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Sample records for angling sport

  1. Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.

    This chapter includes all cases involving student-athletes, coaches, athletic directors, athletic associations, booster organizations, sports programs and events, and sports facilities and equipment at both the K-12 and higher education levels, but does not include case law involving physical education or intramural participation. Sections discuss…

  2. Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein

    SciTech Connect

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-05-01

    Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

  3. Sports physical

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000673.htm Sports physical To use the sharing features on this ... or routine checkups. Why do you Need a Sports Physical? The sports physical is done to: Find ...

  4. Sports Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubaugh, Karl

    2003-01-01

    Lists the following 10 tips for improved sports writing in high school publications: reporting comes before writing; do not try to do too much; show, do not tell; do not do game stories; avoid cliches; avoid "jock-talk"; use the drama of sports; do not write the obvious story; sports is also news; and read great sports writing. (PM)

  5. The First Sports Medicine Books in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Allan J.

    The modern history of sports medicine is chronicled in a discussion of the first writings in English on sports medicine. What may have been the first writing in English is a section on first aid in the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SPORT, published in England in 1898. It describes injuries commonly sustained in angling, boxing, cricket, cycling, football,…

  6. Sports Safety

    MedlinePlus

    Playing sports can be fun, but it can also be dangerous if you are not careful. You can help ... you are healthy before you start playing your sport Wearing the right shoes, gear, and equipment Drinking ...

  7. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  8. Sport Biomechanist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2005-01-01

    If you are an athlete or sports enthusiast, you know that every second counts. To find that 1-2% improvement that can make the difference between 1st and 5th place, sport biomechanists use science to investigate sports techniques and equipment, seeking ways to improve athlete performance and reduce injury risk. In essence, they want athletes to…

  9. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process. PMID:27544982

  10. Sports Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... specialist. The doc will be able to offer alternatives to supplements based on your body and sport. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: January 2015 previous 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Sports Center Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype? A ...

  11. Sports Physicals

    MedlinePlus

    ... stronger athlete. previous continue When & Where Should I Go for a Sports Physical? Some people go to their own doctor for a sports physical; ... one at school. During school physicals, you may go to half a dozen or so "stations" set ...

  12. Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Health, Jefferson City.

    This guide deals with various aspects of sports and nutrition. Twelve chapters are included: (1) "Sports and Nutrition"; (2) "Eat to Compete"; (3) "Fit Folks Need Fit Food"; (4) "The Food Guide Pyramid"; (5) "Fat Finder's Guide"; (6) "Pre- and Post-Event Meals"; (7) "Tips for the Diabetic Athlete"; (8) "Pinning Down Your Optimal Weight"; (9)…

  13. Sports fractures.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, T. A.; Stevens, M. A.; Albright, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Fractures occur in athletes and dramatically influence performance during competitive and recreational activities. Fractures occur in athletes as the result of repetitive stress, acute sports-related trauma and trauma outside of athletics. The literature provides general guidelines for treatment as well as a variety of statistics on the epidemiology of fractures by sport and level of participation. Athletes are healthy and motivated patients, and have high expectations regarding their level of function. These qualities make them good surgical candidates. Although closed treatment methods are appropriate for most sports fractures, an aggressive approach to more complicated fractures employing current techniques may optimize their subsequent performance. PMID:7719781

  14. Sport Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotee, March L.

    1980-01-01

    Sport psychology is defined in terms of human behavior in athletic situations. The psychosocial cross-cultural setting provides a model for studying trait and state psychosocial attributes and suggests issues and concerns for further study. (JMF)

  15. Team Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... played for almost seventy years, originated by World War II vets in rehab on the East and ... with a physical disability. Activities include winter skiing, water sports, summer and winter competitions, fitness and special ...

  16. Sports Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... motivator. Physically, you need strength and endurance. Your training will vary with your sport. You would not ... for swimming. You might, however, cross train. Cross training simply means that you include a variety of ...

  17. Sports and Concussions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of all sports, not just contact sports like football and hockey. As long as people play sports, ... sports, such as: helmet-to-helmet tackles in football getting checked against the boards in hockey heading ...

  18. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper gear can cause them. Some people get hurt because they are not in shape. Not warming up or stretching enough can also ... injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  19. Sports Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for sports marketing. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 999 specialty key indicators for evaluating mastery of 113 competencies in…

  20. Racquet Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebas, Carole J., Ed.; Groppel, Jack L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    In six articles on racquet sports, the origins of the games are traced, methods for teaching skills such as footwork, racquetball strategy, and badminton techniques are discussed, and the biomechanics of the one- and two-handed backhand in tennis are reviewed. Information about paddle tennis is included. (PP)

  1. Sport Progressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clumpner, Roy A.

    This book, which is primarily for secondary physical education teachers, presents a sequential approach to teaching skills that are essential to eight sports. The activities and lead-up games included in the book put beginning students directly into game-like situations where they can practice skills. Each chapter begins with a background of the…

  2. Sport-Related Maxillo-Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ruslin, Muhammad; Boffano, Paolo; ten Brincke, Y J D; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Brand, Henk S

    2016-01-01

    Sports and exercise are important causes of maxillofacial injuries. Different types of sports might differ in frequency and type of fractures. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible relation between the types of sport practiced and the frequency and nature of the facial bone fractures of patients presenting in an oral and maxillofacial surgery department of a Dutch university center. This study is based on an analysis of patient records containing maxillofacial fractures sustained between January 1, 2000 and April 1, 2014 at the Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center (VUmc) in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The present study comprised data from 108 patients with 128 maxillofacial fractures. Seventy-nine percent of the patients were male and 21% were female. The patients ranged in age from 10 to 64 years old with a mean age of 30.6 ± 12.0. The highest incidence of sport-related maxillofacial fractures occurred in individuals between the ages of 20 and 29. The most common sport-related fractures were zygoma complex fractures, followed by mandible fractures. Soccer and hockey were the most prominent causes of sport-related maxillofacial trauma in the present study. Coronoid process fractures were only observed in soccer players and not in other sports groups. Mandible angle fractures were relatively more frequent in rugby than in other sports. The results of this study suggest a relation between type of sport and the nature and frequency of the fractures it causes. PMID:26703035

  3. Sports Medicine Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Allan J.

    1978-01-01

    Includes a general discussion of sports medicine including exercise and conditioning techniques, prevention of illness and injury, treatment of and rehabilitation after sports injury, and the future of sports medicine. (BB)

  4. Back pain and sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000519.htm Back pain and sports To use the sharing features on ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Back Injuries Back Pain Sports Injuries Sports Safety Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  5. Sports cream overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Sports creams are creams or ointments used to treat aches and pains. Sports cream overdose can occur if someone uses this ... Two ingredients in sports creams that can be poisonous are: Menthol Methyl salicylate

  6. What's Your Angle on Angles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Christine A.; Garza-Kling, Gina; Sundling, Elizabeth Hill

    2007-01-01

    Although the nature of the research varies, as do concepts of angle, research in general supports the supposition that angle is a complex idea, best understood from a variety of perspectives. In fact, the concept of angle tends to be threefold, consisting of: (1) the traditional, static notion of two rays meeting at a common vertex; (2) the idea…

  7. Safe! Sports, Campers & Reducing Sports Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Beth J.

    1989-01-01

    Acceptance of adult roles by children increases "adult injuries," notably broken bones from sports. Suggests camp administrators be familiar with clientele, particular sports, and the kinds of injuries that generally result in each. Discusses children's age, types of sports, and other factors that come into play when anticipating and treating…

  8. Sport for All. Low Cost Sports Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This report of the conference on low-cost sports halls, sponsored by the Council of Europe, is divided into two sections: technical studies and conclusions. The introduction to the report provides an overview of the long-term program of the Council of Europe with regard to sport for all and a discussion of multipurpose sports halls. Sociocultural,…

  9. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  10. Sport Sociology: Contemporary Themes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiannakis, Andrew, Ed.; And Others

    Intended for beginning and intermediate level students of sport and society, this anthology of 43 articles is organized into twelve, self-contained teaching units with unit introductions and study questions. Topics addressed include: (1) the sociological study of sport; (2) sport and American society; (3) the interdependence of sport, politics,…

  11. Sports Medicine in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

    This report on a visit to the People's Republic of China in April 1985 to explore methodology of sports science research, treatment of injuries, and role of sports in everyday life discusses the following topics: (1) introduction to China; (2) sports and physical culture; (3) sports medicine and rehabilitation; (4) health factors; (5) cost of…

  12. Building Character through Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Sports are a focus of millions of Americans as they attend, view, and participate in sports. The World Series, Final Four, and Super Bowl often bring back memories of fun-filled parties and celebrations, but there may be several reasons why sports are so popular in the United States. The popularity of sports, however, does not necessarily mean it…

  13. Sports dentistry: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Singamaneni, Vijaya Kumar; Rao, Saketh Rama; Karthikeyan, Jamini

    2014-01-01

    Dental trauma in sports is the major linking channel between sports and dentistry. Sports dentistry is the prevention of oral/facial athletic injuries and related oral diseases and manifestations. In children, sports activities were found to be responsible for 13% of overall oral trauma. It is emphasized that there is a great need for “Team Dentist” from high schools to professional teams. In this review, we discuss the relationship between sports and dentistry, and the importance of educating parents, teachers, and children in prevention of injuries related to the sports. PMID:25625070

  14. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  15. Sports and Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... More Information Optical Illusions Printables Sports and Your Eyes Gear up! If you play sports, you know ...

  16. Sports and Concussion

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Concussion Sports and Concussion Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of ... ages—reducing blows to the head by playing sports safely and avoiding falls is vital to a ...

  17. Champions of American Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westin, Sandra

    1981-01-01

    Describes an exhibition (originating at the Smithsonian Institution) which celebrates athletes and sports-related figures who became legends in their own time. Information is presented on art works, sports memorabilia, advertising posters, and photographs. (AM)

  18. Sport Specialization, Part I

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Jayanthi, Neeru; Difiori, John P.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Logerstedt, David; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: There is increased growth in sports participation across the globe. Sports specialization patterns, which include year-round training, participation on multiple teams of the same sport, and focused participation in a single sport at a young age, are at high levels. The need for this type of early specialized training in young athletes is currently under debate. Evidence Acquisition: Nonsystematic review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Conclusion: Sports specialization is defined as year-round training (greater than 8 months per year), choosing a single main sport, and/or quitting all other sports to focus on 1 sport. Specialized training in young athletes has risks of injury and burnout, while the degree of specialization is positively correlated with increased serious overuse injury risk. Risk factors for injury in young athletes who specialize in a single sport include year-round single-sport training, participation in more competition, decreased age-appropriate play, and involvement in individual sports that require the early development of technical skills. Adults involved in instruction of youth sports may also put young athletes at risk for injury by encouraging increased intensity in organized practices and competition rather than self-directed unstructured free play. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): C. PMID:26502420

  19. Violence in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Donald L.

    Increasing violence in sports is deplored, and a warning is issued on an apparent trend toward antisocial behavior. Contact sports such as hockey and football are cited as typically engendering aggression among athletes, but spectator sports (boxing, car racing, basketball, and baseball) are also singled out as eliciting increasing violence on the…

  20. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  1. Controversies in College Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, George H.

    1979-01-01

    The history of intercollegiate athletics is examined. Focus is on four major outside interventions and four major issues: The economics of collegiate sports; unethical practices in recruiting and on-campus treatment of athletes; equal opportunity for women in sports, and the relationship of collegiate sports to higher education. (JMD)

  2. [Violence in Sports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degelman, Charles, Ed.; Hayes, Bill, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This teaching resource presents articles that draw on young people's natural interest in sports to stimulate their involvement in law-related education. An article on violence in sports explores the causes of this violence--the physical contact inherent in many sports, the desire to win at all costs, the urging of coaches, and the negligence of…

  3. Sport for Older Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    The following papers were prepared for a seminar on sport for older people: (1) "Gerontological Aspects of Physical Exercise" (Eino Heikkinen); (2) "Sporting Activities in the Individual Life from the View of Older Persons" (Henning Allmer); (3) "Reasons Why Decision-Makers Should Urge Old People to Practise Physical and Sporting Activities"…

  4. [Social rehabilitation through sports].

    PubMed

    Strohkendl, H

    1995-11-01

    The contribution community disabled sports is making towards comprehensive rehabilitation of people with disabilities is interpreted much too narrowly by the statutory definition of rehabilitation sports. In the member clubs of Deutscher Behinderten-Sportverband, the German disabled sports association, severely disabled individuals rediscover their potential and self-worth, which may entail self-determination, solidarity with others, and genuine social integration. Renewed awareness of the traditional values of German disabled sports as a self-help movement of those concerned, and characterization of rehabilitation as a complex learning process towards regaining personal autonomy--both call for a thorough reconsideration of ambulatory disabled sports in organizational and funding respects. PMID:8570904

  5. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure. PMID:26900120

  6. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  7. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support AOSSM Research Publications Toggle American Journal of Sports Medicine Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine Journal Apps Sports Medicine Update Other Professional Resources ...

  8. Sports eyewear protective standards.

    PubMed

    Dain, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Eye injuries sustained during sport comprise up to 20 per cent of all injuries to the eye serious enough for medical attention to be sought. The prevalence of eye injuries in sport is not easily assessed due to lack of authoritative participation rates, so most studies report total numbers in a time period. The evidence on the proportion of all ocular injuries that are from sport is reviewed. The relative frequencies in different sports are compared in a qualitative manner and the sports with greater numbers of ocular injuries are detailed. In common with occupational injuries to the eye, most sports eye injuries are considered preventable. The hierarchy of action for occupational risk is detailed and adapted to use in a sports scenario. All the available international, regional and national standards on sports eye protection are detailed and their provisions compared. The major function of the standards is to provide adequate protection against the hazard of the sport concerned. These are detailed and compared as a function of energy transfer. Eye protection must not introduce additional or secondary hazards (for instance, fracturing into sharp fragments on impact) and not introduce features that would deter the wearing of eye protection (for instance, restricting field of view to impede playing the sport). The provisions of the standards intended to limit secondary hazards are detailed and compared. The need for future work in standards writing and the activities of the International Standardization Organization in sports eye protection are detailed. PMID:26875849

  9. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) developed a musculoskeletal ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships in 2010. As the use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound in sports medicine has evolved, it became clear that the curriculum needed to be updated. Furthermore, the name 'musculoskeletal ultrasound' was changed to 'sports ultrasound' (SPORTS US) to reflect the broad range of diagnostic and interventional applications of ultrasound in sports medicine. This document was created to outline the core competencies of SPORTS US and to provide sports medicine fellowship directors and others interested in SPORTS US education with a guide to create a SPORTS US curriculum. By completing this SPORTS US curriculum, sports medicine fellows and physicians can attain proficiency in the core competencies of SPORTS US required for the practice of sports medicine. PMID:25361787

  10. Comparison of eSports and Traditional Sports Consumption Motives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Donghun; Schoenstedt, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    With recognition of the need for studying eSports in this interactive digital communication era, this study explored 14 motivational factors affecting the time spent on eSports gaming. Using a sample of 515 college students and athletic event attendees, we further compared eSports game patterns to their non-eSport or traditional sport involvements…

  11. Epilepsy and sports.

    PubMed

    van Linschoten, R; Backx, F J; Mulder, O G; Meinardi, H

    1990-07-01

    Millions of healthy people participate in sport on a regular basis. Moreover, in the last decade patients with chronic disorders have been encouraged to take part in sporting activities as a part of their rehabilitation. Can epileptic patients freely participate in sport or whether they are restricted to a certain extent by their disorder? An important factor is freedom from seizures. If seizures have been controlled for over 2 years the risk of relapse is the same as the risk of a first seizure. The risk of patients drowning or falling, or their epilepsy worsening because they are engaged in sport is thought to be low. Clinical data suggest that the incidence of seizures during sports and exercise is reduced. In the cooling down period, however, seizures tend to occur more frequently. Physicians should encourage epileptic patients to participate in sporting activities to enhance their physical fitness, self-esteem, and social integration. Before giving advice about the most suitable type of sport, the physician should known the patient's medical history, have a good insight into the different types of sport and be able to judge the role and function of sport to the particular patient. With certain precautions virtually all sports are suitable for most epileptic patients and should therefore be encouraged. However, a small minority of hospitalised patients with severe epilepsy need the supervision of qualified trainers, coaches and volunteers. PMID:2197701

  12. Fun First! Sports for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanters, Michael A.; Tebbutt, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    Outlines the foundation for a new national program, Fun First! Sports for Kids, designed to help grassroots sports leagues work with and get the most out of sport parents, noting that parents have a great impact on a child's sport experience. The article also provides recommendations for actions that sport league administrators can take to…

  13. Ethics in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

    2007-05-01

    Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues. PMID:17218662

  14. Olympic Information in the SPORT Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belna, Alison M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Profiles the SPORT database, produced by Sport Information Resource Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, which provides extensive coverage of individual sports including practice, training and equipment, recreation, sports medicine, physical education, sport facilities, and international sport history. Olympic coverage in SPORT, sports sciences, online…

  15. Sports injuries and society.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Injuries are classified and examples of the ways in which they can arise are given. Treatment, rehabilitation and the value of exercise are considered. A review of the effects of increasing leisure time and sports have been given, the value of legislation, education, protective clothing and close supervision in preventing the occurrence of injuries in sport is discussed. Images p80-a PMID:7248691

  16. Eating Disorders and Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Moriarty, Mary

    Since sports can sometimes lend themselves to eating disorders, coaches and sports administrators must get involved in the detection and treatment of this problem. While no reliable studies or statistics exist on the incidence of anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia among athletes, some research suggests that such disorders occur frequently among…

  17. Sport as Yoga

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Michael

    1977-01-01

    The author has written a metaphysical sports fantasy and completed a novel which explores evolutionary transformations of the mind and body. Now he is working on a long-term research project exploring radical bodily transformations occurring in various fields of human experience. This article on sport is part of that project. (Editor/RK)

  18. Sport in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals of the Universities of the United Kingdom, London.

    This publication discusses the future of university sport development in the United Kingdom in response to a report of the Department for National Heritage calling for revitalization of British sport at all levels. This report integrates findings and recommendations of a special task force, a government working party, and consultation papers of…

  19. Psychological Dynamics of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L.

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the branch of sport and exercise science that focuses on the psychological aspects of human behavior. Part I presents a general orientation to the field, including an introduction and description of sport psychology and a discussion of the history and current status of the field. Individual differences…

  20. Superstition in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, C. Jane; Petrie, Brian M.

    The introduction of this investigation into superstitions of athletes reviews past research on the subject. It is stated, though, that general research on superstitions mentions little directly related to sports; so, by necessity, recourse is made to sports stories and newspaper and magazine articles. The main body of this paper presents results…

  1. Saga of American Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A.; Smith, Ronald A.

    This history of sports and athletic activities in America covers a time span from the close of the sixteenth century to the present time. It is divided into three major sections. The first, "Colonial and Early American Sport," narrates the early moral and ethical attitudes of the Puritans and follows the changes in attitudes and introduction of…

  2. Sports Subsidies Soar. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toma, J. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Doug Lederman's article, "Sports Subsidies Soar," discusses the issue on institutional subsidies for sports program. His article invites an obvious question: why are so many universities willing to subsidize athletics through either a direct transfer of institutional funds, assessing a dedicated student fee, or a combination of these? This…

  3. Mathematics and Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallian, Joseph A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Mathematics and Sports", edited by Joseph A. Gallian, gathers 25 articles that illuminate the power and role of mathematics in the worlds of professional and recreational play. Divided into sections by the kind of sports, the book offers source materials for classroom use and student projects. Readers will encounter mathematical ideas from an…

  4. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P.; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. Methods We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Results Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Conclusions Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation. PMID:26648972

  5. Sport Heroes in Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Doris R.

    This paper reports the findings of a study of the role of sports in the lives of U.S. Congressmen and focuses attention on six gifted athletes for whom sports provided preparation for government service. The word "hero" as used in this paper refers to former members of Congress who were admired for their athletic prowess and for their political…

  6. Overview of sports vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Linda A.; Ferreira, Jannie T.

    2003-03-01

    Sports vision encompasses the visual assessment and provision of sports-specific visual performance enhancement and ocular protection for athletes of all ages, genders and levels of participation. In recent years, sports vision has been identified as one of the key performance indicators in sport. It is built on four main cornerstones: corrective eyewear, protective eyewear, visual skills enhancement and performance enhancement. Although clinically well established in the US, it is still a relatively new area of optometric specialisation elsewhere in the world and is gaining increasing popularity with eyecare practitioners and researchers. This research is often multi-disciplinary and involves input from a variety of subject disciplines, mainly those of optometry, medicine, physiology, psychology, physics, chemistry, computer science and engineering. Collaborative research projects are currently underway between staff of the Schools of Physics and Computing (DIT) and the Academy of Sports Vision (RAU).

  7. [Sport and health].

    PubMed

    Pène, Pierre; Touitou, Yvan

    2009-02-01

    The report of the National Academy of Medicine named "Sport and Health" underlines the medical, social and educational dimensions of sporting activities. Various kinds of sporting practices are described: they concern the approximately 7,000 high level athletes, around 8,000 professional (licensed) sportsmen, and sporting club members (approximately 15 millions people). A large number of amateurs do not practice in any structure and therefore are neither managed in their activities nor medically followed. Some characteristics of sporting practice at various stages of life have been documented. Around 50% of the teenagers from 12 to 17 years have a sporting practice out-of-school besides the weekly three hours applied at school or college; however, the withdrawal of sporting practice by a high number of teenagers results in a sedentary lifestyle with overweight and obesity, major risks factors for health. Elderly people take a profit from a regular and medically controlled physical activity. Functional capacities are thus improved, cardiovascular risks factors among other, which results in better quality of life of the aged and delays their dependence. The benefit upon public health of sporting practice has been pointed out in the primary prevention of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes, breast and colon cancer, and mood disturbances. It is currently well acknowledged that sporting practice is an important component of public health in both primary and secondary prevention of many diseases. Deleterious effects of which the most serious is the sudden death related to a cardiovascular anomaly, which generally occurs during an important physical effort. An important sport drift is the practice of doping to improve performances through the use of hormones, anabolics, EPO, transfusions, ... When a person exceeds his/her capacities of adaptation, because of a badly adapted or a too intense drive, this overtraining results in a

  8. The Development of Sports Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Ivan

    1996-01-01

    The development of sports medicine was influenced by medicalization and increasing competitiveness in modern sport, with sports physicians helping to develop performance enhancing drugs and techniques. This paper discusses sports medicine and drug use in Eastern European countries, early development of anabolic steroids in the United States, and…

  9. Sport Nutritionist: A New Sport Education Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Matthew R.; Zimmerman, Ryan; Ciotto, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Considering the challenges associated with adolescent obesity and the need for innovative and meaningful physical education curricula, the authors of this article decided to create a new sport education role to help students learn about the fundamental nutritional concepts and practices that contribute to a healthy and active lifestyle. The new…

  10. Dietary supplements in sport.

    PubMed

    Burke, L M; Read, R S

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the dietary practices of athletes report that nutritional supplements are commonly used. Supplementation practices vary between sports and individual athletes; however, there is evidence that at least some athletes use a large number of supplements concurrently, often in doses that are very high in comparison with normal dietary intakes. In exploring supplementation practices we propose a classification system separating the supplements into dietary supplements and nutritional erogogenic aids. The dietary supplement is characterised as a product which can be used to address physiological or nutritional issues arising in sport. It may provide a convenient or practical means of consuming special nutrient requirements for exercise, or it may be used to prevent/reverse nutritional deficiencies that commonly occur among athletes. The basis of the dietary supplement is an understanding of nutritional requirements and physiological effects of exercise. When the supplement is used to successfully meet a physiological/nutritional goal arising in sport it may be demonstrated to improve sports performance. While there is some interest in refining the composition or formulation of some dietary supplements, the real interest belongs to the use or application of the supplement; i.e. educating athletes to understand and achieve their nutritional needs in a specific sports situation. The sports drink (carbohydrate-electrolyte replacement drink) is a well known example of a dietary supplement. Scientific attitudes towards the sports drink have changed over the past 20 years. Initial caution that carbohydrate-electrolyte fluids compromise gastric emptying during exercise has now been shown to be unjustified. Numerous studies have shown that 5 to 10% solutions of glucose, glucose polymers (maltodextrins) and other simple sugars all have suitable gastric emptying characteristics for the delivery of fluid and moderate amounts of carbohydrate substrate. The optimal

  11. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    PubMed

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome. PMID:21419964

  12. Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... ups and training sessions before practices and before games. This will help ensure that they have fun ... be allowed periods of rest during practices and games. previous continue Common Types of Sports Injuries Three ...

  13. Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pubic bone (adductors) are also stretched or torn. Cause Sports activities that involve planting the feet ... may need to consider surgery to repair the torn tissues. Page ( 2 ) AAOS does not endorse any ...

  14. Youth Sports Safety Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... the rate of concussions in boys, and in basketball the rate of concussions among girls was 293 ... students age 8-19 participating in sports like basketball, soccer and football between 1997 and 2007, even ...

  15. Photobiomodulation on sports injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Li, Cheng-Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Yang

    2003-12-01

    Sports injuries healing has long been an important field in sports medicine. The stimulatory effects of Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation have been investigated in several medical fields, such as cultured cell response, wound healing, hormonal or neural stimulation, pain relief and others. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether LIL irradiation can accelerate sports injuries healing. Some experimental and clinical studies have shown the laser stimulation effects on soft tissues and cartilage, however, controversy still exists regarding the role of LIL when used as a therapeutic device. Summarizing the data of cell studies and animal experiments and clinic trials by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation is a valuable treatment for superficial and localized sports injuries and that the injuries healing effects of the therapy depend on the dosage of LIL irradiation.

  16. Sports Violence: Caveat Vendor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Jean

    1978-01-01

    Violence at sporting events is a self-feeding stimulus, not a useful cathartic for natural aggression; in the final analysis, it should be realized that athletic contests are games, not struggles for survival. (MM)

  17. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels! PMID:12119866

  18. Ethics in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, J; Perlis, C; Bartolozzi, A R

    2000-09-01

    Sports medicine physicians are not exempt from the ethical challenges of medical practice merely because their patients are robust and healthy. In fact, precisely because the patients with sports injuries are so healthy the moral issues remain subtle. Many ethical issues in sports medicine come about because the traditional relationship between doctor and patient is altered or absent. In the current review, several routine topics in biomedical ethics, including doctor and patient confidentiality, informed consent, the care of minors, medical advertising and use of innovative treatments, will be studied from the sports medicine perspective. Hypothetical case histories will be presented, along with an analysis of the underlying ethical issues. The goal of this analysis is not to offer answers to these moral questions, but to increase awareness and promote contemplation of the correct course of action. PMID:10986974

  19. Sporting Miscues. Part Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adrian, Marlene; House, Gale

    1987-01-01

    Six common sporting miscues are examined and analyzed for their meanings and ramifications. The miscues involve accurate basketball and volleyball shots; overarm patterns; volleyball spikes; softball pitching; and basketball defense moves. (CB)

  20. Sports injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Buckley, S L

    1994-02-01

    More children are participating in organized sports than ever before. Although improved coaching, equipment, officiating, and rules have been implemented to reduce injuries, a significant number of young athletes continue to be injured. Fortunately, most injuries sustained by young athletes are minor requiring only symptomatic treatment. However, because of the unique features of the immature skeleton, particularly the presence of open physes, these injuries can nonetheless result in permanent alteration of bone growth with long-term morbidity and disability. Furthermore, the prognosis and natural history of sports injuries in children may be different than that for similar injuries in adults. It is important that the practitioner dealing with young athletes be aware of the unique features of children's sports injuries so that proper treatment may be initiated and prognosis and expected outcome may be intelligently discussed with the patient and parents. This review provides current information regarding sports injuries in children by summarizing the most recent pertinent articles. PMID:8205179

  1. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  2. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  3. Sports related to drowning.

    PubMed

    Szpilman, David; Orlowski, James P

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic sports are included in the top list of risky practices as the environment per se carries a possibility of death by drowning if not rescued in time. Not only are aquatic sports related to a high risk of death, but also all sports practiced on the water, over the water and on ice. Whatever the reason a person is in the water, drowning carries a higher possibility of death if the individual is unable to cope with the water situation, which may simply be caused by an inability to stay afloat and get out of the water or by an injury or disease that may lead to physical inability or unconsciousness. The competitive nature of sports is a common pathway that leads the sports person to exceed their ability to cope with the environment or simply misjudge their physical capability. Drowning involves some principles and medical interventions that are rarely found in other medical situations as it occurs in a deceptively hostile environment that may not seem dangerous. Therefore, it is essential that health professionals are aware of the complete sequence of action in drowning. This article focuses on the pulmonary injury in sports and recreational activities where drowning plays the major role. PMID:27581833

  4. Selected Periodicals in Sport and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crase, Darrell

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one journals pertinent to the physical educator and to the professional in the areas of motor learning, sport philosophy, sport sociology, sport psychology, and sport medicine are listed with a general note on the scope of each. (JMF)

  5. Cannabis in Sport

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Marilyn A.; Mazzoni, Irene; Rabin, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, when the World Anti-Doping Agency assumed the responsi-bility for establishing and maintaining the list of prohibited substances and methods in sport (i.e. the Prohibited List), cannabinoids have been prohibited in all sports during competition. The basis for this prohibition can be found in the World Anti-Doping Code, which defines the three criteria used to consider banning a substance. In this context, we discuss the potential of can-nabis to enhance sports performance, the risk it poses to the athlete’s health and its violation of the spirit of sport. Although these compounds are prohibited in-competition only, we explain why the pharmacokinetics of their main psychoactive compound, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, may complicate the results management of adverse analytical findings. Passive inhalation does not appear to be a plausible explanation for a positive test. Although the prohibition of cannabinoids in sports is one of the most controversial issues in anti-doping, in this review we stress the reasons behind this prohibition, with strong emphasis on the evolving knowledge of cannabinoid pharmacology. PMID:21985215

  6. Nutrition in team sports.

    PubMed

    Mujika, Iñigo; Burke, Louise M

    2010-01-01

    Team sports are based on intermittent high-intensity activity patterns, but the exact characteristics vary between and within codes, and from one game to the next. Despite the challenge of predicting exact game demands, performance in team sports is often dependent on nutritional factors. Chronic issues include achieving ideal levels of muscle mass and body fat, and supporting the nutrient needs of the training program. Acute issues, both for training and in games, include strategies that allow the player to be well fuelled and hydrated over the duration of exercise. Each player should develop a plan of consuming fluid and carbohydrate according to the needs of their activity patterns, within the breaks that are provided in their sport. In seasonal fixtures, competition varies from a weekly game in some codes to 2-3 games over a weekend road trip in others, and a tournament fixture usually involves 1-3 days between matches. Recovery between events is a major priority, involving rehydration, refuelling and repair/adaptation activities. Some sports supplements may be of value to the team athlete. Sports drinks, gels and liquid meals may be valuable in allowing nutritional goals to be met, while caffeine, creatine and buffering agents may directly enhance performance. PMID:21346334

  7. Sport and Society: An Introduction to Sociology of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Hilmi

    A theoretical framework for the study of sport sociology is provided in this text. It is intended for students of sport, arts and humanities, sociology, and social psychology. Sport and social organization are discussed first. Three models of societies and six theories of social organization are presented which form the basis of the eclectic…

  8. Sport Psychology: Myths in Sport Education and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Joy

    2008-01-01

    From a sport and exercise psychology viewpoint, this article describes the increasing professionalization of youth sport and how many well-intentioned people are using misconceptions or myths to organize and administer youth sport programs. For example, professionalization has led to specialization and year-round training, while playing multiple…

  9. Exercise, Sports and Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... TS 1 —and obviously this would be an advantage for anyone participating in sports. In return for their hard work, sports gave these champs many benefits, including self-discipline, better health, and (important for young people ...

  10. Sports Reference: A Core Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford, Barbara Ripp

    2003-01-01

    Discusses reasons for including sports books in school library reference collections, explains why they should not be found only in public library collections, and provides six annotated bibliographies of sports books suitable for intermediate or middle school library collections. (LRW)

  11. Sports Medicine: A Functional Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegerreis, Sam

    1981-01-01

    Sports medicine represents a specific body of knowledge which can be practiced as a subspecialty by numerous members of medical society. Professional and sandlot athletes are equally deserving of competent and expedient sports medical care. (JN)

  12. Casting Equipment. Casting and Angling Skills Series. Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staton, Robert D., Jr.

    Part of a series of self-contained instructional units designed by the Missouri Department of Conservation to teach Missourians how to use outdoor resources wisely and skillfully, the instructor manual, the first in the casting and angling series, is intended both as a reference book on casting equipment and as an introduction to the sport.…

  13. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The following sports ultrasound (SPORTS US) curriculum is a revision of the curriculum developed by the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) in 2010. Several changes have been made to the curriculum with the primary aim of providing a pathway by which a sports medicine fellow can obtain sufficient SPORTS US training to become proficient in the core competencies of SPORTS US. The core competencies of SPORTS US are outlined in the learning objectives section of this document. The term "SPORTS US" was purposefully chosen rather than "musculoskeletal ultrasound" (MSK US) because it was recognized by the panel that the evolving field of SPORTS US encompasses non-MSK applications of ultrasound such as the FAST examination (focused assessment with sonography for trauma). Although the SPORTS US core competencies in this curriculum are all MSK in nature, they represent the minimum SPORTS US knowledge a sports medicine fellow should acquire during fellowship. However, additional training in more advanced MSK and non-MSK applications of ultrasound can be provided at the fellowship director's discretion. Completion of this SPORTS US curriculum fulfills the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine's (AIUM) requirements to perform an MSK US examination and the prerequisites for the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography's (ARDMS) MSK sonography certification examination. PMID:25536482

  14. Renal injury in sport.

    PubMed

    Holmes, F Clarke; Hunt, Jeremy J; Sevier, Thomas L

    2003-04-01

    Hematuria is the most common presenting sign of renal injury. Its presence in athletes may indicate a benign entity such as exercise-induced hematuria or a more serious injury in the presence of trauma. Exercise-induced hematuria can originate in the kidney, bladder, urethra, or prostate. The type of activity, as well as activity duration and intensity, contributes to its development. A wide differential diagnosis must be considered if hematuria persists longer than 24 to 72 hours. Trauma to the kidney can occur from a direct blow or deceleration; contact and collision sports are most commonly involved. Fortunately, most sports-related renal trauma is mild, and can be managed expectantly. A sporting injury rarely results in nephrectomy. Determining return to play for the athlete with a single kidney remains a controversial issue that requires patient education and an individualized approach. PMID:12831667

  15. Go Figure! Mathematics through Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    This book brings the notions of sports and mathematics together. Educators can use sports to provide a real-life context based on student interest. Not only do students become aware of mathematical thinking, but they can be "trained" to improve their mathematical skills and habits of mind through sports-related learning experiences in math. A…

  16. The Sport-Stress Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santomier, James

    1983-01-01

    This article explains how and why stress mechanisms operate in students who participate in sports. Students respond to different sport situations with various physical, psychological, and social reactions. When developing and supervising sports, school personnel should take into consideration the physical and psychological development of…

  17. Race in Contemporary American Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry

    1982-01-01

    Racism is seen as the major force blocking Black access to most American sports and to "thinking" and authority roles in accessible sports. The overwhelming majority of Black youths seeking sports stardom are destined to be shuttled back into the Black community as noncontributors or undercontributors. (MLW)

  18. Spoilsport: On Sport and Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirrie, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A review of research on connections between sports participation and academic achievement examines social and political implications of a shift from school sports to school-aged sports. It questions the context of such research in its emphasis on the utilitarian rather than intrinsic value of physical activity. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  19. Teaching Character through Sports Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minchew, Sue S.

    2002-01-01

    Illustrates how sports literature can be used in character education. Focuses on 10 ingredients for being a successful or "highly effective" person, and includes examples drawn from sports or sports literature. Discusses setting goals; proactive responses/positive thinking; a strong work ethic; a never-surrender attitude; physical and…

  20. Active Citizenship through Sport Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donovan, Toni M.; MacPhail, Ann; Kirk, David

    2010-01-01

    Sport education (SE) is an instruction model developed amid concerns about the lack of authentic, legitimate opportunities for young people to experience sport through physical education and was designed to facilitate enhanced links between experiences in physical education and those in the wider world of sport. The paper discusses how one UK…

  1. Energy Expenditure of Sport Stacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Steven R.; Udermann, Brian E.; Reineke, David M.; Battista, Rebecca A.

    2009-01-01

    Sport stacking is an activity taught in many physical education programs. The activity, although very popular, has been studied minimally, and the energy expenditure for sport stacking is unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the energy expenditure of sport stacking in elementary school children and to compare that value…

  2. Selected Problems in Sports Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This publication, covering a broad spectrum of sports safety problems, is designed as a source of information for those who plan, organize, administer, or evaluate various physical education and recreational activities, athletics, or sports. In the first section, the prevention of sports injury is stressed with attention to different age groups…

  3. Sports and Child Development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The role of curricular activities for the formation of education, health and behavioural outcomes has been widely studied. Yet, the role of extra-curricular activities has received little attention. This study analyzes the effect of participation in sports clubs—one of the most popular extra-curricular activities among children. We use alternative datasets and flexible semi-parametric estimation methods with a specific way to use the panel dimension of the data to address selection into sports. We find positive and robust effects on children’s school performance and peer relations. Crowding out of passive leisure activities can partially explain the effects. PMID:27144474

  4. Sports and Child Development.

    PubMed

    Felfe, Christina; Lechner, Michael; Steinmayr, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The role of curricular activities for the formation of education, health and behavioural outcomes has been widely studied. Yet, the role of extra-curricular activities has received little attention. This study analyzes the effect of participation in sports clubs-one of the most popular extra-curricular activities among children. We use alternative datasets and flexible semi-parametric estimation methods with a specific way to use the panel dimension of the data to address selection into sports. We find positive and robust effects on children's school performance and peer relations. Crowding out of passive leisure activities can partially explain the effects. PMID:27144474

  5. Physics of ball sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C.; Clanet, C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball sports have been part of human history for thousands of years [1]. Nowadays, 13 of them are part of the Olympic games (badminton, basketball, beach volley, football/soccer, golf, handball, hockey, rugby, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo, ice hockey). All these games differ by launcher (hand, club, racket, bat), ball (size, shape and mass), pitch size and number of players. These differences induce different ball velocities. Apart from the velocities and the way to maximize them, we discuss in this article the ball trajectories and their impact on the size of sports fields.

  6. Ecology Sports Studies Carried Out in School Sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuyu, Xia

    In the 1970 s, people began to care for the environment and concern about the ecology thinking in sports, to study the modern sports facing the ecology problems, to explore "people, sports, environment" the harmonious development of the way. In the paper from the actual conditions of the school briefly discuss the advantages of carrying out 3.3 no complete teaching schemas and the main difficulties it faces, and then propose appropriate measures to provide a theoretical basis for the ecology sports better carried out in school sports.

  7. Sports Injuries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Timothy N.

    1991-01-01

    A literature review revealed an absence of well-controlled studies concerning the prevention of sports injuries in children. A checklist outlines some causes of the overuse syndrome, including (1) training errors; (2) the nature of playing surfaces; (3) muscle imbalance; (4) anatomic malalignments; (5) construction of shoes; and (6) various…

  8. Financing the Sport Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Hypes, Michael G.; Hypes, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    This book is intended to provide students in sport management curricula and professional practitioners with the first comprehensive survey coverage of the many traditional and innovative aspects of financial management. The focus of this text is on the basis of financial management including but not limited to diversification of revenue,…

  9. Sports, Race, and Ressentiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the problem of college sports corruption and the debate over "the plight of the black athlete," suggesting that this debate is actually not about race or athletics but a code for examining contradictions between education and mass democracy. Calls this the problem of "ressentiment." Examines how athletes have used the "plight of the…

  10. Simulation in Sport Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drayer, Joris; Rascher, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Simulations have long been used in business schools to give students experience making real-world decisions in a relatively low risk environment. The OAKLAND A'S BASEBALL BUSINESS SIMULATOR takes a traditional business simulation and applies it to the sport industry, in which sales of tangible products are replaced by sales of experiences provided…

  11. Women in Sport Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Mary Ann; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The philosophy, purpose, grading procedure, and course requirements for the University of Delaware's "Women in Sports" course are set forth. A course outline is provided, along with tips and a resource materials listing for those interested in initiating similar programs. (LH)

  12. Talking Sport and Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon-Watmough, Rebecca; Keogh, Brenda; Naylor, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    For some time the Association for Science Education (ASE) has been aware that it would be useful to have some resources available to get children talking and thinking about issues related to health, sport and fitness. Some of the questions about pulse, breathing rate and so on are pretty obvious to everyone, and there is a risk of these being…

  13. The Economics of Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, William S., Ed.

    This collection of papers presents a picture of economic principles at work in the dynamic world of big-time sports. Papers were given at the 35th Annual Lecture-Seminar Series presented by the Department of Economics at Western Michigan University during the 1998-99 school year. After an "Introduction" (William S. Kern), the six papers are: (1)…

  14. Sport-Related Concussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Don; Brady, Flo

    2011-01-01

    Sport-related concussions (SRC) are not limited to specific age ranges, professional athletes, or gender. The primary focus of much of SRC research pertains to the assessment, management, and return to play (RTP) of the concussed athlete. This article highlights some major issues of SRC along with some controversies that presently exist within the…

  15. Sports Teams Extend Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

  16. Black Women in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Tina Sloan; And Others

    An overview of the achievements of black women in sports is presented in this collection of essays, biographical sketches, and philosophical investigations. The work is divided into five chapters, the first of which focuses on prejudice (racial and sexual), absence of black women as subjects in the research base, work/home/family pressures, black…

  17. Nutrition in Children's Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nathan J.

    Young athletes need to be aware of the importance of good nutrition to athletic performance. A basic diet plan, worked out with a physician to satisfy energy and weight needs, is essential. The best eating schedule and amount and type of food varies with different sports depending on the intensity and duration of physical activity. Weight control…

  18. Sport in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knuttgen, Howard G., Ed.; And Others

    Part 1 of this book, "Evoluation and Organization of Physical Culture," examines the history and current organization of physical education and sport in the People's Republic of China. This part includes chapters on: the evolution and organization of physical culture; physical culture in China today; the organizational structure of physical…

  19. "Emerging" Sports for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Debra E.

    1994-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association has recently introduced nine new sports to intercollegiate athletics: team handball, archery, badminton, bowling, crew, ice hockey, squash, synchronized swimming, and water polo. The initiative is intended to encourage colleges to create more athletic opportunities for women. It sets scholarship limits…

  20. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  1. Competitive Anxiety in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rainer; And Others

    This book is a comprehensive review of competitive anxiety research that has used the Sport Competition Anxiety Test, or SCAT (a trait scale), and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2). The book describes the theoretical basis and development procedures for both scales, including detailed information on reliability and validity. In…

  2. Burnout in Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotella, Robert J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Burnout is a condition of withdrawal from participation in sports as a result of stress. The most significant advance in the study of burnout has been a cognitive-affective model that contains situational, cognitive appraisal, physiological, and behavioral components. Suggestions for preventing and treating burnout are presented. (BC)

  3. [Sex role and sports].

    PubMed

    Darlison, E

    2000-11-01

    Gender inequality in all areas of life remains a global problem despite efforts over the past twenty years in particular to address the situation. In physical activity and sport the inequality between women and men is particularly pronounced in almost all countries, although it differs in degree. Two of the main reasons why inequality between women and men physical activity and sport is more extreme than in many other areas of social life are the result of the close association between the attributes required for sport and those associated with traditional concepts of stereotypical, hegemonic masculinity, and a lack of understanding of the difference between sex and gender. In sport and physical activity physical differences between men and women have been confused with socially constructed differences i.e. physical differences have been confused with gender differences, and this confusion has been used to justify women's lesser and limited participation at all levels. To achieve equality between women and men in physical activity and sport it will be essential that gender is identified and understood as a socially constructed and fluid concept which is a product of the relations between women and men. The fact that women bear children or are generally less physically powerful than men is not sufficient to justify why it is not considered appropriate for women to participate in certain forms of physical activity or why their participation is less valued than the participation of men. An understanding of gender and of the construction of gender relations is an important pre-requisite to addressing the inequality between women and men in physical activity and sport and in developing policies and programs which include, and are of equal benefit to both sexes. While more research on the benefits of participation in physical activity is needed, there is currently sufficient information available to identify the health related and social value of participation to both

  4. Perception of Perspective Angles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  5. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  6. More on Sports and the Big6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents strategies for relating the Big6 information problem-solving process to sports to gain students' attention, sustain it, and make instruction relevant to their interests. Lectures by coaches, computer-based sports games, sports information sources, the use of technology in sports, and judging sports events are discussed. (LRW)

  7. Sport for tall.

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, T

    1983-01-01

    Eight new events (handball, basketball, and six rowing events) were introduced for women in the Olympic Games at Montreal in 1976. Of 187 women rowers who competed at Montreal, none was shorter than the mean height (162 cm, 64 in) of women aged 18-24 in the United States. In team events only two out of 250 participants were shorter than the reference mean. Even among the tall, it was the taller participants who won medals. What does the slogan "Sport for All" mean in this context? Moreover, the physical size required of champion rowers and basketball players is not to be found in some Asian, African, and Latin American populations. International contests in many such events therefore seem to be at variance with the first charter of the Olympic Games. An independent reviewing body is urgently needed to examine the merits of man made rules in many sporting contests. PMID:6412804

  8. Leadership in sports organizations.

    PubMed

    Chelladurai, P

    1980-12-01

    The paper describes a multidimensional model of leadership which specifies three states of leader behavior: leader behavior required by the situation, leader behavior preferred by the members, and the actual leader behavior. These three states of leader behavior are defined respectively by the situational characteristics such as the goals, size and structure of the organization and the nature of the work group and its norms; the characteristics of the members such as their personality and ability; and the leader's characteristics such as his personality and ability. The degree of congruence among the three states of leader behavior determines the performance of the group and the satisfaction of the members. Based on the model and on Blau and Scott's (1969) typology of organizations, the paper suggests specific leadership styles appropriate to the various types of sports organizations. Further, leadership styles appropriate to recreational sport and to different levels of athletic teams are also suggested. PMID:7449038

  9. Sport for tall.

    PubMed

    Khosla, T

    1983-09-10

    Eight new events (handball, basketball, and six rowing events) were introduced for women in the Olympic Games at Montreal in 1976. Of 187 women rowers who competed at Montreal, none was shorter than the mean height (162 cm, 64 in) of women aged 18-24 in the United States. In team events only two out of 250 participants were shorter than the reference mean. Even among the tall, it was the taller participants who won medals. What does the slogan "Sport for All" mean in this context? Moreover, the physical size required of champion rowers and basketball players is not to be found in some Asian, African, and Latin American populations. International contests in many such events therefore seem to be at variance with the first charter of the Olympic Games. An independent reviewing body is urgently needed to examine the merits of man made rules in many sporting contests. PMID:6412804

  10. Sports medicine and ethics.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Daniela; Hornik, Christoph P; Smith, P Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K; McKinney, Ross E

    2013-01-01

    Physicians working in the world of competitive sports face unique ethical challenges, many of which center around conflicts of interest. Team-employed physicians have obligations to act in the club's best interest while caring for the individual athlete. As such, they must balance issues like protecting versus sharing health information, as well as issues regarding autonomous informed consent versus paternalistic decision making in determining whether an athlete may compete safely. Moreover, the physician has to deal with an athlete's decisions about performance enhancement and return to play, pursuit of which may not be in the athlete's long-term best interests but may benefit the athlete and team in the short term. These difficult tasks are complicated by the lack of evidence-based standards in a field influenced by the lure of financial gains for multiple parties involved. In this article, we review ethical issues in sports medicine with specific attention paid to American professional football. PMID:24024796

  11. Circuitry for Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Angle resolver pulsed and read under microprocessor control. Pulse generator excites resolver windings with dual slope pulse. System sequentially reads sine and cosine windings. Microprocessor determines angle through which resolver shaft turned from reference angle. Suitable applications include rate tables, antenna direction controllers, and machine tools.

  12. The neuropathology of sport.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  13. The neuropathology of sport

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Stein, Thor D.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  14. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  15. Sibling dynamics and sport expertise.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, M J; Farrow, D; MacMahon, C; Baker, J

    2015-10-01

    Family members are known to be highly influential in the development of sport expertise. To date, much of the research in this area has focused on parents, with less known about sibling influences on expertise. This investigation explored associations between sport expertise, sibling characteristics, and sibling participation in sport and physical activity. Athletes representing three skill levels provided details of sibling characteristics and participation in sport and physical activity via the Developmental History of Athletes Questionnaire. Elite athletes were more likely to be later-born children, while pre-elite and non-elite athletes were more likely to be first-born. Compared with siblings of non-elite athletes, siblings of elite athletes were more likely to have participated in regular physical activity and were more likely to have participated in sport at the pre-elite and elite levels. These results suggest siblings may play a key role in sport expertise development. PMID:25640295

  16. Development of the Sport Orientation Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L.; Deeter, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, a multidimensional, sport-specific measure of individual differences in achievement orientation, indicates that it is a valid and reliable measure of individual sport achievement orientation. (JD)

  17. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are medical ...

  18. Sports and Technology. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Fred W.

    1993-01-01

    Technology is making a significant impact in all areas of sports and recreation. New equipment and computer training methods in spectator sports have had a major social and economic impact, and individual sports have reaped the benefits of technology. (JOW)

  19. Probe into the Elements of Leisure Sports Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Kaixian; Gao, Qun

    2008-01-01

    This paper probes into the basic elements of leisure sports practice by referencing literature materials and logic analyses. Studies show that leisure sports practice consists of six elements, including leisure sports ideas, leisure sports environment, leisure sports time, leisure sports activity, leisure sports skill, and leisure sports state.…

  20. Transforming Communities through Sport? Critical Pedagogy and Sport for Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaaij, Ramón; Oxford, Sarah; Jeanes, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The value of sport as a vehicle for social development and progressive social change has been much debated, yet what tends to get missed in this debate is the way education may foster, enable or impede the transformative action that underpins the social outcomes to which the "sport for development and peace" (SDP) sector aspires. This…

  1. Safety in Team Sports. Sports Safety Series, Monograph No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borozne, Joseph, Ed.; And Others

    This monograph examines methods of promoting safe practices in the conduct of selected team sports with the aim of reducing and eliminating the occurrance of injuries. The team sports discussed are baseball and softball, basketball, field hockey, tackle football, touch and flag football, ice hockey, lacrosse, and soccer. (MJB)

  2. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  3. Heads Up to High School Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  4. "New Ground" in the History of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mark W.

    1979-01-01

    Several areas of sport history and their relationships to the process of society are outlined including transportation and sports participation, mass media, migrant movements, and minority participation. (JMF)

  5. Brain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, John; Conidi, Frank

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Helmets are used for sports, military, and transportation to protect against impact forces and associated injuries. The common belief among end users is that the helmet protects the whole head, including the brain. However, current consensus among biomechanists and sports neurologists indicates that helmets do not provide significant protection against concussion and brain injuries. In this paper the authors present existing scientific evidence on the mechanisms underlying traumatic head and brain injuries, along with a biomechanical evaluation of 21 current and retired football helmets. METHODS The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) standard test apparatus was modified and validated for impact testing of protective headwear to include the measurement of both linear and angular kinematics. From a drop height of 2.0 m onto a flat steel anvil, each football helmet was impacted 5 times in the occipital area. RESULTS Skull fracture risk was determined for each of the current varsity football helmets by calculating the percentage reduction in linear acceleration relative to a 140-g skull fracture threshold. Risk of subdural hematoma was determined by calculating the percentage reduction in angular acceleration relative to the bridging vein failure threshold, computed as a function of impact duration. Ranking the helmets according to their performance under these criteria, the authors determined that the Schutt Vengeance performed the best overall. CONCLUSIONS The study findings demonstrated that not all football helmets provide equal or adequate protection against either focal head injuries or traumatic brain injuries. In fact, some of the most popular helmets on the field ranked among the worst. While protection is improving, none of the current or retired varsity football helmets can provide absolute protection against brain injuries, including concussions and subdural hematomas. To maximize protection against head and

  6. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  7. Hampshire Probation Sports Counselling Scheme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Keith

    A sports counseling scheme for young people on criminal probation in Hampshire (England) was developed in the 1980s as a partnership between the Sports Council and the Probation Service. The scheme aims to encourage offenders, aged 14 and up, to make constructive use of their leisure time; to allow participants the opportunity to have positive…

  8. Sports Fitness School for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tacha, Karolyn K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Sports Fitness Program developed at Kansas State University offers children a way to develop or improve skills and learn physical education concepts. This summer program is an alternative to traditional sports programs since activities are not competitive and are less structured. Details of program organization are discussed. (DF)

  9. Orienteering for Sport and Pleasure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengtsson, Hans; Atkinson, George

    This text presents the principles of the sport of orienteering (navigating through an unknown area using a map and compass as guide) and is useful to beginners, experienced orienteers, and "armchair" orienteers. Included in the text are: (1) a glossary of key words; (2) a basic introduction to, and history of, the sport; (3) description of the…

  10. Native Americans as Sports Mascots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the controversy over whether sport teams should use Native American logos, mascots, or native symbols. Suggests that by implementing role-reversal techniques (putting the nonnative people in the same place) uncaring sports fans may recognize the disrespect involved; offers a hypothetical newspaper article that illustrates the…

  11. Young Women, Sports, and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Sandra L.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines young women's access to two traditionally male domains, sport and science, from two perspectives. The structural approach suggests that sport and science are stratified by gender and have historically been chilly climates for women. The Critical approach argues that structure and agency are important in understanding sources…

  12. The Sport Education Tactical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Tony; McCollum, Starla

    2009-01-01

    Two popular instructional models in middle and high school are the sport education model (SEM) and the tactical games model (TGM). The SEM prepares students to become competent, literate, and enthusiastic sportspersons. The TGM prepares students to be able to play games using a tactical approach. Combining the models to form a sport education…

  13. Teaching Combative Sports through Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.; Kozub, Mary L.

    2004-01-01

    Martial arts have become popular in the United States and have transitioned from being spectator sports to avenues for active participation by people of all ages. The purpose of this article is to highlight tactical similarities in selected combative sport activities and to provide martial arts and wrestling instructors with an alternative…

  14. Team Building for Youth Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Gordon A.; Loughead, Todd M.; Newin, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Participation in youth sport generally begins to decline after the age of 12. Among the reasons for this are personal aspects such as lack of desire, and social aspects including negative experiences with coaches. One way that coaches can improve the sporting environment is through group activities that promote team building. The purpose of this…

  15. Career Paths in Sport Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Keri A.; Legg, Eric; Tanner, Preston; Timmerman, Danielle; Dustin, Daniel; Arthur-Banning, Skye G.

    2015-01-01

    Sport management alumni (N = 268) from five universities that offer undergraduate programs with an emphasis in sport management within departments of parks, recreation, and tourism were sampled via an electronic survey. The survey sought to learn where alumni were working, and how they felt about their career choice and undergraduate professional…

  16. University Students: Attainment and Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, L. B.; Douglass, L.

    1975-01-01

    The extent to which 230 university students following a one-year psychology course were 'active' (i.e., competitively or recreationally involved) in sport or 'non-participant' was compared with their scores on measures of personality, attitude, social class, sex, previous school involvement in sport, and attainment in university course work.…

  17. Readings in Sports Psychology 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, H. T. A., Ed.

    In this collection of papers the psychology of human behavior and performance is examined as it is revealed by the action and interaction of athletes, coaches, and physical education teachers actively engaged in competitive and noncompetitive sports. The following subjects are discussed: (1) competitive sport and personality development; (2)…

  18. Service-Learning in Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Vincent; Kane, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    This article examines how a graduate sport-marketing class, at an urban university, implemented a sport-related service-learning project (Hoops Against Hunger) that provided relief to victims of Florida's 2004 hurricanes. The article describes the seven components of the project (need, participants, learning, service, publicity, evaluation, and…

  19. Women and sport.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M; Robertson, A

    2010-05-01

    Women have historically taken part in sports for many centuries. The first recorded female game competitions were the Herean Games in approximately 1,000 BC, named after the Goddess Hera. Held at Olympia in Greece, these games were for women alone and were thought to have originated as part of ancient fertility rights. Historically there is evidence of sporting activities involving women, but nothing of significance until after the 1948 summer Olympic Games, when 385 female athletes participated. Over the last six decades there has been a noted rise in the number of female athletes, reaching its maximum with the 2008 Beijing Olympics, where over 42% of the 11,028 athletes were women. Similarly in 2006, at the Turin Winter Olympics in Italy, 40% of the 2,500 athletes were females. In the 2012 Olympics, the Olympic Committee anticipates that approximately 44% of all athletes participating will be female. Despite there being a significant rise in the number of elite athletes in the UK, there appears to be an overall decrease in the amount and intensity of physical exercise undertaken by teenage girls. This is considered to be due to the fact that physical education is no longer an integral part of the school curriculum in the UK. There is, however, a small but significant group of elite athletes who start to train at a very early age (9-10 years old) especially in gymnastics, skating, swimming and athletics. PMID:20533698

  20. Casting in Sport

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Mark; Malone, Kathy; Darmelio, John; Rettig, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing cast usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing cast construction. Materials used in playing cast construction should be hard enough to provide sufficient stabilization to the injured area and include adequate padding to absorb blunt impact forces. The purpose of the biomechanical portion of this investigation was to attempt to determine the most appropriate materials for use in constructing playing casts for the hand and wrist by assessing different materials for: 1) hardness using a Shore durometer, and 2) ability to absorb impact using a force platform. Results revealed that RTV11 and Scotchcast were the “least hard” of the underlying casting materials and that Temper Stick foam greatly increased the ability of RTV11 to absorb impact. Assessment of the mechanical properties of playing cast materials and review of current developments in high school football rules are used to aid practitioners in choosing the most appropriate materials for playing cast construction. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558257

  1. Sports Medicine and Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Daniela; Hornik, Christoph P.; Smith, P. Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K.; McKinney, Ross E.

    2014-01-01

    Physicians working in the world of competitive sports face unique ethical challenges, many of which center around conflicts of interest. Team-employed physicians have obligations to act in the club’s best interest while caring for the individual athlete. As such, they must balance issues like protecting versus sharing health information, as well as issues regarding autonomous informed consent versus paternalistic decision-making in determining whether an athlete may compete safely. Moreover, the physician has to deal with an athlete’s decisions about performance enhancement and return to play, pursuit of which may not be in the athlete’s long-term best interests but may benefit the athlete and team in the short term. These difficult tasks are complicated by the lack of evidence-based standards in a field influenced by the lure of financial gains for multiple parties involved. In this article, we review ethical issues in sports medicine with specific attention paid to American professional football. PMID:24024796

  2. Sports Information Online: Searching the SPORT Database and Tips for Finding Sports Medicine Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janke, Richard V.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The first article describes SPORT, a database providing international coverage of athletics and physical education, and compares it to other online services in terms of coverage, thesauri, possible search strategies, and actual usage. The second article reviews available online information on sports medicine. (CLB)

  3. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  4. Solar angle reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sibson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The introduction is the only text in the volume; the rest of the book contains easy-to-use graphical methods for building design and construction using solar energy. Isogonic charts and solar angle diagrams are included. Isogonic charts. Solar angle diagrams.

  5. Social neighborhood environment and sports participation among Dutch adults: does sports location matter?

    PubMed

    Kramer, D; Stronks, K; Maas, J; Wingen, M; Kunst, A E

    2015-04-01

    Studies on the relation between the social neighborhood environment and sports participation have produced inconsistent results. Use of generic sports outcomes may have obscured associations only apparent for sports at certain locations. This study aims to assess the association between the social neighborhood environment and three location-specific sports outcomes. Repeated cross-sectional data on sports participation (any type of sports, sports at indoor sports clubs, sports at outdoor sports clubs, sports on streets) were obtained from 20 600 adults using the Dutch national health survey 2006-2009. Data on neighborhood social safety and social capital were obtained using the Dutch Housing Research 2006. Over 40% of Dutch adults participated in any type of sports. Indoor sports clubs were most popular. Multilevel logistic regression analyses revealed that neighborhood social safety was positively associated with sports at indoor sports clubs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.48), but not with the other sports outcomes. Contrary, neighborhood social capital was positively associated with sports on streets only (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.17-2.44). The results suggest that a positive social neighborhood environment enhances sports participation, but that this impact depends on the location of the sports activity. This study highlights the importance of using location-specific sports outcomes when assessing environmental determinants. PMID:24506213

  6. Club Sports in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Jay; And Others

    This report outlines policies to aid administrators of athletic, physical education, and intramural programs as they seek to provide leadership to the club sports movement on their campuses. The report first discusses the recent emergence and popularity of club sports, and explains some advantages of club sports over varsity sports. The next…

  7. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  8. The Sporting Past in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borish, Linda J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the role of sports in U.S. history. Describes primary sources and scholarly articles available for use in integrating sports history into history courses. Addresses questions about sport and society in the United States from the Puritans through the present day. Suggests that sports have been used to limit upward mobility and maintain…

  9. More than Play: Three Careers in Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilorio, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Sports are more than fun and games; they also provide work for many people. Sports workers earn wages in leagues across the nation. Organized sports include a variety of individual and team events, which require the efforts of many workers in different occupations. Many people are particularly attracted to the sports occupations that are closest…

  10. An Examination of Conceptualization of Sport Metaphors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dervent, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the metaphors that were used by athletes, coaches, faculty members, and sport managers to describe the concept of "sport". Participants (N = 473) were asked to reveal the single metaphor they had in minds in the sense of the concept of sport by the prompt "Sport is like … because …" 22 valid metaphors were…

  11. Developing Individual and Team Character in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stacey A.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that participation in sport builds character is a long-standing one. Advocates of sport participation believe that sport provides an appropriate context for the learning of social skills such as cooperation and the development of prosocial behavior (Weiss, Smith, & Stuntz, 2008). Research in sport regarding character development has…

  12. Moral Thinking, Sports Rules and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Leo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to resolve "moral conflict" in sport and to present a better approach with respect to right actions for sports participants. While acknowledging that there are many positive values or principles (e.g. Olympism) in sport, some "moral conflict" in sport might still arise and therefore cannot be easily resolved. By…

  13. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe. PMID:26636254

  14. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis. PMID:17279471

  15. Sports Medicine: What is a Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... difference between a Sports Medicine Specialist and an Orthopedic Surgeon? Both are well trained in musculoskeletal medicine. ... in the non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. Orthopedic surgeons are also trained in the operative treatment ...

  16. Sport-induced lipoma.

    PubMed

    Copcu, E

    2004-04-01

    Lipoma is the most common benign soft tissue tumour in human beings. It can be seen in all parts of the body and occupies the subcutaneous compartment predominantly. The pathogenesis of lipoma is still unknown, but trauma is one of the most implicated etiological factors. We report about two athletes with a very quickly grown lipoma on their right scapular area. One was a professional volleyball player and the other one was a table-tennis player. Both patients were right-handed. To our knowledge, there has been no report on sport-induced lipoma in the literature. We speculate that chronically minor traumas especially to the scapular area, in which fat tissue is located between the bone and the firm skin, may trigger the formation and enlargement of lipoma. PMID:15088241

  17. Sport and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blonstein, J L

    1966-01-01

    Dr J L Blonstein spoke of the medical aspects of amateur boxing, and showed that serious injuries are comparatively rare and that the accident rate compares very favourably with those of other sports. He went on to outline the various boxing injuries and their treatment. Dr A L Bass surveyed the treatment and rehabilitation of football injuries, most of which are concerned with soft tissue trauma. He emphasized the importance, to a professional footballer, of returning to activity in a fully recovered state and outlined the facilities which are necessary to ensure this. Dr Roger Bannister considered physiological mechanisms involved in athletic performances and factors affecting transport of oxygen to the muscles. PMID:5939521

  18. Supplements and sports.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, David M; Harbert, Allison J

    2008-11-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from professional athletes to junior high school students. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have serious adverse effects. Anabolic steroids and ephedrine have life-threatening adverse effects and are prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and the National Collegiate Athletic Association for use in competition. Blood transfusions, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone are also prohibited in competition. Caffeine, creatine, and sodium bicarbonate have been shown to enhance performance in certain contexts and have few adverse effects. No performance benefit has been shown with amino acids, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, chromium, human growth hormone, and iron. Carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages have no serious adverse effects and can aid performance when used for fluid replacement. Given the widespread use of performance-enhancing supplements, physicians should be prepared to counsel athletes of all ages about their effectiveness, safety, and legality. PMID:19007050

  19. Orthotics in Sports Shoes

    PubMed Central

    Schamberger, Wolf

    1983-01-01

    We are all born with a varying assortment of biomechanical discrepancies. Ordinarily these may be of no consequence, but to those who try to achieve excellence in a certain sport these discrepancies can spell the difference between success and failure. Some athletes may have to accept the fact that biomechanically the odds are against them ever becoming excellent and that intensive training may in fact be detrimental to their wellbeing. However, the majority can be helped with advice on proper shoe wear and orthotic correction. This article highlights the role of foot orthotics as indicated for various biomechanically-related problems commonly encountered in athletes. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23 PMID:21283401

  20. Modernizing sports facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, R.

    1996-09-01

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team to meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.

  1. Lisfranc injuries in sport.

    PubMed

    DeOrio, Matthew; Erickson, Melissa; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Easley, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex have traditionally been associated with high energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions and industrial accidents. Recently, there has been a greater appreciation of mid-foot sprains that represent a spectrum of injury to the Lisfranc ligament complex. As a result, there has been an increased incidence of such injury resulting from low-energy trauma in activities ranging from recreational activity to elite athletic activity. This article discusses issues related to anatomy, clinical presentation, mechanism of injury, and diagnosis that are necessary to provide appropriate treatment for these injuries. There should be a high index of suspicion of this injury, and prompt diagnosis is important to allow athletes to return to sport with the best possible outcome. PMID:19501801

  2. [Sport: practiced from birth?].

    PubMed

    Espejo, L Miauton; Gehri, M; Soldini, N

    2014-07-16

    Physical activity in children is on the decline, leaving room for sedentary behaviour. Children are mentally over stimulated through the use of screens, but their physical condition is diminishing. The benefits of physical activity in adults are well known. Although paediatric literature is less abundant, the benefits of regular physical activity in young children are real and extend into adulthood. The promotion of physical activity can be made by any responsible adult in a child's entourage. It means clarifying the confusion between physical activity and sport, evaluating the balance between the physical and sedentary behaviour of the children and their families and establishing with them the possible necessary changes. PAPRICA--young childhood is 4 hour interdisciplinary training session approaching these various themes. PMID:25141563

  3. Photoelectric angle converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  4. Men at sport: gay men's experiences in the sport workplace.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Elizabeth S

    2011-01-01

    Research on sexual identity and sport has revealed a shifting narrative about the experiences of gay men. While some suggest the atmosphere is hostile, others posit that homophobia and sexual prejudice are playing less of a role in gay men's experiences. This research focuses on the experiences of 10 gay men working in professional, collegiate, and club sport, as part of a larger dataset of 37 male and female employees. Five of the men were overtly and publicly out at work, while five were closeted (to varying degrees). This article focuses on three themes for gay men working in sport: 1) the importance of coming out in the workplace; 2) the role of the locker room as a contested terrain, and 3) the disconnect between their experiences at work and their perceptions of the workplace environment as negative or positive. Men in this study were basing their impressions on their total experience in sport (as current and former players, as employees, and as fans). It also suggests that the public "story" of gay men working in sport represents one of two extremes-either the proverbial "horror story," or the extremely positive representation of gay men's experiences. This research suggests that gay men's experiences in sport are more complex and nuanced than the public narrative implies. PMID:21534074

  5. Reading Angles in Maps

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15–53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare 2D to 3D angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to 2D and 3D displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  6. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  7. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  8. Materials and technology in sport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caine, Mike; Blair, Kim; Vasquez, Mike

    2012-08-01

    An evolution from natural to highly engineered materials has drastically changed the way in which athletes train and compete. Thanks to challenging technological problems and unconventional commercialization pathways, universities can make a direct impact on the development of sporting goods.

  9. Sports Injury Prevention Tip Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Finance Human Resources and Administrative Services Information Technology Marketing and Sales Membership Practice Public Affairs Quality Publishing ... Feedback Recent a a a print email share Facebook Twitter 2016 Sports Injury Prevention Tip Sheet 3/ ...

  10. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain Can Be A Pain Page Content If ... speeds, sports hernias are frequently confused with common muscle strain ,” says Michael Sampson, DO, who practices in ...

  11. The Physics of Sport Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Walter C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a physics course, Biomechanics, designed for physical education majors, where stroboscopic photography is used to provide student data to calculate average velocities of objects in different sport activities. (GA)

  12. Sport: A Myth about Consciousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Darlene Z.

    1978-01-01

    Escape from the mundane, the classical Greek search for a higher quality of life, and the expression of the (Jungian) masculine principle are examples of the mythic elements the human psyche creates within sport. (Author/LH)

  13. The aging spine in sports.

    PubMed

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Elson, Lauren; Brand, Erik

    2012-07-01

    1. Masters athletes may experience low back pain from multiple sources. Masters athletes with discogenic back pain should avoid or modify sports with combined rotational and compressive forces; individuals with facet-mediated pain should avoid or modify sports with excessive extension and rotation. 2. Optimization of flexibility, strength, endurance, and core control is critical. Sports specific training, realistic goal setting, and counseling are of maximal importance. 3. Overall, the health benefits of continued sports and athletic participation outweigh the potential risks of spinal degeneration in middle-aged athletes. There is little correlation between radiographic appearance of the spine and symptoms; therefore, symptoms should serve as the primary guide when determining activity modifications. Overall, masters athletes should be encouraged to remain active and fit to enhance their quality of life and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22657996

  14. Sports medicine: some ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Sim, J

    1993-06-01

    The ethical aspects of sports medicine have hitherto received little scrutiny, in contrast to its legal implications, which have recently been subject to much greater discussion. However, the differences that are apparent between sports medicine and 'mainstream' areas of clinical practice can shed new light on a number of the central issues within health-care ethics. By means of hypothetical case studies, this paper seeks to examine some of these issues within a sports medicine context. Specific attention will be paid to the concepts of autonomy and paternalism, issues to do with truthfulness, and the question of conflicting professional loyalties. It is suggested that the ethics of sports medicine warrant further and more detailed examination. PMID:8358592

  15. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  16. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs. PMID:19005358

  17. [Acute myocardial infarction during sport].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M; Asakuma, S; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Yasutomi, N; Iwasaki, T

    1995-10-01

    Thirty patients with acute myocardial infarction which occurred during sport were investigated to identify the type of sport, prodromata, situations at the onset of disease, habit of exercise, preceding medical evaluation, coronary risk factors, and coronary angiographic findings. Infarction occurred during golf in 12 patients, bowling in 4, gateball in 4, jogging or running in 5, baseball in 2, and tennis or table tennis in 3. The majority of the patients were playing ball games. Twenty-seven patients were men (90%) and 3 were women (10%). All patients had played the same kind of sport for several years. Twenty-four patients had one or more coronary risk factors, and especially 18 patients smoked cigarettes. Nine patients had experienced anterior chest pain but only two patients had received medical evaluation. Coronary angiography was performed in 25 patients (83.3%), revealing single-vessel disease in 14, two-vessel disease in 6, three-vessel disease in 4, and disease of all left main coronary trunks in 1. The acute episode of infarction occurred mainly in spring or fall. Many patients with acute myocardial infarction occurring during sport participate in sports of low or moderate dynamic and low static exercises which are generally regarded safe. Many patients had enjoyed their sports regularly for a long time. Though many patients had coronary risk factors, only a few had received a medical check before their heart attack. PMID:7500263

  18. Local Positioning Systems in (Game) Sports

    PubMed Central

    Leser, Roland; Baca, Arnold; Ogris, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Position data of players and athletes are widely used in sports performance analysis for measuring the amounts of physical activities as well as for tactical assessments in game sports. However, positioning sensing systems are applied in sports as tools to gain objective information of sports behavior rather than as components of intelligent spaces (IS). The paper outlines the idea of IS for the sports context with special focus to game sports and how intelligent sports feedback systems can benefit from IS. Henceforth, the most common location sensing techniques used in sports and their practical application are reviewed, as location is among the most important enabling techniques for IS. Furthermore, the article exemplifies the idea of IS in sports on two applications. PMID:22163725

  19. Biomechanics: an integral part of sport science and sport medicine.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B

    1999-12-01

    Biomechanics is one of the disciplines in the field of Human Movement and Exercise Science and it can be divided into three broad categories from a research perspective. Clinical biomechanics involves research in the areas of gait, neuromuscular control, tissue mechanics, and movement evaluation during rehabilitation from either injury or disease. Occupational biomechanics typically involves research in the areas of ergonomics and human growth or morphology as they influence movement. While these two categories will briefly be discussed, the primary aim of this paper is to show the role of biomechanics in sports science and sports medicine. Research in sports biomechanics may take the form of describing movement from a performance enhancement (such as matching of impulse curves in rowing) or injury reduction perspective (such as diving in swimming or the assessment of knee joint loading during downhill walking). However, the strength of sports biomechanics research is the ability to establish an understanding of causal mechanisms for selected movements (such as the role of internal rotation of the upper arm in hitting or striking, and the influence of elastic energy and muscle pre-stretch in stretch-shorten-cycle actions). The growth of modelling and computer simulation has further enhanced the potential use of sports biomechanics research (such as quantification of knee joint ligament forces from a dynamic model and optimising gymnastics performance through simulation of in-flight movements). Biomechanics research may also play an integral role in reducing the incidence and severity of sporting injuries (such as identification of the causes of back injuries in cricket, and the causes of knee joint injuries in sport). In the following discussion no attempt will be made to reference all papers published in each of these areas because of the enormity of the task. Published and current work from the biomechanics laboratory at the Department of Human Movement and

  20. Spine and sport.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Milko C; Kramer, Josef

    2014-07-01

    The spine, in athletes is a relatively frequent origin of problems. Chronic spine problems are much more common compared to acute injuries. Chronic injuries to the spine most often occur in low-contact sports like gymnastics and are most commonly the result of overuse. Acute injuries are more common in high-speed and full contact sports and are traumatic in origin. Injuries to the spinal cord can be devastating but are fortunately very uncommon. Although imaging of the spine appears to be straightforward, any radiologist will acknowledge that the optimal imaging strategy is often unclear due to several reasons. For the cervical spine much has improved since the NEXUS and CCR studies appeared in which clear rules were defined when to image the C-spine in acute trauma situations. For the thoracic and lumbar spines such rules are not defined. Although conventional imaging has long been the primary imaging modality of choice there is ample evidence that this should be abandoned in favor of multidetector CT for the C-spine. This is reflected in the ACR criteria in which conventional imaging of tile C-spine in trauma is rated as the least appropriate imaging method. However, this is not true in children and adolescents although a strict age criterion is not defined. It is also not true for injuries to the thoracic and lumbar spine in which conventional imaging still plays a large role as primary imaging modality followed by evaluation by CT in trauma situations. The role for MRI in acute situations is increasing especially with the increasing use of the TLICS system to classify injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine in which the evaluation of the integrity of the posterior ligamentous structures is included. For the evaluation of chronic complaints, the roles of CT and MRI are basically reversed in which MRI will become the prime imaging modality of choice after conventional imaging after which CT can be reserved for a selected patient group. The merit of the

  1. Sulbutiamine in sports.

    PubMed

    Sobolevsky, Tim; Rodchenkov, Grigory

    2010-01-01

    Sulbutiamine (isobutyryl thiamine disulfide) is a lipophilic derivative of thiamine used for the treatment of asthenia and other related pathological conditions. It is available over-the-counter in several countries either as a component of nutritional supplements or as a pharmaceutical preparation. The presence of sulbutiamine in urinary doping control samples was monitored to evaluate the relevance of its use in sports. As one of the sulbutiamine metabolites has very close retention time and the same characteristic ion (m/z 194) as the main boldenone metabolite, the raw data files generated from the screening for anabolic steroids were automatically reprocessed to identify the samples containing sulbutiamine. It was found that of ca. 16 000 samples analyzed in the Russian laboratory during 2009, about 100 samples contained sulbutiamine. It is important to note that most of these samples were collected in-competition, and sulbutiamine concentration was estimated to be greater than 500 ng/ml. This may indicate that sulbutiamine was intentionally administered for its ergogenic and mild stimulating properties. PMID:21204296

  2. Sports-related concussion

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Daniel M.; Galetta, Kristin M.; Phillips, H. Westley; Dziemianowicz, E. Mark S.; Wilson, James A.; Dorman, Emily S.; Laudano, Eric; Galetta, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Studies suggest that a lack of standardized knowledge may lead to underreporting and undertreatment of sports-related concussion. However, there has been little work done to establish how this knowledge may affect athletes’ behaviors toward reporting their concussions and removing themselves from play. We conducted an anonymous online survey to assess athletes’ knowledge of signs and symptoms of concussion, and also sought to estimate the potential frequency of underreporting in a collegiate athlete cohort. Among 262 athletes who responded to the survey, 43% of those with a history of concussion reported that they had knowingly hidden symptoms of a concussion to stay in a game, and 22% of athletes overall indicated that they would be unlikely or very unlikely to report concussion symptoms to a coach or athletic trainer in the future. These data suggest that there may be a substantial degree of underreporting of concussion among collegiate athletes, despite most acknowledging that they have been formally educated about the risks of concussion. PMID:24195017

  3. Nutrition in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Vitale, J J

    1985-09-01

    Strenuous or vigorous exercise does not appear to significantly alter the requirements for any specific nutrient except calories. The major nutritional problem in sports medicine, particularly among the young, will be one of meeting caloric requirements from a variety of foods. As high- or low-energy requirements are met, so will requirements for all other essential nutrients. We should all heed the words of Sir Robert Hutchison (1871-1960), as perhaps the Food and Nutrition Board did. He wrote in the New Castle Medical Journal, vol. 12, 1932, "One swears by whole meal bread, one by sour milk; vegetarianism is the only road to the salvation of some, other insist not only in vegetables alone, but on eating those raw. At one time the only thing that matters is calories; at another time they are crazy about vitamins or about roughage. Scientific truth may be put quite briefly; eat moderately, having an ordinary mixed diet and don't worry." Robert Charles Benchley (1889-1945), an American humorist, critic, and actor, was known to say that when the thought of exercise came upon him, he would lie down until the thought passed over. Clement Richard Attlee (1883-1967), prime minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951, said he owed his long life to resisting all forms of exercise. PMID:4028546

  4. [Doping in sports].

    PubMed

    Jeschke, J; Nekola, J; Chlumský, J

    1999-05-10

    The first organized doping controls were carried out in the 1970s. In 1993, the Czech Antidoping Charter was signed and the Antidoping Committee was established. The medical commission of International Olympic Committee decides, which substances and methods are prohibited. The current classification is as follows: I. prohibited classes of substances--stimulants, narcotics, anabolic agents, diuretics and some hormones. II. prohibited methods--blood doping and pharmaceutical, chemical or physical manipulation. III. classes of drugs subject to certain restrictions--alcohol, marijuana, local anesthetics, corticosteroids and beta blockers. All substances are characterized from the ergogenic viewpoint and health risks are particularly emphasized. In practice, doping control starts by drawing the athletes and ends by urine sample analysis in a special laboratory. In case of positive results, the sportsman is banned from sports activity for 3 months, 2 years or for the rest of his life. In 24 worldwide laboratories in 1995 93,938 urine samples were analyzed. 1516 (1.61%) proved to be positive, including 986 anabolic steroid use. In 1997, the Czech laboratory carried out 843 checks, of which 15 (1.7%) were positive. The largest positive doping group were body builders. Doping poses a major risk among junior sportsmen. Prevalence worldwide is estimated at 2-10% of the male population. In the future a severe antidoping attitude, as well as antidoping enlightenment, are certain to continue. By these standards the activity of the Czech Antidoping Committee is on a very high level. PMID:10422337

  5. Sports Related Injuries: Incidence, Management and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Michael A.

    1982-01-01

    The incidence of injury related to various sports is reviewed according to sport, area of injury, number of participants and hours per week spent at the sport. Organized sports accounted for fewer injuries than unsupervised recreational activities like tree climbing, skateboarding and running. The knee is the most commonly injured site. Sensitivity to patients' commitment to their sport is necessary: sometimes instead of rest, they can substitute a less hazardous form of exercise. Principles of prevention involve proper familiarity with the sport, proper equipment and proper conditioning. PMID:21286103

  6. Sport medicine and sport science practitioners' experiences of organizational change.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, C R D; Gilmore, S; Thelwell, R C

    2015-10-01

    Despite the emergence of and widespread uptake of a growing range of medical and scientific professions in elite sport, such environs present a volatile professional domain characterized by change and unprecedentedly high turnover of personnel. This study explored sport medicine and science practitioners' experiences of organizational change using a longitudinal design over a 2-year period. Specifically, data were collected in three temporally defined phases via 49 semi-structured interviews with 20 sport medics and scientists employed by three organizations competing in the top tiers of English football and cricket. The findings indicated that change occurred over four distinct stages; anticipation and uncertainty, upheaval and realization, integration and experimentation, normalization and learning. Moreover, these data highlight salient emotional, behavioral, and attitudinal experiences of medics and scientists, the existence of poor employment practices, and direct and indirect implications for on-field performance following organizational change. The findings are discussed in line with advances to extant change theory and applied implications for prospective sport medics and scientists, sport organizations, and professional bodies responsible for the training and development of neophyte practitioners. PMID:25487162

  7. Marijuana as doping in sports.

    PubMed

    Campos, Daniel R; Yonamine, Mauricio; de Moraes Moreau, Regina L

    2003-01-01

    A high incidence of positive cases for cannabinoids, in analyses for doping control in sports, has been observed since the International Olympic Committee (IOC) included them in the 1989 list of prohibited drugs under the title of classes of prohibited substances in certain circumstances. Where the rules of sports federations so provide, tests are conducted for marijuana, hashish or any other cannabis product exposure by means of urinalysis of 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (carboxy-THC) the main metabolite of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Concentrations >15 ng/mL (cut-off value) in confirmatory analytical procedures are considered doping. Cannabis is an illicit drug in several countries and has received much attention in the media for its potential therapeutic uses and the efforts to legalise its use. Studies have demonstrated that the use of cannabinoids can reduce anxiety, but it does not have ergogenic potential in sports activities. An increase in heart rate and blood pressure, decline of cardiac output and reduced psychomotor activity are some of the pharmacological effects of THC that will determine a decrease in athletic performance. An ergolytic activity of cannabis products has been observed in athletes of several different sport categories. In Brazil, analyses for doping control in sports, performed in our laboratories, have detected positive cases for carboxy-THC in urine samples of soccer, volleyball, cycling and other athletes. It is our intention to discuss in this article some points that may discourage individuals from using cannabis products during sports activities, even in the so-called permitted circumstances defined by the IOC and some sports federations. PMID:12744713

  8. Sports drinks hazard to teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Milosevic, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the dental hazards associated with sports supplement drinks by investigating the chemicophysical properties of eight brands of sports drinks. METHODS: The pH and titratable acidity against 0.1 M NaOH was measured. Calcium, phosphate, and fluoride concentrations and viscosities of Carbolode, Gatorade, High Five, Isostar, Lucozade Sport Lemon, Lucozade Sport Orange, Maxim, and PSP22 were determined. RESULTS: The pH values of the drinks ranged from 4.46 (Maxim) to 2.38 (Isostar) and therefore were below the critical pH value (5.5) for enamel demineralisation. Both Lucozade varieties had high titratable acidities (16.30 ml 0.1M NaOH to neutrality) with Gatorade, High Five, and Isostar displaying intermediate titratable acidity, although Isostar had 74.5 ppm calcium and 63.6 ppm phosphate. The fluoride concentration of all drinks was low, and none of the drinks was particularly viscous (range 3.1-1.4 mPa.s). CONCLUSIONS: The chemicophysical analyses indicate that all the sports drinks in this study have erosive potential. However, drinks with higher pH, lower titratable acidity, and higher concentrations of calcium, phosphate, and fluoride will reduce this erosive potential. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9132205

  9. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146. PMID:27607069

  10. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  11. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  12. The Rainbow Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, B.

    1978-01-01

    Two articles in the "Scientific American" form the background of this note. The rainbow angle for the primary bow of a monochromatic Cartesian rainbow is calculated. Special projects for senior high school students could be patterned after this quantitative study. (MP)

  13. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  14. Yaw Angle Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) is a 5 degree-of -freedom repulsive force magnetic suspension system designed to study the control of objects over large magnetic gaps. A digital control algorithm uses 6 sets of laser-sheet sensors and 5 control coils to position a cylinder 3' above the plane of electromagnetics

  15. NCAA Public Relations Manual: Promoting Women's Intercollegiate Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flarup, Tamara J.

    The successful women's sports publicist communicates the legitimacy of women's intercollegiate athletics to the media and to the public. Because the field of women's sports has not had the amount of media exposure compared to that of professional sports, collegiate men's revenue sports, and high school sports, the women's sports publicist must…

  16. Sport in Germany. Basis-Info 3-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitz, Steffen

    This paper explores the importance and impact of sport in Germany from a variety of perspectives. Topics include: (1) the social function of sport; (2) popular sport, focusing on exercise and self-development rather than competition; (3) sport's role in the leisure activities of the handicapped; (4) top sport performers; (5) drugs and sport; (6)…

  17. Tendinopathy in Sport

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W.; Renström, Per

    2012-01-01

    Context: Tendinopathy is increasing in prevalence and accounts for a substantial part of all sports injuries and occupational disorders. Despite the magnitude of the disorder, high-quality scientific data on etiology and available treatments have been limited. Evidence Acquisition: The authors conducted a MEDLINE search on tendinopathy, or “tendonitis” or “tendinosis” or “epicondylitis” or “jumpers knee” from 1980 to 2011. The emphasis was placed on updates on epidemiology, etiology, and recent patient-oriented Level 1 literature. Results: Repetitive exposure in combination with recently discovered intrinsic factors, such as genetic variants of matrix proteins, and metabolic disorders is a risk factor for the development of tendinopathy. Recent findings demonstrate that tendinosis is characterized by a fibrotic, failed healing response associated with pathological vessel and sensory nerve ingrowth. This aberrant sensory nerve sprouting may partly explain increased pain signaling and partly, by release of neuronal mediators, contribute to the fibrotic alterations observed in tendinopathy. The initial nonoperative treatment should involve eccentric exercise, which should be the cornerstone (basis) of treatment of tendinopathy. Eccentric training combined with extracorporeal shockwave treatment has in some reports shown higher success rates compared to any therapies alone. Injection therapies (cortisone, sclerosing agents, blood products including platelet-rich plasma) may have short-term effects but have no proven long-term treatment effects or meta-analyses to support them. For epicondylitis, cortisone injections have demonstrated poorer long-time results than conservative physiotherapy. Today surgery is less indicated because of successful conservative therapies. New minioperative procedures that, via the endoscope, remove pathologic tissue or abnormal neoinnervation demonstrate promising results but need confirmation by Level 1 studies. Conclusions

  18. Cryotherapy in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Swenson, C; Swärd, L; Karlsson, J

    1996-08-01

    The use of cryotherapy, i.e. the application of cold for the treatment of injury or disease, is widespread in sports medicine today. It is an established method when treating acute soft tissue injuries, but there is a discrepancy between the scientific basis for cryotherapy and clinical studies. Various methods such as ice packs, ice towels, ice massage, gel packs, refrigerant gases and inflatable splints can be used. Cold is also used to reduce the recovery time as part of the rehabilitation programme both after acute injuries and in the treatment of chronic injuries. Cryotherapy has also been shown to reduce pain effectively in the post-operative period after reconstructive surgery of the joints. Both superficial and deep temperature changes depend on the method of application, initial temperature and application time. The physiological and biological effects are due to the reduction in temperature in the various tissues, together with the neuromuscular action and relaxation of the muscles produced by the application of cold. Cold increases the pain threshold, the viscosity and the plastic deformation of the tissues but decreases the motor performance. The application of cold has also been found to decrease the inflammatory reaction in an experimental situation. Cold appears to be effective and harmless and few complications or side-effects after the use of cold therapy are reported. Prolonged application at very low temperatures should, however, be avoided as this may cause serious side-effects, such as frost-bite and nerve injuries. Practical applications, indications and contraindications are discussed. PMID:8896090

  19. Differences in Television Sports Reporting of Men's and Women's Athletics: ESPN SportsCenter and CNN Sports Tonight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuggle, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the amount of coverage given to women's athletics by ESPN SportsCenter and CNN Sports Tonight. Results indicated: both programs devoted only about 5% of their air time to women's sports; story placement and on-camera comments indicated an emphasis on men's athletics; and stories about women involved individual competition, with almost no…

  20. Sport Governance and Policy Development: An Ethical Approach to Managing Sport in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Bodey, Kimberly J.; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    "Sport Governance and Policy Development" is written with the sport management student in mind. Designed to address the curriculum standards set by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education and the North American Society for Sport Management, this book provides information to meet core and related competency areas required for the…

  1. Promoting Girls' Participation in Sports: Discursive Constructions of Girls in a Sports Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svender, Jenny; Larsson, Hakan; Redelius, Karin

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to promote girls' participation in sports and which girls are seen as needing support? In this article we focus a government-financed sports venture and scrutinize the frames governing what is possible to say about girls and their participation in sports. By analyzing project applications from local sport clubs we investigate how…

  2. Sport Education as a Pedagogical Application for Ethical Development in Physical Education and Youth Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephen; Kirk, David; O'Donovan, Toni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider four pedagogical applications within the Sport Education model to examine the ways in which a young person can become a literate sports person and develop ethical behaviour through engagement in physical education and youth sport. Through a systematic review of the Sport Education research literature we…

  3. The Conventions of Sport Clubs: Enabling and Constraining the Implementation of Social Goods through Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skille, Eivind Asrum

    2011-01-01

    In order to shed light on the possibilities for using sport as a vehicle for the realization of social goods--understood as sport having a wider social role--this paper scrutinizes Norwegian sport clubs. The study is guided by the concept of convention, which refers to individuals' cognitive structures, and to social structure. Three sport clubs…

  4. The Relationship between University Libraries' Collection for Sports and Their Students' Sports Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagami, Soichiro; Tsuji, Keita

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness of university libraries, we investigated the relationship between university students' sports performances and their libraries collections of sports. By examining approximately 20 university libraries' collections and their sports ranks, as indicated by Waseda Sports 2008, we demonstrated their positive…

  5. Investigations in the Science of Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammrich, Penny L.; Fadigan, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Sisters in Sport Science (SISS) program which provides equitable access for girls to science and mathematics through sports. Includes a sample SISS activity that integrates track and physical sciences. (YDS)

  6. Returning to sports after a back injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... to return to the sport with your doctor, physical therapist, or other health care providers? Have you been ... sport, talk to your health care provider and physical therapist about whether you can do this safely. Contact ...

  7. Sports Jobs Shine for Olympic Summer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariani, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Gives information about opportunities, job tasks, and educational requirements of sports-related jobs in high school, college, and professional athletics: coaches, sports medicine specialists, managers, public relations specialists, and trainers. (SK)

  8. Sport Opportunities for Athletes with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This series outlines sport opportunities for athletes with disabilities. Included are articles discussing sports for athletes with cerebral palsy, deaf athletes, blind athletes, wheelchair bound athletes, amputee athletes, as well as a discussion of the Special Olympics. (JMK)

  9. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Evidence, Knowledge Gaps, Recommendations & Future Directions AMSSM Sports Ultrasound Online Didactics UPCOMING EVENTS SEPTEMBER 2016 6/ ... Sponsorship Advertising Mailing List Rentals SEARCH: FIND A SPORTS DOC Please enter a search term relevant to ...

  10. Transference of Skills between Sports and Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jonathan; Srivastava, Ashok; Woo, Hong Seng

    1998-01-01

    A literature review and survey on transferability of skills from sports to business and evidence of mutually beneficial skills transfer. Organizations sponsoring sports offered more than monetary assistance, including managerial help, computer equipment, marketing, etc. (SK)

  11. Dermatologic aspects of sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Levine, N

    1980-10-01

    The skin lies at the interface of the athlete and the sports milieu and is subjected to many sports-related dermatoses. Direct traumatic injuries, such as friction blisters, black heel, piezogenic papules, and traumatic subungual hematomas, occur regularly. Environmental insults such as sunburn, cold-induced injury, and contact dermatitis plague the sportsman. Cutaneous infections such as "athlete's foot," otitis externa, herpes simplex, and warts occur because of a favorable microenvironment, occurring with sweating and occlusion as well as close interpersonal contact. Sports participation may uncover or exacerbate latent dermatoses such as occurs in acne mechanica and exercise-induced anaphylaxis. The sportsman is best served if the physician considers him as an athlete-patient. PMID:7430463

  12. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  13. Gender Equity, Sport Sponsorship, and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiamouyiannis, Athena

    2009-01-01

    As the pressure to win in select collegiate sports escalates, financial pressures mount, and the need to comply with Title IX regulations and gender equity policies continues, athletics administrators are faced with having to make difficult decisions regarding their sport programs. To assist in the decision-making process regarding sport programs,…

  14. Exploring Commitment to Youth Sports Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickabaugh, Tim

    2009-01-01

    With over 38 million U.S. youth (54% of children between ages 6 to 17) participating in organized sports each year, there is an ever increasing demand for entry-level youth sport leaders. To meet this leadership demand in organized youth sports, over 2.5 million adults volunteer to coach, yet less than 10% of these individuals have any formal…

  15. Developing a Personal Philosophy of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Cuneen, Jacquelyn

    2001-01-01

    Suggests five questions to initiate critical reflection, followed by five steps to guide the development of a personal philosophy of sport. The five questions (upon which the five steps are based) include examining the basis for one's values, what one values in sport, and what values are exhibited by others in the sport. Sample ethical dilemmas…

  16. Controversies in Pediatric Sports Medicine (Commentary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyment, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses controversial issues that have arisen in children's sports, including infant exercise programs, trampolines, amenorrhea in the adolescent athlete, coed contact sports, and sport participation by children with Down Syndrome. Policy statements are included from the American Academy of Pediatrics. (JD)

  17. Applying the Sport Education Model to Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    The physical education field abounds with theoretically sound curricular approaches such as fitness education, skill theme approach, tactical approach, and sport education. In an era that emphasizes authentic sport experiences, the Sport Education Model includes unique features that sets it apart from other curricular models and can be a valuable…

  18. Specialization or Diversification in Youth Sport?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensch, Lynn Pantuosco

    2006-01-01

    In 1990, Grant Hill published an article in Strategies that raised the issue of the "one sport high school athlete" and the tough decisions that young athletes face in terms of specializing in sport. The contents of that article were based on his study of high school athletic directors' and coaches' perspectives on sport specialization. This…

  19. Designing Games for Sport Education: Curricular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Brett

    2005-01-01

    Sports Education is becoming a popular alternative curricular model in physical education, opposing the more traditional Multi-activity model. Physical education classes are slowly changing to include sport education. The change comes with the support of the community in the form of Sport Education in Physical Education Program (SEPEP). However,…

  20. Chart Notes from a Sports Nutritionist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1986-01-01

    A sports nutritionist/registered dietician on the sports medicine team can provide clients with reliable nutrition information and respond to their interest in healthful, high-energy eating. Three case reports illustrate the usefulness of a nutritionist to practitioners of sports medicine. A chart of healthful foods is provided. (MT)

  1. Comparative Physical Education and Sport. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Bruce L.; And Others

    Educational theories and practice in the field of physical education and sport in various countries are discussed and compared. Chapters address: (1) comparative physical education and sport; (2) history and methodology of comparative education; (3) history and methodolog of comparative physical education and sport; (4) physical education in the…

  2. Corporate Athleticism: A New Sports Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart-Nibbrig, Nand

    A discussion is presented on the commercialization of college team sports. The term "corporate athleticism" is used to refer to the influence of the business ethic on the college sport system, and the introduction of commercial values as the basic organizing principle of competitive college sports. Consideration is given to the consequences of…

  3. Sports-Related Eye Injuries by Age

    MedlinePlus

    Sports-Related Eye Injuries by Age Activity Estimated Injuries* Ages 0–14 Ages 15+ Basketball 5,237 ... Exercise, Weightlifting) 1,697 401 1,297 Racquet Sports 1,241 233 1,008 Ball Sports, Unspecified ...

  4. Interscholastic Sports: A Character-Building Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Stokowski, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    While interscholastic sports help young athletes enhance sport skills, physical fitness, self-discipline, sportsmanship, teamwork, time-management skills, self-confidence, and mental toughness, their benefits actually surpass even these. Interscholastic sports also promote life skills and lessons and enhance academic performance. The National…

  5. Why Young Athletes Sign Up for Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Zach; Strasser, Joe; McKenzie, Isaac; Stoll, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students participate in sports because of several reasons. A coach may effectively guide his team if he knows what motivates each player. In this article, the authors investigate the reasons why athletes sign up for sports. They designed a questionnaire with open-ended and close-ended questions which focuses on how students perceived sports, why…

  6. Youth Sport Volunteering: Developing Social Capital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Tess; Bradbury, Steven

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the capacity of youth sport volunteering to contribute to the development of social capital. Following a review of the emergence of social capital as a key theme in UK sport policy, the paper focuses on the ability of a structured sports volunteering programme to equip young people with skills for effective volunteering, and…

  7. Sports-related Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Pamela S.; Chandler, Steven B.

    2001-01-01

    Physical educators can incorporate sports-related novels into their curricula to help students explore a variety of sports and to open the door to discussions of the benefits of sport and fitness activities. This article describes how students can take the reading and compositions skills they learned in English and apply them to physical education…

  8. Sport Psychology--Building a Bright Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunker, Linda K.; McGuire, Richard T.

    There is a need to provide practical applications of psychology to improve the quality of performance and the meaningfulness of participation in sports. The scientific and research-based foundations for sport psychology must be acknowledged and expanded. Sport psychologists should provide to coaches and athletes services that offer sound…

  9. Application of Science and Medicine to Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Albert W., Ed.

    Great progress has been made in recent years in the scientific study of exercise and application to sport. This book provides an analysis of the state of physiological and clinical knowledge related to exercise and sports. The three sections--medicine and physical activity, science and exercise, and practical application to sport--cover a variety…

  10. Making It as a Sports Official.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Bryant, M. C.

    The purpose of this text is to offer information, including career development strategies, about sports officiating, an occupation that attracts little attention as a source of employment. The book presents fundamental techniques for building successful careers as qualified sports officials and illustrates how sports officiating can be taken from…