one nucleotide polymorphisms. Besides, 4 large indels that have direct repeats at both ends were also observed, which appear to be originated from recombinational events. The cpm mutation spectrum suggests that the CPM gene product is probably involved in plastome mismatch repair. The numerous subtle molecular changes that were localized in a wide range of plastome sites show the cpm as a valuable source of plastome variability for plant research and/or plant breeding. Moreover, the cpm mutant appears to be an interesting experimental material for investigating the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the stability of plant organelle DNA. PMID:26774059

  15. Perceptions of tilt angles of an agricultural tractor.

    PubMed

    Görücü, Serap; Cavallo, Eugenio; Murphy, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    A tractor stability simulator has been developed to help study tractor operators' perceptions of angles when the simulator is tilted to the side. The simulator is a trailer-mounted tractor cab equipped with hydraulic lift that can tilt the tractor cabin up to 30 degrees. This paper summarizes data from 82 participants who sat in the simulator while it was tilted. Demographic variables, estimates of tilt angles, and measured tilt angles were collected. The effects of age, gender, tractor driving experience, and frequency of operation on the estimated and measured tilt angles were analyzed. The results showed that about 50% of the participants reported estimations of side tilt angles within ±5 degrees of the actual angles, and nearly the same percentage overestimated the actual side tilt angles. Only a small percentage underestimated the angles. Older, more experienced, and male participants set higher limits on the actual angle at which they felt uncomfortable and would not drive. PMID:24417527

  16. Angle amplifier based on multiplexed volume holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangcai; Zhao, Yifei; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2008-03-01

    Angle amplifier of laser beam scanner is a widely used device in optical systems. Volume holographic optical elements can be applied in the angle amplifier. Compared with the traditional angle amplifier, it has the advantages of high angle resolution, high diffraction efficiency, small size, and high angle magnification and flexible design. Bragg anglewavelength- compensating recording method is introduced. Because of the Bragg compensatory relation between angle and wavelength, this device could be recorded at another wavelength. The design of the angle amplifier recording at the wavelength of 514.2nm for the working wavelength of 632.8nm is described. An optical setup for recording the angle amplifier device is designed and discussed. Experimental results in the photorefractive crystal Fe:LiNbO 3 demonstrate the feasibility of the angle amplifier scheme.

  17. Study of critical ricochet angle for conical nose shape projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Vijayalakshmi; Law, Manish G.; Naik, Smita D.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to formulate a generic analytical model to assess the phenomena of water ricochet for a conical nose shaped projectile. A theoretical model is analyzed to study the critical angle of conical nose shaped projectile entering in water and is extended for different mediums as normal sand and mercury. Numerical Simulation has been carried out to find the effect of tip angle of the conical nose shaped projectile on the critical angle. Critical angle is defined as that angle of impact of the projectile above which ricochet will occur. This angle is obtained by balancing the momentums acting on the projectile at the time of impact on the basis of Newtonian theory. Major factors affecting critical angle are impact velocity, impact angle, density of the projectile and the target. An attempt has been made to study the effect of longitudinal spin of the projectile on the critical angle.

  18. Genetic Analysis of 63 Mutations Affecting Maize Kernel Development Isolated from Mutator Stocks

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, M. J.; Stinard, P. S.; James, M. G.; Myers, A. M.; Robertson, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three mutations affecting development of the maize kernel were isolated from active Robertson's Mutator (Mu) stocks. At least 14 previously undescribed maize gene loci were defined by mutations in this collection. Genetic mapping located 53 of these defective kernel (dek) mutations to particular chromosome arms, and more precise map determinations were made for 21 of the mutations. Genetic analyses identified 20 instances of allelism between one of the novel mutations and a previously described dek mutation, or between new dek mutations identified in this study; phenotypic variability was observed in three of the allelic series. Viability testing of homozygous mutant kernels identified numerous dek mutations with various pleiotropic effects on seedling and plant development. The mutations described here presumably arose by insertion of a Mu transposon within a dek gene; thus, many of the affected loci are expected to be accessible to molecular cloning via transposon-tagging. PMID:8138165

  19. Interplay of mutation and disassortativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sanjiv K.; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    Despite disassortativity being commonly observed in many biological networks, our current understanding of its evolutionary origin is inadequate. Motivated by the occurrence of mutations during an evolutionary time span that results in changes in the behavior of interactions, we demonstrate that if we maximize the stability of the underlying system, the genetic algorithm leads to the evolution of a disassortative structure. The mutation probability governs the degree of saturation of the disassortativity coefficient, and this reveals the origin of the wide range of disassortativity values found in real systems. We analytically verify these results for star networks, and by considering various values for the antisymmetric couplings, we find a regime in which scale-free networks are more stable than the corresponding random networks.

  20. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  1. Infrared Solar Spectroscopic Measurements of Free Tropospheric CO, C2H6, and HCN above Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Seasonal Variations and Evidence for Enhanced Emissions from the Southeast Asian Tropical Fires of 1997-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Stephen, T. M.; Pougatchev, N. S.; Fishman, J.; David, S. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Novelli, P. C.; Jones, N. B.

    1999-01-01

    High spectral resolution (0.003 per cm) infrared solar absorption measurements of CO, C2H6, and HCN have been recorded at the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change station on Mauna Loa, Hawaii, (19.5N, 155.6W, altitude 3.4 km). The observations were obtained on over 250 days between August 1995 and February 1998. Column measurements are reported for the 3.4-16 km altitude region, which corresponds approximately to the free troposphere above the station. Average CO mixing ratios computed for this layer have been compared with flask sampling CO measurements obtained in situ at the station during the same time period. Both show asymmetrical seasonal cycles superimposed on significant variability. The first 2 years of observations exhibit a broad January-April maximum and a sharper CO minimum during late summer. The C2H6 and CO 3.4-16 km columns were highly correlated throughout the observing period with the C2H6/CO slope intermediate between higher and lower values derived from similar infrared spectroscopic measurements at 32'N and 45'S latitude, respectively. Variable enhancements in CO, C2H6, and particularly HCN were observed beginning in about September 1997. The maximum HCN free tropospheric monthly mean column observed in November 1997 corresponds to an average 3.4-16 km mixing ratio of 0.7 ppbv (1 ppbv = 10(exp -9) per unit volume), more than a factor of 3 above the background level. The HCN enhancements continued through the end of the observational series. Back-trajectory calculations suggest that the emissions originated at low northern latitudes in southeast Asia. Surface CO mixing ratios and the C2H6 tropospheric columns measured during the same time also showed anomalous autumn 1997 maxima. The intense and widespread tropical wild fires that burned during the strong El Nino warm phase of 1997- 1998 are the likely source of the elevated emission products.

  2. Comparison of the atmospheric CO/sub 2/ measurement programs of GMCC/NOAA and SIO at Mauna Loa Observatory: results of the December 5-12, 1983 tests. Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Gammon, R.; Thoning, K.; Keeling, C.D.; Moss, D.

    1984-05-03

    Field tests were conducted to assess possible instrumental sources of disagreement in a joint record of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory. Results indicate that the CO/sub 2/ systems gave the same measured ambient atmospheric air value to within about 0.15 ppM. For tests through common plumbing the URAS-APC difference on average was 0.12 ppM. For tests through different plumbing a similar difference of 0.15 ppM was observed, disregarding the period of faulty pump performance during Test E. The sigma/sub m//sup -2/ weighted mean difference for all tests was 0.138 ppM with a weighted sigma/sub m/ = 0.016 ppM. A single cause was not discovered which accounted for these differences which did not appear to correlate with permutations in plumbing. On average no significant difference was observed when measuring CO/sub 2/-in-air from a pressurized cylinder with common plumbing. The observed differences are smaller but of the same sign as the mean difference provisionally computed between the NOAA and SIO systems. The overall level of agreement has been provisionally determined at the 0.3 to 0.6 ppM level for monthly means, with a relative drift of about 0.08 ppM y/sup -1/ from an initial difference of about -0.5 ppM in 1974 to + 0.6 ppM in 1982. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Euler angles as torsional flat spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Mandujano, Hector A.

    In this work we use general tensor calculus to compare the geodesic equation of motion and Newton's first law for force-free classical systems that are described by an arbitrary number of generalized coordinates in spaces with and without torsion. We choose as objects of study the flat torsional Euler angle metric spaces for rigid rotators. We tested the equivalence of the two motion equations using computational software that allowed algebraic manipulation. The main result is that the equivalence only holds for torsion-free spaces, and for isotropic force-free rotators. We present analytical calculations for the isotropic case and computational results for the general case.

  4. Junctional angle of a bihanded helix.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wolgemuth, Charles W; Huber, Greg

    2014-10-01

    Helical filaments having sections of reversed chirality are common phenomena in the biological realm. The apparent angle between the two sections of opposite handedness provides information about the geometry and elasticity of the junctional region. In this paper, the governing differential equations for the local helical axis are developed, and asymptotic solutions of the governing equations are solved by perturbation theory. The asymptotic solutions are compared with the corresponding numerical solutions, and the relative error at second order is found to be less than 1.5% over a range of biologically relevant curvature and torsion values from 0 to 1/2 in dimensionless units. PMID:25375538

  5. Argon-Assisted Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Jason Brian

    Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is a physical vapour deposition (PVD) technique capable of fabricating highly porous thin films with controllable film morphology on the 10 nm length scale. The GLAD process is flexible and may be used on virtually any PVD-compatible material. This makes GLAD a useful technique in many applications including photovoltaics, humidity sensing, and photonic devices. Conventional, dense films grown at normal incidence concurrent with ion or energetic neutral bombardment have been reported to have higher film density than unbombarded films. In a similar sense, highly porous GLAD films grown with concurrent bombardment should generate films with new interesting properties and extend the versatility of the GLAD process. The research presented in this thesis investigates the use of energetic neutral bombardment during GLAD film growth to produce new film morphologies. Here, with increasing bombardment, the column tilt increases, film density increases, and specific surface area decreases. A film simultaneously exhibiting high column tilt angle and film density is enabled by incorporating bombardment concurrent with GLAD film growth. This in turn results in films with larger principal refractive indices, but a smaller normalized in plane birefringence. Bombarded films were also found to be compatible with the phisweep process which helps decouple the column tilt angle from film density. Characterization of the bombardment-assisted growth process indicates that both sputtering and bombardment-induced diffusion play a role in the modification of film morphology. The film property modifications which arise as a result of bombardment-assisted growth lead to device improvements in a number of applications. Bombardment was used to fabricate square spiral photonic crystal structures with increased column tilt which bear a closer resemblance to optimized simulated structures than conventionally-grown GLAD films. The increase in column tilt angle and

  6. Analyzing biomolecular interactions by variable angle ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Lee, Chih-Kung; Lee, J. H.; Shiue, Shuen-Chen; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lin, Shiming

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative ellipsometer is developed and applied to metrology of the biomolecular interaction on a protein biochip. Both the theory, optical and opto-mechanical configurations of this newly developed ellipsometer and methodologies adopted in system design to improve the system performance are presented. It will be shown that by measuring the ellipsometric parameters, the corresponding concentration variation in biochemical reaction can be calculated according to stoichiometry analysis. By applying the variable angle ellipsometry to analysis of a multi-layered sample, the thickness and concentration are resolved. It is believed that the newly developed ellipsometer biosensor is able to undertake an accurate measurement on biomedical interaction.

  7. X-29 high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishmael, Stephen D.; Smith, Rogers E.; Purifoy, Dana D.; Womer, Rodney K.

    1990-01-01

    Flight test program highlights are discussed for the X-29 high angle-of-attack (AOA) aircraft. The AOA envelope extended from 10 to 66 deg; the X-29 exhibited precise pitch control, allowing AOA to be maintained within 1 deg during stabilized points as well as permitting rapid recoveries from all AOAs. Attention is given to controllability degradation above 40-deg AOA due to asymmetric yawing moments. The use of this aircraft as a fundamental research tool which complements analytical methods is powerfully justified by the obviation of scaling effects.

  8. Neurenteric cysts of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Roder, Constantin; Ebner, Florian H; Schuhmann, Martin U

    2013-12-01

    Neurenteric cysts in the central nervous system are rare developmental malformations. Usually the cysts are located ventral to the high thoracic or low cervical spinal cord. Only a few cases of intracranial neurenteric cysts have been reported in the literature to date. We report two cases of intracranial neurenteric cysts in the cerebellopontine angle with totally different radiographic, macroscopic, and microscopic appearance. As seen in these cases, the imaging spectrum of neurenteric cysts can be diverse, including malignancy-suspecting partial rim-enhancement or low-grade glioma features. Microsurgical therapy should include endoscopic assistance to ensure complete removal of cyst content. PMID:23397125

  9. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  10. Angle parameter changes of phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy for acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Wei; Chen, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Lu, Bin; Wang, Wen-Qing; Fang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the difference in angle parameters and clinical outcome following phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy in patients with acute primary angle closure (APAC) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). METHODS Patients (n=23, 31 eyes) were randomized to receive phacoemulsification or combined phacotrabeculectomy (n=24, 31 eyes). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), the main complications following surgery, and indentation gonioscopy and angle parameters measured using UBM were documented preoperatively and postoperatively. RESULTS The improvement in BCVA in the phacoemulsification group was significantly greater than in the combined group (P<0.05). IOP in the phacoemulsification group was slightly higher than in the combined group following 1wk of follow-up (P<0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups at the latter follow-up (P>0.05). Phacoemulsification alone resulted in a slight increase in the trabecular ciliary processes distance compared with the combined surgery (P<0.05), whereas the other angle parameters showed no significant difference between the groups. Complications in combined group were greater than phacoemulsification only group. CONCLUSION Both surgeries effectively opened the drainage angle and deepened the anterior chamber, and IOP was well controlled postoperatively. However, phacoemulsification showed better efficacy in improving visual function and showed reduced complications following surgery. PMID:26309873

  11. Dirac leptonic angle matrix versus Majorana leptonic angle matrix and their renormalization group running behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Enlightened by the idea of the 3×3 Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle matrix proposed recently by Harrison , we introduce the Dirac angle matrix Φ and the Majorana angle matrix Ψ in the lepton sector for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos, respectively. We show that in the presence of CP violation, the angle matrix Φ or Ψ is entirely equivalent to the complex Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix V itself, but has the advantage of being real, phase rephasing invariant, directly associated to the leptonic unitarity triangles and do not depend on any particular parametrization of V. In this paper, we further analyzed how the angle matrices evolve with the energy scale. The one-loop renormalization group equations of Φ, Ψ and some other rephasing invariant parameters are derived and a numerical analysis is performed to compare between the case of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Different neutrino mass spectra are taken into account in our calculation. We find that apparently different from the case of Dirac neutrinos, for Majorana neutrinos the renormalization group equation evolutions of Φ, Ψ and J strongly depend on the Majorana-type CP-violating parameters and are more sensitive to the sign of Δm312. They may receive significant radiative corrections in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with large tan⁡β if three neutrino masses are nearly degenerate.

  12. Mechanisms of Mutation in Nondividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.; Rosche, William A.

    2010-01-01

    When populations of cells are subjected to nonlethal selection, mutations arise in the absence of cell division, a phenomenon that has been called “adaptive mutation.” In a strain of Escherichia coli that cannot metabolize lactose (Lac−) but that reverts to lactose utilization (Lac+) when lactose is its sole energy and carbon source, the mutational process consists of two components. (1) A highly efficient, recombination-dependent mechanism giving rise to mutations on the F′ episome that carries the Lac− allele; and (2) a less efficient, unknown mechanism giving rise to mutations elsewhere in the genome. Both selected and nonselected mutations arise in the Lac− population, but nonselected mutations are enriched in Lac+ mutants, suggesting that some Lac+ cells have passed though a transient period of increased mutation. These results have several evolutionary implications. (1) DNA synthesis initiated by recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation, particularly in cells that are not undergoing genomic replication. (2) The highly active mutational mechanism on the episome could be important in the horizontal transfer of variant alleles among species that carry and exchange conjugal plasmids. (3) A subpopulation of cells in a state of transient mutation could be a source of multiple variant alleles and could provide a mechanism for rapid adaptive evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10415479

  13. TCF12 is mutated in anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Labreche, Karim; Simeonova, Iva; Kamoun, Aurélie; Gleize, Vincent; Chubb, Daniel; Letouzé, Eric; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Dobbins, Sara E; Elarouci, Nabila; Ducray, Francois; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Zelenika, Diana; Wardell, Christopher P; Frampton, Mathew; Saulnier, Olivier; Pastinen, Tomi; Hallout, Sabrina; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Mark Lathrop, G; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) are rare primary brain tumours that are generally incurable, with heterogeneous prognosis and few treatment targets identified. Most oligodendrogliomas have chromosomes 1p/19q co-deletion and an IDH mutation. Here we analysed 51 AO by whole-exome sequencing, identifying previously reported frequent somatic mutations in CIC and FUBP1. We also identified recurrent mutations in TCF12 and in an additional series of 83 AO. Overall, 7.5% of AO are mutated for TCF12, which encodes an oligodendrocyte-related transcription factor. Eighty percent of TCF12 mutations identified were in either the bHLH domain, which is important for TCF12 function as a transcription factor, or were frameshift mutations leading to TCF12 truncated for this domain. We show that these mutations compromise TCF12 transcriptional activity and are associated with a more aggressive tumour type. Our analysis provides further insights into the unique and shared pathways driving AO. PMID:26068201

  14. TCF12 is mutated in anaplastic oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Labreche, Karim; Simeonova, Iva; Kamoun, Aurélie; Gleize, Vincent; Chubb, Daniel; Letouzé, Eric; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Dobbins, Sara E.; Elarouci, Nabila; Ducray, Francois; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Zelenika, Diana; Wardell, Christopher P.; Frampton, Mathew; Saulnier, Olivier; Pastinen, Tomi; Hallout, Sabrina; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Mark Lathrop, G.; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S.; Adam, Clovis; Andraud, Marie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Blechet, Claire; Campone, Mario; Carpentier, Antoine; Carpentier, Catherine; Carpiuc, Ioana; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Colin, Philippe; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Desenclos, Christine; Desse, Nicolas; Dhermain, Frederic; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Eimer, Sandrine; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Gaillard, Stéphane; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Gaultier, Claude; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Godard, Joel; Marcel Gueye, Edouard; Sebastien Guillamo, Jean; Hamdi-Elouadhani, Selma; Honnorat, Jerome; Louis Kemeny, Jean; Khallil, Toufik; Jouvet, Anne; Labrousse, Francois; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Le Guérinel, Caroline; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Loiseau, Hugues; Loussouarn, Delphine; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Menei, Philippe; Janette Motsuo Fotso, Marie; Noel, Georges; Parker, Fabrice; Peoc'h, Michel; Polivka, Marc; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Ramirez, Carole; Ricard, Damien; Richard, Pomone; Rigau, Valérie; Rousseau, Audrey; Runavot, Gwenaelle; Sevestre, Henri; Christine Tortel, Marie; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Vauleon, Elodie; Viennet, Gabriel; Villa, Chiara; Wager, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) are rare primary brain tumours that are generally incurable, with heterogeneous prognosis and few treatment targets identified. Most oligodendrogliomas have chromosomes 1p/19q co-deletion and an IDH mutation. Here we analysed 51 AO by whole-exome sequencing, identifying previously reported frequent somatic mutations in CIC and FUBP1. We also identified recurrent mutations in TCF12 and in an additional series of 83 AO. Overall, 7.5% of AO are mutated for TCF12, which encodes an oligodendrocyte-related transcription factor. Eighty percent of TCF12 mutations identified were in either the bHLH domain, which is important for TCF12 function as a transcription factor, or were frameshift mutations leading to TCF12 truncated for this domain. We show that these mutations compromise TCF12 transcriptional activity and are associated with a more aggressive tumour type. Our analysis provides further insights into the unique and shared pathways driving AO. PMID:26068201

  15. Digenic mutations in severe congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Germeshausen, Manuela; Zeidler, Cornelia; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Lanciotti, Marina; Ballmaier, Matthias; Welte, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Mutations in different genes have been described as causative for severe neutropenia, e.g. ELANE, HAX1 and G6PC3. Although congenital neutropenia is considered to be a group of monogenic disorders, the phenotypic heterogeneity even within the yet defined genetic subtypes points to additional genetic and/or epigenetic influences on the disease phenotype. We describe congenital neutropenia patients with mutations in two candidate genes each, including 6 novel mutations. Two of them had a heterozygous ELANE mutation combined with a homozygous mutation in G6PC3 or HAX1, respectively. The other 2 patients combined homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in G6PC3 or HAX1 with a heterozygous mutation in the respective other gene. Our results suggest that digenicity may underlie this disorder of myelopoiesis at least in some congenital neutropenia patients. PMID:20220065

  16. Mutational patterns in oncogenes and tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Baeissa, Hanadi M; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Richardson, Christopher J; Pearl, Frances M G

    2016-06-15

    All cancers depend upon mutations in critical genes, which confer a selective advantage to the tumour cell. Knowledge of these mutations is crucial to understanding the biology of cancer initiation and progression, and to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. The key to understanding the contribution of a disease-associated mutation to the development and progression of cancer, comes from an understanding of the consequences of that mutation on the function of the affected protein, and the impact on the pathways in which that protein is involved. In this paper we examine the mutation patterns observed in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, and discuss different approaches that have been developed to identify driver mutations within cancers that contribute to the disease progress. We also discuss the MOKCa database where we have developed an automatic pipeline that structurally and functionally annotates all proteins from the human proteome that are mutated in cancer. PMID:27284061

  17. Study on self-calibration angle encoder using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Zi; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    The angle measurement technology is very important in precision manufacture, optical industry, aerospace, aviation and navigation, etc. Further, the angle encoder, which uses concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' and transforms the angle into number of electronic pulse, is the most common instrument for angle measurement. To improve the accuracy of the angle encoder, a novel self-calibration method was proposed that enables the angle encoder to calibrate itself without angle reference. An angle deviation curve among 0° to 360° was simulated with equal weights Fourier components for the study of the self-calibration method. In addition, a self-calibration algorithm was used in the process of this deviation curve. The simulation result shows the relationship between the arrangement of multi-reading heads and the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. Besides, an actual self-calibration angle encoder was calibrated by polygon angle standard in national institute of metrology, China. The experiment result indicates the actual self-calibration effect on the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. In the end, the comparison, which is between the simulation self-calibration result and the experiment self-calibration result, reflects good consistency and proves the reliability of the self-calibration angle encoder.

  18. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  19. WIDE-ANGLE, NARROW-ANGLE, AND IMAGING BASELINES OF OPTICAL LONG-BASELINE INTERFEROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Woillez, J.; Lacour, S. E-mail: sylvestre.lacour@obspm.fr

    2013-02-10

    For optical interferometers, the baseline is typically defined as the vector joining two perfectly identical telescopes. However, when the telescopes are naturally different or when the requirements on the baseline vector challenge the telescope perfection, the baseline definition depends on how the interferometer is used. This is where the notions of wide-angle, narrow-angle, and imaging baselines come into play. This article explores this variety of baselines, with the purpose of presenting a coherent set of definitions, describing how they relate to each other, and suggesting baseline metrology requirements. Ultimately, this work aims at supporting upcoming long-baseline optical interferometers with narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced imaging capabilities at the microarcsecond level.

  20. Wide-angle imaging system with fiberoptic components providing angle-dependent virtual material stops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180 deg strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frustoconical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180 deg strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  1. Large Angle Transient Dynamics (LATDYN) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. Louis; Chang, Che-Wei; Powell, Michael G.; Wu, Shih-Chin; Bingel, Bradford D.; Theophilos, Paula M.

    1991-01-01

    A computer code for modeling the large angle transient dynamics (LATDYN) of structures was developed to investigate techniques for analyzing flexible deformation and control/structure interaction problems associated with large angular motions of spacecraft. This type of analysis is beyond the routine capability of conventional analytical tools without simplifying assumptions. In some instances, the motion may be sufficiently slow and the spacecraft (or component) sufficiently rigid to simplify analyses of dynamics and controls by making pseudo-static and/or rigid body assumptions. The LATDYN introduces a new approach to the problem by combining finite element structural analysis, multi-body dynamics, and control system analysis in a single tool. It includes a type of finite element that can deform and rotate through large angles at the same time, and which can be connected to other finite elements either rigidly or through mechanical joints. The LATDYN also provides symbolic capabilities for modeling control systems which are interfaced directly with the finite element structural model. Thus, the nonlinear equations representing the structural model are integrated along with the equations representing sensors, processing, and controls as a coupled system.

  2. Design analysis of composite angle clips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, W. S.; Lawrence, K. L.; King, Y. F.; Tang, C.

    1992-07-01

    Attention is given to an analysis procedure for determining the maximum allowable beam pressure for a composite angle clip in a beam-clip structural configuration. A quasi-isotropic laminate was used in this type. Three layups, (45 sub 10, 0 sub 10, -45 sub 10, 90 sub 10) sub s, (45, 0 -45, 90) sub 10s, and (45 sub 10, 90 sub 10, -45 sub 10, 0 sub 10) sub s, are used to study the effect of delamination and first ply failure strength. It is found that without any ply failure the (45, 0, -45, 90) sub 10s clip can sustain the highest beam pressure, and the (45 sub 10, 90 sub 10, -45 sub 10, 0 sub 10) sub s has the lowest allowable pressure among the three laminates. A critical location is identified in the composite angle clip. A modified Pagano-Pipes approximation method is used to evaluate the interlaminar normal stress at the critical location through the laminate thickness for all three layups. The (45, 0, -45, 90) sub 10s is found to be the least susceptible to delamination.

  3. Hidden Topological Angles in Path Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behtash, Alireza; Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Schäfer, Thomas; Ünsal, Mithat

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the existence of hidden topological angles (HTAs) in a large class of quantum field theories and quantum mechanical systems. HTAs are distinct from theta parameters in the Lagrangian. They arise as invariant angles associated with saddle points of the complexified path integral and their descent manifolds (Lefschetz thimbles). Physical effects of HTAs become most transparent upon analytic continuation in nf to a noninteger number of flavors, reducing in the integer nf limit to a Z2 valued phase difference between dominant saddles. In N =1 super Yang-Mills theory we demonstrate the microscopic mechanism for the vanishing of the gluon condensate. The same effect leads to an anomalously small condensate in a QCD-like S U (N ) gauge theory with fermions in the two-index representation. The basic phenomenon is that, contrary to folklore, the gluon condensate can receive both positive and negative contributions in a semiclassical expansion. In quantum mechanics, a HTA leads to a difference in semiclassical expansion of integer and half-integer spin particles.

  4. Diphotons, new vacuum angles, and strong CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Patrick; McKeen, David

    2016-04-01

    The Standard Model contains a well-understood, natural, spin-0 diphoton resonance: the π 0. Numerous studies have pointed out that the hint of a new diphoton resonance at 750 GeV could be a pion analog, identified with the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of a chiral symmetry spontaneously broken by new strong dynamics at the TeV scale. These "hypercolor" models are generically expected to violate parity through a topological angle tilde{θ} . We discuss the physics of tilde{θ} and its impact on the phenomenology of the new sector. We also describe some of the theoretical implications of a nonzero tilde{θ} . In particular, tilde{θ} can generate an O(1) threshold correction to the QCD vacuum angle θ near the TeV scale, sharply constraining ultraviolet solutions to the strong CP problem. Alternatively, finding that tilde{θ} is small may be interpreted as evidence in favor of UV solutions to strong CP, particularly those based on spontaneously broken P or CP symmetries.

  5. Hidden Topological Angles in Path Integrals.

    PubMed

    Behtash, Alireza; Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Schäfer, Thomas; Ünsal, Mithat

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate the existence of hidden topological angles (HTAs) in a large class of quantum field theories and quantum mechanical systems. HTAs are distinct from theta parameters in the Lagrangian. They arise as invariant angles associated with saddle points of the complexified path integral and their descent manifolds (Lefschetz thimbles). Physical effects of HTAs become most transparent upon analytic continuation in n_{f} to a noninteger number of flavors, reducing in the integer n_{f} limit to a Z_{2} valued phase difference between dominant saddles. In N=1 super Yang-Mills theory we demonstrate the microscopic mechanism for the vanishing of the gluon condensate. The same effect leads to an anomalously small condensate in a QCD-like SU(N) gauge theory with fermions in the two-index representation. The basic phenomenon is that, contrary to folklore, the gluon condensate can receive both positive and negative contributions in a semiclassical expansion. In quantum mechanics, a HTA leads to a difference in semiclassical expansion of integer and half-integer spin particles. PMID:26252675

  6. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 54 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs.

  8. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  9. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  10. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  11. Tilt angle control of nanocolumns grown by glancing angle sputtering at variable argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Cebollada, A.; Alvarez, R.; Romero-Gomez, P.; Palmero, A.

    2010-10-25

    We show that the tilt angle of nanostructures obtained by glancing angle sputtering is finely tuned by selecting the adequate argon pressure. At low pressures, a ballistic deposition regime dominates, yielding high directional atoms that form tilted nanocolumns. High pressures lead to a diffusive regime which gives rise to vertical columnar growth. Monte Carlo simulations reproduce the experimental results indicating that the loss of directionality of the sputtered particles in the gas phase, together with the self-shadowing mechanism at the surface, are the main processes responsible for the development of the columns.

  12. Use of mutation spectra analysis software.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I; Kondrashov, F; Glazko, G

    2001-02-01

    The study and comparison of mutation(al) spectra is an important problem in molecular biology, because these spectra often reflect on important features of mutations and their fixation. Such features include the interaction of DNA with various mutagens, the function of repair/replication enzymes, and properties of target proteins. It is known that mutability varies significantly along nucleotide sequences, such that mutations often concentrate at certain positions, called "hotspots," in a sequence. In this paper, we discuss in detail two approaches for mutation spectra analysis: the comparison of mutation spectra with a HG-PUBL program, (FTP: sunsite.unc.edu/pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations/hyperg) and hotspot prediction with the CLUSTERM program (www.itba.mi.cnr.it/webmutation; ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/dbms/clusterm.zip). Several other approaches for mutational spectra analysis, such as the analysis of a target protein structure, hotspot context revealing, multiple spectra comparisons, as well as a number of mutation databases are briefly described. Mutation spectra in the lacI gene of E. coli and the human p53 gene are used for illustration of various difficulties of such analysis. PMID:11180592

  13. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  14. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  15. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements

  16. Geometric angles in cyclic evolutions of a classical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sen, Tanaji

    1988-01-01

    A perturbative method, using Lie transforms, is given for calculating the Hannay angle for slow, cyclic evolutions of a classical system, taking into account the finite rate of change of the Hamiltonian. The method is applied to the generalized harmonic oscillator. The classical Aharonov-Anandan angle is also calculated. The interpretational ambiguity in the definitions of geometrical angles is discussed.

  17. 14 CFR 29.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... described in this section. (b) Dihedral angle L (left) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes, the... formed by two intersecting vertical planes, the first parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft... longitudinal axis. (d) Dihedral angle A (aft) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes making angles of...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... described in this section. (b) Dihedral angle L (left) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes, the... formed by two intersecting vertical planes, the first parallel to the longitudinal axis of the airplane... longitudinal axis. (d) Dihedral angle A (aft) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes making angles of...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... this section. (b) Dihedral angle L (left) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes, the first... two intersecting vertical planes, the first parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft, and... longitudinal axis. (d) Dihedral angle A (aft) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes making angles of...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... this section. (b) Dihedral angle L (left) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes, the first... two intersecting vertical planes, the first parallel to the longitudinal axis of the airplane, and the... axis. (d) Dihedral angle A (aft) is formed by two intersecting vertical planes making angles of...

  1. Visual Angle as Determinant Factor for Relative Distance Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsushima, Elton H.; de Oliveira, Artur P.; Ribeiro-Filho, Nilton P.; Da Silva, Jose A.

    2005-01-01

    Visual angles are defined as the angle between line of sight up to the mean point of a relative distance and the relative distance itself. In one experiment, we examined the functional aspect of visual angle in relative distance perception using two different layouts composed by 14 stakes, one of them with its center 23 m away from the observation…

  2. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 1: Corners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of their article, Erin Host, Emily Baynham and Heather McMaster use a combination of digital technology and concrete materials to explore the concept of "corners". They provide a practical, easy to follow sequence of activities that builds on students' understandings. [For "Using Digital Technology to See Angles from…

  3. Moderate Positive Spin Hall Angle in Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguera, Marta; Singh, Simran; Del Barco, Enrique; Springell, Ross; Miller, Casey W.

    We will present results on FMR and voltage measurements of magnetic damping and the inverse spin Hall effect, respectively, in Ni80Fe20/Uranium bilayers. A pure spin current is injected into an Uranium film from the ferromagnetic resonance dynamics of the magnetization of an adjacent Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) film. The spin current generated is then converted into an electric field by the inverse spin Hall effect. Our results suggest a spin mixing conductance of order 2x1019 m-2 and a positive spin Hall angle of 0.004, which are both unexpected based on trends in d-electron systems. These results support the idea that materials with unfilled f-electron orbitals may require additional exploration for spin physics. Work at UCF was supported by NSF-ECCS grant # 1402990. Work at RIT was supported by NSF-ECCS Grant 1515677.

  4. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Anastas, George V., Jr.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Goldie, James H.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Hockney, Richard L.; Torti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible.

  5. Wide Angle View of Arsia Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Arsia Mons (above) is one of the largest volcanoes known. This shield volcano is part of an aligned trio known as the Tharsis Montes--the others are Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons. Arsia Mons is rivaled only by Olympus Mons in terms of its volume. The summit of Arsia Mons is more than 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) higher than the surrounding plains. The crater--or caldera--at the volcano summit is approximately 110 km (68 mi) across. This view of Arsia Mons was taken by the red and blue wide angle cameras of the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) system. Bright water ice clouds (the whitish/bluish wisps) hang above the volcano--a common sight every martian afternoon in this region. Arsia Mons is located at 120o west longitude and 9o south latitude. Illumination is from the left.

  6. Large angle magnetic suspension test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1993-01-01

    Progress made under the subject grant in the period from 1 Nov. 1992 to 31 May 1993 is presented. The research involves the continued development of the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) and also the recommissioning of an additional piece of exisiting hardware. During the period in question, the initial configuration of LAMSTF was completed and made routinely and reliably operational. A digital phase advance controller was completed and documented. The goal of a controlled 360 deg rotation was achieved. Work started on the recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS). Work completed during the report period included: modeling; position sensing; controller; support of the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology; and recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System.

  7. X-Ray Small Angle Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Pape, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    The direct determination of the electron density distributions of multilayered specimens with a small number of unit cells from X-ray small angle scattering experiments via the Q-function method of Hosemann and Bagchi includes the deconvolution of the so-called Qo-function, the generalized Patterson function of one unit cell. In this paper a new and direct deconvolution method on the basis of Fourier series is presented which is suitable for one-dimensional centrosymmetrical (or antisymmetrical) density distributions. A FORTRAN-program has been written which has an execution time of ca. 20 s on an UNIVAC 1106-computer. The procedure has been successfully tested on some convolution functions generated by membrane-type electron density distributions. PMID:4830467

  8. The Spacelab Wide Angle Telescope (SWAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. M.; Gull, T. R.; Henize, K. G.; Bertola, F.

    1979-01-01

    A fast wide angle telescope that will be capable of imaging to the darker sky limit and in the ultraviolet wavelength region available above the atmosphere is described. The telescope (SWAT) has a resolution comparable to that of the large ground-based Schmidt telescope and a field of at least five degrees. A number of astrophysically important investigations can only be accomplished with such a telescope, e.g., detection of hidden, hot objects like hot white dwarfs and subwarfs in stellar binary systems, and energetic regions in globular clusters and galaxy nuclei. It permits unique studies of the UV-morphology of extended objects and allows discovery of very faint extensions, halos, jets, and filaments in galaxies. It can contribute to the investigation of dust in the Milky Way and in other galaxies and, with an objective prism, spectra of very faint objects can be obtained. The SWAT will localize objects for further study with the narrow-field Space Telescope.

  9. Foreign body embedded in anterior chamber angle.

    PubMed

    Graffi, Shmuel; Tiosano, Beatrice; Ben Cnaan, Ran; Bahir, Jonathan; Naftali, Modi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of a metallic foreign body embedded in the anterior chamber angle. After standing in close proximity to a construction worker breaking a tile, a 26-year-old woman using soft contact lens for the correction of mild myopia presented to emergency department for evaluation of a foreign body sensation of her right eye. Methods and Results. Diagnosis was confirmed by gonioscopic examination and a noncontrast CT scan of head and orbits. The foreign body was removed by an external approach without utilizing a magnet. The patient's final outcome was favorable. Discussion. The above is a rare clinical situation, which is impossible to detect on slit-lamp examination without a gonioscopic view. Proper imaging and a specific management are mandatory in order to achieve favorable outcome. PMID:23091762

  10. Mirtazapine-induced acute angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Nilay; Durmaz, Onur; Durna, Mehmet Murat

    2015-01-01

    Acute angle closure (AAC) is an ocular emergency with symptoms including blurred vision, eye pain, headache, nausea, vomiting and reddening of the eye those results from increased intraocular pressure. This clinical condition can lead to permanent damage in vision, thus causing blindness by generating progressive and irreversible optic neuropathy if left untreated. There are several reasons of AAC, including several types of local and systemic medications; mainly sympathomimetics, cholinergics, anti-cholinergics, mydriatics, anti-histamines, antiepileptics like topiramate, tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, sulfa-based drugs and anticoagulants. Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant, is an atypical antidepressant with a complex pharmacological profile. This case report describes a patient with major depressive disorder, who experienced AAC after the first dosage of mirtazapine treatment, and highlights the importance of close monitoring of individuals under antidepressant treatment particularly immediately after initiation of the drug. PMID:26265648

  11. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Torti, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The component technologies were developed required for an advanced control moment gyro (CMG) type of slewing actuator for large payloads. The key component of the CMG is a large-angle magnetic suspension (LAMS). The LAMS combines the functions of the gimbal structure, torque motors, and rotor bearings of a CMG. The LAMS uses a single superconducting source coil and an array of cryoresistive control coils to produce a specific output torque more than an order of magnitude greater than conventional devices. The designed and tested LAMS system is based around an available superconducting solenoid, an array of twelve room-temperature normal control coils, and a multi-input, multi-output control system. The control laws were demonstrated for stabilizing and controlling the LAMS system.

  12. Experimental Status of the CKM Angle {beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschauer, James F.

    2009-12-17

    We summarize measurements of the CKM angle {beta} at the B-factories emphasizing a comparison of {beta} measured in the B{sup 0}{yields}cc-barK{sup (*)0} decay channels and {beta}{sub eff} measured in b{yields}qq-bars decay channels, such as B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}K{sub S}{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}'K{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}.

  13. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, L. D.; Hyer, M. W.; Shuart, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Test results from the compression loading of (+ or - Theta/ - or + Theta)(sub 6s) angle-ply IM7-8551-7a specimens, 0 less than or = Theta less than or = 90 degs, are presented. The observed failure strengths and modes are discussed, and typical stress-strain relations shown. Using classical lamination theory and the maximum stress criterion, an attempt is made to predict failure stress as a function of Theta. This attempt results in poor correlation with test results and thus a more advanced model is used. The model, which is based on a geometrically nonlinear theory, and which was taken from previous work, includes the influence of observed layer waviness. The waviness is described by the wave length and the wave amplitude. The theory is briefly described and results from the theory are correlated with test results. It is shown that by using levels of waviness observed in the specimens, the correlation between predictions and observations is good.

  14. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mirtazapine-induced acute angle closure.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Nilay; Durmaz, Onur; Durna, Mehmet Murat

    2015-06-01

    Acute angle closure (AAC) is an ocular emergency with symptoms including blurred vision, eye pain, headache, nausea, vomiting and reddening of the eye those results from increased intraocular pressure. This clinical condition can lead to permanent damage in vision, thus causing blindness by generating progressive and irreversible optic neuropathy if left untreated. There are several reasons of AAC, including several types of local and systemic medications; mainly sympathomimetics, cholinergics, anti-cholinergics, mydriatics, anti-histamines, antiepileptics like topiramate, tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, sulfa-based drugs and anticoagulants. Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant, is an atypical antidepressant with a complex pharmacological profile. This case report describes a patient with major depressive disorder, who experienced AAC after the first dosage of mirtazapine treatment, and highlights the importance of close monitoring of individuals under antidepressant treatment particularly immediately after initiation of the drug. PMID:26265648

  16. An optical angle of attack sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, T. Kevin; Owen, F. Kevin

    A major source of transonic and supersonic wind-tunnel test data uncertainty is due to angle of attack (alpha) measurement errors caused by unknown sting and balance deflections under load. A novel laser-based instrument has been developed to enable continuous time-dependent alpha measurements to be made without signal dropout. Detectors capable of 0.01-deg resolution over an 18-deg range and 0.03-deg resolution over a 44-deg range with time-dependent outputs of 60 Hz have been developed. This capability is sufficient to provide accurate real-time alpha information for correlation with model balance measurements during transport and fighter model testing. Proof-of-concept experiments, along with the results of recent measurements conducted at the NASA Ames 9 x 7-ft supersonic wind tunnel, are presented. Experiments were also conducted to determine the reliable range, sensitivity, and long-term stability of the instrument.

  17. Evolution of Barb Angle and Filament Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H. Q.; Kurokawa, H.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Shibata, K.; Bao, X. M.; Wang, G. P.; Li, C.

    2005-09-01

    Hα observations of a quiescent U-shaped filament were obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory and at Hida Observatory with the Flare Monitoring Telescope. The filament was located in the southern hemisphere on 1998 November 4. We study the evolution of the angle of a barb with respect to the axis of the filament and find the evolution can be divided into two phases: a rise from the acute phase to the obtuse phase and a fall. Thus, this indicates that the chirality of this barb changes with time. Moreover, in the process of evolution, we find that interconnection of the part of the filament bearing the barb with the whole filament became either weakened or strengthened. We impute the final eruption of the filament to the chirality evolution of the barb.

  18. Soller collimators for small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1988-09-30

    Small angle diffractometers at pulsed sources need to have fairly short flight paths if they are to make use of the long-wavelength portion of the spectrum without encountering problems from frame overlap or sacrificing intensity with band-limiting or pulse-removing choppers. With such short flight paths, achieving the necessary angular collimation in the incident beam while utilizing the full source size (/approximately/10 cm diameter) and a reasonable sample size (/approximately/1 cm diameter) requires the use of converging multiple-aperture collimation. If the collimation channels are all focused to the same point on the detector then the large sample size will not affect Q/sub min/ or the Q-resolution, even if the sample-to-detector distance is short. The Small Angle Diffractometer (SAD) at IPNS uses crossed converging soller collimators to provide focusing multiple-aperture collimation having /approximately/400 converging beam channels with essentially no ''dead'' space between them. This entire collimator system occupies a distance of only /approximately/60 cm along the incident flight path, while providing angular collimation of 0.003 radians FWHM. The dimensions for the SAD upstream collimator are L/sub c/ = 32.8 cm, d/sub 1/ = 0.974 mm, d/sub 2/ = 0.851 mm, while for the SAD downstream collimator L/sub c/ = 25.0 cm, d/sub 1/ - 0.844 mm, d/sub 2/ = 0.750 mm. Each of these collimators has 20 blades defining 21 horizontal or vertical channels. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Crank angle detecting system for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, H.; Nishiyama, M.; Nakamura, K.; Ishigami, K.

    1988-05-31

    An ignition system for a multi-cylinder internal combustion engine is described comprising: (a) engine cylinders in which spark plugs are installed respectively, (b) indicating means disposed so as to synchronize with an engine crankshaft and formed with a large number of slits and a small number of slits, the large number of slits being provided for indicating crankshaft angular positions and the small number of slits being provided for indicating predetermined piston strokes and wherein the small number of slits have mutually different widths from each other to distinguish between piston strokes of at least the groups of cylinders; (c) sensing means for sensing crankshaft angular positions in cooperation with the large number of slits of the indicating means and outputting a crank angle signal representing the crankshaft angular position and for sensing the predetermined piston strokes in cooperation with the small number of slits and outputting different width piston stroke signals corresponding to the different width slits; (d) discriminating means for identifying each cylinder group and outputting cylinder group identification signals on the basis of the different width stroke signals derived from the sensing means; (e) ignition timing determining means for generating an ignition timing signal on the basis of the crank angle signal; (f) ignition coil controlling means for generating ignition coil current signals corresponding to the cylinder group identification signals; and (g) ignition timing controlling means for generating cylinder group ignition signals in response to the ignition coil current signals and ignition timing signal so that the spark plugs of each cylinder group are ignited at a proper time.

  20. Disequilibrium dihedral angles in dolerite sills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holness, Marian B.; Richardson, Chris; Helz, Rosalind T.

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of clinopyroxene-plagioclase-plagioclase junctions in mafic rocks, measured by the median dihedral angle Θcpp, is created during solidification. In the solidifying Kilauea Iki (Hawaii) lava lake, the wider junctions between plagioclase grains are the first to be filled by pyroxene, followed by the narrower junctions. The final Θcpp, attained when all clinopyroxene-plagioclase-plagioclase junctions are formed, is 78° in the upper crust of the lake, and 85° in the lower solidification front. Θcpp in the 3.5-m-thick Traigh Bhàn na Sgùrra sill (Inner Hebrides) is everywhere 78°. In the Whin Sill (northern England, 38 m thick) and the Portal Peak sill (Antarctica, 129 m thick), Θcpp varies symmetrically, with the lowest values at the margins. The 266-m-thick Basement Sill (Antarctica) has asymmetric variation of Θcpp, attributed to a complex filling history. The chilled margins of the Basement Sill are partially texturally equilibrated, with high Θcpp. The plagioclase grain size in the two widest sills varies asymmetrically, with the coarsest rocks found in the upper third. Both Θcpp and average grain size are functions of model crystallization times. Θcpp increases from 78° to a maximum of ∼100° as the crystallization time increases from 1 to 500 yr. Because the use of grain size as a measure of crystallization time is dependent on an estimate of crystal growth rates, dihedral angles provide a more direct proxy for cooling rates in dolerites.