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Sample records for angular correlation measurements

  1. Measurements on B-hadron angular correlations at 7 TeV with the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Leonardo; CMS Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    A measurement of the angular correlations between beauty and anti-beauty hadrons produced in LHC proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV is presented, probing for the first time the small angular separation region. The B hadrons are identified by the presence of secondary vertices from their decays and their kinematics reconstructed combining the decay vertex with the primary interaction vertex. The results are compared with predictions based on perturbative QCD calculations at leading and next-to-leading order.

  2. A Precision Measurement of Neutron Beta Decay Angular Correlations with Polarized Pulsed Cold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Pil-Neyo

    2004-05-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing an experiment to measure the neutron beta decay angular correlations, a, b, B, A, to 0.1the very high pulsed cold neutron intensities in a new nuclear physics beam line that is under construction at SNS. The design of the experiment is based on three important technical advances: the pulsed cold neutron beam, a polarized ^3He neutron spin filter, and large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both electrons and protons resulting from the decay will be guided in the spectrometer by electric and magnetic fields and then detected in coincidence with two 2π large-segmented silicon detectors. Measuring the correlations in the same apparatus provides a redundant measurement of λ=G_A/G_V. I will describe the experiment and report the status of the development.

  3. Mitigating systematic errors in angular correlation function measurements from wide field surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C. B.; Hildebrandt, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present an investigation into the effects of survey systematics such as varying depth, point spread function size, and extinction on the galaxy selection and correlation in photometric, multi-epoch, wide area surveys. We take the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) as an example. Variations in galaxy selection due to systematics are found to cause density fluctuations of up to 10 per cent for some small fraction of the area for most galaxy redshift slices and as much as 50 per cent for some extreme cases of faint high-redshift samples. This results in correlations of galaxies against survey systematics of order ˜1 per cent when averaged over the survey area. We present an empirical method for mitigating these systematic correlations from measurements of angular correlation functions using weighted random points. These weighted random catalogues are estimated from the observed galaxy overdensities by mapping these to survey parameters. We are able to model and mitigate the effect of systematic correlations allowing for non-linear dependences of density on systematics. Applied to CFHTLenS, we find that the method reduces spurious correlations in the data by a factor of 2 for most galaxy samples and as much as an order of magnitude in others. Such a treatment is particularly important for an unbiased estimation of very small correlation signals, as e.g. from weak gravitational lensing magnification bias. We impose a criterion for using a galaxy sample in a magnification measurement of the majority of the systematic correlations show improvement and are less than 10 per cent of the expected magnification signal when combined in the galaxy cross-correlation. After correction the galaxy samples in CFHTLenS satisfy this criterion for zphot < 0.9 and will be used in a future analysis of magnification.

  4. Measurement and analysis of quadruple ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) angular correlations for high spin states of {sup 24}Mg.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhover, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Lister, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Amro, H.; Caggiano, J.; Heinz, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.

    2000-10-30

    The high-lying, {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 24}Mg have been studied by measuring the complete decay path of {alpha} and {gamma} emissions using five segmented Silicon detectors in conjunction with GAMMASPHERE. The authors analyzed the ({alpha}{gamma}) triple angular correlations and, for the first time, ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) quadruple correlations. The data analysis is based on a new Fourier transformation technique. The power of the technique is demonstrated.

  5. Proximal distributions from angular correlations: A measure of the onset of coarse-graining

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Kippi M.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    In this work we examine and extend the theory of proximal radial distribution functions for molecules in solution. We point out two formal extensions, the first of which generalizes the proximal distribution function hierarchy approach to the complete, angularly dependent molecular pair distribution function. Second, we generalize from the traditional right-handed solute-solvent proximal distribution functions to the left-handed distributions. The resulting neighbor hierarchy convergence is shown to provide a measure of the coarse-graining of the internal solute sites with respect to the solvent. Simulation of the test case of a deca-alanine peptide shows that this coarse-graining measure converges at a length scale of approximately 5 amino acids for the system considered. PMID:24320368

  6. Proximal distributions from angular correlations: A measure of the onset of coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Kippi M.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2013-12-01

    In this work we examine and extend the theory of proximal radial distribution functions for molecules in solution. We point out two formal extensions, the first of which generalizes the proximal distribution function hierarchy approach to the complete, angularly dependent molecular pair distribution function. Second, we generalize from the traditional right-handed solute-solvent proximal distribution functions to the left-handed distributions. The resulting neighbor hierarchy convergence is shown to provide a measure of the coarse-graining of the internal solute sites with respect to the solvent. Simulation of the test case of a deca-alanine peptide shows that this coarse-graining measure converges at a length scale of approximately 5 amino acids for the system considered.

  7. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  8. Measurement of inclusive two-particle angular correlations in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Valle Wemans, A. Do; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Castillo, L. R. Flores; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fokitis, M.; Martin, T. Fonseca; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Gopfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gossling, C.; Gottfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gonidec, A.; Gonzalez, S.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Eschrich, I. Gough; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafstrom, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. 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A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Pengo, R.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poghosyan, T.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Posch, C.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Radloff, P.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Renkel, P.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchez, A.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schoning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjolin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Volpini, G.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Ohsugi, T.

    2012-05-01

    We present a measurement of two-particle angular correlations in proton- proton collisions at √{s} = 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The collision events were collected during 2009 and 2010 with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider using a single-arm minimum bias trigger. Correlations are measured for charged particles produced in the kinematic range of transverse momentum p T > 100 MeV and pseudorapidity | η| < 2.5. A complex structure in pseudorapidity and azimuth is observed at both collision energies. Results are compared to pythia 8 and herwig++ as well as to the AMBT2B, DW and Perugia 2011 tunes of pythia 6. The data are not satisfactorily described by any of these models.

  9. Nuclear quadrupole interaction at 181Ta in hafnium dioxide fiber: Time differential perturbed angular correlation measurements and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Das, P.; Guin, R.; Das, S. K.

    2012-09-01

    The thermal behavior of hafnium dioxide fiber has been investigated with the aid of time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique along with XRD and SEM measurements. This study has proved a good thermal stability of the fibrous material up to 1173 K and the fiber loses its crystallinity to a meager extent at 1673 K. No phase transition has been observed up to 1673 K in this fiber. TDPAC parameters for the HfO2 fiber annealed at 1173 K are ωQ=124.6 (3) Mrad/s and η=0.36 (1). These values remain unaltered for the HfO2 fiber annealed even at 1673 K. Electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) for HfO2 doped with tantalum impurity have been performed and the calculated EFG parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values.

  10. Initial measurements of the angular velocity of walking humans using an active millimeter-wave correlation interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilevu, Kojo S.; Kammerman, Kelly L.; Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The design of a 29.5 GHz experimental active interferometer for the measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans is presented in this paper, as well as initial measurements of walking humans. Measurement of the angular motion of moving objects is a desirable function in remote security sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of arrival estimation algorithms. Recently, the authors presented a new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry. The method measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency shift imparted on the signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. The experimental system consists of a transmitter and two separate receivers with two widely spaced antennas. The received signals in each of the two channels are downconverted and digitized, and post-processed offline. Initial results of a walking person passing through the interferometer beam pattern are presented, which verify the expected operation of the receiver derived from the initial theory.

  11. Gamma Ray Emission Tomography and Angular Correlation Measurements to Study the Distribution and Binding Site of Selenium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahni, Anwar

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The distribution of ^ {75}Se in tissue equivalent materials was investigated employing Gamma ray Emission Topography with a rectilinear scanner utilizing NaI(Tl) and BGO detectors. The reconstructed images, using Filtered Back Projection and Iterative techniques were presented in 2D colour and 3D representations. Using a lead collimator of aperture 1.5 x 20 mm and 70 length, the distribution of selenium with variation of volume and concentration was examined and clearly seen. Several corrections such as background, scattering, attenuation compensation and X-ray characteristic suppression, were performed to improve the quality of the images which was evaluated in terms of the fidelity factor. The possibility of quantifying an image was considered with regard to spatial resolution and least detectable concentration. The spatial resolution was measured using two small vials containing the same concentration of selenium, the value obtained was the same as the width of the collimator aperture. The value of the least detectable concentration of selenium however, was difficult to find, due to the many ambiguous factors involved. The binding site of selenium which is based on quadrupole interaction with the surrounding electric field, was investigated employing Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experiments using NaI(Tl) and BaF_2 detectors. Using NaI(Tl) detectors, it was difficult to observe the perturbation, due to the poor time resolution. The BaF_2 detector according to the literature has a shorter light emission decay time constant (0.6 ns), suggested that a better time resolution than that found with the NaI(Tl) detectors could be obtained. A Perturbed Angular Correlation experiment employing BaF _2 detectors and a fast-slow coincidence system was set up. The time differential PAC of selenium in solution showed an unperturbed angular correlation pattern. The main problem is the very short half life of the

  12. Angular correlation measurements for 4-{alpha} decaying states in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    Previous measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 8}Be){sup 16}O{sup *}(4 {alpha}) reaction identified discrete levels in {sup 16}O which decay by breakup into 4 {alpha} particles through a number of different decay sequences, including {sup 16}O{sup *} {yields} {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C (O{sub 2}{sup +}). These states are observed in a range of excitation energies where resonances are observed in inelastic {alpha} + {sup 12}C scattering leading to the {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C final states. These resonances were associated with 4 {alpha}-particle chain configurations in {sup 16}O. Should the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction possess this same extended structure, it would serve as an important piece of evidence supporting the idea that even more deformed structures are formed in the {sup 24}Mg compound system. In order to more firmly make this association, it is important to determine the spins of the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction.

  13. Gluon correlations from a glasma flux-tube model compared to measured hadron correlations on transverse momentum (pt,pt) and angular differences (ηΔ,φΔ)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Ray, R. L.

    2011-09-09

    A glasma flux-tube model has been proposed to explain strong elongation on pseudorapidity η of the same-side two-dimensional (2D) peak in minimum-bias angular correlations from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. The same-side peak or “soft ridge” is said to arise from coupling of flux tubes to radial flow whereby gluons radiated transversely from flux tubes are boosted by radial flow to form a narrow structure or ridge on azimuth. In this study we test the theory conjecture by comparing measurements to predictions for particle production, spectra, and correlations from the glasma model and from conventional fragmentation processes. We conclude that themore » glasma model is contradicted by measured hadron yields, spectra, and correlations, whereas a two-component model of hadron production, including minimum-bias parton fragmentation, provides a quantitative description of most features of the data, although η elongation of the same-side 2D peak remains undescribed.« less

  14. Understanding GRETINA using angular correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Madeline

    2015-10-01

    The ability to trace the path of gamma rays through germanium is not only necessary for taking full advantage of GRETINA but also a promising possibility for homeland security defense against nuclear threats. This research tested the current tracking algorithm using the angular correlation method by comparing results from raw and tracked data to the theoretical model for Co-60. It was found that the current tracking method is unsuccessful in reproducing angular correlation. Variations to the tracking algorithm were made in the FM value, tracking angle, number of angles of separation observed, and window of coincidence in attempt to improve correlation results. From these variations it was observed that having a larger FM improved results, reducing the number of observational angles worsened correlation, and that overall larger tracking angles improved with larger windows of coincidence and vice-verse. Future research would be to refine the angle of measurement for raw data and to explore the possibility of an energy dependence by testing other elements. This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357

  15. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  16. Measurement of $B\\bar{B}$ Angular Correlations based on Secondary Vertex Reconstruction at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the angular correlations between beauty and anti-beauty hadrons (B B-bar) produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the CERN LHC is presented, probing for the first time the region of small angular separation. The B hadrons are identified by the presence of displaced secondary vertices from their decays. The B hadron angular separation is reconstructed from the decay vertices and the primary-interaction vertex. The differential B B-bar production cross section, measured from a data sample collected by CMS and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 inverse picobarns, shows that a sizable fraction of the B B-bar pairs are produced with small opening angles. These studies provide a test of QCD and further insight into the dynamics of b b-bar production.

  17. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  18. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  19. Interferometric measurement of angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10-11 rad/sqrt{textrm {Hz}} from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  20. Angular measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    A system for the measurement of shaft angles is disclosed wherein a synchro resolver is sequentially pulsed, and alternately, a sine and then a cosine representative voltage output of it are sampled. Two like type, sine or cosine, succeeding outputs (V sub S1, V sub S2) are averaged and algebraically related to the opposite type output pulse (V sub c) occurring between the averaged pulses to provide a precise indication of the angle of a shaft coupled to the resolver at the instant of the occurrence of the intermediately occurring pulse (V sub c).

  1. Angular measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1986-06-01

    A system for the measurement of shaft angles is disclosed wherein a synchro resolver is sequentially pulsed, and alternately, a sine and then a cosine representative voltage output of it are sampled. Two like type, sine or cosine, succeeding outputs (V sub S1, V sub S2) are averaged and algebraically related to the opposite type output pulse (V sub c) occurring between the averaged pulses to provide a precise indication of the angle of a shaft coupled to the resolver at the instant of the occurrence of the intermediately occurring pulse (V sub c).

  2. A Precision Measurement of Neutron {beta}-Decay Angular Correlations with Pulsed Cold Neutrons -- The abBA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J.D.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Mitchell, G.S.; Penttilae, S.I.; Wilburn, W.S.; Calarco, J.R.; Hersman, F.W.; Chupp, T.E.; Cianciolo, T.V.; Rykaczewski, K.P.; Young, G.R.; Desai, D.; Grzywacz, R.K.; Souza, R.T. de; Snow, W.M.; Frlez, E.; Pocanic, D.; Gentile, T.; Greene, G.L.

    2005-05-24

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer to measure neutron beta decay angular parameters, a, b, B, and A, to the 0.1% precision level. This precision will be achieved by combining three new technical approaches; a pulsed cold neutron beam, a 3He neutron spin filter, and segmented large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both the electron and proton resulting from the decay will be guided by electric and magnetic fields and detected in coincidence by two 2{pi} solid-angle silicon detectors. For the neutron polarization-dependent observables A and B, a novel precision neutron polarimetry technique has been developed. The parameters a and b will be obtained from the proton time-of-flight and the measured electron energy spectrum. Measurement of the four parameters in the same apparatus provides a redundant determination of parameter {lambda}=gA/gV, providing a test of the standard electroweak interaction.

  3. A Precision Measurement of Neutron β-Decay Angular Correlations with Pulsed Cold Neutrons — The abBA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J. R.; Chupp, T. E.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Desai, D.; De Souza, R. T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Frlež, E.; Gentile, T.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Hersman, F. W.; Jones, G. L.; Mitchell, G. S.; Penttilä, S. I.; Počanić, D.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, G. R.

    2005-05-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer to measure neutron beta decay angular parameters, a, b, B, and A, to the 0.1% precision level. This precision will be achieved by combining three new technical approaches; a pulsed cold neutron beam, a 3He neutron spin filter, and segmented large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both the electron and proton resulting from the decay will be guided by electric and magnetic fields and detected in coincidence by two 2π solid-angle silicon detectors. For the neutron polarization-dependent observables A and B, a novel precision neutron polarimetry technique has been developed. The parameters a and b will be obtained from the proton time-of-flight and the measured electron energy spectrum. Measurement of the four parameters in the same apparatus provides a redundant determination of parameter λ=gA/gV, providing a test of the standard electroweak interaction.

  4. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  5. Measurement of Long-Range Near-Side Two-Particle Angular Correlations in p p Collisions at √{s }=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.

    2016-04-01

    Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270 nb-1 . The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η | <2.4 ) and over the full azimuth (ϕ ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (pT ). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δ η | >2.0 ), near-side (Δ ϕ ≈0 ) structure emerges in the two-particle Δ η -Δ ϕ correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0 correlation strength similar to that found in earlier p p data at √{s }=7 TeV . The present measurement extends the study of near-side long-range correlations up to charged particle multiplicities Nch˜180 , a region so far unexplored in p p collisions. The observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in p p , p Pb , and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.

  6. Measurement of Long-Range Near-Side Two-Particle Angular Correlations in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=13  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; De Souza Santos, A; Dogra, S; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; El-Khateeb, E; Elkafrawy, T; Mohamed, A; Salama, E; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Davignon, O; Filipovic, N; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Merlin, J A; Skovpen, K; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Toriashvili, T; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Feld, L; Heister, A; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K

    2016-04-29

    Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270  nb^{-1}. The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η|<2.4) and over the full azimuth (ϕ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (p_{T}). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δη|>2.0), near-side (Δϕ≈0) structure emerges in the two-particle Δη-Δϕ correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0correlation strength similar to that found in earlier pp data at sqrt[s]=7  TeV. The present measurement extends the study of near-side long-range correlations up to charged particle multiplicities N_{ch}∼180, a region so far unexplored in pp collisions. The observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies. PMID:27176516

  7. Measurement of long-range near-side two-particle angular correlations in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    Our results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270 nb-1. The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η| < 2.4) and over the full azimuth (Φ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (pT). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δη| > 2.0), near-side (ΔΦ≈ 0) structure emerges in the two-particle Dh–Df correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0 < pT < 2.0 GeV/c and an approximately linear increase with the charged particle multiplicity. The overall correlation strength at √s = 13 TeV is similar to that found in earlier pp data at √s = 7 TeV, but is measured up to much higher multiplicity values. We observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.

  8. Calculation of fusion product angular correlation coefficients for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1987-08-01

    The angular correlation coefficients for fusion products are calculated in the cases of Maxwellian and beam-target plasmas. Measurement of these coefficients as a localized ion temperature or fast-ion diagnostic is discussed. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Detailed angular correlation analysis with 4{pi} spectrometers: Spin determinations and multipolarity mixing measurements in {sup 128}Ba

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, I.; Vogel, O.; Klein, H.; Dewald, A.; von Brentano, P.; Gableske, J.; Nicolay, N.; Gelberg, A.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Janssens, R.V.; Carpenter, M.P.; Kruecken, R.; Petkov, P.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Bazzacco, D.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Pavan, P.; de Angelis, G.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D.R.; Frauendorf, S.; Doenau, F.

    1998-08-01

    We analyze for the first time the full {gamma}{gamma} directional correlations from oriented states (DCO) in an experiment performed with the GASP detector array. Our analysis is based on a transformation of the directional information into expansion coefficients of an orthogonal basis. With this method, which we call SpeeDCO (spectral expansion of DCO), the complete DCO information is concentrated in 12 {gamma}{gamma} coincidence spectra. The analysis is applicable to all detector arrays which uniformly cover the solid angle. We show that the complete DCO information can be used for a reliable and unique determination of spins and multipolarity mixing ratios in weakly populated bands. We were able to establish the spins and the positive parity of the {Delta}I=1 {open_quotes}M1 band{close_quotes} in {sup 128}Ba and multipolarity mixing ratios of nine M1/E2 in-band transitions were derived as well. The measured values are in good agreement with those expected for a high-K rotational band. thinsp thinsp thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. /sup 12/C(/sup 6/Li,d)/sup 16/O. -->. cap alpha. +/sup 12/C reaction mechanism by means of angular correlation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Imme, G.; Pappalardo, G.; Raciti, G.; Saunier, N.

    1980-06-01

    The particle-particle angular correlation method is applied to the reaction /sup 12/C(/sup 6/Li,d)/sup 16/O ..-->.. ..cap alpha..+/sup 12/C. Deuterons were detected at theta/sup lab//sub d/=10/sup 0/. Information on the reaction mechanism is obtained by analyzing the shape and the angular shift of the experimental data. A dominant direct transfer mechanism is found for the primary reaction. The ratios GAMMA..cap alpha../sub 0//GAMMA and the ..cap alpha..-reduced widths ..gamma cap alpha../sub 0/ are deduced.

  11. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  12. Hyperfine interaction measurements in LaCrO3 and LaFeO3 perovskites using perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogra, R.; Junqueira, A. C.; Saxena, R. N.; Carbonari, A. W.; Mestnik-Filho, J.; Moralles, M.

    2001-06-01

    The perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique was used to study the hyperfine interactions in the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic regions of the distorted perovskites LaCrO3 and LaFeO3. The dilute 111In-->111Cd nuclear probes were introduced into the samples through a chemical process. The present measurements cover the temperature ranges from 15 to 848 K for LaCrO3 and 77 to 1324 K for LaFeO3. Two distinct electric-quadrupole interactions were observed in each compound. The lower quadrupole frequency was assigned to the transition-metal atom site while the higher frequency was attributed to the lanthanum site in both cases. Temperature dependence of the electric-quadrupole interaction parameters indicated structural phase transitions at around 512 and 1223 K, respectively, in LaCrO3 and LaFeO3. The phase transitions were associated with the change from an orthorhombic to rhombohedral structure and characterized by a sudden increase in the electric field gradient Vzz and a decrease in the asymmetry parameter η for both sites. PAC spectra measured below the Néel temperature revealed that at 0 K the supertransferred magnetic hyperfine field on 111Cd at the Cr site in LaCrO3 (2.4 T) is much smaller than at the Fe site in LaFeO3 (19.4 T). The magnetic field on 111Cd at La sites in both compounds is of the order of 0.3 T. Additional measurements were made to determine the magnetic hyperfine field using the probe nucleus 140La-->140Ce. The result reconfirmed that a relatively weak hyperfine field is supertransferred to the probe atoms at La sites.

  13. Delocalized correlations in twin light beams with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Marino, A M; Boyer, V; Pooser, R C; Lett, P D; Lemons, K; Jones, K M

    2008-08-29

    We generate intensity-difference-squeezed Laguerre-Gauss twin beams of light carrying orbital angular momentum by using four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. The conservation of orbital angular momentum in the four-wave mixing process is studied as well as the spatial distribution of the quantum correlations obtained with different configurations of orbital angular momentum. Intensity-difference squeezing of up to -6.7 dB is demonstrated with beams carrying orbital angular momentum. Delocalized spatial correlations between the twin beams are observed. PMID:18851611

  14. Angular wander measurements of maser clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutel, Robert L.

    Angular wander measurements of the relative positions of closely spaced maser features provides a powerful probe of interstellar turbulence associated with regions of star formation. Differential angular wander is easily measured in a maser complex and can strongly distinguish between shallow and steep power-law turbulence. The best candidates for such measurements appear to be the 6 and 12 GHz type II methanol masers.

  15. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    In most spacecraft (SC) there is a need to know the SC angular rate. Precise angular rate is required for attitude determination, and a coarse rate is needed for attitude control damping. Classically, angular rate information is obtained from gyro measurements. These days, there is a tendency to build smaller, lighter and cheaper SC, therefore the inclination now is to do away with gyros and use other means and methods to determine the angular rate. The latter is also needed even in gyro equipped satellites when performing high rate maneuvers whose angular-rate is out of range of the on board gyros or in case of gyro failure. There are several ways to obtain the angular rate in a gyro-less SC. When the attitude is known, one can differentiate the attitude in whatever parameters it is given and use the kinematics equation that connects the derivative of the attitude with the satellite angular-rate and compute the latter. Since SC usually utilize vector measurements for attitude determination, the differentiation of the attitude introduces a considerable noise component in the computed angular-rate vector.

  16. Measurement of the cross section and angular correlations for associated production of a Z boson with b hadrons in pp collisions at = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins, M. Correa; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Manganote, E. J. Tonelli; Pereira, A. Vilela; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Sierra, L. F. Chaparro; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Donckt, M. Vander; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Pardos, C. Diez; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Heine, K.; Höing, R. S.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Marchesini, I.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Troendle, D.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kornmayer, A.; Pardo, P. Lobelle; Martschei, D.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Radics, B.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Saxena, P.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Singh, A. P.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Grigelionis, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Moreno, S. Carrillo; Valencia, F. Vazquez; Ibarguen, H. A. Salazar; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Antunes, J. 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A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Marono, M. Vidal; Wang, F.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Kaadze, K.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2013-12-01

    A study of proton-proton collisions in which two b hadrons are produced in association with a Z boson is reported. The collisions were recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeVwith the CMS detector at the LHC, for an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb-1. The b hadrons are identified by means of displaced secondary vertices, without the use of reconstructed jets, permitting the study of b-hadron pair production at small angular separation. Differential cross sections are presented as a function of the angular separation of the b hadrons and the Z boson. In addition, inclusive measurements are presented. For both the inclusive and differential studies, different ranges of Z boson momentum are considered, and each measurement is compared to the predictions from different event generators at leading-order and next-to-leading-order accuracy. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Angular performance measure for tighter uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Hradil, Z.; Rehacek, J.; Klimov, A. B.; Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.

    2010-01-15

    The uncertainty principle places a fundamental limit on the accuracy with which we can measure conjugate quantities. However, the fluctuations of these variables can be assessed in terms of different estimators. We propose an angular performance that allows for tighter uncertainty relations for angle and angular momentum. The differences with previous bounds can be significant for particular states and indeed may be amenable to experimental measurement with the present technology.

  18. Gluon correlations from a glasma flux-tube model compared to measured hadron correlations on transverse momentum (pt,pt) and angular differences (ηΔΔ)

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Ray, R. L.

    2011-09-09

    A glasma flux-tube model has been proposed to explain strong elongation on pseudorapidity η of the same-side two-dimensional (2D) peak in minimum-bias angular correlations from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. The same-side peak or “soft ridge” is said to arise from coupling of flux tubes to radial flow whereby gluons radiated transversely from flux tubes are boosted by radial flow to form a narrow structure or ridge on azimuth. In this study we test the theory conjecture by comparing measurements to predictions for particle production, spectra, and correlations from the glasma model and from conventional fragmentation processes. We conclude that the glasma model is contradicted by measured hadron yields, spectra, and correlations, whereas a two-component model of hadron production, including minimum-bias parton fragmentation, provides a quantitative description of most features of the data, although η elongation of the same-side 2D peak remains undescribed.

  19. Studying oxygen vacancies in ceramics by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Han-Tzong; Wang, Ruiping; Fuchs, H.; Gardner, J.A. . Dept. of Physics); Evenson, W.E. . Dept. of Physics); Sommers, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Perturbed angular correlation measurements in tetragonal and cubic zirconia and in ceria are described. A physically reasonable and self-consistent interpretation of these data implies that oxygen vacancies are trapped at a second neighbor position by Cd in tetragonal zirconia and by In in ceria. For Cd in tetragonal zirconia, the vacancy trap energy is found to be 0.44 eV, and the energy barrier between adjacent trap sites is approximately 0.8 eV. The activation energy of an oxygen vacancy hopping between trap sites around {sup 111}Cd in ceria is found to be 0.55 eV. The activation energy for oxygen vacancy hopping in cubic zirconia, as detected by {sup 181}Ta PAC, is about 1.0 eV and independent of the Y concentration. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Studies of interaction between He and elements with mass number 140 in Fe by time-differential perturbed-angular-correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Yoshitaka; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Xu, Qiu; Tanigaki, Minoru; Sato, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    Room-temperature time-differential perturbed-angular-correlation (TDPAC) spectra of 140Ce arising through 140Ba-140La from 140Cs in He-doped Fe, unannealed and annealed in vacuum at various temperatures, were obtained in order to examine whether Ce (or rather, La and Ba) and He form complexes having a definite geometrical structure in Fe, as suggested by first-principles density-functional theory calculations. No clear signal of such complexes was observed in the TDPAC spectra. However, the TDPAC spectra indicate that Ce and He form complexes having a variety of geometrical structures. Comparison with reported TDPAC results on 111Cd arising from 111In in He-doped stainless steel shows that the parent atoms (La and Ba) of 140Ce trap He atoms more efficiently than In atoms do, indicating stronger bonding of He to the former atoms, while different from the present case, 111Cd (In)-He complexes form a unique geometrical structure.

  1. Fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herden, C.; Röder, J.; Gardner, J. A.; Becker, K. D.

    2008-09-01

    A new generation time differential perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectrometer has been designed and built. The design strategy and details of the data collection and reduction methodology are reported. First results obtained by the new spectrometer are reported and compared with PAC data obtained by more conventional means.

  2. Angular correlation in the two-electron continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2006-02-15

    Following absorption of a single photon, angles of simultaneous emission of two electrons from a He(n {sup 1}S) atom become more correlated with increasing n. We find that the strength of this correlation is due to the two-electron continuum of the electron-impact ionization of the He{sup +}(ns) ion. The strength is determined by the width of the momentum profile of the ionic ns state but not the strength of the electron correlation in the He initial state. This can explain the increasing (over He) angular correlation strength found in double photoionization of targets such as Be, Ne, and H{sub 2}.

  3. Measurement of the energy, multiplicity and angular correlation of γ-rays from the thermal neutron capture reaction Gd(n, γ) using JPARC-ANNRI

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Iwa; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Takatomi; Mori, Takaaki; Kayano, Tsubasa; Sakuda, Makoto; Kimura, Atsushi; Harada, Hideo

    2014-05-02

    We conducted an experiment using the JPARC-ANNRI spectrometer to measure the energy, multiplicity and correlation of γ-rays from the neutron capture of natural gadolinium. We incorporated the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation into the detector, and compared the data with the results of the MC simulation. We report our data analysis and compare our data with those obtained by the MC simulation.

  4. Measurement of Long-Range Angular Correlation and Quadrupole Anisotropy of Pions and (Anti)Protons in Central d+Au Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2015-05-15

    We present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and minimum bias p+p collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity |η|<0.35, and the energy is measured at large rapidity (-3.7<η<-3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across |Δη|>2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v_{2} for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to p_{T}=4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v_{2} for identified π^{±} and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy-ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions. PMID:26024164

  5. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We alsomore » present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.« less

  6. Satellite Angular Rate Estimation From Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the angular rate vector of a satellite which is based on the time derivatives of vector measurements expressed in a reference and body coordinate. The computed derivatives are fed into a spacial Kalman filter which yields an estimate of the spacecraft angular velocity. The filter, named Extended Interlaced Kalman Filter (EIKF), is an extension of the Kalman filter which, although being linear, estimates the state of a nonlinear dynamic system. It consists of two or three parallel Kalman filters whose individual estimates are fed to one another and are considered as known inputs by the other parallel filter(s). The nonlinear dynamics stem from the nonlinear differential equation that describes the rotation of a three dimensional body. Initial results, using simulated data, and real Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data indicate that the algorithm is efficient and robust.

  7. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss. PMID:27519107

  8. ISOTROPY IN THE TWO-POINT ANGULAR CORRELATION FUNCTION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sophie

    2012-04-01

    We study the directional dependence of the angular two-point correlation function in maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose two new statistics: one which measures the correlation of each point in the sky with a ring of points separated an angle {theta} away, and a second one that measures the missing angular correlation above 60 deg as a function of direction. Using these statistics, we find that most of the low power in cut-sky maps measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment comes from unusually low contributions from the directions of the lobes of the quadrupole and the octupole. These findings may aid a future explanation of why the CMB exhibits low power at large angular scales.

  9. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  10. Angular correlation measurements for {sup 12}C{sup 12}C,{sup 12}C{sup 12}C 3{sup -} scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Betts, R.R.; Freer, M.

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies of inelastic {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C scattering to a variety of final states identified significant resonance behavior in a number of different reaction channels. These resonances can be interpreted as either potential scattering resonances, or as population of cluster structures in the compound nucleus {sup 24}Mg, or as some interplay between the two mechanisms. Currently, for many of these resonances the situation remains unclear. One example is a large peak observed in the excitation function for the 3{sup -} - g.s. excitation, identified in previous work performed at the Daresbury Laboratory in England. This peak is observed at the same center-of-mass energy as one observed in the O{sub 2}{sup +}-O{sub 2}{sup +} inelastic scattering channel. That structure was suggested to correspond to exotic deformed configurations in the compound nucleus {sup 24}Mg. As the peak in the 3{sup -} + g.s. exit channel occurs at precisely the same energy as the purported resonance, it is tempting to associate the two. Before such an association can be confirmed or ruled out, further information must be obtained about the 3{sup -} + g.s. structure. In particular, it is important to determine the angular momenta that dominate the 3{sup -} + g.s. structure.

  11. A detection system with broad angular acceptance for particle identification and angular distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Arazi, A.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Capurro, O. A.; Cardona, M. A.; de Barbará, E.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martí, G. V.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    A new detection system for time-optimized heavy-ion angular distribution measurements has been designed and constructed. This device is composed by an ionization chamber with a segmented-grid anode and three position-sensitive silicon detectors. This particular arrangement allows identifying reaction products emitted within a 30° wide angular range with better than 1° angular resolution. As a demonstration of its capabilities, angular distributions of the elastic scattering cross-section and the production of alpha particles in the 7Li+27Al system, at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, are presented.

  12. Vector correlation analysis for inelastic and reactive collisions between partners possessing spin and orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2009-12-31

    A general reactive collision of the type A + B --> C + D is considered where both the collision partners (A and B) or the products (C and D) may possess internal, i.e., spin, orbital or rotational, angular momenta. Compact expressions are derived using a rigorous quantum mechanical analysis for the angular momentum anisotropy of either of the products (C or D) arising from an initially polarized distribution of the reactant angular momentum. The angular momentum distribution of the product is expressed in terms of canonical spherical tensors multiplied by anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L). These coefficients act as transformation coefficients between the angular momentum anisotropy of the reactants and that of the product. They are independent of scattering angle but depend on the details of the scattering dynamics. The relationship between the coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L) and the body-fixed scattering S matrix is given and the methodology for the quantum mechanical calculation of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients is clearly laid out. The anisotropy-transforming coefficients are amenable to direct experimental measurement in a similar manner to vector correlation and alignment parameters in photodissociation processes. A key aspect of the theory is the use of projections of both reactant and product angular momenta onto the product recoil vector direction. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that if the state multipole for reactant angular momentum distribution has a projection q(k) onto the product recoil vector the state multipoles for the product angular momentum distribution all have this same projection. Expressions are also presented for the distribution of the product angular momentum when its components are evaluated relative to the space-fixed Z-axis. Notes with detailed derivations of all the formulas are available as Supporting Information. PMID:19642631

  13. Theory and imaging applications of the angular correlation of multiply-scattered optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Brian Gilday

    Through analysis of the field angular correlation the scattering of quasimonochromatic optical fields is considered as a coherence-based process well into the multiple scattering regime. Coherence analysis leads to the prediction of coherent effects in multiply-scattered light that can be applied to perform computed amplitude- phase imaging through turbid media and noninvasive laser material characterization. With the incentive of improved imaging through turbid media an experiment is described that directly compares the degradations, with the number of scattering mean free paths, of the field angular correlation and the correlation of the scattered wave with an unscattered reference wave, both of which can be used to form gates for imaging techniques in scattered light. Results for 20μ m polymer spheres show that the former correlation is consistently larger well into the multiple scattering regime (up to 10 mean free paths) for wavevector separations less than at least 50mm -1, and that the two correlations tend to merge in this scattering regime for larger wavevector separations. The implications of the results for imaging applications are considered. Complementary theoretical formulations of coherence effects in multiply-scattered fields are presented. Relations of the spatial coherence properties to the angular characteristics of the scattered field are established. A coherence-based model of multiple scattering processes is derived. The model predicts radiative-transfer-like behavior for restricted observational parameters, but also shows that the coherence-based process is required for an accurate description of the scattered field over an observational parameters. The applicability of the model to noninvasive laser material characterization is emphasized. A wavefront-sensor method is presented for measurement of the complex field angular correlation function of a three-dimensional turbid medium. The angular correlation function is measured at a series of

  14. Methods for measuring and transporting angular momentum in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David; Flanagan, Eanna; Stein, Leo; Vines, Justin

    2016-03-01

    For an observer in a curved spacetime, elements of the dual space of the set of linearized Poincare transformations from the observer's tangent space to itself can naturally be interpreted as local linear and angular momenta. We give an operational procedure by which the observer can measure such local linear and angular momenta from the local spacetime geometry. These momenta can be interpreted as approximate versions of the linear and angular momenta of the spacetime about the observer's location. The measurement algorithm allows for a more accurate determination of the linear and angular momentum of stationary, asymptotically flat systems than previous proposals do. We also describe a prescription by which observers at different locations can compare values of their measured linear and angular momentum by using a specific transport equation, which refines previous proposals. These operational definitions may also prove useful for clarifying the physical interpretation of Bondi-Metzner-Sachs asymptotic charges in asymptotically flat spacetimes.

  15. Development of an optical fiber sensor for angular displacement measurements.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Tae-Hee; Choi, Ju-Hyeon; Oh, Han-Byeol; Kim, A-Hee; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Park, Jong-Rak; Lee, Young-Jae; Park, Hee-Jung; Jun, Jae-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    For diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the joint angle measurement of a patient after an accident or a surgical operation is significant for monitoring and evaluating the recovering process. This paper proposed an optical fiber sensor for the measurement of angular displacement. The effect of beveled fiber angle on the detected light signal was investigated to find an appropriate mathematical model. Beveled fiber tips redirected the light over a range of angles away from the fiber axis. Inverse polynomial models were applied to directly obtain and display the joint angle change in real time with the Lab-VIEW program. The actual joint angle correlated well with the calculated LabVIEW output angle over the test range. The proposed optical sensor is simple, cost effective, small in size, and can evaluate the joint angle in real time. This method is expected to be useful in the field of rehabilitation and sport science. PMID:24211963

  16. Weak measurements with orbital-angular-momentum pointer states.

    PubMed

    Puentes, G; Hermosa, N; Torres, J P

    2012-07-27

    Weak measurements are a unique tool for accessing information about weakly interacting quantum systems with minimal back action. Joint weak measurements of single-particle operators with pointer states characterized by a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution can provide, in turn, key information about quantum correlations that can be relevant for quantum information applications. Here we demonstrate that by employing two-dimensional pointer states endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM), it is possible to extract weak values of the higher order moments of single-particle operators, an inaccessible quantity with Gaussian pointer states only. We provide a specific example that illustrates the advantages of our method both in terms of signal enhancement and information retrieval. PMID:23006067

  17. Correlations among angular wave component amplitudes in elastic multiple-scattering random media.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Brian G; Deslauriers, Louis; Grannell, Shawn M; Ahmed, Rizwan E; Dilworth, David S; Athey, Brian D; Leith, Emmett N

    2002-02-01

    The propagation of scalar waves through random media that provide multiple elastic scattering is considered by derivation of an expression for the angular correlation of the scattered wave amplitudes. Coherent wave transmission is shown to occur through a mechanism similar to that responsible for coherent backscattering. While the properties of the scattered wave are generally consistent with radiative-transfer theory for sufficiently small incident and scattering angles, coherent transmission provides corrections to radiative-transfer results at larger angles. The theoretical angular correlation curves are fit, by specifying the probability densities of two random variables that correspond to material parameters, to measured data of laser light scattering from various polymer microsphere suspensions. PMID:11863685

  18. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  19. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2011-05-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  20. Thermalization of positronium atoms studied with time-resolved angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, S.; Iwata, T.; Kawashima, K.; Saito, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Hyodo, T.

    2000-06-01

    Time dependence of the kinetic energy of positronium atoms in the free space between the grains of a pressed tablet (1 g/cm 3) of ultrafine silica powder (Cab-O-Sil EH-5) has been measured with time-resolved angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) apparatus. The apparatus has a momentum resolution of 1.29×10 -3 mc in full width at half maximum and a time resolution of 2.7 ns in full width at half maximum. It is found that the energy of positronium falls below 0.1e V in ˜10 ns after the formation.

  1. Measuring Two Angularities on a Single Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of the complete singular phase space of a jet when multiple measurements have been made about the jet structure. Using Soft-Collinear Effective Field Theory, strict factorization theorems are found only for the boundaries of physical phase space in these multi-differential cross-sections. These theorems have incompatible evolution equations, but nonetheless, a resummation ansazt can be found that interpolates between the boundaries. While logarithmic accuracy cannot be guaranteed in the bulk of phase space, the ansazt reproduces the correct resummation exactly at any boundary. Aside from jet physics, applications to more exclusive PDF's and Drell-Yan event shapes are indicated.

  2. Measurement of angular velocity in the perception of rotation.

    PubMed

    Barraza, José F; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2002-09-01

    Humans are sensitive to the parameters of translational motion, namely, direction and speed. At the same time, people have special mechanisms to deal with more complex motions, such as rotations and expansions. One wonders whether people may also be sensitive to the parameters of these complex motions. Here, we report on a series of experiments that explore whether human subjects can use angular velocity to evaluate how fast a rotational motion is. In four experiments, subjects were required to perform a task of speed-of-rotation discrimination by comparing two annuli of different radii in a temporal 2AFC paradigm. Results showed that humans could rely on a sensitive measurement of angular velocity to perform this discrimination task. This was especially true when the quality of the rotational signal was high (given by the number of dots composing the annulus). When the signal quality decreased, a bias towards linear velocity of 5-80% appeared, suggesting the existence of separate mechanisms for angular and linear velocity. This bias was independent from the reference radius. Finally, we asked whether the measurement of angular velocity required a rigid rotation, that is, whether the visual system makes only one global estimate of angular velocity. For this purpose, a random-dot disk was built such that all the dots were rotating with the same tangential speed, irrespectively of radius. Results showed that subjects do not estimate a unique global angular velocity, but that they perceive a non-rigid disk, with angular velocity falling inversely proportionally with radius. PMID:12367744

  3. Optical orbital angular momentum for optical communication and its measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xi-zheng; Lv, Hong; Wu, Jing-zhi; Hu, Shu-qiao

    2009-07-01

    The beam with orbital angular momentum is a present domestic and foreign research key direction. Its application and development will bring the profound influence in the optical communications field. At the same time, light's orbital angular momentum promises potential applications in both classical and quantum optical communication. The research progress of the beam with orbital angular momentum and encoding information as light's OAM for free-space optical communication were reviewed in this article, the existing design method, mechanism and description methods of encoding information as light's OAM were discussed. In quantum communication, qudits can be encoded in photons using their OAM for creating high-dimensional entanglement based on entangled photon pairs from SPDC. In this paper, light's OAM is used as information carrier for classical and quantum communication, which is promising to ensures the security of atmospheric laser communication, improves the density and precision of information transmission. It is apparent that an efficient way to measure the orbital angular momentum of individual photons and light beams with good efficiency would be of potentially great importance for optical communications and quantum information. In view of the above, the measurements of orbital angular momentum of individual photons and light beams are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  4. Modes of correlated angular motion in live cells across three distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew W; Kenwright, David A; Waigh, Thomas A; Woodman, Philip G; Allan, Victoria J

    2013-06-01

    Particle tracking experiments with high speed digital microscopy yield the positions and trajectories of lipid droplets inside living cells. Angular correlation analysis shows that the lipid droplets have uncorrelated motion at short time scales (τ < 1 ms) followed by anti-persistent motion for lag times in the range of 1 ⩽ τ ⩽ 10 ms. The angular correlation at longer time scales, τ > 10 ms, becomes persistent, indicating directed movement. The motion at all time scales is associated with the lipid droplets being tethered to and driven along the microtubule network. The point at which the angular correlation changes from anti-persistent to persistent motion corresponds to the cross over between sub-diffusive and super diffusive motion, as observed by mean square displacement analysis. Correct analysis of the angular correlations of the detector noise is found to be crucial in modelling the observed phenomena. PMID:23574726

  5. Hyperfine magnetic field at Ta impurities in nickel: Perturbed angular correlation and first principle calculation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekić, B. Dj.; Umićević, A. B.; Belošević-Čavor, J. N.; Koteski, V. J.; Ivanovski, V. N.; Stojković, M. N.

    2008-03-01

    The hyperfine magnetic field (H) in 0.2 at.% Hf-Ni alloy is measured at the 181Ta probe using the time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method, in the temperature range 78-675 K. The obtained value of 8.6 (3) T at room temperature is in good agreement with the previously reported measurements for similar Hf concentrations in Ni. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) experiments confirmed that small atomic concentrations of Hf atoms (<1 at.%) mainly substitute on Ni lattice sites in the fcc crystal lattice without forming any intermetallic phase. In addition, ab-initio calculation using all-electron augmented plane waves plus local orbitals (APW+lo) formalism is performed and the obtained result for the hyperfine magnetic field at Ta site is in accordance with the measurement.

  6. Correlative Measurements Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The GSFC Correlative Measurements Program at the Wallops Flight Facility was represented on the Satellite/Satellite Intercomparisons Working Group. The Correlative Measurements Program uses the Rocket Ozonesonde (ROCOZ-A) and the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) balloon borne ozonesonde to measure the vertical profile of ozone amount in the atmosphere. The balloon work is described in a separate report. The ROCOZ-A instrument was used for many years to provide in situ truth data for various satellite ozone measuring systems, such as SBUV on Nimbus-7, SAGE-II, SBUV-II on the NOAA series of polar orbiting satellites, SME, LIMS, etc. The particular data sets of interest to the Ozone Trends Panel Working Group were collected at Natal, Brazil. The major results produced for and used by the Ozone Trends Panel are shown. The ROCOZ-A average ozone density profile is plotted versus altitude on the left. ECC ozonesondes were used for the portion of the profile below 20 km, the lower limit for ROCOZ-A. The difference between SAGE-II and ROCOZ-A average density profiles is shown.

  7. Angular correlations in gluon production at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-02-01

    We present a general, model independent argument demonstrating that gluons produced in high energy hadronic collision are necessarily correlated in rapidity and also in the emission angle. The strength of the correlation depends on the process and on the structure/model of the colliding particles. In particular we argue that it is strongly affected (and underestimated) by factorized approximations frequently used to quantify the effect.

  8. Measurement of polarization with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Leitch, E M; Kovac, J M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Dragovan, M; Reddall, B; Sandberg, E S

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can reveal with remarkable precision the conditions of the Universe when it was approximately 400,000 years old. The three most fundamental properties of the CMB are its frequency spectrum (which determines the temperature), and the fluctuations in both the temperature and polarization across a range of angular scales. The frequency spectrum has been well determined, and considerable progress has been made in measuring the power spectrum of the temperature fluctuations. But despite many efforts to measure the polarization, detection of this property of the CMB has hitherto been beyond the reach of even the most sensitive observations. Here we describe the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), an array of radio telescopes, which for the past two years has conducted polarization-sensitive observations of the CMB from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station. PMID:12490940

  9. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Delayed Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I. Y.; Harman, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements, which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear part of the rotas rotational dynamics equation of a body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This non unique decomposition, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft (SC) dynamics model as a linear one and, thus, the application of a PseudoLinear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to compute recursively the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the rotational dynamics by a simple Markov model is also examined. In this paper special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results are presented.

  10. Angular-Rate Estimation using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  11. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quatemion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quatemion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quatemion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  12. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (zL=0.6304) and RXJ1131-1231 (zL=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ2, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in DA per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ2 at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ2 with 5% precision.

  13. A Novel Microsensor for Measuring Angular Distribution of Radiative Intensity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas E; Pilorz, Stuart; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bebout, Brad

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the design, construction and characterization of a novel type of light probe for measuring the angular radiance distribution of light fields. The differential acceptance angle (DAA) probe can resolve the directionality of a light field in environments with steep light gradients, such as microbial mats, without the need to remove, reorient, and reinsert the probe, a clear advantage over prior techniques. The probe consists of an inner irradiance sensor inside a concentric, moveable light-absorbing sheath. The radiative intensity in a specific zenith direction can be calculated by comparing the irradiance onto the sensor at different acceptance angles. We used this probe to measure the angular radiance distribution of two sample light fields, and observed good agreement with a conventional radiance probe. The DAA probe will aid researchers in understanding light transfer physics in dense microbial communities and expedite validation of numerical radiative transfer models for these environments. PMID:25763775

  14. Angular velocity estimation from measurement vectors of star tracker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jun-cai; Yi, Wen-jun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Yang, Jian-kun; Li, Xiu-jian; Tan, Ji-chun

    2012-06-01

    In most spacecraft, there is a need to know the craft's angular rate. Approaches with least squares and an adaptive Kalman filter are proposed for estimating the angular rate directly from the star tracker measurements. In these approaches, only knowledge of the vector measurements and sampling interval is required. The designed adaptive Kalman filter can filter out noise without information of the dynamic model and inertia dyadic. To verify the proposed estimation approaches, simulations based on the orbit data of the challenging minisatellite payload (CHAMP) satellite and experimental tests with night-sky observation are performed. Both the simulations and experimental testing results have demonstrated that the proposed approach performs well in terms of accuracy, robustness, and performance. PMID:22695598

  15. Small angular displacement measurement based on an autocollimator and a common-path compensation principle

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ke; Kuang Cuifang; Liu Xu

    2013-01-15

    A novel method for small angular displacement measurement based on an autocollimator and a common-path compensation principle by using single CCD detector was proposed. The principles of the angular displacement measurement and the common-path compensation were analyzed. The feasibility of measurement method was verified and the experimental results revealed that the linear correlativity between the relative displacement of the measuring beam spot and the angular displacement is 0.99996. And the measurement resolution is about 0.03 arcsec. To test the compensation's effect, a series of experiments introducing three different interferences from system and external environment were performed. The experimental results indicated that the standard deviations of the measuring beam spot's angular drift were improved by at least 25.0% to at most 80.0% in x direction while by at least 28.2% to at most 95.6% in y direction. Thus, the stability of the system and the measurement resolution were improved.

  16. Herschel-ATLAS: The Angular Correlation Function of Submillimetre Galaxies at High and Low Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, S. J.; Dunne, L.; Rigby, E.; Eales, S.; Cooray, A.; Scott, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Negrello, M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Benford, D.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bonfield, D.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Dariush, A.; deZotti, G.; Dye, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular correlation function of galaxies selected from the first field of the H-ATLAS survey. Careful removal of the background from galactic cirrus is essential, and currently dominates the uncertainty in our measurements. For our 250 micrometer-selected sample we detect no significant clustering, consistent with the expectation that the 250 pm-selected sources are mostly normal galaxies at z < or equal to 1. For our 350 micrometer and 500 micrometer-selected samples we detect relatively strong clustering with correlation amplitudes A of 0.2 and 1.2 at 1', but with relatively large uncertainties. For samples which preferentially select high redshift galaxies at z approx. 2-3 we detect significant strong clustering, leading to an estimate of r(0) approx. 7-11/h Mpc. The slope of our clustering measurements is very steep. delta approx. 2. The measurements are consistent with the idea that sub-mm sources consist of a low redshift population of normal galaxies and a high redshift population of highly clustered star-bursting galaxies.

  17. A new all-digital time differential {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagl, Matthias; Vetter, Ulrich; Uhrmacher, Michael; Hofsaess, Hans

    2010-07-15

    A new digital time differential perturbed angular correlation spectrometer, designed to measure the energy of and coincidence time between correlated detector signals, here correlated {gamma} photons, is presented. The system overcomes limitations of earlier digital approaches and features improved performance and handling. By consequently separating the data recording and evaluation, it permits the simultaneous measurement of decays with several {gamma}-ray cascades at once and avoids the necessity of premeasurement configuration. Tests showed that the spectrometer reaches a time resolution of 460 ps [using a {sup 60}Co sample and Lu{sub 1.8}Y{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LYSO) scintillators, otherwise better than 100 ps], an energy resolution that is equivalent to the limit of the used scintillation material, and a processing capability of more than 200 000 {gamma} quanta per detector and second. Other possible applications of the presented methods include nuclear spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, time of flight studies, lidar, and radar.

  18. Angular correlations in radiative cascades following resonant electron capture by highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Matula, O.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the angular correlations between the photons emitted in the dielectronic recombination (DR) of initially hydrogenlike heavy ions. The theoretical analysis is performed based on a density-matrix approach and Dirac's relativistic theory. Special emphasis has been placed upon the effects of the higher-order, nondipole terms in the expansion of the electron-photon interaction. To illustrate these effects, we present and discuss detailed calculations for K-LL DR of initially hydrogenlike xenon, gold, and uranium. These computations show that the angular correlations are significantly affected by interference between the leading electric-dipole (E1) and the magnetic-quadrupole (M2) transitions.

  19. Isoresistive dynamometer measurement of trunk muscle velocity at different angular phases of flexion and extension.

    PubMed

    Surakka, J; Alanen, E; Aunola, S; Karppi, S L

    2001-07-01

    Isoresistive trunk muscle dynamometer is a potentially useful piece of equipment in evaluation of trunk muscle velocity, but to date, studies analysing the possibilities and limitations of such measurements are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyse the trunk muscle velocity in repetitive flexion and extension movements at three different angular phases, using an isoresistive trunk muscle dynamometer, and to assess the reliability of the measurements. The study population consisted of 120 healthy, sedentary men and women who volunteered for the study. The measurements were carried out before and after a 22-week training intervention programme. The results show that the peak velocities of the phases between 15 and 35 degrees in flexion and 20-0 degrees in extension (i.e. the second phases) correlated highly (r=0.99 in flexion and in extension) with the peak velocity of the whole movement ranging from -5 to 55 degrees in flexion and 40 to -20 degrees in extension. Correlations were high, both before and after the intervention. The LISREL model analysis showed high reliability of measurement for the second angular phases (in flexion and extension). According to the model, the correlation between the first and second measurement (with a 22-week training intervention in between) was 0.78 in flexion and 0.81 in extension. In conclusion, the angular phases from 15 to 35 degrees in flexion and from 20 to 0 degrees in extension represent the peak velocity of the whole movement. Negative residual correlations between the first and last angular phases in the LISREL model reflect the way of performing the movement: the faster the start the slower the end, and vice versa. PMID:11442583

  20. Correlation of angular and lateral distributions of electrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Maria; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Legumina, Remigiusz

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain the weak correlation of the angular and lateral deflections of electrons in extensive air showers in the primary energy range 1016-1019 eV, when compared with that in some models of electron propagation. We derive analytical formulae for the correlation coefficient in the multiple scattering model with energy losses and show a strong role of the ionisation in diminishing the correlation. By considering a Heitler-like model of an electromagnetic cascade we show also that the presence of photons, parent to electrons, causes a decrease of the correlation, roughly explaining quantitatively the small correlation in air showers.

  1. A dual-heterodyne laser interferometer for simultaneous measurement of linear and angular displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Duan, Hui-Zong; Li, Lin-Tao; Liang, Yu-Rong; Luo, Jun; Yeh, Hsien-Chi

    2015-12-01

    Picometer laser interferometry is an essential tool for ultra-precision measurements in frontier scientific research and advanced manufacturing. In this paper, we present a dual-heterodyne laser interferometer for simultaneously measuring linear and angular displacements with resolutions of picometer and nanoradian, respectively. The phase measurement method is based on cross-correlation analysis and realized by a PXI-bus data acquisition system. By implementing a dual-heterodyne interferometer with a highly symmetric optical configuration, low frequency noises caused by the environmental fluctuations can be suppressed to very low levels via common-mode noise rejection. Experimental results for the dual-heterodyne interferometer configuration presented demonstrate that the noise levels of the linear and angular displacement measurements are approximately 1 pm/Hz1/2 and 0.5 nrad/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz.

  2. Precisely measuring the orbital angular momentum of beams via weak measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiangdong; Ren, Changliang; Zhang, Zhiyou

    2016-06-01

    We proposed and analyzed a scheme of precisely measuring orbital angular momentum (OAM) of the vortex beams with the help of weak measurement process. The orbital angular momentum information l of the unknown OAM state can be obtained by its spatial displacements. The valid condition of precisely measuring orbital angular momentum was completely discussed. Interestingly, it is shown that the measurement by using the two-dimensional spatial displacements jointly is very useful for precisely measuring the OAM state with a large orbital angular momentum l . The signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement can be enhanced by increasing the weak-coupling γ linearly as the valid condition is still satisfied. For fixed γ , the maximal signal-to-noise ratio for each weak value increases with the decrease of the weak value.

  3. Direct measure of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-shui; Zhao, Haiqing

    2011-12-15

    The quantumness of the correlation known as quantum correlation is usually measured by quantum discord. So far various quantum discords can be roughly understood as indirect measure by some special discrepancy of two quantities. We present a direct measure of quantum correlation by revealing the difference between the structures of classically and quantum correlated states. Our measure explicitly includes the contributions of the inseparability and local nonorthogonality of the eigenvectors of a density matrix. Besides its relatively easy computability, our measure can provide a unified understanding of quantum correlation of all the present versions.

  4. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Haberberger, D. Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  5. Interferometric methods to measure orbital and spin, or the total angular momentum of a single photon.

    PubMed

    Leach, Jonathan; Courtial, Johannes; Skeldon, Kenneth; Barnett, Stephen M; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Padgett, Miles J

    2004-01-01

    We propose interferometric methods capable of measuring either the total angular momentum, or simultaneously measuring the spin and orbital angular momentum of single photons. This development enables the measurement of any angular momentum eigenstate of a single photon. The work allows the investigation of single-photon two-qubit entangled states and has implications for high density information transfer. PMID:14753990

  6. Matrix elements of explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions with arbitrary angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Tennesse; Varga, Kálmán

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm for calculating the Hamiltonian matrix elements with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions for quantum-mechanical calculations of atoms with arbitrary angular momentum is presented. The calculations are checked on several excited states of three and four electron systems. The presented formalism can be used as unified framework for high accuracy calculations of properties of small atoms and molecules.

  7. Angular bias errors in three-component laser velocimeter measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.Y.; Kim, P.J.; Walker, D.T.

    1996-09-01

    For three-component laser velocimeter systems, the change in projected area of the coincident measurement volume for different flow directions will introduce an angular bias in naturally sampled data. In this study, the effect of turbulence level and orientation of the measurement volumes on angular bias errors was examined. The operation of a typical three-component laser velocimeter was simulated using a Monte Carlo technique. Results for the specific configuration examined show that for turbulence levels less than 10% no significant bias errors in the mean velocities will occur and errors in the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities will be less than 3% for all orientations. For turbulence levels less than 30%, component mean velocity bias errors less than 5% of the mean velocity vector magnitude can be attained with proper orientation of the measurement volume; however, the r.m.s. velocities may be in error as much as 10%. For turbulence levels above 50%, there is no orientation which will yield accurate estimates of all three mean velocities; component mean velocity errors as large as 15% of the mean velocity vector magnitude may be encountered.

  8. Effects of angular correlations on particle-particle propagation in infinite nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, J.; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of angular correlations on self-consistent solutions for single-particle (sp) potentials in infinite nuclear matter is investigated. To this end we treat explicitly the angular dependence of the particle-particle (pp) propagator in Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) equation for the g matrix. It is observed that the exact angular dependence of the pp propagator yields highly fluctuating structures, posing stringent difficulties in the actual search of self-consistent solutions for the sp energy. A perturbative approach is presented to evaluate the effect of the angular correlations in the self-consistent solutions. Solutions at Fermi momenta kF in the range 1.20 - 1.75 fm-1 are reported using Argonne v 18 nucleon- nucleon potential. Although the sp potentials are sensitive to the treatment of the angular behaviour of the propagator, such sensitivity appears at momenta well above the Fermi surface. As a result, the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter differ marginally from those calculated using angle-averaged energy denominators in pp propagators.

  9. Fast two-position initial alignment for SINS using velocity plus angular rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guobin

    2015-10-01

    An improved two-position initial alignment model for strapdown inertial navigation system is proposed. In addition to the velocity, angular rates are incorporated as measurements. The measurement equations in full three channels are derived in both navigation and body frames and the latter of which is found to be preferred. The cross-correlation between the process and the measurement noises is analyzed and addressed in the Kalman filter. The incorporation of the angular rates, without introducing additional device or external signal, speeds up the convergence of estimating the attitudes, especially the heading. In the simulation study, different algorithms are tested with different initial errors, and the advantages of the proposed method compared to the conventional one are validated by the simulation results.

  10. Calibration method for angular measurement of moiré patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fan; Bai, Jian; Wang, Kaiwei; Hou, Xiyun; Yao, Jiang

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a high-accuracy calibration method for angular measurement of deformed and curved Moiré patterns, based on template matching algorithm, is presented. We report a feasible and accurate method, based on Talbot interferometry and Moiré deflectometry, to measure long focal-length lenses. Theoretical analysis indicates that the precision of this method is mainly influenced by the angle of Moiré patterns. However, it's difficult to obtain high-accuracy angle of Moiré patterns, since the Moiré patterns derived from experiment are constantly deformed or curved. We demonstrate a method, based on template matching algorithm, to calibrate deformed and curved Moiré patterns, thus their angle can be calculated fast and accurately in sub-pixel domain. Numerical analysis and simulation prove that the method mentioned above demonstrates high precision and stability, and experiment results show that the accuracy of the long focal lengths measurement is improved obviously.

  11. On the Extraction of Angular Velocity from Attitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, I. Y.; Harman, Richard R.; Thienel, Julie K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we research the extraction of the angular rate vector from attitude information without differentiation, in particular from quaternion measurements. We show that instead of using a Kalman filter of some kind, it is possible to obtain good rate estimates, suitable for spacecraft attitude control loop damping, using simple feedback loops, thereby eliminating the need for recurrent covariance computation performed when a Kalman filter is used. This considerably simplifies the computations required for rate estimation in gyro-less spacecraft. Some interesting qualities of the Kalman filter gain are explored, proven and utilized. We examine two kinds of feedback loops, one with varying gain that is proportional to the well known Q matrix, which is computed using the measured quaternion, and the other type of feedback loop is one with constant coefficients. The latter type includes two kinds; namely, a proportional feedback loop, and a proportional-integral feedback loop. The various schemes are examined through simulations and their performance is compared. It is shown that all schemes are adequate for extracting the angular velocity at an accuracy suitable for control loop damping.

  12. Detailed Study of the Angular Correlations in the Prompt Neutron Emission in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopatch, Yu.; Chietera, A.; Stuttgé, L.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Chernysheva, E.; Dorvaux, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Hanappe, F.; Mezentseva, Z.; Telezhnikov, S.

    An experiment has been performed at IPHC Strasbourg, aimed at the detailed investigation of angular correlations in the neutron emission from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Fission fragments were measured by the angle-sensitive double ionization chamber CODIS while neutrons were detected by a set of 60 DEMON scintillator counters. The main aim of the experiment is the observation of the correlation between the fragment spins and neutron emission anisotropy. Preliminary results, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations, as well as the preliminary analysis of the experimental data are shown.

  13. The impact of angular separation on the performance of biplane correlation imaging for lung nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasab, Nariman Majdi; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of biplane correlation imaging (BCI) using a set of off-angle projections acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom. BCI reduces the effect of anatomical noise, which would otherwise impact the detection subtle lesions in planar images. BCI also minimizes the number of false positives (FPs) when used in conjunction with computer aided diagnosis (CAD) applied to a set of coronal chest x-ray projections by eliminating non-correlated nodule candidates. In BCI, two digital images of the chest are acquired within a short time interval from two slightly different posterior projections. The image data are then incorporated into the CAD algorithm in which nodules are detected by examining the geometrical correlation of the detected signals in the two views, thus largely "canceling" the impact of anatomical noise. Seventy-one low exposure posterior projections were acquired of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing tissue equivalent lesions with small angular separations (0.32 degree) over a range of 20 degrees, [-10°, +10°], along the vertical axis. The data were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the technique as a function of angular separation. The results indicated that the best performance was obtained when the angular separation of the projection pair was greater than 6 degrees. Within the range of optimum angular separation, the number of FPs per image, FPpI, was ~1.1 with average sensitivity around 75% (supported by a grant from the NIH R01CA109074).

  14. Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) studies of the 133Ba ion uptake in bone crystals.

    PubMed

    Rimbert, J N; Kellershohn, C; Dumas, F; Hubert, C

    1981-03-01

    TDPAC measurements of the 356-81 keV gamma-ray cascade resulting from electron capture decay of 133Ba have been performed at room temperature on BaCl2 (aqueous solution and polycrystalline powder), and on samples where the 133Ba nucleus is bound to bone powder, and also to synthesised hydroxylapatite, all after absorption in vitro. As expected, the angular correlation is not perturbed in the solution. However, in the polycrystalline chloride the time dependence of the anisotropy of the cascade of 133Cs nuclide indicates that the decaying nucleus undergoes electric interactions due to different electric field gradients acting at the site of the nucleus. In 133Ba-bone powder the results show a static quadrupolar interaction differing with the absorption contact time during sample preparation, indicating that depth of 133Ba ion fixation in the bone crystal is dependent on this contact time. These results seem to be confirmed by the TDPAC measurements performed on 133Ba-hydroxylapatite samples where the contact times for absorption of active-ion 133Ba and hydroxylapatite in suspension were very different. PMID:7220599

  15. Soft gluon resummations in dijet azimuthal angular correlations in hadronic collisions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Yuan, C-P; Yuan, Feng

    2014-12-01

    We derive all order soft gluon resummation in dijet azimuthal angular correlation in hadronic collisions at the next-to-leading logarithmic level. The relevant coefficients for the Sudakov resummation factor, the soft and hard factors, are calculated. The theory predictions agree well with the experimental data from D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron. This provides a benchmark calculation for the transverse momentum dependent QCD resummation for jet productions in hadron collisions. PMID:25526118

  16. Inconsistent [ital K]-[ital L] x-ray angular correlations in uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, T.; Maxwell, J.A.; Teesdale, W.J.; Campbell, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Angular correlations between [ital K][alpha][sub 1] x rays and subsequent [ital L][sub 3] x-ray transitions were measured using a [sup 233]Pa radionuclide source and high-resolution x-ray detectors. The results provide separately the values of [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha][sub 1]) and [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha][sub 2]) as opposed to the compound quantity [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha]). For the [ital Ll] and [ital L][alpha][sub 2] transitions, the [ital A][sub 22] values agreed closely with those based upon theoretical (Hartree-Fock) [ital E]1 and [ital M]2 transition rates. For the less intense [ital L][beta][sub 6] and [ital L][beta][sub 2,15] transitions, agreement was also observed, although within larger uncertainties. In contrast, the value of [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha][sub 1]) was 0.085[plus minus]0.007, which is somewhat larger than the predicted value of 0.073. Possible causes for this discrepancy are explored.

  17. Stability of erythrocyte ghosts: a gamma-ray perturbed angular correlation study.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C A; Tin, G W; Baldeschwieler, J D

    1983-01-01

    The structural integrity of erythrocyte ghosts made by the preswell and slow-dialysis techniques has been studied in vitro by use of gamma-ray perturbed angular correlation (PAC) techniques and also by standard in vitro leakage methods employing sequestered labeled markers. Complexes of 111In3+ and nitrilotriacetate were encapsulated in ghosts made from human, rabbit, rat, and mouse erythrocytes, and their leakage was monitored by both methods. In addition, 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin was encapsulated, and ghost integrity was monitored by conventional leakage measurements. With the PAC technique the percentage of material released from human ghosts was determined quantitatively, and the results were equivalent to those obtained by the conventional method. In addition, at various times after intravenous injection, tissue distribution of the ghosts in the mouse was studied. The percent injected dose per gram of tissue of the labeled surface proteins of erythrocyte ghosts in circulation approximated that of the entrapped labeled albumin. This suggests that the ghost membrane and contents are strongly associated in vivo. Large 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin molecules and small 111In3+-nitrilotriacetate complexes were delivered in high quantitites to the lung initially, and to the liver and spleen. Because erythrocyte ghosts have the ability to entrap a wide range of substances and deliver them to specific organs, ghosts may be preferable to other drug carriers or drug therapy for treatment of certain disorders. PMID:6572379

  18. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: Testing Photometric Redshift Distributions Using Angular Cross-Correlations with Spectroscopic Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilises measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4%. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3-D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  19. Di-Hadron Angular Correlation Dependence on Leading Hadron Identity in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauder, Kolja

    A unique state of matter is created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). It displays the properties of a near-perfect liquid of quarks and gluons (partons) interacting collectively via the strong force. Properties of this medium can be explored using high-energy probes created in the form of back-to-back pairs (jets) in hard scatterings. A distinct feature of the QGP is jet quenching, which describes the large energy loss of such probes observed in measurements of hadron distributions in head-on heavy ion collisions. A more differential measurement of jet quenching is achieved using di-hadron correlations, where relative angular distributions are studied with respect to a leading (high energy) "trigger" hadron. Two striking features found in di-hadron correlations are the emergence of a long-range plateau on the near-side (at small relative azimuth), the so-called "ridge", and a broadening and deformation of the away-side, back to back with the trigger. Using 200 GeV central gold-gold and minimum bias deuteron-gold collision data collected by the STAR detector at RHIC, a systematic study of the dependence of di-hadron correlation structures on the identity of the trigger particle is carried out in this work by statistically separating pion from non-pion (i.e. proton and kaon) triggers, offering new insights into the hadronization mechanisms in the QGP. The jet-like yield at small relative angles is found enhanced for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference, while leading non-pions (protons and kaons) do not elicit such an enhancement. These findings are discussed within the context of quark recombination. At large angles, the correlated yield is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. Parameters extracted from two-dimensional model fits are used to test consistency with the constituent quark scaling assumptions

  20. LACK OF ANGULAR CORRELATION AND ODD-PARITY PREFERENCE IN COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the angular correlation in the recent cosmic microwave background data. In addition to the known large-angle correlation anomaly, we find the lack of correlation at small angles with high statistical significance. We have investigated various non-cosmological contamination as well as the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team's simulated data. However, we have not found a definite cause. In the angular power spectrum of WMAP data, there exists anomalous odd-parity preference at low multipoles. Noting the equivalence between the power spectrum and the correlation, we have investigated the association between the lack of large-angle correlation and the odd-parity preference. From our investigation, we find that the odd-parity preference at low multipoles is, in fact, a phenomenological origin of the lack of large-angle correlation. Further investigation is required to find out whether the origin of the anomaly is cosmological or due to unaccounted systematics. The data from the Planck surveyor, which has systematics distinct from WMAP, will greatly help us to resolve its origin.

  1. Capillary-scale direct measurement of hemoglobin concentration of erythrocytes using photothermal angular light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Uihan; Song, Jaewoo; Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Soocheol; Hwang, Jaehyun; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-12-15

    We present a direct, rapid and chemical-free detection method for hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), based on photothermal angular light scattering. The iron oxides contained in hemoglobin molecules exhibit high absorption of 532-nm light and generate heat under the illumination of 532-nm light, which subsequently alters the refractive index of blood. We measured this photothermal change in refractive index by employing angular light scattering spectroscopy with the goal of quantifying [Hb] in blood samples. Highly sensitive [Hb] measurement of blood samples was performed by monitoring the shifts in angularly dispersed scattering patterns from the blood-loaded microcapillary tubes. Our system measured [Hb] over the range of 0.35-17.9 g/dL with a detection limit of ~0.12 g/dL. Our sensor was characterized by excellent correlation with a reference hematology analyzer (r>0.96), and yielded a precision of 0.63 g/dL for a blood sample of 9.0 g/dL. PMID:26176206

  2. Measurement of aggregates' size distribution by angular light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caumont-Prim, Chloé; Yon, Jérôme; Coppalle, Alexis; Ouf, François-Xavier; Fang Ren, Kuan

    2013-09-01

    A novel method is introduced for in situ determination of the size distribution of submicronic fractal aggregate particles by unique measurement of angular scattering of light. This method relies on the dependence of a new defined function Rg⋆ on the polydispersity of the aggregates' size distribution. The function Rg⋆ is then interpreted by the use of iso-level charts to determine the parameters of the log-normal soot size distribution. The main advantage of this method is its independence of the particle optical properties and primary sphere diameter. Moreover, except for the knowledge of fractal dimension, this method does not require any additional measurement. It is validated on monodisperse particles selected by a differential mobility analyzer and polydisperse soot from ethylene diffusion flame whose size distribution is independently determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Finally, the size distribution of soot generated by a commercial apparatus is measured by the proposed method and the comparison to that given by a commercial granulometer shows a good agreement.

  3. Angular momenta correlation in kinematically constrained reactions. II. Application to the B + OH BO + H system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Margarita; Gimenez, Xavier; Aguilar, Antonio; Gonzalez Urena, Angel

    Extensive quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been carried out to study the disposal of both rotational and orbital angular momentum in the B + OH BO + H reaction. The potential energy surface (PES) of this reaction shows two minima associated with the HOB and HBO configurations. In addition, two distinct PESs were used each having a different geometrical structure of the HOB intermediate: bent for surface 1 and linear for surface 2. For the title reaction the product angular momentum disposal shows significant deviations from the kinematic limit expected for a heavy + heavy-light (HH L) reaction. The analysis of the product angular momenta distribution clearly indicates a correlation with the topology of the PES used. It was found that while the insertion mechanism associated with PES1 (HOB bent intermediate) favours a significant disposal into product rotational and orbital momenta, little disposal into both momenta is obtained for reactive trajectories occurring through the collinear HOB intermediate of PES2, for which BO is highly stretched. A simple modification of the conventional kinematic expressions, aimed at incorporating the effect of the dynamics into the angular momenta transfer, is proposed and tested. Modified expressions give results strongly consistent with those obtained from QCT calculations.

  4. Perturbed angular correlation experiments on the pressure-induced structural modification of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ceolín, M

    2000-09-11

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of the bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by means of the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) technique as a function of the hydrostatic pressure (up to 4.1 kbar) applied to the sample. The results have clearly shown that at moderated pressures (around 1.5 kbar) the BSA molecule suffers structural modifications which produces an increase of the molecular volume and the rotational correlation time of the molecule. About the reversibility of the process, our results indicate that the changes are fully irreversible. Our experiments are the first devoted to the study of the high-pressure behaviour of biological molecules using the PAC technique. PMID:10989128

  5. Zebra tape identification for the instantaneous angular speed computation and angular resampling of motorbike valve train measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivola, Alessandro; Troncossi, Marco

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign was performed on the valve train of a racing motorbike engine in order to get insight into the dynamic of the system. In particular the valve motion was acquired in cold test conditions by means of a laser vibrometer able to acquire displacement and velocity signals. The valve time-dependent measurements needed to be referred to the camshaft angular position in order to analyse the data in the angular domain, as usually done for rotating machines. To this purpose the camshaft was fitted with a zebra tape whose dark and light stripes were tracked by means of an optical probe. Unfortunately, both manufacturing and mounting imperfections of the employed zebra tape, resulting in stripes with slightly different widths, precluded the possibility to directly obtain the correct relationship between camshaft angular position and time. In order to overcome this problem, the identification of the zebra tape was performed by means of the original and practical procedure that is the focus of the present paper. The method consists of three main steps: namely, an ad-hoc test corresponding to special operating conditions, the computation of the instantaneous angular speed, and the final association of the stripes with the corresponding shaft angular position. The results reported in the paper demonstrate the suitability of the simple procedure for the zebra tape identification performed with the final purpose to implement a computed order tracking technique for the data analysis.

  6. Angular correlation of annihilation radiation associated with vacancy defects in electron-irradiated 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasuso, A.; Chiba, T.; Higuchi, T.

    2005-05-15

    Electron-positron momentum distributions associated with vacancy defects in 6H-SiC after irradiation with 2-MeV electrons and annealing at 1000 deg. C have been studied using angular correlation of annihilation radiation measurements. It was confirmed that the above vacancy defects have dangling bonds along the c axis and the rotational symmetry around it. The first-principles calculation suggested that the vacancy defects are attributable to either carbon-vacancy-carbon-antisite complexes or silicon-vacancy-nitrogen pairs, while isolated carbon vacancies, silicon vacancies, and nearest neighbor divacancies are ruled out.

  7. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  8. Angular correlations in the two-photon decay of heliumlike heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Surzhykov, A.; Fratini, F.; Volotka, A.; Santos, J. P.; Indelicato, P.; Plunien, G.; Stoehlker, Th.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-04-15

    The two-photon decay of heavy, helium-like ions is investigated based on second-order perturbation theory and Dirac's relativistic equation. Special attention has been paid to the angular emission of the two photons (i.e., how the angular correlation function depends on the shell structure of the ions in their initial and final states). Moreover, the effects from the (electric and magnetic) nondipole terms in the expansion of the electron-photon interaction are discussed. Detailed calculations have been carried out for the two-photon decay of the 1s2s {sup 1}S{sub 0}, 1s2s {sup 3}S{sub 1}, and 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0} states of helium-like Xe{sup 52+}, Au{sup 77+}, and U{sup 90+} ions.

  9. Hyperspherical explicitly correlated Gaussian approach for four-body systems with finite angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, D.; Blume, D.

    2012-06-01

    It has been predicted that four-body systems with angular momentum L=1 and parity π=+1 exhibit four-body resonances [1,2] and Efimov physics [3]. To treat these phenomena in the hyperspherical framework, we extend the work of von Stecher and Greene [4] to finite angular momenta. In particular, we employ explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions with global vectors to solve the hyperangular Schr"odinger equation for four-body systems with L^π=1^+ and 1^- symmetry. We apply the approach to four-fermion systems with unequal masses.[4pt] [1] K. M. Daily and D. Blume, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 170403 (2010).[0pt] [2] S. Gandolfi and J. Carlson, arXiv: 1006.5186v1.[0pt] [3] Y. Castin, C. Mora and L. Pricoupenko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 223201 (2010).[0pt] [4] J. von Stecher and C. H. Greene, Phys. Rev. A. 80, 022504 (2009).

  10. Study of Positronium in Low-k Dielectric Films by means of 2D-Angular Correlation Experiments at a High-Intensity Slow-Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gessmann, T; Petkov, M P; Weber, M H; Lynn, K G; Rodbell, K P; Asoka-Kumar, P; Stoeffl, W; Howell, R H

    2001-06-20

    Depth-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) were performed at the high-intensity slow-positron beam of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We studied the formation of positronium in thin films of methyl-silsesquioxane (MSSQ) spin-on glass containing open-volume defects in the size of voids. Samples with different average void sizes were investigated and positronium formation could be found in all cases. The width of the angular correlation related to the annihilation of parapositronium increased with the void size indicating the annihilation of non-thermalized parapositronium.

  11. Angular Correlation of Electrons Emitted by Double Auger Decay of K-Shell Ionized Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Philip

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated in detail the 4-body continuum state produced when core-ionized neon undergoes Double-Auger (DA) decay, using COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS ). We conducted the experiment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source (LBNL-ALS) beamline 11.0.2. The synchrotron operated in 2-bunch mode and outputted an elliptically polarized, pulsed photon beam (hn=872.9eV), sufficient to K-shell ionize neon just above threshold. Our analysis supports research showing that Auger electrons tend to share energy asymmetrically. We qualitatively compared this result to Photo-Double Ionization (PDI) of helium. Further, we confirm research that shows how Auger electrons that share energy symmetrically can be modeled by the elastic-like knock-out process plus Post-Collision Interaction ( PCI) effects. New observations include the angular correlation between the photo-electron and each respective Auger electron, for specific ranges of energy sharing. We identify a broad feature in the asymmetric case that shows a level of interaction between electrons that until recently, has disagreed with theory. Additionally, we consider the angular correlation between the photo-electron and the momentum sum of the Auger electrons. We observe that the angular correlation between this sum and the photo-electron in the highly asymmetric case is nearly identical to the correlation between just the fast-Auger and the photo-electron - as expected. In the case of symmetric energy sharing, the sum momentum vector appears to be isotropic, particularly for small angles of interaction. Finally, we acknowledge two novel methods of calibration. The first, uses well known line-energies to calibrate the spectrometer. These lines correspond to the decay channels of core-excited neon, Ne(1 s-13p). The second, describes a method to statistically weight list-mode data in order to calibrate it to well known physical features (e.g., isotropic distributions).

  12. Normalization of the Matter Power Spectrum via Higher Order Angular Correlations of Luminous Red Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Brunner, Robert J.; Myers, Adam D.

    2008-08-01

    We present a novel technique with which to measure σ8. It relies on measuring the dependence of the second-order bias of a density field on σ8, using two separate techniques. Each technique employs area-averaged angular correlation functions (bar omegaN), one relying on the shape of bar omega2, the other relying on the amplitude of s3 (s3 = bar omega3/bar omega22). We confirm the validity of this method by testing it on a mock catalog drawn from Millennium Simulation data and finding a value of σ8 - σtrue8 = - 0.002 +/- 0.062. We create a catalog of photometrically selected LRGs from SDSS DR5 and separate it into three distinct data sets by photometric redshift, with median redshifts of 0.47, 0.53, and 0.61. Measurements of c2 and σ8 are made for each data set, with the assumption of a flat geometry and WMAP3 best-fit priors on Ωm, h, and Γ. We find, with increasing redshift, that c2 = 0.09 +/- 0.04, 0.09 +/- 0.05, and 0.09 +/- 0.03, and σ8 = 0.78 +/- 0.08, 0.80 +/- 0.09, and 0.80 +/- 0.09. We combine these three consistent σ8 measurements to produce σ8 = 0.79 +/- 0.05. Allowing the parameters Ωm, h, and Γ to vary within their WMAP3 1 σ error, we find that the best-fit value of σ8 does not change by more than 8%, and we are thus confident that our measurement is accurate to within 10%. We anticipate that future surveys, such as Pan-STARRS, DES, and LSST, will be able to employ this method in order to measure σ8 to great precision, and this will serve as an important check, complementarily, on the values determined via more established methods.

  13. Test of the conserved vector current hypothesis by a {beta}-ray angular distribution measurement in the mass-8 system

    SciTech Connect

    Sumikama, T.; Matsuta, K.; Ogura, M.; Iwakoshi, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Fukuda, M.; Mihara, M.; Nagatomo, T.; Minamisono, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Minamisono, T.

    2011-06-15

    The {beta}-ray angular correlations for the spin alignments of {sup 8}Li and {sup 8}B have been observed in order to test the conserved vector current (CVC) hypothesis. The alignment correlation terms were combined with the known {beta}-{alpha} angular correlation terms to determine all the matrix elements contributing to the correlation terms. The weak magnetism term, 7.5{+-}0.2, deduced from the {beta}-ray correlation terms was consistent with the CVC prediction 7.3{+-}0.2, deduced from the analog-{gamma} decay measurement based on the CVC hypothesis. However, there was no consistent CVC prediction for the second-forbidden term associated with the weak vector current. The experimental value for the second-forbidden term was 1.0{+-}0.3, while the CVC prediction was 0.1{+-}0.4 or 2.1{+-}0.5.

  14. Angular dependence in proton-proton correlation functions in central 40Ca + 40Ca and 48Ca + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, V.; Kilburn, M. A.; Chajęcki, Z.; Henzlova, D.; Lynch, W. G.; Brown, D.; Chbihi, A.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Danielewicz, P.; Desouza, R. T.; Famiano, M.; Herlitzius, C.; Hudan, S.; Lee, Jenny; Lukyanov, S.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sobotka, L. G.; Sun, Z. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Vander Molen, A.; Verde, G.; Wallace, M. S.; Youngs, M.

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of proton-proton correlation functions is studied in central 40Ca+40Ca and 48Ca+48Ca nuclear reactions at E/A=80 MeV. Measurements were performed with the High Resolution Array (HiRA) complemented by the 4π Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. A striking angular dependence in the laboratory frame is found within proton-proton correlation functions for both systems that greatly exceeds the measured and expected isospin dependent difference between the neutron-rich and neutron-deficient systems. Sources measured at backward angles reflect the participant zone of the reaction, while much larger sources observed at forward angles reflect the expanding, fragmenting, and evaporating projectile remnants. The decrease of the size of the source with increasing momentum is observed at backward angles while a weaker trend in the opposite direction is observed at forward angles. The results are compared to the theoretical calculations using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model.

  15. Super-resolving angular rotation measurement using binary-outcome homodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Zhang, Jiandong; Cen, Longzhu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    There has been much recent interest in high precision angular rotation measurement using photon orbital angular momentum to realize super-resolving angular rotation measurement. It is well known that quantum detection strategies can obtain a quantum-enhanced performance. Here, we prove that binary-outcome homodyne detection method can obtain a narrower signal peak, showing better resolution compared with the existing data processing method. Since the photon loss is unavoidable in the actual non-ideal optical system, this paper further discusses the impact of photon loss on the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement with binary-outcome homodyne detection method. PMID:27505811

  16. Time correlators from deferred measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehri, D.; Lebedev, A. V.; Lesovik, G. B.; Blatter, G.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated measurements that typically occur in two-time or multitime correlators rely on von Neumann's projection postulate, telling how to restart the system after an intermediate measurement. We invoke the principle of deferred measurement to describe an alternative procedure in which coevolving quantum memories extract system information through entanglement, combined with a final readout of the memories described by Born's rule. Our approach to repeated quantum measurements respects the unitary evolution of quantum mechanics during intermediate times, unifies the treatment of strong and weak measurements, and reproduces the projected and (anti)symmetrized correlators in the two limits. As an illustration, we apply our formalism to the calculation of the electron charge correlator in a mesoscopic physics setting, where single electron pulses assume the role of flying memory qubits. We propose an experimental setup that reduces the measurement of the time correlator to the measurement of currents and noise, exploiting the (pulsed) injection of electrons to cope with the challenge of performing short-time measurements.

  17. Studies of point-defect interactions in solids using perturbed angular correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhmann, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Vacancy defect production and migration in {sup 111}In doped Au, Pt and Ni following plastic deformation are studied via {sup 111}Cd perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlations (TDPAC). In all three metals, deformation produces the same defect species as are seen following irradiation. In Au, a particular In-vacancy complex which is probably a trapped divacancy exists in two distinct configurations. Thermal conversion from one configuration to the other occurs near 200K. In Pt, an In-vacancy complex exhibits a strongly temperature dependent electric field gradient, indicating the presence of local resonant modes. In Ni, a relaxed In-trivacancy complex forms via simple, single-step trapping of a migrating trivacancy. Once formed, the In-trivacancy complex in Ni can trap up to four guest H or D atoms. These are bound to the complex with an energy of {approximately}0.5 eV, irrespective of isotopic mass. By monitoring the damping of the TDPAC precession not associated with a bound defect, the author observed release of untrapped interstitial H from the lattice. These experiments give a consistent, microscopic picture of H diffusion and release from Ni. The use of BaF{sub 2} scintillators allows for an eightfold improvement in TDPAC time resolution. This makes possible experiments in systems previously inaccessible due to large precessional frequencies. The author demonstrates the utility of BaF{sub 2} in several examples, including {sup 100}RhNi, {sup 99}TcFe, {sup 101}RuFe, {sup 100}RhCo and {sup 100}RhFe, systems which had not been studied previously due to time resolution limitation. The Larmor frequency for {sup 100}RhFe, 5565 Mrad/s, is the highest frequency ever measured via TDPAC.

  18. Angular correlation of the cosmic microwave background in the Rh = ct Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, F.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The emergence of several unexpected large-scale features in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has pointed to possible new physics driving the origin of density fluctuations in the early Universe and their evolution into the large-scale structure we see today. Aims: In this paper, we focus our attention on the possible absence of angular correlation in the CMB anisotropies at angles larger than ~60°, and consider whether this feature may be the signature of fluctuations expected in the Rh = ct Universe. Methods: We calculate the CMB angular correlation function for a fluctuation spectrum expected from growth in a Universe whose dynamics is constrained by the equation-of-state p = -ρ/3, where p and ρ are the total pressure and density, respectively. Results: We find that, though the disparity between the predictions of ΛCDM and the WMAP sky may be due to cosmic variance, it may also be due to an absence of inflation. The classic horizon problem does not exist in the Rh = ct Universe, so a period of exponential growth was not necessary in this cosmology in order to account for the general uniformity of the CMB (save for the aforementioned tiny fluctuations of 1 part in 100 000 in the WMAP relic signal). Conclusions: We show that the Rh = ct Universe without inflation can account for the apparent absence in CMB angular correlation at angles θ ≳ 60° without invoking cosmic variance, providing additional motivation for pursuing this cosmology as a viable description of nature.

  19. Perturbed angular correlation study of radiation-induced defects in Rh metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawda, M.; Patel, N.; Sebastian, K. C.; Somayajulu, D. R. S.; Sarkar, M.; Singh, R. P.; Murlithar, S.; Awasthi, D. K.

    2006-06-01

    Radiation-induced defects are studied in cubic rhodium metal, using the local probe technique 'Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) at liquid N-2 temperature. Isochronal annealing was done at 300, 1073 and 1473 K temperatures. The irradiated sample showed two quadrupole interaction frequencies at 1150 and 93 MHz. The low frequency disappeared at room-temperature annealing, which was assigned to In trapped at a vacancy, whereas the higher frequency remained up to high temperatures and was attributed to In trapped at Rh-C complexes in the Rh matrix.

  20. Video-analysis Interface for Angular Joint Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondani, M.; Ghersi, I.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    Real-time quantification of joint articular movement is instrumental in the comprehensive assessment of significant biomechanical gestures. The development of an interface, based on an automatic algorithm for 3D-motion analysis, is presented in this work. The graphical interface uses open-source libraries for video processing, and its use is intuitive. The proposed method is low-cost, of acceptable precision (|εθ| < 1°), and minimally invasive. It allows to obtain angular movement of joints in different planes, synchronized with the video of the gesture, as well as to make comparisons and calculate parameters of interest from the acquired angular kinematics.

  1. Perturbed Angular Correlation of the stretched cascade in the decay of 180mHf using a digital spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Markus; Butz, Tilman

    2012-05-01

    We report on the measurement of the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) at Hf sites using the nuclear probe 180mHf in HfF4·HF·2H2O at 300 K by exploiting all possible start quanta in the stretched cascade with a digital Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (TDPAC) spectrometer. With conventional spectrometers, multiple prompt start signals would paralyze the router. The gain in coincidence rate is about a factor of 5 compared to a conventional spectrometer using a single start only. With multiple starts 180mHf is a promising new isomeric nuclear probe in TDPAC experiments. As an additional feature we implemented the possibility to measure up to four cascades simultaneously in order to save data collection time or to measure isobaric contaminations like 111mCd and 111In.

  2. Angular correlation between photoelectrons and auger electrons from K-shell ionization of neon.

    PubMed

    Landers, A L; Robicheaux, F; Jahnke, T; Schöffler, M; Osipov, T; Titze, J; Lee, S Y; Adaniya, H; Hertlein, M; Ranitovic, P; Bocharova, I; Akoury, D; Bhandary, A; Weber, Th; Prior, M H; Cocke, C L; Dörner, R; Belkacem, A

    2009-06-01

    We have used cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy to study the continuum correlation between the photoelectron of core-photoionized neon and the subsequent Auger electron. We observe a strong angular correlation between the two electrons. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations agree quite well with the photoelectron energy distribution that is shifted due to the potential change associated with Auger decay. However, a striking discrepancy results in the distribution of the relative angle between Auger and photoelectron. The classical model predicts a shift in photoelectron flux away from the Auger emission direction, and the data strikingly reveal that the flux is lost rather than diverted, indicating that the two-step interpretation of photoionization followed by Auger emission is insufficient to fully describe the core-photoionization process. PMID:19658860

  3. Angular Correlation between Photoelectrons and Auger Electrons from K-Shell Ionization of Neon

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, A. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Bhandary, A.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Titze, J.; Akoury, D.; Doerner, R.; Osipov, T.; Lee, S. Y.; Adaniya, H.; Hertlein, M.; Weber, Th.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.; Ranitovic, P.; Bocharova, I.; Cocke, C. L.

    2009-06-05

    We have used cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy to study the continuum correlation between the photoelectron of core-photoionized neon and the subsequent Auger electron. We observe a strong angular correlation between the two electrons. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations agree quite well with the photoelectron energy distribution that is shifted due to the potential change associated with Auger decay. However, a striking discrepancy results in the distribution of the relative angle between Auger and photoelectron. The classical model predicts a shift in photoelectron flux away from the Auger emission direction, and the data strikingly reveal that the flux is lost rather than diverted, indicating that the two-step interpretation of photoionization followed by Auger emission is insufficient to fully describe the core-photoionization process.

  4. A high precision instrument to measure angular and binocular deviation introduced by aircraft windscreens by using a shadow casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shivananju, B. N.; Yamdagni, S.; Vasu, R. M.; Asokan, S.

    2012-12-15

    Objects viewed through transparent sheets with residual non-parallelism and irregularity appear shifted and distorted. This distortion is measured in terms of angular and binocular deviation of an object viewed through the transparent sheet. The angular and binocular deviations introduced are particularly important in the context of aircraft windscreens and canopies as they can interfere with decision making of pilots especially while landing, leading to accidents. In this work, we have developed an instrument to measure both the angular and binocular deviations introduced by transparent sheets. This instrument is especially useful in the qualification of aircraft windscreens and canopies. It measures the deviation in the geometrical shadow cast by a periodic dot pattern trans-illuminated by the distorted light beam from the transparent test specimen compared to the reference pattern. Accurate quantification of the shift in the pattern is obtained by cross-correlating the reference shadow pattern with the specimen shadow pattern and measuring the location of the correlation peak. The developed instrument is handy to use and computes both angular and binocular deviation with an accuracy of less than {+-}0.1 mrad ( Almost-Equal-To 0.036 mrad) and has an excellent repeatability with an error of less than 2%.

  5. Long-Range Near-Side Angular Correlations in Proton-Proton Interactions in CMS.

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-21

    The CMS Collaboration Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in proton-proton collisions at center of mass energies of 0.9, 2.36 and 7TeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (?) and azimuthal angle (f) are presented using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Short-range correlations in ??, which are studied in minimum bias events, are characterized using a simple independent cluster parameterization in order to quantify their strength (cluster size) and their extent in ? (cluster decay width). Long-range azimuthal correlations are studied more differentially as a function of charged particle multiplicity and particle transverse momentum using a 980nb-1 data set at 7TeV. In high multiplicity events, a pronounced structure emerges in the two-dimensional correlation function for particles in intermediate pT’s of 1-3GeV/c, 2.0< |??|<4.8 and ?f˜0. This is the ?rst observation of such a ridge-like feature in two-particle correlation functions in pp or p-pbar collisions. EVO Universe, password "seminar"; Phone Bridge ID: 2330444 Password: 5142

  6. Neutron-neutron angular correlations in spontaneous and neutron-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jorgen

    2015-04-01

    For many years, the state of the art for treating fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. However, such average fission models have limited interaction-by-interaction capabilities. Energy is not explicitly conserved and no correlations are available because all particles are emitted isotropically and independently. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of emitted particles are correlated. Such correlations are interesting for many modern applications, including detecting small amounts of material and detector development. Event-by-event generation of complete fission events are particularly useful because it is possible to obtain the fission products as well as the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process, all with complete kinematic information. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. Such codes, when included in broader Monte Carlo transport codes, like MCNP, can be made broadly available. We compare results from our fast event-by-event fission code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) with available neutron-neutron angular correlation data and study the sensitivities of these observables to the model inputs. This work was done under the auspices of the US DOE by (RV) LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and by (JR) LBNL, Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. We acknowledge support of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development in DOE/NNSA.

  7. Long-Range Near-Side Angular Correlations in Proton-Proton Interactions in CMS.

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    The CMS Collaboration Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in proton-proton collisions at center of mass energies of 0.9, 2.36 and 7TeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (?) and azimuthal angle (f) are presented using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Short-range correlations in ??, which are studied in minimum bias events, are characterized using a simple independent cluster parameterization in order to quantify their strength (cluster size) and their extent in ? (cluster decay width). Long-range azimuthal correlations are studied more differentially as a function of charged particle multiplicity and particle transverse momentum using a 980nb-1 data set at 7TeV. In high multiplicity events, a pronounced structure emerges in the two-dimensional correlation function for particles in intermediate pT?s of 1-3GeV/c, 2.0< |??|<4.8 and ?f?0. This is the ?rst observation of such a ridge-like feature in two-particle correlation functions in pp or p-pbar collisions. EVO Universe, password "seminar"; Phone Bridge ID: 2330444 Password: 5142

  8. Characteristics of angular cross correlations studied by light scattering from two-dimensional microsphere films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, M. A.; Gutt, C.; Grübel, G.

    2014-07-01

    Recently the analysis of scattering patterns by angular cross-correlation analysis (CCA) was introduced to reveal the orientational order in disordered samples with special focus to future applications on x-ray free-electron laser facilities. We apply this CCA approach to ultra-small-angle light-scattering data obtained from two-dimensional monolayers of microspheres. The films were studied in addition by optical microscopy. This combined approach allows to calculate the cross-correlations of the scattering patterns, characterized by the orientational correlation function Ψl(q), as well as to obtain the real-space structure of the monolayers. We show that CCA is sensitive to the orientational order of monolayers formed by the microspheres which are not directly visible from the scattering patterns. By mixing microspheres of different radii the sizes of ordered monolayer domains is reduced. For these samples it is shown that Ψl(q) quantitatively describes the degree of hexagonal order of the two-dimensional films. The experimental CCA results are compared with calculations based on the microscopy images. Both techniques show qualitatively similar features. Differences can be attributed to the wave-front distortion of the laser beam in the experiment. This effect is discussed by investigating the effect of different wave fronts on the cross-correlation analysis results. The so-determined characteristics of the cross-correlation analysis will be also relevant for future x-ray-based studies.

  9. A Simple Method to Measure the Angular Speed of a Spinning Object

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Raj M.

    2008-01-01

    The angular speed of a spinning object is commonly measured using a stroboscope or a mechanically or optically coupled tachometer. We present here an alternate, simple, and instructive method to measure it using a microphone and a computer.

  10. Angular correlation functions of X-ray point-like sources in the full exposure XMM-LSS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyiv, A.; Clerc, N.; Plionis, M.; Surdej, J.; Pierre, M.; Basilakos, S.; Chiappetti, L.; Gandhi, P.; Gosset, E.; Melnyk, O.; Pacaud, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Our aim is to study the large-scale structure of different types of AGN using the medium-deep XMM-LSS survey. Methods: We measure the two-point angular correlation function of 5700 and 2500 X-ray point-like sources over the 11 sq. deg. XMM-LSS field in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) bands. For the conversion from the angular to the spatial correlation function we used the Limber integral equation and the luminosity-dependent density evolution model of the AGN X-ray luminosity function. Results: We have found significant angular correlations with the power-law parameters γ = 1.81 ± 0.02, θ0 = 1.3'' ± 0.2'' for the soft, and γ = 2.00 ± 0.04, θ0 = 7.3'' ± 1.0'' for the hard bands. The amplitude of the correlation function w(θ) is higher in the hard than in the soft band for fx ≲ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 and lower above this flux limit. We confirm that the clustering strength θ0 grows with the flux limit of the sample, a trend which is also present in the amplitude of the spatial correlation function, but only for the soft band. In the hard band, it remains almost constant with r0 ≃ 10h-1 Mpc, irrespective of the flux limit. Our analysis of AGN subsamples with different hardness ratios shows that the sources with a hard-spectrum are more clustered than soft-spectrum ones. This result may be a hint that the two main types of AGN populate different environments. Finally, we find that our clustering results correspond to an X-ray selected AGN bias factor of 2.5 for the soft band sources (at a median bar{z} ≃ 1.1) and 3.3 for the hard band sources (at a median bar{z} ≃ 1), which translates into a host dark matter halo mass of 1013h-1M⊙ and 1013.7h-1M⊙ for the soft and hard bands, respectively. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Olivier Garcet who has initiated the present work just before his sudden death.

  11. Measurement of the angular-motion parameters of a base by a dynamically adjustable gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbrutskii, A. V.

    1986-04-01

    The paper examines the dynamics and errors of a balanced dynamically adjustable gyroscope as a sensor of the angular deviations and angular velocities of the base. Attention is given to measurements made under conditions of uniform and uniformly accelerated rotation of the base.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Linear and Angular Measurements on Digital Orthopantomogram with Calcaneus Bone Mineral Density

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Mariappan Jonathan; Srinivasan, Subramaniam Vasudevan; Koliyan, Ramadoss; Kumar, Jimsha Vannathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Bone remodeling is a continuous and complex process which occurs throughout life. Radiomorphometric and radioangular indices on the orthopantomogram are the predictors of bone remodeling associated with mandible. Bone mineral density is the amount of calcified tissue in a certain volume of the bone. Materials and Methods Fifty normal healthy individuals within the age range of 25-55 years were included in the study. Linear measurements including mandibular cortical width (MCW) and panoramic mandibular index (PMI); and angular measurements including mandibular angle (MA) and antegonial angle (AGA) were recorded. Quantitative ultrasound bone mineral density (BMD) scan of the heel bone (calcaneus) of the same patient were also performed. Results In our study, for both males and females, antegonial angle (AGA) had highest correlation with calcaneus bone mineral density. In the age group of less than 35 years, PMI in males, and AGA in females had highest correlation. In the age range of more than 35 years, MA in males and AGA in females had highest correlation. Conclusion There is a correlation between the mandibular bone remodelling changes and calcaneal bone mineral density in case of elder subjects and thus these parameters may be used as an inexpensive alternative screening method to assess the bone mineral density and identify individuals at risk for osteoporosis and fractures and also for dental treatment planning. PMID:26393197

  13. Magnetic interaction in NdScGe: a local investigation by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. N.; Dhar, S. K.

    2004-02-01

    The magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions for the 111Cd probe nucleus in the equi-atomic ferromagnetic compound NdScGe (T_{\\mathrm {c}}\\sim 200 K) have been investigated by the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. The Cd probe occupying the Sc site experiences a large magnetic hyperfine field with saturation value Bhf(0) = -8.5 T. By comparing the results with the hyperfine field data in Nd metal and estimates made with the RKKY interaction, we find an indication for sizeable spin polarization of the conduction electrons in NdScGe. In addition, we find evidence of lattice softening near the Curie temperature reflected by an abrupt decrease in the quadrupole interaction frequency ngrQ(T).

  14. The muon capture in {sup 16}O: the angular and polarization correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Isakov, V. I.

    2012-02-15

    Longitudinal polarization of the daughter nuclei {sup 16}N which arises in Micro-Sign {sup -} capture on {sup 16}O as a function of the recoil angle, together with the angular distribution and the alignment of the recoil nucleus are calculated. The neutrinos born escape mainly along the muon spin. The polarization is found to vary from zero (recoil momentum counter to the muon spin direction) up to 50% (along the muon spin direction). The results can be applied to the experimental tests of T conservation, to the analysis of the projects of constructing the powerful mono-energetic neutrino sources, to the experimental study of the pseudo-scalar form factor and the K-electron capture, and to other spin-polarization correlation experiments.

  15. Neural correlates for angular head velocity in the rat dorsal tegmental nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassett, J. P.; Taube, J. S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Many neurons in the rat lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) fire selectively in relation to the animal's head direction (HD) in the horizontal plane independent of the rat's location or behavior. One hypothesis of how this representation is generated and updated is via subcortical projections from the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN). Here we report the type of activity in DTN neurons. The majority of cells (75%) fired as a function of the rat's angular head velocity (AHV). Cells exhibited one of two types of firing patterns: (1) symmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with AHV during head turns in both directions, and (2) asymmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with head turns in one direction and correlated either negatively or not at all in the opposite direction. In addition to modulation by AHV, some of the AHV cells (40.1%) were weakly modulated by the rat's linear velocity, and a smaller number were modulated by HD (11%) or head pitch (15.9%). Autocorrelation analyses indicated that with the head stationary, AHV cells displayed irregular discharge patterns. Because afferents from the DTN are the major source of information projecting to the LMN, these results suggest that AHV information from the DTN plays a significant role in generating the HD signal in LMN. A model is proposed showing how DTN AHV cells can generate and update the LMN HD cell signal.

  16. Neural correlates for angular head velocity in the rat dorsal tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bassett, J P; Taube, J S

    2001-08-01

    Many neurons in the rat lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) fire selectively in relation to the animal's head direction (HD) in the horizontal plane independent of the rat's location or behavior. One hypothesis of how this representation is generated and updated is via subcortical projections from the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN). Here we report the type of activity in DTN neurons. The majority of cells (75%) fired as a function of the rat's angular head velocity (AHV). Cells exhibited one of two types of firing patterns: (1) symmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with AHV during head turns in both directions, and (2) asymmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with head turns in one direction and correlated either negatively or not at all in the opposite direction. In addition to modulation by AHV, some of the AHV cells (40.1%) were weakly modulated by the rat's linear velocity, and a smaller number were modulated by HD (11%) or head pitch (15.9%). Autocorrelation analyses indicated that with the head stationary, AHV cells displayed irregular discharge patterns. Because afferents from the DTN are the major source of information projecting to the LMN, these results suggest that AHV information from the DTN plays a significant role in generating the HD signal in LMN. A model is proposed showing how DTN AHV cells can generate and update the LMN HD cell signal. PMID:11466446

  17. Discrete time interval measurement system: fundamentals, resolution and errors in the measurement of angular vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez de León, F. C.; Meroño Pérez, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    The traditional method for measuring the velocity and the angular vibration in the shaft of rotating machines using incremental encoders is based on counting the pulses at given time intervals. This method is generically called the time interval measurement system (TIMS). A variant of this method that we have developed in this work consists of measuring the corresponding time of each pulse from the encoder and sampling the signal by means of an A/D converter as if it were an analog signal, that is to say, in discrete time. For this reason, we have denominated this method as the discrete time interval measurement system (DTIMS). This measurement system provides a substantial improvement in the precision and frequency resolution compared with the traditional method of counting pulses. In addition, this method permits modification of the width of some pulses in order to obtain a mark-phase on every lap. This paper explains the theoretical fundamentals of the DTIMS and its application for measuring the angular vibrations of rotating machines. It also displays the required relationship between the sampling rate of the signal, the number of pulses of the encoder and the rotating velocity in order to obtain the required resolution and to delimit the methodological errors in the measurement.

  18. A Perturbed-Angular-Correlation Study of Hyperfine Interactions at 181Ta in α-Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquevich, A. F.; Junqueira, A. C.; Carbonari, A. W.; Saxena, R. N.

    2004-11-01

    The hyperfine interactions at 181Ta ions on Fe3+ sites in α-Fe2O3 (hematite) were studied in the temperature range 11 1100 K by means of the perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique. The 181Hf(β-)181Ta probe nuclei were introduced chemically into the sample during the preparation. The hyperfine interaction measurements allow to observe the magnetic phase transition and to characterize the supertransferred hyperfine magnetic field Bhf and the electric field gradient (EFG) at the impurity sites. The angles between Bhf and the principal axes of the EFG were determined. The Morin transition was also observed. The results are compared with those of similar experiments carried out using 111Cd probe.

  19. Angular Motion Estimation Using Dynamic Models in a Gyro-Free Inertial Measurement Unit

    PubMed Central

    Edwan, Ezzaldeen; Knedlik, Stefan; Loffeld, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the results of using dynamic models borrowed from tracking theory in describing the time evolution of the state vector to have an estimate of the angular motion in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit (GF-IMU). The GF-IMU is a special type inertial measurement unit (IMU) that uses only a set of accelerometers in inferring the angular motion. Using distributed accelerometers, we get an angular information vector (AIV) composed of angular acceleration and quadratic angular velocity terms. We use a Kalman filter approach to estimate the angular velocity vector since it is not expressed explicitly within the AIV. The bias parameters inherent in the accelerometers measurements' produce a biased AIV and hence the AIV bias parameters are estimated within an augmented state vector. Using dynamic models, the appended bias parameters of the AIV become observable and hence we can have unbiased angular motion estimate. Moreover, a good model is required to extract the maximum amount of information from the observation. Observability analysis is done to determine the conditions for having an observable state space model. For higher grades of accelerometers and under relatively higher sampling frequency, the error of accelerometer measurements is dominated by the noise error. Consequently, simulations are conducted on two models, one has bias parameters appended in the state space model and the other is a reduced model without bias parameters. PMID:22778586

  20. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D’Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En’yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O’Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.

  1. How does angular resolution affect diffusion imaging measures?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Liang; Leow, Alex D; Jahanshad, Neda; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Barysheva, Marina; Lee, Agatha D; Toga, Arthur W; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-01-15

    A key question in diffusion imaging is how many diffusion-weighted images suffice to provide adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for studies of fiber integrity. Motion, physiological effects, and scan duration all affect the achievable SNR in real brain images, making theoretical studies and simulations only partially useful. We therefore scanned 50 healthy adults with 105-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) at 4T. From gradient image subsets of varying size (6angular distribution energy, we created SNR plots (versus gradient numbers) for seven common diffusion anisotropy indices: fractional and relative anisotropy (FA, RA), mean diffusivity (MD), volume ratio (VR), geodesic anisotropy (GA), its hyperbolic tangent (tGA), and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA). SNR, defined in a region of interest in the corpus callosum, was near-maximal with 58, 66, and 62 gradients for MD, FA, and RA, respectively, and with about 55 gradients for GA and tGA. For VR and GFA, SNR increased rapidly with more gradients. SNR was optimized when the ratio of diffusion-sensitized to non-sensitized images was 9.13 for GA and tGA, 10.57 for FA, 9.17 for RA, and 26 for MD and VR. In orientation density functions modeling the HARDI signal as a continuous mixture of tensors, the diffusion profile reconstruction accuracy rose rapidly with additional gradients. These plots may help in making trade-off decisions when designing diffusion imaging protocols. PMID:19819339

  2. Local structure reconstruction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon from angular correlation and synchrotron diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, D. T.; Minani, E.; Knoesen, D.; Schut, H.; Eijt, S. W. H.; Furlan, F.; Giles, C.; Härting, M.

    2006-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a widely used thin film semiconductor material which is still incompletely understood. It is generally assumed to form a continuous random network, with a high concentration of coordination defects (dangling bonds), which are hydrogen terminated. Neither the exact nature of these sites nor the degree of medium range order has been fully determined. In this paper, we present the first results for the local structure, from a combined study using angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR) and synchrotron radiation diffraction. Reciprocal space information is obtained directly, for the mesoscale structure and the local defect structure, from the orientation dependent diffraction and 2D-ACAR patterns, respectively. Furthermore, inversion of both patterns yields a comparison of real space information through maps of the silicon-silicon pair correlation function and the electron-positron autocorrelation function B2 γ( r). From this information, it is possible to identify the dominant structural defect as a vacancy-size dangling bond cluster, around which the network strain is fully relaxed.

  3. Measurement of Neutron-Induced, Angular-Momentum-Dependent Fission Probabilities Direct Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Jovanovic, Igor; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The surrogate method has previously been used to successfully measure (n , f) cross sections of a variety of difficult to produce actinide isotopes. These measurements are inaccurate at excitation energies below 1.5 MeV where the distribution of angular momentum states populated in the compound nucleus created by neutron absorption significantly differs from that arising from direct reactions. A method to measure the fission probability of individual angular momentum states arising from 239 Pu(d , pf) and 239 Pu(α ,α' f) reactions has been developed. This method consists on charged particle detectors with 40 keV FWHM resolution at 13 angles up and downstream of the beam. An array of photovoltaic (solar) cells is used to measure the angular distribution of fission fragments with high angular resolution. This distribution uniquely identifies the populated angular momentum states. These are fit to expected distributions to determine the contribution of each state. The charged particle and fission matrix obtained from these measurements determines fission probabilities of specific angular momentum states in the transition nucleus. Development of this scheme and first results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number 2012-DN-130-NF0001.

  4. D0 results on three-jet production, multijet cross-section ratios, and minimum bias angular correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; /Louisiana Tech. U.

    2010-01-01

    We report the measurement of the cross-section for three-jet production and the ratio of inclusive three-jet to two-jet cross-sections, as well as a study of angular correlations in minimum bias events, based on data taken with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The differential inclusive three-jet cross section as a function of the invariant three-jetmass (M{sub 3jet}) is measured in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1}. The measurement is performed in three rapidity regions (|y| < 0.8, |y| < 1.6 and |y| < 2.4) and in three regions of the third (ordered in p{sub T}) jet transverse momenta (p{sub T3} > 40 GeV, p{sub T3} > 70 GeV, p{sub T3} > 100 GeV) for events with leading jet transverse momentum larger than 150 GeV and well separated jets. NLO QCD calculations are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the measured cross sections. Based on the same data set, we present the first measurement of ratios of multi-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The ratio of inclusive trijet and dijet cross sections, R{sub 3/2}, has been measured as a function of the transverse jet momenta. The data are compared to QCD model predictions in different approximations. Finally, we present a new way to describe minimum bias events based on angular distributions in {approx}5 million minimum bias p{bar p} collisions collected between April 2002 and February 2006 with the D0 detector. We demonstrate that the distribution of {Delta}{phi} in the detector transverse plane between the leading track and all other tracks is a robust observable that can be used for tuning of multiple color interaction models. Pseudorapidity correlations of the {Delta}{phi} distributions are also studied.

  5. A compact digital time differential perturbed angular correlation-spectrometer using field programmable gate arrays and various timestamp algorithms.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Markus; Iwig, Kornelius; Butz, Tilman

    2011-06-01

    A user-friendly fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC)-spectrometer with six detectors and fast digitizers using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) is described and performance data are given. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and a time resolution such as conventional analog spectrometers. Its calculation intensive part was implemented inside the digitizer. This gives the possibility to change parameters (energy windows, constant fraction trigger delay) and see their influence immediately in the γ-γ correlation diagrams. Tests were performed which showed that the time resolution using a (60)Co source with energy window set at 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV is 265 ps with LaBr(3)(Ce) scintillators and 254 ps with BaF(2) scintillators. A true constant fraction algorithm turned out to be slightly better than the constant fraction of amplitude method. The spectrometer performance was tested with a TDPAC measurement using a (44)Ti in rutile source and a positron lifetime measurement using (22)Na. The maximum possible data rate of the spectrometer is 1.1 × 10(6) γ quanta per detector and second. PMID:21721728

  6. A compact digital time differential perturbed angular correlation-spectrometer using field programmable gate arrays and various timestamp algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Markus; Butz, Tilman; Iwig, Kornelius

    2011-06-15

    A user-friendly fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC)-spectrometer with six detectors and fast digitizers using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) is described and performance data are given. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and a time resolution such as conventional analog spectrometers. Its calculation intensive part was implemented inside the digitizer. This gives the possibility to change parameters (energy windows, constant fraction trigger delay) and see their influence immediately in the {gamma}-{gamma} correlation diagrams. Tests were performed which showed that the time resolution using a {sup 60}Co source with energy window set at 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV is 265 ps with LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators and 254 ps with BaF{sub 2} scintillators. A true constant fraction algorithm turned out to be slightly better than the constant fraction of amplitude method. The spectrometer performance was tested with a TDPAC measurement using a {sup 44}Ti in rutile source and a positron lifetime measurement using {sup 22}Na. The maximum possible data rate of the spectrometer is 1.1 x 10{sup 6} {gamma} quanta per detector and second.

  7. A compact digital time differential perturbed angular correlation-spectrometer using field programmable gate arrays and various timestamp algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Markus; Iwig, Kornelius; Butz, Tilman

    2011-06-01

    A user-friendly fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC)-spectrometer with six detectors and fast digitizers using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) is described and performance data are given. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and a time resolution such as conventional analog spectrometers. Its calculation intensive part was implemented inside the digitizer. This gives the possibility to change parameters (energy windows, constant fraction trigger delay) and see their influence immediately in the γ-γ correlation diagrams. Tests were performed which showed that the time resolution using a 60Co source with energy window set at 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV is 265 ps with LaBr3(Ce) scintillators and 254 ps with BaF2 scintillators. A true constant fraction algorithm turned out to be slightly better than the constant fraction of amplitude method. The spectrometer performance was tested with a TDPAC measurement using a 44Ti in rutile source and a positron lifetime measurement using 22Na. The maximum possible data rate of the spectrometer is 1.1 × 106 γ quanta per detector and second.

  8. Measurement of irregularities in angular velocities of rotating assemblies in memory devices on magnetic carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virakas, G. I.; Matsyulevichyus, R. A.; Minkevichyus, K. P.; Potsyus, Z. Y.; Shirvinskas, B. D.

    1973-01-01

    Problems in measurement of irregularities in angular velocity of rotating assemblies in memory devices with rigid and flexible magnetic data carriers are discussed. A device and method for determination of change in angular velocities in various frequency and rotation rate ranges are examined. A schematic diagram of a photoelectric sensor for recording the signal pulses is provided. Mathematical models are developed to show the amount of error which can result from misalignment of the test equipment.

  9. Hyperfine Magnetic Field Measurements in the Heusler Alloys COBALT(2)-TITANIUM-Z, COBALT(2)-MAGNESIUM-Z (z = Silicon, Germanium, and Tin) and COBALT(2)-MAGNESIUM- Gallium Using the Moessbauer Effect (me) and the Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (tdpac) Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahamer, Amer Said

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the hyperfine magnetic field in a series of Heusler alloys were performed. The probes were in (^{119}Sn) and cadmium (^{111}Cd). These measurements were performed at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio. Two techniques were used. The first technique was the Mossbauer effect, which was used to measure the hyperfine magnetic field on ^{119 }Sn in Co_2TiZ (Z = Si, Ge, and Sn), and the second technique was the Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation which was used to measure the hyperfine magnetic field on ^ {111}Cd in the Co_2MnZ (Z = Si, Ge, Sn, and Ga). The probes are expected to go to the Z sites of the alloys. The hyperfine magnetic field measurements on ^{119}Sn in Co _2TiZ (Z = Si, Ge, and Sn) alloys were done at room, dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures by using the Mossbauer effect technique. The data were fitted by using a least squares fit from which three parameters were extracted. These parameters are the isomer shift, the quadrupole splitting and the hyperfine magnetic field. Temperature variation measurements of the hyperfine magnetic field were performed on ^{111 }Cd in Co_2MnZ (Z = Si, Ge, Sn, and Ga) alloys. The data were fitted again by using a least squares fit from which the Larmor frequency which is related to the hyperfine magnetic field was extracted. Also the Fourier Transforms were taken of the data, on the one hand to confirm the results of the least squares fit and on the other hand to look for more frequencies. Results of the Fourier Transforms show that some of the probe, ^{111}In, did go to the Co site in the Co_2MnZ (Z = Ga, Si, and Ge) alloys. The hmf on ^{111 }Cd in the Co site of these alloys is found to be 68 kOe which is consistent with the value found in the literature. Two theoretical models were examined for the trends of hyperfine magnetic field on ^{119 }Sn and ^{111}Cd in Co_2MnZ (Z = Si, Ge, Sn, and Ga) alloys. These are the Campbell and Blandin model and the Stearns' overlap model

  10. Angular correlations in emission of prescission neutrons from {sup 235}U fission induced by slow polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danilyan, G. V.; Wilpert, T.; Granz, P.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Mezei, F.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Russina, M. V.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2008-12-15

    A new approach to searching for and studying scission neutrons, which is based on the analysis of specific angular correlations in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons, is described and used to evaluate the fraction of scission neutrons in the total number of prompt neutrons of {sup 235}U fission emitted perpendicularly to the fission axis.

  11. Tunable angular-dependent magnetoresistance correlations in magnetic films and their implications for spin Hall magnetoresistance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. K.; Zhang, Y.; Gu, L.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, L.

    2016-02-01

    Angular-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) is considered to be intrinsic to spintronic materials, represented by the classical anisotropic MR (AMR) phenomenon and the recently emerged spin Hall MR (SMR). So far, isotropic AMR, AMR with geometric size effect and interfacial effect, and SMR have been treated separately to explain distinct MR correlations observed in various systems. Current study shows all four types of MR correlations can be reproduced in Fe thin films depending on the film thickness, texture, interface, and morphology. Results suggest previous explanations of the thin-film MR correlations are incomplete and it is inappropriate to use a specific MR angular-dependent correlation as the sole criterion in determining the origin of AMR or ascertaining the exclusive existence of SMR.

  12. Perturbed angular correlation study of the ion exchange of indium into silicalite zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramallo-López, J. M.; Requejo, F. G.; Rentería, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Miró, E. E.

    1999-09-01

    Two indium-containing silicalite zeolites (In/H ZSM5) catalysts prepared by wet impregnation and ionic exchange were characterized by the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) technique using 111In as probe to determine the nature of the indium species. Some of these species take part in the catalytic reaction of the selective reduction (SCR) of NOx with methane. PAC experiments were performed at 500ºC in air before and after reduction reoxidation treatments on the catalysts in order to determine the origin of the different hyperfine interactions and then the degree of ionic exchange. Complementary catalytic activity characterizations were also performed. PAC experiments performed on the catalyst obtained by wet impregnation showed that all In-atoms form In2O3 crystallites while almost 70% of In-atoms form In2O3 in the catalyst obtained by ionic exchange. The PAC experiments of both catalysts performed after the reduction reoxidation treatment revealed the presence of two hyperfine interactions, different from those corresponding to indium in In2O3. These hyperfine interactions should be associated to disperse In species responsible of the catalytic activity located in the ionic exchange-sites of the zeolites.

  13. Development of an angular displacement measurement technique through birefringence heterodyne interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hung-Lin; Lee, Ju-Yi; Chen, Lin-Yu; Yang, Yang

    2016-04-01

    An angular displacement measurement sensor with high resolution for large range measurement is presented. The design concept of the proposed method is based on the birefringence effect and phase detection of heterodyne interferometry. High system symmetry and simple operation can be easily achieved by employing an innovative sandwich optical design for the angular sensor. To evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed method, several experiments were performed. The experimental results demonstrate that our angular displacement measurement sensor can achieve a measurement range greater than 26°. Considering the high-frequency noise, the measurement resolution of the system is approximately 1.2° × 10-4. Because of the common-path arrangement, our proposed method can provide superior immunity against environmental disturbances. PMID:27136979

  14. SUB-M-RAD ANGULAR STABILITY MEASUREMENTS BY USE OF LONG TRACE PROFILER BASED SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN,S.

    1999-07-23

    High accuracy angle measurement at the sub-{mu}rad level requires extremely high instrument stability. In order to reach sub-{mu}rad stability (0.1 arc second or less) over long time periods, it is necessary to maintain the test object and almost all of the optical components in the measuring instrument in very steady positions. However, mechanical force relaxation, thermal expansion, and asymmetric structures produce angular and linear displacements in the system resulting in angular measurement error. A Long-Trace-Profiler (LTP)-based stable equipment is used to test precision angular stability with sub-{mu}rad resolution. Long term stability over 15 hours has been measured on different kind of mechanical structures. Temperature monitoring during the tests is extremely important. Some test results showing the effects of thermal variations are presented, which indicate that temperature stability on the order of 0.1 C is absolutely necessary for repeatable sub-{mu}rad measurements. The optical method, using optics with an even number of reflecting surfaces (for example, a right angle prism, pentaprism, or rhomboid prism) to reduce the influence of existing angular displacement, is introduced and the comparison measurement is presented. An optical fiber transfer line is able to reduce the laser angular shift from about 10 {mu}rad to a level of 0.3 {mu}rad rms. Careful system configuration, design and operation are very important for the sub-{mu}rad angle stability.

  15. Low temperature structural modification in Rb2ZrF6: Investigations by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S. K.; Dey, C. C.; Saha, S.

    2016-06-01

    Temperature dependent perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in crystalline compounds Rb2ZrF6 and Cs2HfF6 have been performed in the temperature range 298-753 K. In Rb2ZrF6, four discrete quadrupole interaction frequencies have been observed at room temperature which correspond to four minor structural modifications. From previous measurements, on the other hand, two structural modifications of this compound were known. A displacive phase transition, probably, occurs at low temperature due to rotation of the ZrF62- octahedron and produces different structural modifications. From present measurements in Rb2ZrF6, two quadrupole interaction frequencies [ωQ=26.1(3) Mrad/s, η=0.55(2), δ=5(1)% and ωQ=148.7(3) Mrad/s, η=0.538(5), δ=1.2%] have been found at room temperature which were not found from previous studies. In Cs2HfF6, these new structural modifications have not been observed.

  16. Three-hadron angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions from perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Ortiz, Antonio; Paic, Guy; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-08-15

    We study three-hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider at midrapidity. We use the leading-order parton matrix elements for 2{yields}3 processes and include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using the modified fragmentation function approach. For the case when the produced hadrons have either the same or not too different momenta, we observe two away-side peaks at 2{pi}/3 and 4{pi}/3. We consider the dependence of the angular correlations on energy loss parameters that have been used in studies of single inclusive hadron production at RHIC. Our results on the angular dependence of the cross section agree well with preliminary data by the PHENIX Collaboration. We comment on the possible contribution of 2{yields}3 processes to dihadron angular correlations and how a comparison of the two processes may help characterize the plasma further.

  17. Uncertainty of angular displacement measurement with a MEMS gyroscope integrated in a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos Porath, Maurício; Dolci, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Low-cost inertial sensors have recently gained popularity and are now widely used in electronic devices such as smartphones and tablets. In this paper we present the results of a set of experiments aiming to assess the angular displacement measurement errors of a gyroscope integrated in a smartphone of a recent model. The goal is to verify whether these sensors could substitute dedicated electronic inclinometers for the measurement of angular displacement. We estimated a maximum error of 0.3° (sum of expanded uncertainty and maximum absolute bias) for the roll and pitch axes, for a measurement time without referencing up to 1 h.

  18. The Spatial Distribution of Satellite Galaxies within Halos: Measuring the Very Small Scale Angular Clustering of SDSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscionere, Jennifer A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K.; Scoccimarro, Román

    2015-06-01

    We measure the angular clustering of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 in order to probe the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies within their dark matter halos. Specifically, we measure the angular correlation function on very small scales (7″–320″) in a range of luminosity threshold samples (absolute r-band magnitudes from ‑18 up to ‑21) that are constructed from the subset of SDSS that has been spectroscopically observed more than once (the so-called plate overlap region). We choose to measure angular clustering in this reduced survey footprint in order to minimize the effects of fiber collision incompleteness, which are otherwise substantial on these small scales, and we discuss the possible impact that fiber collisions have on our measurements. We model our clustering measurements using a fully numerical halo model that populates dark matter halos in N-body simulations to create realistic mock galaxy catalogs. The model has free parameters that specify both the number and spatial distribution of galaxies within their host halos. We adopt a flexible density profile for the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies that is similar to the dark matter Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) profile, except that the inner slope is allowed to vary. We find that the angular clustering of our most luminous samples ({{M}r} < ‑20 and ‑21) suggests that luminous satellite galaxies have substantially steeper inner density profiles than NFW. Lower-luminosity samples are less constraining, however, and are consistent with satellite galaxies having shallow density profiles. Our results confirm the findings of Watson et al. while using different clustering measurements and modeling methodology.

  19. Surrogate Reaction Measurement of Angular Dependent 239Pu (n , f) Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    The surrogate method has previously been used to measure (n , f) cross sections of difficult to produce actinide isotopes. These measurements have inaccuracies at excitation energies below 1.5 MeV where the distribution of angular momentum states populated in the compound nucleus created by neutron absorption significantly differs from that arising from direct reactions. A method to measure the fission probability of individual angular momentum states arising from 239Pu (d , pf) and 239Pu (α ,α' f) reactions has been developed. This experimental apparatus consists of charged particle detectors with 40 keV FWHM resolution at 13 angles up and downstream of the particle beam. A segmented array of photovoltaic (solar) cells is used to measure the angular distribution of fission fragments. This distribution uniquely identifies the populated angular momentum states. These are fit to expected distributions to determine the contribution of each state. The charged particle and fission rates matrix obtained from this analysis determines fission probabilities of specific angular momentum states in the transition nucleus. Development of this scheme and first results will be discussed.

  20. Fission Fragment Angular Distributions measured with a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinrath, Verena

    2015-04-28

    The subject is presented in a series of slides with the following organization: Introduction (What is anisotropy? Relevance (Theory and ratio cross section), Previous measurements); Experiment (Particle tracking in the fissionTPC, Neutron time of flight, Data analysis & uncertainty calculation, Preliminary result for 235U); and Future Work (Refine 235U result, Process 239Pu data).

  1. Professional tennis players' serve: correlation between segmental angular momentums and ball velocity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caroline; Kulpa, Richard; Delamarche, Paul; Bideau, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the relationships between segmental angular momentum and ball velocity between the following events: ball toss, maximal elbow flexion (MEF), racket lowest point (RLP), maximal shoulder external rotation (MER), and ball impact (BI). Ten tennis players performed serves recorded with a real-time motion capture. Mean angular momentums of the trunk, upper arm, forearm, and the hand-racket were calculated. The anteroposterior axis angular momentum of the trunk was significantly related with ball velocity during the MEF-RLP, RLP-MER, and MER-BI phases. The strongest relationships between the transverse-axis angular momentums and ball velocity followed a proximal-to-distal timing sequence that allows the transfer of angular momentum from the trunk (MEF-RLP and RLP-MER phases) to the upper arm (RLP-MER phase), forearm (RLP-MER and MER-BI phases), and the hand-racket (MER-BI phase). Since sequence is crucial for ball velocity, players should increase angular momentums of the trunk during MEF-MER, upper arm during RLP-MER, forearm during RLP-BI, and the hand-racket during MER-BI. PMID:23724603

  2. Time-differential perturbed angular correlation study of the electric field gradient in Ti2Rh MoSi2-type compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodniecki, P.; Kulińska, A.; Wodniecka, B.

    The electric field gradient (EFG) at the 181Hf→181Ta site in Ti2Rh C11 b -type compound was measured as a function of temperature using time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. The room temperature results show one EFG with the parameters of: ν Q =336(1) MHz→V zz =5.9×1017 V cm-2, η=0.1. Very week linear temperature dependence of this EFG was measured with the slope of 3.6 (2)×10-5 K-1. The results are compared with those for other isostructural compounds.

  3. Time-differential perturbed angular correlation study of the electric field gradient in Ti2Rh MoSi2-type compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodniecki, P.; Kulińska, A.; Wodniecka, B.

    2007-06-01

    The electric field gradient (EFG) at the 181Hf→181Ta site in Ti2Rh C11 b -type compound was measured as a function of temperature using time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. The room temperature results show one EFG with the parameters of: ν Q = 336(1) MHz→V zz =5.9 × 1017 V cm - 2, η = 0.1. Very week linear temperature dependence of this EFG was measured with the slope of 3.6 (2) × 10 - 5 K - 1. The results are compared with those for other isostructural compounds.

  4. Development of a High Accuracy Angular Measurement System for Langley Research Center Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett; Yu, Si-bok; Rhew, Ray D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern experimental and test activities demand innovative and adaptable procedures to maximize data content and quality while working within severely constrained budgetary and facility resource environments. This report describes development of a high accuracy angular measurement capability for NASA Langley Research Center hypersonic wind tunnel facilities to overcome these deficiencies. Specifically, utilization of micro-electro-mechanical sensors including accelerometers and gyros, coupled with software driven data acquisition hardware, integrated within a prototype measurement system, is considered. Development methodology addresses basic design requirements formulated from wind tunnel facility constraints and current operating procedures, as well as engineering and scientific test objectives. Description of the analytical framework governing relationships between time dependent multi-axis acceleration and angular rate sensor data and the desired three dimensional Eulerian angular state of the test model is given. Calibration procedures for identifying and estimating critical parameters in the sensor hardware is also addressed.

  5. Using Doppler Shifts of GPS Signals To Measure Angular Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    A method has been proposed for extracting information on the rate of rotation of an aircraft, spacecraft, or other body from differential Doppler shifts of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals received by antennas mounted on the body. In principle, the method should be capable of yielding low-noise estimates of rates of rotation. The method could eliminate the need for gyroscopes to measure rates of rotation. The method is based on the fact that for a given signal of frequency ft transmitted by a given GPS satellite, the differential Doppler shift is attributable to the difference between those components of the instantaneous translational velocities of the antennas that lie along the line of sight from the antennas to the GPS satellite.

  6. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  7. Study of the equilibrium vacancy ensemble in aluminum using 1D- and 2D-angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Berko, S.; Chakraborty, B.; Hoffmann, K.R.; Lippel, P.; Siegel, R.W.

    1985-03-12

    One- and two-dimensional angular correlation of positron-electron annihilation radiation (1D and 2D-ACAR) data have been obtained between 293 and 903 K for single crystals of aluminum. The peak counting rates vs temperature, which were measured using the 1D-ACAR technique, provide a model independent value for the temperature dependence of the positron trapping probability. Using these results it is possible to strip out the Bloch state contribution from the observed 2D-ACAR surfaces and then compare the resulting defect ACAR surfaces to calculated 2D-ACAR surfaces for positrons annihilating from the Bloch, monovacancy, and divacancy-trapped states. The result of this comparison is that the presence of an increasing equilibrium divacancy population is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of ACAR data at high temperature in Al and that the present results when compared to earlier studies on Al indicate that the ratio of the trapping rates at divacancies and monovacancies is of order two.

  8. Measurement and analysis of angular velocity variations of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatović, Ž. M.; Štavljanin, M. S.; Tomić, M. V.; Knežević, D. M.; Biočanin, S. Lj.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the procedures for measuring and analyzing the angular velocity variation of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft on its free end and on the power-output end. In addition, the paper deals with important aspects of the measurement of crankshaft torsional oscillations. The method is based on digital encoders placed at two distances, and one of them is a sensor not inserted directly on the shaft, i.e. a non-contact method with a toothed disc is used. The principle based on toothed disc is also used to measure the actual camshaft angular velocity of in-line compact high-pressure pump the engine is equipped with, and this paper aims to demonstrate the possibility of measuring the actual angular velocity of any rotating shaft in the engine, on which it is physically possible to mount a toothed disc. The method was created completely independently during long-range development and research tests of V46 family engines. This method is specific for its particular adaptability for use on larger engines with extensive vibrations and torsional oscillations. The main purpose of this paper is a practical contribution to all the more interesting research of the use of engine crankshaft angular velocity as a diagnostic tool for identifying the engine irregular running.

  9. Angular and spectrally resolved investigations of yeast cells by light scattering microscopy and goniometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Julian; Müller, Dennis; Nothelfer, Steffen; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-07-01

    Spectrally and angular resolved light scattering from yeast cells was studied with a scattering microscope and a goniometer. Different cell models were investigated with help of analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations. It was found that extraction of precise morphological and optical cellular properties from the measured scattering patterns and phase functions requires more sophisticated cell models than standard Mie theory.

  10. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon’s polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  11. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  12. A New Automatic System for Angular Measurement and Calibration in Radiometric Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements. PMID:22319320

  13. Influence of tungsten fiber's slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Zhan, Wen-Ze; Wu, Jun-Fei; Milyukov, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm.

  14. Influence of tungsten fiber's slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Zhan, Wen-Ze; Wu, Jun-Fei; Milyukov, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm. PMID:27587137

  15. Aerosol Retrieval from Multiangle Multispectral Photopolarimetric Measurements: Importance of Spectral Range and Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Hasekamp, O.; Van Diedenhoven, B.; Cairns, B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the importance of spectral range and angular resolution for aerosol retrieval from multiangle photopolarimetric measurements over land. For this purpose, we use an extensive set of simulated measurements for different spectral ranges and angular resolutions and subsets of real measurements of the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) carried out during the PODEX and SEAC4RS campaigns over the continental USA. Aerosol retrievals performed from RSP measurements show good agreement with ground-based AERONET measurements for aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and refractive index. Furthermore, we found that inclusion of shortwave infrared bands (1590 and/or 2250 nm) significantly improves the retrieval of AOD, SSA and coarse mode microphysical properties. However, accuracies of the retrieved aerosol properties do not improve significantly when more than five viewing angles are used in the retrieval.

  16. Precise Measurements of DVCS at JLab and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Deeply-virtual Compton scattering provides the cleanest access to the 3D imaging of the nucleon structure encoded in the generalized parton distributions, that correlate the fraction of the total nucleon momentum carried by a constituent to its position in the transverse plane. Besides the information on the spatial imaging of the nucleon, GPDs provide an access, through the Ji relation, to the contribution of the angular momentum of quarks to proton spin. An accurate estimate of such a contribution will lead to a better understanding of the origin of the proton spin. Jefferson Lab has been an ideal environment for the study of exclusive processes, thanks to the combination of the high-intensity and high-polarization electron beam provided by the CEBAF, with the complementary equipments of the three experimental halls. This has allowed high-precision measurements of the DVCS observables in a wide kinematic region, with focus on those observable s that provide access to the GPDs entering the Ji relation. These studies will be further widened by the projected data from the 12-GeV era, which will improve the existing measurements both in terms of precision and phase-space coverage. The important results on the proton DVCS obtained during the 6-GeV era will be discussed, together with the upcoming experiments approved for the 12-GeV upgrade, that foresees measurements with both proton and quasi-free neutron targets and that, when combined, will lead to the extraction of the Compton Form Factors for separate quark flavors.

  17. Precise Measurements of DVCS at JLab and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Deeply-virtual Compton scattering provides the cleanest access to the 3D imaging of the nucleon structure encoded in the generalized parton distributions, that correlate the fraction of the total nucleon momentum carried by a constituent to its position in the transverse plane. Besides the information on the spatial imaging of the nucleon, GPDs provide an access, through the Ji relation, to the contribution of the angular momentum of quarks to proton spin. An accurate estimate of such a contribution will lead to a better understanding of the origin of the proton spin. Jefferson Lab has been an ideal environment for the study of exclusive processes, thanks to the combination of the high-intensity and high-polarization electron beam provided by the CEBAF, with the complementary equipments of the three experimental halls. This has allowed high-precision measurements of the DVCS observables in a wide kinematic region, with focus on those observable s that provide access to the GPDs entering the Ji relation. These studies will be further widened by the projected data from the 12-GeV era, which will improve the existing measurements both in terms of precision and phase-space coverage. The important results on the proton DVCS obtained during the 6-GeV era will be discussed, together with the upcoming experiments approved for the 12-GeV upgrade, that foresees measurements with both proton and quasi-free neutron targets and that, when combined, will lead to the extraction of the Compton Form Factors for separate quark flavors.

  18. Handheld directional reflectometer: an angular imaging device to measure BRDF and HDR in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattison, Phillip R.; Dombrowski, Mark S.; Lorenz, James M.; Davis, Keith J.; Mann, Harley C.; Johnson, Philip; Foos, Bryan

    1998-10-01

    Many applications require quantitative measurements of surface light scattering, including quality control on production lines, inspection of painted surfaces, inspection of field repairs, etc. Instruments for measuring surface scattering typically fall into two main categories, namely bidirectional reflectometers, which measure the angular distribution of scattering, and hemispherical directional reflectometers, which measure the total scattering into the hemisphere above the surface. Measurement of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) gives the greatest insight into how light is scattered from a surface. Measurements of BRDF, however, are typically very lengthy measurements taken by moving a source and detector to map the scattering. Since BRDF has four angular degrees of freedom, such measurements can require hours to days to complete. Instruments for measuring BRDF are also typically laboratory devices, although a field- portable bi-directional reflectometer does exist. Hemispherical directional reflectance (HDR) is a much easier measurement to make, although care must be taken to use the proper methodology when measuring at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometer, since integrating spheres (typically used to make such measurements) are very energy inefficient and lose their integrating properties at very long wavelengths. A few field- portable hemispherical directional reflectometers do exist, but typically measure HDR only at near-normal angles. Boeing Defense and Space Group and Surface Optics Corporation, under a contract from the Air Force Research Laboratory, have developed a new hand-held instrument capable of measuring both BRDF and HDR using a unique, patented angular imaging technique. A combination of an hemi-ellipsoidal mirror and an additional lens translate the angular scatter from a surface into a two-dimensional spatial distribution, which is recorded by an imaging array. This configuration fully maps the scattering from a half

  19. Angular correlations of projectilelike and fission fragments in the reaction [sup 16]O+[sup 238]U at 110 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, A.; Aiello, S.; De Filippo, E.; Lanzano, G.; Lo Nigro, S.; Milone, C. ); Mermaz, M.C. )

    1994-08-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane angular correlations of fission fragments detected in coincidence with projectilelike residues produced in the nuclear collisions [sup 16]O+[sup 238]U at 110 MeV have been investigated. The data present the essential features of a targetlike sequential fission process. A quantitative description of the experimental angular anisotropies requires the storage in the fissioning nucleus of a mean angular momentum in agreement with a dominant mass transfer mechanism.

  20. Angular correlations between heavy and light fragments in the reaction sup 32 S+ sup 26 Mg at E sub lab =163. 5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S. ); Prete, G. ); Viesti, G. )

    1990-04-01

    Angular correlation measurements between heavy residues ({ital Z}{sub {ital R}}=23--13) and light fragments ({ital Z}{sub {ital L}}=2--10) have been performed for the reaction {sup 32}S+{sup 26}Mg at {ital E}{sub lab}=163.5 MeV. The binary nature of the mechanisms competing with fusion-evaporation is evidenced. Linear momentum analysis and velocity plots indicate contributions of binary reactions also for those elements that are generally believed to be produced by fusion-evaporation mechanisms.

  1. High energy angular distribution measurements of the exclusive deuteron photodisintegration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elaine Schulte; et. Al.

    2002-10-01

    The first complete measurements of the angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section at photon energies above 1.6 GeV were performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The results show a persistent forward-backward asymmetry up to Egamma = 2.4 GeV, the highest-energy measured in this experiment. The Hard Rescattering and the Quark-Gluon string models are in fair agreement with the results.

  2. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-10-31

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  3. Postulates for measures of genuine multipartite correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles H.; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Ryszard; Horodecki, Pawel

    2011-01-15

    A lot of research has been done on multipartite correlations, but the problem of satisfactorily defining genuine multipartite correlations--those not trivially reducible to lower partite correlations--remains unsolved. In this paper we propose three reasonable postulates which each measure or indicator of genuine multipartite correlations (or genuine multipartite entanglement) should satisfy. We also introduce the concept of degree of correlations, which gives partial characterization of multipartite correlations. Then, we show that covariance does not satisfy two postulates and hence it cannot be used as an indicator of genuine multipartite correlations. Finally, we propose a candidate for a measure of genuine multipartite correlations based on the work that can be drawn from a local heat bath by means of a multipartite state.

  4. Cephalometric Angular Measurements of the Mandible Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Kang, Seok Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted this study to analyze the values of the key cephalometric angular measurements of the mandible using 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography scans. Methods In the 106 enrolled patients, a 3D cephalometric analysis was performed to measure the angular variables of the mandible. These values were compared between the two sides and between the two sexes. Results The frontal measurements revealed that the mandibular body curve angle was larger on the left (Lt) side (right [Rt], 141.24±7.54; Lt, 142.68±6.94; P=0.002) and the gonial angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 134.37±8.44; Lt, 131.54±7.14; P<0.001). The sagittal measurements showed that the gonial angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 134.37±8.44; Lt, 131.54±7.14; P>0.05). Further, the transverse measurements revealed that the mandibular body curve angle was larger on the right side (Rt, 140.28±7.05; Lt, 137.56±6.23; P<0.001). Conclusions These results provide an average of the mandibular angular measurements for the Korean population, establishing a standard for determining surgical patient groups and outcome evaluations in the field of mandible contour surgery. PMID:26848443

  5. Is v3 necessary or even informative in describing angular correlation data from RHIC and the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Lanny; Trainor, Thomas; Prindle, Duncan

    2013-10-01

    One of the more interesting observations from the heavy-ion program at RHIC and now at the LHC are long-range correlations on relative pseudorapidity at small azimuth opening angles. In 2010 Alver and Roland suggested that this so-called same-side ridge could be explained in terms of higher-order, azimuth cosine distributions generated by event-wise energy density fluctuations in the initial-state plus hydrodynamic flow. Applications of third- and higher-order harmonics in analysis of angular correlations from heavy-ion collisions have become ubiquitous in the literature. However, we question the introduction of ``higher harmonics'' to the 2D data description. Extending previous work we examine the necessity and utility of v3. We find that the net effect of v3 is to accommodate minor non-Gaussian structure in the same-side 2D peak for pt-integral correlations from RHIC. A single Gaussian hypothesis for those data is not falsified within statistics. Model ambiguities and instabilities resulting from v3 are discussed and resolved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the 0-1% angular correlation data for 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions from ATLAS do not require a v3 component. Supported in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  6. Experimental measurements for studying angular and spectral variation of thermal infrared emissivity.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Juan; Sobrino, José A

    2004-08-10

    One condition for precise multiangle algorithms for estimating sea and land surface temperature with the data from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer is accurate knowledge of the angular variation of surface emissivity in the thermal IR spectrum region. Today there are very few measurements of this variation. The present study is conducted to provide angular emissivity measurements for five representative samples (water, clay, sand, loam, gravel). The measurements are made in one thermal IR broadband (8-13 microm) and three narrower bands (8.2-9.2, 10.3-11.3, and 11.5-12.5 microm) at angles of 0 degrees-60 degrees (at 5 degrees increments) to the surface normal. The results show a general decrease in emissivity with increasing viewing angles, with the 8.2-9.2-microm channel the most sensitive to this dependence and sand the sample showing the greatest variation. PMID:15376438

  7. Angular Magnetoresistance and Hall Measurements in New Dirac Material, ZrSiS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar; Schoop, Leslie; Lotsch, Bettina; Parkin, Stuart

    Dirac and Weyl materials have shot to the forefront of condensed matter research in the last few years. Recently, the square-net material, ZrSiS, was theorized and experimentally shown (via ARPES) to host several highly dispersive Dirac cones, including the first Dirac cone demanded by non-symmorphic symmetry in a Si square net. Here we report the magnetoresistance and Hall Effect measurements in this compound. ZrSiS samples with RRR = 40 were found to have MR values up to 6000% at 2 K, be predominantly p-type with a carrier concentration of ~8 x 1019 cm-3 and mobility ~8500 cm2/Vs. Angular magnetoresistance measurements reveal a peculiar behavior with multiple local maxima, depending on field strength, indicating of a sensitive and sensitive Fermi surface. SdH oscillations analysis confirms Hall and angular magnetoresistance measurements. These results, in the context of the theoretical and ARPES results, will be discussed.

  8. Broadband measurement of translational and angular vibrations using a single continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Salman, Muhammad; Sabra, Karim G

    2012-09-01

    A continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry (CSLDV) technique is used to measure the low frequency broadband vibrations associated with human skeletal muscle vibrations (typically f < 100 Hz) by continuously varying the orientation of laser beam over distances that are short compared to the characteristic wavelengths of the vibrations. The high frequency scan (compared to the vibration frequency) enables the detection of broadband translational and angular velocities at a single point using amplitude demodulation of the CSDLV signal. For instance, linear scans allow measurement of the normal surface velocity and one component of angular velocity vector, while circular scans allow measurement of an additional angular velocity component. This CSLDV technique is first validated here using gel samples mimicking soft tissues and then applied to measure multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) of a subject's hand exhibiting fatigue-induced tremor. Hence this CSLDV technique potentially provides a means for measuring multiple DOF of small human body parts (e.g., fingers, tendons, small muscles) for various applications (e.g., haptic technology, remote surgery) when the use of skin-mounted sensors (e.g. accelerometers) can be problematic due to mass-loading artifacts or tethering issues. PMID:22978867

  9. Weak Measurements Destroy Too Much Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-xiong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui; Song, He-shan

    2016-01-01

    The quantum correlation under weak measurements is studied via skew information. For 2 × d-dimensional states, it can be given by a closed form which linearly depends on the quantum correlation [EPL. 107 (2014) 10007] determined by the strength of the weak measurement. It is found that the quantum correlation under weak measurements only captures partial quantumness of the state. In particular, the extraction of the residual quantumness by the latter measurements will inevitably destroy too much quantumness. To demonstration, the Werner state is given as an example.

  10. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  11. Temperature dependence of electric field gradient in LaCoO3 perovskite investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, Astrogildo C.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Saxena, Rajendra N.; Mestnik-Filho, José; Dogra, Rakesh

    2005-11-01

    The time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique was used to study the temperature dependence of electric field gradient (EFG) in LaCoO3 perovskite using {}^{111}\\mathrm {In}\\rightarrow {}^{111}\\mathrm {Cd} and {}^{181}\\mathrm {Hf} \\rightarrow {}^{181}\\mathrm {Ta} nuclear probes. The radioactive parent nuclei 111In and 181Hf were introduced into the oxide lattice through a chemical process during sample preparation and were found to occupy only the Co sites in LaCoO3. The PAC measurements with 111Cd and 181Ta probes were made in the temperature range of 4.2-1146 K and 4.2-1004 K, respectively. No long-range magnetic order was observed up to 4.2 K. The EFGs at 111Cd and 181Ta show very similar temperature dependences. They increase slowly between 4.2 and about 77 K and then decrease almost linearly with increasing temperature until about 500-600 K, where a broad peak-like structure is observed, followed by linear decrease at still higher temperatures. These discontinuities at about 77 K and 500-600 K have been interpreted as thermally activated spin state transitions from the low-spin (t2g6eg0) ground state configuration to the intermediate-spin (t2g5eg1) state and from the intermediate-spin to the high-spin (t2g4eg2) state of the Co3+ ion, confirming previous observation in other recent studies. An indication of a Jahn-Teller distortion, which stabilizes the intermediate-spin state with orbital ordering, is also pointed out.

  12. Measurement of the angular distribution in anti-p p ---> psi(2S) ---> e+ e-

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogiani, M.; Andreotti, M.; Argiro, S.; Bagnasco, S.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Borreani, G.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Cester, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fan, X.; Garzoglio, G.; Gollwitzer, K.E.; Graham, M.; Hahn, A.; Hu, M.; Jin, S.; Joffe, D.; Kasper, J.; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Northwestern U. /UC, Irvine /Minnesota U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the angular distribution for the exclusive process {bar p}p {yields} {psi}(2S) {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} based on a sample of 6844 events collected by the Fermilab E835 experiment. They find that the angular distribution is well described by the expected functional form dN/d cos {theta}* {proportional_to} 1 + {lambda} cos{sup 2} {theta}*, where {theta}* is the angle between the antiproton and the electron in the center of mass frame, with {lambda} = 0.67 {+-} 0.15(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.). The measured value for {lambda} implies a small but non zero {psi}(2S) helicity 0 formation amplitude in {bar p}p, comparable to what is observed in J/{psi} decays to baryon pairs.

  13. Flow Angularity Measurements in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation using a survey rake with 11 five-hole pyramid-head probes has been conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to measure the test section flow angularity. Flow measurements were made in a 10-ft square grid centered about the test section centerline at a single streamwise location for nine Mach numbers ranging from 0.50 to 1.19 at dynamic pressures of 100 and 225 pounds per square foot. Test section flow angularity was found to be minimal with a generally random flow pattern. Corrections for survey rake induced in-plane flow were determined to be necessary; however, corrections for rake induced lift effects were not required.

  14. Orbital Angular Momentum: How to Define it and How to Measure it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the controversy concerning the ambiguities in the definition of quark and gluon angular momentum we explain pedagogically the origin of these ambiguities and stress that there are fundamentally only three physically relevant variants. We give precise expressions for the sum rules involving them. We consider their measurement, both experimentally and on the lattice, and discuss some attempts to calculate them in models.

  15. High angular momentum states of lithium atom, studied with symmetry-projected explicitly correlated Gaussian lobe functions

    SciTech Connect

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2014-07-28

    Method of construction of wave functions approximating eigenfunctions of the L{sup ^2} operator is proposed for high angular momentum states of few-electron atoms. Basis functions are explicitly correlated Gaussian lobes, projected onto irreducible representations of finite point groups. Variational calculations have been carried out for the lowest states of lithium atom, with quantum number L in the range from 1 to 8. Nonrelativistic energies accurate to several dozens of nanohartree have been obtained. For 2{sup 2}P, 3{sup 2}D, and 4{sup 2}F states they agree well with the reference results. Transition frequencies have been computed and compared with available experimental data.

  16. Tilt angular anisoplanatism and a full-aperture tilt-measurement technique with a laser guide star.

    PubMed

    Belen'kii, M S

    2000-11-20

    A method is presented for sensing atmospheric wave-front tilt from a laser guide star (LGS) by observing a laser beacon with auxiliary telescopes. The analysis is performed with a LGS scatter model and Zernike polynomial expansion of wave-front distortions. It is shown that integration of the LGS image over its angular extent and the position of the auxiliary telescope in an array reduce the tilt sensing error associated with the contribution from the downward path. This allows us to single out only the wave-front tilt of the transmitted beam on the uplink path that corresponds to the tilt for the scientific object. The tilt angular correlation is analyzed in the atmosphere with a finite turbulence outer scale. The tilt correlation angle depends on the angular size of the telescope and the outer scale of turbulence. The tilt sensing error increases with the auxiliary telescope diameter, suggesting that an auxiliary telescope must be small. The Strehl ratio associated with the contribution from the downward path is in the range from 0.1 to 0.9 when the relative telescope diameter D/r(0) varies from 4 to 93 and the turbulence outer scale is in the 10-150-m range. Tilt correction increases the Strehl ratio compared with the uncorrected image for all the system parameters and seeing conditions considered. The method discussed gives a higher performance than the conventional technique, which uses an off-axis natural guide star. A scheme for measuring tilt with a beam projected from a small aperture is described. This scheme allows us to avoid phosphorescence of the main optical train for a sodium LGS. PMID:18354615

  17. Prescriptions for measuring and transporting local angular momenta in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Éanna É.; Nichols, David A.; Stein, Leo C.; Vines, Justin

    2016-05-01

    For observers in curved spacetimes, elements of the dual space of the set of linearized Poincaré transformations from an observer's tangent space to itself can be naturally interpreted as local linear and angular momenta. We present an operational procedure by which observers can measure such quantities using only information about the spacetime curvature at their location. When applied by observers near spacelike or null infinity in stationary, vacuum, asymptotically flat spacetimes, there is a sense in which the procedure yields the well-defined linear and angular momenta of the spacetime. We also describe a general method by which observers can transport local linear and angular momenta from one point to another, which improves previous prescriptions. This transport is not path independent in general, but becomes path independent for the measured momenta in the same limiting regime. The transport prescription is defined in terms of differential equations, but it can also be interpreted as parallel transport in a particular direct-sum vector bundle. Using the curvature of the connection on this bundle, we compute and discuss the holonomy of the transport law. We anticipate that these measurement and transport definitions may ultimately prove useful for clarifying the physical interpretation of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs charges of asymptotically flat spacetimes.

  18. Static Magnetic Properties of Films Measured by Means of Angular Perturbative Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Alexandre; Melo, Abner; da Costa, Ricardo; Chesman, Carlos

    In this work we introduced a new technique to measure magnetic anisotropies and magnetoelectrical properties, such as Anisotropic Magnetoresistance (AMR) and Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) amplitudes. The Perturbative Magnetoresistance (PMR) consist of a regular collinear four probe magnetoresistance set up with an AC magnetic field (hac) applied perpendicular to the DC (Hdc) one. hac amplitude is about 1.0 Oe and oscillate at 270 Hz. We successfully interpreted the signal response from the voltage measured by lock-in amplifier and proposed a model based on energy minimization to extract magnetic anisotropies, AMR and GMR amplitudes. Measuring the in-plane angular dependency of PMR signal we were able to identify the usual magnetic anisotropy, such as uniaxial, unidirectional and cubic. Taking into account the perturbative nature of this technique (small hac amplitude and low frequency), we argue that angular PMR can be used to investigate some dynamic magnetic effects where static technique can not provide such information. A distinct feature of angular PMR is the capability to be used in saturated and non-saturated regime, so revealing magnetic properties dependency on applied field strength. We addressed the Rotatable Anisotropy as an example in this work.

  19. A Proposed Frequency Synthesis Approach to Accurately Measure the Angular Position of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagri, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an approach for measuring the angular position of a spacecraft with reference to a nearby calibration source (quasar) with an accuracy of a few tenths of a nanoradian using a very long baseline interferometer of two antennas that measures the interferometer phase with a modest accuracy. It employs (1) radio frequency phase to determine the spacecraft position with high precision and (2) multiple delay measurements using either frequency tones or telemetry signals at different frequency spacings to resolve ambiguity of the location of the fringe (cycle) containing the direction of the spacecraft.

  20. Norm-based measurement of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuchun; Guo Guangcan

    2011-06-15

    In this paper we derived a necessary and sufficient condition for classical correlated states and proposed a norm-based measurement Q of quantum correlation. Using the max norm of operators, we gave the expression of the quantum correlation measurement Q and investigated the dynamics of Q in Markovian and non-Markovian cases, respectively. Q decays exponentially and vanishes only asymptotically in the Markovian case and causes periodical death and rebirth in the non-Markovian case. In the pure state, the quantum correlation Q is always larger than the entanglement, which was different from other known measurements. In addition, we showed that locally broadcastable and broadcastable are equivalent and reproved the density of quantum correlated states.

  1. Complexity measures, emergence, and multiparticle correlations.

    PubMed

    Galla, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2012-04-01

    We study correlation measures for complex systems. First, we investigate some recently proposed measures based on information geometry. We show that these measures can increase under local transformations as well as under discarding particles, thereby questioning their interpretation as a quantifier for complexity or correlations. We then propose a refined definition of these measures, investigate its properties, and discuss its numerical evaluation. As an example, we study coupled logistic maps and study the behavior of the different measures for that case. Finally, we investigate other local effects during the coarse graining of the complex system. PMID:22680558

  2. Complexity measures, emergence, and multiparticle correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2012-04-01

    We study correlation measures for complex systems. First, we investigate some recently proposed measures based on information geometry. We show that these measures can increase under local transformations as well as under discarding particles, thereby questioning their interpretation as a quantifier for complexity or correlations. We then propose a refined definition of these measures, investigate its properties, and discuss its numerical evaluation. As an example, we study coupled logistic maps and study the behavior of the different measures for that case. Finally, we investigate other local effects during the coarse graining of the complex system.

  3. A spinning mirror for fast angular scans of EBW emission for magnetic pitch profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, Francesco

    2010-10-15

    A tilted spinning mirror rapidly steers the line of sight of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) emission radiometer at the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). In order to resist high mechanical stresses at rotation speeds of up to 12 000 rpm and to avoid eddy current induced magnetic braking, the mirror consists of a glass-reinforced nylon substrate of a special self-balanced design, coated with a reflecting layer. By completing an angular scan every 2.5-10 ms, it allows one to characterize with good time resolution the Bernstein-extraordinary-ordinary mode-conversion efficiency as a function of the view angles. Angular maps of conversion efficiency are directly related to the magnetic pitch angle at the cutoff layer for the ordinary mode. Hence, measurements at various frequencies provide the safety factor profile at the plasma edge. Initial measurements and indications of the feasibility of the diagnostic are presented. Moreover, angular scans indicate the best launch conditions for EBW heating.

  4. Performance of surface plasmon resonance imaging system based on angular modulation and intensity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu-lu; Chen, Xing; Cui, Da-fu

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging system based on angular modulation (AM) and intensity measurement (IM) together to avoid the mechanical errors of the angle scanning device. The SPR resonant angle was found by angular scanning method and then the light intensity changes were collected at a fixed incident angle. Glycerol gradient solution (0%, 1%, 2%, 3% (weight percentage) glycerol dissolved in water) experiments were conducted, which indicate that the best fixed angle location is the middle of the linear range of SPR absorption peak and the central area signals are more uniform than those of the border areas. The sensitivity differences of different areas of SPR images are studied, and an optimized algorithm is developed.

  5. On the measurability of quantum correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio de Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2015-05-15

    The concept of correlation function is widely used in classical statistical mechanics to characterize how two or more variables depend on each other. In quantum mechanics, on the other hand, there are observables that cannot be measured at the same time; the so-called incompatible observables. This prospect imposes a limitation on the definition of a quantum analog for the correlation function in terms of a sequence of measurements. Here, based on the notion of sequential weak measurements, we circumvent this limitation by introducing a framework to measure general quantum correlation functions, in principle, independently of the state of the system and the operators involved. To illustrate, we propose an experimental configuration to obtain explicitly the quantum correlation function between two Pauli operators, in which the input state is an arbitrary mixed qubit state encoded on the polarization of photons.

  6. Multipolarity of the 2-→1- , ground-state transition in 210Bi via multivariable angular correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Szpak, B.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C.; Urban, W.

    2016-07-01

    The multipolarity of the main transition leading to the ground state in 210Bi was investigated using the angular correlations of γ rays. The analyzed γ -coincidence data were obtained from the 209Bi(n ,γ )210Bi experiment performed at Institut Laue-Langevin Grenoble at the PF1B cold-neutron facility. The EXILL (EXOGAM at the ILL) multidetector array, consisting of 16 high-purity germanium detectors, was used to detect γ transitions. The mixing ratio of the 320-keV γ ray was defined by minimizing a multivariable χΣ2 function constructed from the coefficients of angular correlation functions for seven pairs of strong transitions in 210Bi. As a result, the almost pure M 1 multipolarity of the 320-keV γ ray was obtained, with an E 2 admixture of less than 0.6% only (95% confidence limit). Based on this multipolarity the neutron-capture cross section leading to the ground state in 210Bi, that decays in turn to radiotoxic 210Po, was determined to be within the limits 21.3(9) and 21.5(9) mb. This result is important for nuclear reactor applications.

  7. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorova, E.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttge, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-22

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  8. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, E.; Gönnenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-01

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  9. Evaluation of the accuracy of linear and angular measurements on panoramic radiographs taken at different positions

    PubMed Central

    Nikneshan, Sima; Sharafi, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the accuracy of linear and angular measurements on panoramic radiographs taken at different positions in vitro. Materials and Methods Two acrylic models were fabricated from a cast with normal occlusion. Straight and 75° mesially and lingually angulated pins were placed, and standardized panoramic radiographs were taken at standard position, at an 8° downward tilt of the occlusal plane compared to the standard position, at an 8° upward tilt of the anterior occlusal plane, and at a 10° downward tilt of the right and left sides of the model. On the radiographs, the length of the pins above (crown) and below (root) the occlusal plane, total pin length, crown-to-root ratio, and angulation of pins relative to the occlusal plane were calculated. The data were subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and LSD multiple comparisons tests. Results Significant differences were noted between the radiographic measurements and true values in different positions on both models with linear (P<0.001) and those with angulated pins (P<0.005). No statistically significant differences were observed between the angular measurements and baselines of the natural head posture at different positions for the linear and angulated pins. Conclusion Angular measurements on panoramic radiographs were sufficiently accurate and changes in the position of the occlusal plane equal to or less than 10° had no significant effect on them. Some variations could exist in the pin positioning (head positioning), and they were tolerable while taking panoramic radiographs. Linear measurements showed the least errors in the standard position and 8° upward tilt of the anterior part of the occlusal plane compared to other positions. PMID:24083213

  10. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance. PMID:26465526

  11. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance.

  12. Fiber optic sensor for angular position measurement: application for an electrical power-assisted steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javahiraly, Nicolas; Chakari, Ayoub

    2013-05-01

    To achieve a very effective automotive power steering system, we need two important data, the angular position of the wheel and the torque applied on the shaft by the driver of the car. We present a new accurate optical fiber angular position sensor connected to an automotive power steering column. In this new design, the sensor allows the measurement of the angular position of a car steering wheel over a large and adjustable range (± several turns of the wheel). The wheel rotation induces micro-bending in the transducer part of the optical fiber sensing system. This system operates as an amplitude modulation sensor based on mode coupling in the transducing fiber in the case when all the modes are equally excited. We study the sensor response both theoretically and experimentally with a multimode step index optical fiber [rf (fiber radius) = 300 μm rc (core radius) = 50 μm nc (core index) = 1,457; N.A. = 0, 22 and the wavelength is 632,8 nm at the ambient Temperature (20°C)]. We show that the sensitivity can be controlled as a function of the sensor's length. We compare modeling and experimental validation and we conclude with a perspective on what could soon be an industrial sensor.

  13. Measuring the Direction and Angular Velocity of a Black Hole Accretion Disk via Lagged Interferometric Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Loeb, Abraham; Shiokawa, Hotaka; Chael, Andrew A.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2015-11-01

    We show that interferometry can be applied to study irregular, rapidly rotating structures, as are expected in the turbulent accretion flow near a black hole. Specifically, we analyze the lagged covariance between interferometric baselines of similar lengths but slightly different orientations. For a flow viewed close to face-on, we demonstrate that the peak in the lagged covariance indicates the direction and angular velocity of the emission pattern from the flow. Even for moderately inclined flows, the covariance robustly estimates the flow direction, although the estimated angular velocity can be significantly biased. Importantly, measuring the direction of the flow as clockwise or counterclockwise on the sky breaks a degeneracy in accretion disk inclinations when analyzing time-averaged images alone. We explore the potential efficacy of our technique using three-dimensional, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and we highlight several baseline pairs for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) that are well-suited to this application. These results indicate that the EHT may be capable of estimating the direction and angular velocity of the emitting material near Sgr A*, and they suggest that a rotating flow may even be utilized to improve imaging capabilities.

  14. Angular correlations in beauty production at the Tevatron at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wijngaarden, Daniel A

    2005-06-01

    Measurements of the b quark production cross section at the Tevatron and at Hera in the final decades of the 20th century have consistently yielded higher values than predicted by Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) QCD. This discrepancy has led to a large efforts by theorists to improve theoretical calculations of the cross sections and simulations of b quark production. As a result, the difference between theory and experiment has been much reduced. New measurements are needed to test the developments in the calculations and in event simulation. In this thesis, a measurement of angular correlations between b jets produced in the same event is presented. The angular separation between two b jets is directly sensitive to higher order contributions. In addition, the measurement does not depend strongly on fragmentation models or on the experimental luminosity and efficiency, which lead to a large uncertainty in measurements of the inclusive cross section. At the Tevatron, b{bar b} quark pairs are predominantly produced through the strong interaction. In leading order QCD, the b quarks are produced back to back in phase space. Next-to-leading order contributions involving a third particle in the final state allow production of b pairs that are very close together in phase space. The Leading Order and NLO contributions can be separated into three different processes: flavour creation, gluon splitting and flavour excitation. While the separation based on Feynman diagrams is ambiguous and the three processes are not each separately gauge invariant in NLO QCD, the distinction can be made explicitly in terms of event generators using LO matrix elements. Direct production of a b{bar b} quark pair in the hard scatter interaction is known as flavour creation. The quarks emerge nearly back to back in azimuth. In gluon splitting processes, a gluon is produced in the hard scatter interaction. The gluon subsequently splits into a b{bar b} quark pair. The quarks are very close in phase

  15. A weak magnetism observed in SnO2 doped with Fe by means of Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. M.; Carbonari, A. W.; Martucci, T.; Costa, M. S.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Macedo, M. A. V.; Saxena, R. N.

    Nano-structured samples of SnO2 doped with Fe prepared by the sol-gel method were studied by the Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation (PAC) Spectroscopy using 111In (111Cd) probe nuclei as well as by 57Fe Mšssbauer spectroscopy. The samples were prepared from very pure metallic Sn and Fe. Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced during the sol-gel process of sample preparation for PAC measurements. The PAC measurements were carried out after annealing the samples at different temperatures and the results show a combined electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole interaction for probe nuclei that do not occupy the regular Sn sites. The hyperfine parameters revealed weak magnetic interactions.

  16. Minijet deformation and charge-independent angular correlations on momentum subspace (η,ϕ) in Au-Au collisions at sNN=130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bezverkhny, B. I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, H. A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reid, J. G.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; H. G., Ritter; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wetzler, A.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2006-06-01

    Measurements of two-particle correlations on angular difference variables η1-η2 (pseudorapidity) and ϕ1-ϕ2 (azimuth) are presented for all primary charged hadrons with transverse momentum 0.15≤pt≤2 GeV/c and |η|≤1.3 from Au-Au collisions at sNN=130 GeV. Large-amplitude correlations are observed over a broad range in relative angles where distinct structures appear on the same-side and away-side (i.e., relative azimuth less than π/2 or greater than π/2). The principal correlation structures include that associated with elliptic flow plus a strong, same-side peak. It is hypothesized that the latter results from correlated hadrons associated with semi-hard parton scattering in the early stage of the heavy-ion collision which produces a jet-like correlation peak at small relative angles. The width of the jet-like peak on η1-η2 increases by a factor 2.3 from peripheral to central collisions, suggesting strong coupling of semi-hard scattered partons to a longitudinally-expanding medium. The new methods of jet analysis introduced here provide access to scattered partons at low transverse momentum well below the kinematic range where perturbative quantum chromodynamics and standard fragmentation models are applicable.

  17. A novel method for full position and angular orientation measurement of moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake; Kwok, Philip; Pereira, Carlos M.

    2015-05-01

    Angular orientation of an object such as a projectile, relative to the earth or another object such as a mobile platform continues to be an ongoing topic of interest for guidance and/or steering. Currently available sensors, which include inertia devices such as accelerometers and gyros; magnetometers; surface mounted antennas; radars; GPS; and optical line of sight devices, do not provide an acceptable on-board solution for many applications, particularly for gun-fired munitions. We present a viable solution, which combines open-aperture sensors with custom designed radiation patterns and one or more amplitude modulated polarization scanning reference sources. Subsequently, the sensor system presents a new approach to angle measurements, with several key advantages over traditional cross-polarization based rotation sensors. Primarily, angular information is coded into a complex spatiotemporal pattern, which is insensitive to power fluctuations caused by environmental factors, while making the angle measurement independent of distance from the referencing source. Triangulation, using multiple sources, may be also used for onboard position measurement. Both measurements are independent of GPS localization; are direct and relative to the established local referencing system; and not subject to drift and/or error accumulation. Results of laboratory tests as well as field tests are presented.

  18. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR BEAM SURFACE SCATTERING APPARATUS FOR VELOCITY AND ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ceyer, S. T.; Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1980-11-01

    A molecular beam surface scattering apparatus designed for the study of corrosion and catalyticsurfacereactions is described. The apparatus incorporates two molecular or atomic beams aimed at a surface characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), a rotatable, differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a versatile manipulator. Angular distributions and energy distributions as a funcion of angle and independent of the surface residence time can be measured. Typical data for the oxidation of deuterium to D{sub 2}O on a Pt(lll) crystal surface are presented.

  19. The measurement of linear and angular displacements in prototype aircraft - Instrumentation, calibration and operational accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm van Leeuwen, Sam

    The design and development of angular displacement transducers for flight test instrumentation systems are considered. Calibration tools, developed to meet the accuracy requirements, allowed in situ calibration with short turn around times. The design of the control surface deflection measurement channels for the Fokker 100 prototype aircraft is discussed in detail. It is demonstrated that a bellows coupling provides accurate results, and that the levers and push-pull rod drive mechanisms perform well. The results suggest that a complex mechanical drive mechanism reduces the system accuracy.

  20. Fluid flow vorticity measurement using laser beams with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Ryabtsev, A; Pouya, S; Safaripour, A; Koochesfahani, M; Dantus, M

    2016-05-30

    Vorticity is one of the most important dynamic flow variables and is fundamental to the basic flow physics of many areas of fluid dynamics, including aerodynamics, turbulent flows and chaotic motion. We report on the direct measurements of fluid flow vorticity using a beam with orbital angular momentum that takes advantage of the rotational Doppler shift from microparticles intersecting the beam focus. Experiments are carried out on fluid flows with well-characterized vorticity and the experimental results are found to be in excellent agreement with the expected values. This method allows for localized real-time determination of vorticity in a fluid flow with three-dimensional resolution. PMID:27410101

  1. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Li-Di; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yong-Ji

    2014-01-15

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to 7.3×10{sup −7} rad /√( Hz ) at the signal frequency of 2 mHz, which contributes a 0.4 ppm uncertainty to the G value.

  2. Two-dimensional single-shot measurement of angular dispersion for compressor alignment.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, A; Mangin-Thro, L; Cheriaux, G; Osvay, K

    2013-02-15

    Misalignment of the stretcher-compressor stages of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) lasers can aggravate the spatiotemporal shape of ultrashort pulses. We demonstrate a simple technique for angular dispersion measurement, which offers real-time single-shot two-dimensional characterization across the entire beam profile. The accuracy of our pilot experiment approaches its current theoretical limit of 0.1 μrad/nm. Unlike the current one-dimensional techniques working in the near field, the method works in the far field; hence, it is especially appropriate for assisting the most accurate alignment of a CPA laser compressor ensuring the maximum intensity on the target. PMID:23455085

  3. Understanding the amplitudes of noise correlation measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise is known to result in time series from which station-station travel-time measurements can be made. Part of the reason that these cross-correlation travel-time measurements are reliable is that there exists a theoretical framework that quantifies how these travel times depend on the features of the ambient noise. However, corresponding theoretical results do not currently exist to describe how the amplitudes of the cross correlation depend on such features. For example, currently it is not possible to take a given distribution of noise sources and calculate the cross correlation amplitudes one would expect from such a distribution. Here, we provide a ray-theoretical framework for calculating cross correlations. This framework differs from previous work in that it explicitly accounts for attenuation as well as the spatial distribution of sources and therefore can address the issue of quantifying amplitudes in noise correlation measurements. After introducing the general framework, we apply it to two specific problems. First, we show that we can quantify the amplitudes of coherency measurements, and find that the decay of coherency with station-station spacing depends crucially on the distribution of noise sources. We suggest that researchers interested in performing attenuation measurements from noise coherency should first determine how the dominant sources of noise are distributed. Second, we show that we can quantify the signal-to-noise ratio of noise correlations more precisely than previous work, and that these signal-to-noise ratios can be estimated for given situations prior to the deployment of seismometers. It is expected that there are applications of the theoretical framework beyond the two specific cases considered, but these applications await future work.

  4. Ternary Fission Studies by Correlation Measurements with Ternary Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutterer, Manfred

    2011-10-01

    The rare ternary fission process has been studied mainly by inclusive measurements of the energy distributions and fractional yields of the light charged particles (LCPs) from fission, or by experiments on the angular and energy correlation between LCPs and fission fragments (FFs). The present contribution presents a brief overview of more elaborate correlation measurements that comprise the emission of neutrons and γ rays with LCPs and FFs, or the coincident registration of two LCPs. These measurements have permitted identification of new modes of particle-accompanied fission, such as the population of excited states in LCPs, the formation of neutron-unstable nuclei as short-lived intermediate LCPs, as well as the sequential decay of particle-unstable LCPs and quaternary fission. Furthermore, the neutron multiplicity numbers bar ν (A) and distributions of fragment masses A, measured for the ternary fission modes with various LCP isotopes, give a valuable hint of the role played by nuclear shell structure in the fission process near scission. Finally, two different hitherto unknown asymmetries in ternary α-particle emission with respect to the fission axis, called the TRI and ROT effect, were studied in fission reactions induced by polarised cold neutrons.

  5. Dynamical evolution, hadronization and angular de-correlation of heavy flavor in a hot and dense QCD medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Bass, Steffen A.

    2014-12-01

    We study heavy flavor evolution and hadronization in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium evolution of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin framework that incorporates both collisional and radiative energy loss mechanisms. The subsequent hadronization process for heavy quarks is calculated with a fragmentation plus recombination model. We find significant contribution from gluon radiation to heavy quark energy loss at high pT; the recombination mechanism can greatly enhance the D meson production at medium pT. Our calculation provides a good description of the D meson nuclear modification at the LHC. In addition, we explore the angular correlation functions of heavy flavor pairs which may provide us a potential candidate for distinguishing different energy loss mechanisms of heavy quarks inside the QGP.

  6. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  7. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control. PMID:24517806

  8. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control.

  9. Generating nonclassical correlations without fully aligning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, Joel J.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Liang, Yeong-Cherng

    2011-02-15

    We investigate the scenario where spatially separated parties perform measurements in randomly chosen bases on an N-partite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. We show that without any alignment of the measurements, the observers will obtain correlations that violate a Bell inequality with a probability that rapidly approaches 1 as N increases and that this probability is robust against noise. We also prove that restricting these randomly chosen measurements to a plane perpendicular to a common direction will always generate correlations that violate some Bell inequality. Specifically, if each observer chooses their two measurements to be locally orthogonal, then the N observers will violate one of two Bell inequalities by an amount that increases exponentially with N. These results are also robust against noise and perturbations of each observer's reference direction from the common direction.

  10. Directional correlation measurements for gamma transitions in /sup 127/Te

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, M.O.M.D.; Saxena, R.N.

    1985-02-01

    The directional correlation of coincident ..gamma.. transitions in /sup 127/Te has been measured following the ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 127/Sb (T/sub 1/2/ = 3.9 d) using Ge(Li)-Ge(Li) and Ge(Li)-NaI(T1) gamma spectrometers. Measurements have been carried out for 14 gamma cascades resulting in the determination of multipole mixing ratios delta(E2/M1) for 15 ..gamma.. transitions. The present results permitted a definite spin assignment of (7/2) for the 785 keV level and confirmation of several previous assignments to other levels in /sup 127/Te. The g factor of the 340 keV ((9/2)/sup -/) level has also been measured using the integral perturbed angular correlation method in the hyperfine magnetic field of a Te in Ni matrix. The results of the g factor as well as the mixing ratio for the 252 keV ((9/2)/sup -/..-->..(11/2)/sup -/) transition support the earlier interpretation of this state as an anomalous coupling state.

  11. Computer Anxiety: Definition, Measurement, and Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambre, Marjorie A.; Cook, Desmond L.

    This review examines the definition, measurement, and correlates of computer anxiety as provided in available research. The concept of computer anxiety reflects an anxiety state, rather than an anxiety trait, thus rendering it susceptible to change over time. Computer anxiety is similar in nature to math anxiety and test anxiety. Two approaches to…

  12. PHENIX Measurements of Correlations at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Arkadiy

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic heavy-ion collisions provide a unique opportunity to study the expansion dynamics and the transport properties of the produced strongly interacting quark gluon plasma (QGP). This article reviews the recent soft physics results obtained via correlation measurements from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC: space-time extent of the pion emission source and azimuthal anisotropy of the particle production.

  13. Quantum Correlations and the Measurement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The transition from classical to quantum mechanics rests on the recognition that the structure of information is not what we thought it was: there are operational, i.e., phenomenal, probabilistic correlations that lie outside the polytope of local correlations. Such correlations cannot be simulated with classical resources, which generate classical correlations represented by the points in a simplex, where the vertices of the simplex represent joint deterministic states that are the common causes of the correlations. The `no go' hidden variable theorems tell us that we can't shoe-horn phenomenal correlations outside the local polytope into a classical simplex by supposing that something has been left out of the story. The replacement of the classical simplex by the quantum convex set as the structure representing probabilistic correlations is the analogue for quantum mechanics of the replacement of Newton's Euclidean space and time by Minkowski spacetime in special relativity. The nonclassical features of quantum mechanics, including the irreducible information loss on measurement, are generic features of correlations that lie outside the classical simplex. This paper is an elaboration of these ideas, which have their source in work by Pitowsky (J. Math. Phys. 27:1556, 1986; Math. Program. 50:395, 1991; Phys. Rev. A 77:062109, 2008), Garg and Mermin (Found. Phys. 14:1-39, 1984), Barrett (Phys. Rev. A 75:032304, 2007; Phys. Rev. A 7:022101, 2005) and others, e.g., Brunner et al. (arXiv:1303.2849, 2013), but the literature goes back to Boole (An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, Dover, New York, 1951). The final section looks at the measurement problem of quantum mechanics in this context. A large part of the problem is removed by seeing that the inconsistency in reconciling the entangled state at the end of a quantum measurement process with the definiteness of the macroscopic pointer reading and the definiteness of the correlated value of the measured micro

  14. Wavefront propagation in turbulence: an unified approach to the derivation of angular correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Molodij, Guillaume

    2011-08-01

    A general expression of the spatial correlation functions of quantities related to the phase fluctuations of a wave that have propagated through the atmospheric turbulence are derived. A generalization of the method to integrand containing the product of an arbitrary number of hypergeometric functions is presented. The formalism is able to give the coefficients of phase-expansion functions orthogonal over an arbitrary circularly symmetric weighting function for an isotropic turbulence spectrum, as well as to describe the effect of the finite outer and inner scales of the turbulence and to describe the spherical propagation or to derive the effects of the analytical operators acting on the phase such as the derivatives of any order. The derivation of the generalized integrals with multiparameters is based on the Mellin transforms integration method. PMID:21811336

  15. Measurements of the Angular Distributions in the Decays B → K(*) µ+µ- at CDF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2012-02-24

    We reconstruct the decays B → K(*) µ+µ- and measure their angular distributions in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb-1. The transverse polarization asymmetry AT(2) and the time-reversal-odd charge-and-parity asymmetry Aim are measured for the first time, together with the K* longitudinal polarization fraction FL and the µ on forward-backward asymmetry AFB, for the decays B0→K*0µ+µ- and B0→K*+µ+µ-. Our results are among the most accurate to date and consistent with those from other experiments.

  16. Measurement of angular antispring effect in optical cavity by radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, Shihori; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyakawa, Osamu

    2010-03-15

    We present a measurement of an angular antispring effect caused by radiation pressure in an optical cavity with a mirror of 20 mg suspended by a silica fiber of 10 {mu}m in diameter. The antispring effect occurred since the torque on the suspended mirror is increased with the higher radiation pressure force, pushing the system towards instability. We measured shifts of the rotational resonant frequencies of the suspended mirror from 2.0 Hz to 1.0 Hz with the increased circulating power. It is verified that the result agrees with the theoretical curve to show the antispring effect. The result proves that it will be possible to make a reliable control system model of the radiation pressure effect for the second generation of the gravitational wave detectors.

  17. Measurements of the Angular Distributions in the Decays B→K(*)μ+μ- at CDF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2012-02-01

    We reconstruct the decays B → K(*) µ+µ- and measure their angular distributions in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb-1. The transverse polarization asymmetry AT(2) and the time-reversal-odd charge-and-parity asymmetry Aim are measured for the first time, together with the K* longitudinal polarization fraction FL and the µ on forward-backward asymmetry AFB, for the decays B0→K*0µ+µ- and B0→K*+µ+µ-. Our results are among the most accurate to date and consistent with those from other experiments.

  18. Evolution equation for geometric quantum correlation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng

    2015-05-01

    A simple relation is established for the evolution equation of quantum-information-processing protocols such as quantum teleportation, remote state preparation, Bell-inequality violation, and particularly the dynamics of geometric quantum correlation measures. This relation shows that when the system traverses the local quantum channel, various figures of merit of the quantum correlations for different protocols demonstrate a factorization decay behavior for dynamics. We identified the family of quantum states for different kinds of quantum channels under the action of which the relation holds. This relation simplifies the assessment of many quantum tasks.

  19. Accessing sea quark's angular momentum through polarized target Drell-Yan single-spin asymmetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaodong; P-1039 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A Letter-Of-Intent (P-1039) has been submitted to the Fermilab's Program Advisory Committee in May 2013, for a measurement of transversely polarized proton target (NH3) single-spin asymmetry (SSA) in Drell-Yan reaction with a 120 GeV/c unpolarized proton beam using a similar setup as in the ongoing unpolarized target experiment (E906). The goal of this LOI is to clearly pin down the u -quark Sivers distribution in the x range of 0.1-0.3, where a large sea flavor asymmetry (d / u) has been observed. A non-vanishing quark Sivers distribution arises from the imaginary piece of amplitudes interference between quark angular momentum L = 0 , and L ≠ 0 wave functions. Existing semi-inclusive DIS Sivers-type SSA data from HERMES, COMPASS and JLab-Hall A, while sensitive to valence quarks' Sivers distributions, do not provide much constrains on sea quarks' Sivers distributions. In the case that u -quark carries zero angular momentum, one expects u -quark's Sivers distribution to vanish, therefore observing a zero target SSA in Drell-Yan reaction in P-1039.

  20. Angular Cross-correlation of Spitzer IRAC and Herschel Spire Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Cooray, A.; Wang, L.; HerMES Consortium

    2011-01-01

    The Spitzer Deep Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) each provide deep and wide coverage, centered on the Bootes field, at infrared and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The SDWFS covers approximately 8.5 square degrees with sensitivities of galaxies out to z 3. From the public SDWFS source catalog, we remove stars and contaminants by concentration, using selection methods based on IRAC and optical colors; optical photometry is provided by the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Photometric redshifts of detected IRAC sources are then determined using the 1.6 micron spectral feature (or 'bump'). We classify three different kinds of bumps, (bump 1- bump 3), with redshifts ranging approximately from 0-1.3, 1.3-2, and 2-3 respectively. The number of bump 1 sources in the SDWFS catalogs were found to be in excess of 25,000 at the 5 sigma detection limit of the 3.6 micron channel of the IRAC instrument. Bump 2 and bump 3 source identification yielded similar, but slightly fewer counts. We also extract a separate catalog of 2500 or so dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) at z 2 using 24 micron and r-band fluxes. As part of HerMES observations with SPIRE, the Bootes field contain more than 15,000 clearly detected SPIRE sources at 250 microns, In this paper we report on the cross correlation function of these bump sources with the source catalogs from three bands of the SPIRE instrument onboard Herschel. The aim is to broadly reconstruct the redshift distribution of SPIRE sources using redshift distributions of bump and DOGs in the bootes field and the relative clustering strengths.

  1. Monitoring quantum transport: Backaction and measurement correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Robert; Gómez-García, Jorge; Kohler, Sigmund

    2014-10-01

    We investigate a tunnel contact coupled to a double quantum dot (DQD) and employed as a charge monitor for the latter. We consider both the classical limit and the quantum regime. In the classical case, we derive measurement correlations from conditional probabilities, yielding quantitative statements about the parameter regime in which the detection scheme works well. Moreover, we demonstrate that not only the DQD occupation but also the corresponding current may strongly correlate with the detector current. The quantum-mechanical solution, obtained with a Bloch-Redfield master equation, shows that the backaction of the measurement tends to localize the DQD electrons, and thus significantly reduces the DQD current. Moreover, it provides the effective parameters of the classical treatment. It turns out that already the classical description is adequate for most operating regimes.

  2. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jânio A.; Botelho, Ricardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain's line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. Methods: We evaluated the CLV in a sample of CVJM, BI, CM patients and a control group of normal subjects and correlated their data with craniocervical angular craniometry. Results: A total of 97 subjects were studied: 32 normal subjects, 41 CM patients, 9 basilar invagination type 1 (BI1) patients, and 15 basilar invagination type 2 (BI2) patients. The mean CLV violation in the groups were: The control group, 0.16 ± 0.45 cm; the CM group, 0.32 ± 0.48 cm; the BI1 group, 1.35 ± 0.5 cm; and the BI2 group, 1.98 ± 0.18 cm. There was strong correlation between CLV and Boogard's angle (R = 0.82, P = 0.000) and the clivus canal angle (R = 0.7, P = 0.000). Conclusions: CM's CLV is discrete and similar to the normal subjects. BI1 and BI2 presented with at least of 0.95 cm CLV and these violations were strongly correlated with a primary cranial angulation (clivus horizontalization) and an acute clivus canal angle (a secondary craniocervical angle). PMID:26229733

  3. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  4. Angular-divergence calculation for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injection ion source based on spectroscopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yuan; Hu, Chundong; Zhuang, Ge

    2014-02-15

    Calorimetric method has been primarily applied for several experimental campaigns to determine the angular divergence of high-current ion source for the neutral beam injection system on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A Doppler shift spectroscopy has been developed to provide the secondary measurement of the angular divergence to improve the divergence measurement accuracy and for real-time and non-perturbing measurement. The modified calculation model based on the W7AS neutral beam injectors is adopted to accommodate the slot-type accelerating grids used in the EAST's ion source. Preliminary spectroscopic experimental results are presented comparable to the calorimetrically determined value of theoretical calculation.

  5. Nonsymmetrized correlations in quantum noninvasive measurements.

    PubMed

    Bednorz, Adam; Bruder, Christoph; Reulet, Bertrand; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2013-06-21

    A long-standing problem in quantum mesoscopic physics is which operator order corresponds to noise expressions like , where I(ω) is the measured current at frequency ω. Symmetrized order describes a classical measurement while nonsymmetrized order corresponds to a quantum detector, e.g., one sensitive to either emission or absorption of photons. We show that both order schemes can be embedded in quantum weak-measurement theory taking into account measurements with memory, characterized by a memory function which is independent of a particular experimental detection scheme. We discuss the resulting quasiprobabilities for different detector temperatures and how their negativity can be tested on the level of second-order correlation functions already. Experimentally, this negativity can be related to the squeezing of the many-body state of the transported electrons in an ac-driven tunnel junction. PMID:23829718

  6. Nonsymmetrized Correlations in Mesoscopic Current Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzig, Wolfgang; Bednorz, Adam; Bruder, Christoph; Reulet, Bertrand

    2014-03-01

    A long-standing problem in quantum mesoscopic physics is which operator order corresponds to noise expressions like < I(ω) I(- ω) > , where I(ω) is the measured current at frequency ω. Symmetrized order describes a classical measurement while nonsymmetrized order corresponds to a quantum detector, e.g., one sensitive to either emission or absorption of photons. We show that both order schemes can be embedded in quantum weak-measurement theory taking into account measurements with memory, characterized by a memory function which is independent of a particular experimental detection scheme [A. Bednorz, C. Bruder, B. Reulet, and W. Belzig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 250404 (2013)]. We discuss the resulting quasiprobabilities for different detector temperatures and how their negativity can be tested on the level of second-order correlation functions already. Experimentally, this negativity can be related to the squeezing of the many-body state of the transported electrons in an ac-driven tunnel junction.

  7. Long-range angular correlations of π, K and p in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; D Erasmo, G.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.

    2013-10-01

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger particles and various species of charged associated particles (unidentified particles, pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons) are measured by the ALICE detector in p-Pb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV in the transverse-momentum range 0.3correlations expressed as associated yield per trigger particle are obtained in the pseudorapidity range |ηlab|<0.8. Fourier coefficients are extracted from the long-range correlations projected onto the azimuthal angle difference and studied as a function of pT and in intervals of event multiplicity. In high-multiplicity events, the second-order coefficient for protons, v2p, is observed to be smaller than that for pions, v2π, up to about pT=2 GeV/c. To reduce correlations due to jets, the per-trigger yield measured in low-multiplicity events is subtracted from that in high-multiplicity events. A two-ridge structure is obtained for all particle species. The Fourier decomposition of this structure shows that the second-order coefficients for pions and kaons are similar. The v2p is found to be smaller at low pT and larger at higher pT than v2π, with a crossing occurring at about 2 GeV/c. This is qualitatively similar to the elliptic-flow pattern observed in heavy-ion collisions. A mass ordering effect at low transverse momenta is consistent with expectations from hydrodynamic model calculations assuming a collectively expanding system.

  8. Measurement and analysis of instantaneous torque and angular velocity variations of a low speed two stroke diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Espadafor, Francisco J.; A. Becerra Villanueva, José; Palomo Guerrero, Daniel; Torres García, Miguel; Carvajal Trujillo, Elisa; Fernández Vacas, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the potential of using direct measurement of engine torque for diagnostic purposes in large engines - in this case applied to power generation. The procedures for measuring and analyzing the instantaneous torque, the angular displacement on the generator output end and the angular displacement on its free end for a ten-cylinder, low speed two stroke diesel engine are presented. Angular speed oscillations are frequently used for combustion engine diagnostics although they cannot be used to measure engine power directly. In addition, and for engines with huge inertia generators such as those used in power plants, speed oscillations are very low and this reduces the signal to noise ratio and makes the evaluation of the instantaneous angular speed very noisy. In the work described here, torque and angular displacement measurements carried out at the same point and with the same engine conditions are compared and the superior performance of torque is demonstrated. Harmonic analysis of instantaneous torque allowed the identification of the dynamic characteristics of the power train of the diesel group and clearly suggests that this signal can be used as a diagnostic tool for excitation, combustion malfunctions, or for the mechanical characteristics of the system and crankshaft stiffness. The torque distortion introduced by the generator due to the discontinuity imposed by the pole pairs is also observed in the torque signal, suggesting that the torque signal can be used to identify generator malfunction.

  9. Oxidation of Hafnium and Diffusion of Hafnium Atoms in Hexagonal Close-Packed Hafnium; Microscopic Investigations by Perturbed Angular Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Chandi C.

    2012-11-01

    Time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) studies in hafnium metal (~5%Zr) have been carried out at different temperatures. It is found that hafnium metal on heating at 873 K continuously for two days in air, transforms partially and abruptly to HfO2 while no component of oxide has been observed for heating up to 773 K and during initial heating at 873 K for 1 day. This result is strikingly different to that expected from the Arrhenius theory. Also, a strong nuclear relaxation effect has been observed at 873 K due to rapid fluctuation of hafnium atoms in hexagonal closepacked (hcp) hafnium. At this temperature, ~ 5% probe nuclei experience static perturbation due to monoclinic HfO2, ~ 50% experience fluctuating interaction, and ~ 5% produce static defect configuration of hcp hafnium. With lowering of temperature, defect configurations of hafnium increase at the cost of fluctuating interaction. An almost total fluctuating interaction observed in hcp hafnium at a temperature much lower than its melting point is another interesting phenomenon.

  10. PAC (perturbed angular correlation) analysis of defect motion by Blume's stochastic model for I = 5/2 electric quadrupole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, W.E. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Gardner, J.A.; Wang, Ruiping . Dept. of Physics); Su, Han-Tzong ); McKale, A.G. )

    1990-01-01

    Using Blume's stochastic model and the approach of Winkler and Gerdau, we have computed-time-dependent effects on perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectra due to defect motion in solids in the case of I = (5/2) electric quadrupole interactions. We report detailed analysis for a family of simple models: XYZ + Z'' models, in which the symmetry axis of an axial efg is allowed to fluctuate among orientations along x, y, and z axes, and a static axial efg oriented along the z axis is added to the fluctuating efgs. When the static efg is zero, this model is termed the XYZ'' model. Approximate forms are given for G{sub 2}(t) in the slow and rapid fluctuation regimes, i.e. suitable for the low and high temperature regions, respectively. Where they adequately reflect the underlying physical processes, these expressions allow one to fit PAC data for a wide range of temperatures and dopant concentrations to a single model, thus increasing the uniqueness of the interpretation of the defect properties. Application of the models are given for zirconia and ceria ceramics. 14 refs.

  11. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  12. Cosmological measurements with general relativistic galaxy correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Montanari, Francesco; Bertacca, Daniele; Doré, Olivier; Durrer, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the cosmological dependence and the constraining power of large-scale galaxy correlations, including all redshift-distortions, wide-angle, lensing and gravitational potential effects on linear scales. We analyze the cosmological information present in the lensing convergence and in the gravitational potential terms describing the so-called ``relativistic effects'', and we find that, while smaller than the information contained in intrinsic galaxy clustering, it is not negligible. We investigate how neglecting them does bias cosmological measurements performed by future spectroscopic and photometric large-scale surveys such as SKA and Euclid. We perform a Fisher analysis using the CLASS code, modified to include scale-dependent galaxy bias and redshift-dependent magnification and evolution bias. Our results show that neglecting relativistic terms, especially lensing convergence, introduces an error in the forecasted precision in measuring cosmological parameters of the order of a few tens of percent, in particular when measuring the matter content of the Universe and primordial non-Gaussianity parameters. The analysis suggests a possible substantial systematic error in cosmological parameter constraints. Therefore, we argue that radial correlations and integrated relativistic terms need to be taken into account when forecasting the constraining power of future large-scale number counts of galaxy surveys.

  13. New method to measure the angular antispring effect in a Fabry-Perot cavity with remote excitation using radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Koji; Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki; Furusawa, Akira; Kawamura, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    In experiments with Fabry-Perot cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, an angular antispring effect on the mirror of the cavity is caused by radiation pressure from resonant light in the cavity. A new method was invented to measure the effect precisely with remote excitation on the mirror using the radiation pressure. This method was found to be available for the suspended 23 mg mirror and improved the measurement accuracy by a factor of two, compared with the previous method. This result leads to stable control systems to eliminate the angular instability of the mirror caused by the effect.

  14. d + Au hadron correlation measurements from PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickles, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of extended pseudorapidity correlations at the LHC in p+p and p+Pb collisions are of great interest. Here we present related results from d+Au collisions at PHENIX. We present the observed v2 and discuss the possible origin in the geometry of the collision region. We also present new measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge in d+Au collision. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems using 3 He + Au collisions are discussed.

  15. The first mass and angular momentum loss measurements for a CV-like binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    The period distribution of close binaries, cataclysmic variables, novae and single-degenerate SN1a progenitor candidates is largely controlled by magnetically-driven mass and angular momentum loss (AML) from the M dwarf secondary. The mass loss rates for these spun-up stars remain essentially unknown and impossible to observe directly, with likely values in the range 1e-12 to 1e-15 Msun/yr. AML presciptions for CVs differ by orders of magnitude. One way to measure the mass loss rate is to observe the dM wind accrete onto its WD companion in a pre-CV very close to Roche Lobe overflow but lacking the obscuring complications and emission from an accretion disk. The measurement can be combined with realistic MHD models to understand the accretion fraction, the mass that escapes, and the AML. The best-studied nearby pre-CV is QS Vir (48pc, P=3.6hr). However, its wind accretion rates measured from 1999 HST UV spectra of the WD metal absorption lines and 2006 XMM-Newton CCD spectroscopy differ by a factor of a thousand, pointing to either a dominant CME stochastic component, or a "magnetic switch" found in MHD simulations and driven by cyclic activity on the M dwarf. HST COS spectra combined with XMM-Newton monitoring on timescales from weeks to years will tease out CME vs cyclic accretion variations. UV and X-ray measurements will provide the first consistency check of both accretion rate measurement methods. MHD models tailored to the system will enable the first quasi-direct measurements of the mass loss and AML from a CV-like binary. Our project requires 6 HST/COS orbits in Cycles 22-24, and 60ksec on XMM in Cycle 22

  16. Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at sNN=62 and 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Beavis, D. R.; Behera, N. K.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Daugherity, M. S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schaub, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We present two-dimensional (2D) two-particle angular correlations measured with the STAR detector on relative pseudorapidity η and azimuth ϕ for charged particles from Au-Au collisions at sNN=62 and 200 GeV with transverse momentum pt≥0.15 GeV/c, |η|≤1, and 2π in azimuth. Observed correlations include a same-side (relative azimuth <π/2) 2D peak, a closely related away-side azimuth dipole, and an azimuth quadrupole conventionally associated with elliptic flow. The same-side 2D peak and away-side dipole are explained by semihard parton scattering and fragmentation (minijets) in proton-proton and peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions. Those structures follow N-N binary-collision scaling in Au-Au collisions until midcentrality, where a transition to a qualitatively different centrality trend occurs within one 10% centrality bin. Above the transition point the number of same-side and away-side correlated pairs increases rapidly relative to binary-collision scaling, the η width of the same-side 2D peak also increases rapidly (η elongation), and the ϕ width actually decreases significantly. Those centrality trends are in marked contrast with conventional expectations for jet quenching in a dense medium. The observed centrality trends are compared to perturbative QCD predictions computed in hijing, which serve as a theoretical baseline, and to the expected trends for semihard parton scattering and fragmentation in a thermalized opaque medium predicted by theoretical calculations and phenomenological models. We are unable to reconcile a semihard parton scattering and fragmentation origin for the observed correlation structure and centrality trends with heavy-ion collision scenarios that invoke rapid parton thermalization. If the collision system turns out to be effectively opaque to few-GeV partons the present observations would be inconsistent with the minijet picture discussed here.

  17. Investigations of an integrated angular velocity measurement and attitude control system for spacecraft using magnetically suspended double-gimbal CMGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shiqiang; Han, Bangcheng

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated angular velocity measurement and attitude control system of spacecraft using magnetically suspended double-gimbal control moment gyros (MSDGCMGs). The high speed rotor of MSDGCMG is alleviated by a five-degree-of-freedom permanent magnet biased AMB control system. With this special rotor supported manner, the MSDGCMG has the function of attitude rate sensing as well as attitude control. This characteristic provides a new approach to a compact light-weight spacecraft design, which can combine these two functions into a single device. This paper discusses the principles and implementations of AMB-based angular velocity measurement. Spacecraft dynamics with DGMSCMG actuators, including the dynamics of magnetically suspended high-speed rotor, the dynamics of inner gimbal and outer gimbal, as well as the determination method of spacecraft angular velocity are modeled, respectively. The effectiveness of the proposed integrated system is also validated numerically and experimentally.

  18. Microstructure quantification and correlation with flow stress of ultrafine grained commercially pure Al fabricated by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Reihanian, M.; Ebrahimi, R.; Moshksar, M.M.; Terada, D.; Tsuji, N.

    2008-09-15

    Commercial purity Al was severely deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to eight passes using route B{sub C}. The deformation microstructure was characterized quantitatively by electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructural homogeneity was investigated by EBSD at various locations from center to surface of the samples on a longitudinal section parallel to the pressing direction. Structural parameters including mean boundary spacing, boundary misorientation angle and fraction of high angle grain boundaries were measured and characterized through the section of the ECAP samples. EBSD scans revealed a homogeneous ultrafine grained microstructure after 8 passes. The analysis showed that the fraction of high angle grain boundaries was more than 70% at most locations of the sample section. Also, an average boundary spacing of 380 nm was obtained by the linear intercept method. TEM analysis was used for more detailed characterization of the microstructure, such as low angle boundaries with misorientation angles smaller than 2 deg. Using the structural parameters-flow stress relationship, the flow stress was estimated based on the EBSD and TEM/Kikuchi-line analyses and compared with measured values.

  19. Angular resolved light scattering for discriminating among marine picoplankton: modeling and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bing; Jaffe, Jules S.; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Esener, Sadik C.

    2006-12-01

    In order to assess the capability to optically identify small marine microbes, both simulations and experiments of angular resolved light scattering (ARLS) were performed. After calibration with 30-nm vesicles characterized by a nearly constant scattering distribution for vertically polarized light (azimuthal angle=90°), ARLS from suspensions of three types of marine picoplankton (two prokaryotes and one eukaryote) in seawater was measured with a scattering device that consisted of an elliptical mirror, a rotating aperture, and a PMT. Scattered light was recorded with adequate signal-to-noise in the 40-140°. Simulations modeled the cells as prolate spheroids with independently measured dimensions. For the prokaryotes, approximated as homogeneous spheroids, simulations were performed using the RM (Rayleigh-Mie) - I method, a hybrid of the Rayleigh-Debye approximation and the generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. For the picoeukaryote, an extended RM - I method was developed for a coated spheroid with different shell thickness distributions. The picoeukaryote was then modeled as a coated sphere with a spherical core. Good overall agreements were obtained between simulations and experiments. The distinctive scattering patterns of the different species hold promise for an identification system based on ARLS.

  20. The measurement of angular differential cross sections at the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvale, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility (ASF) located at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center as well as some of the initial experiments to be performed with it, are covered. The goal is to develop an apparatus capable of measuring angular differential cross sections (ADCS) for the scattering of 2 to 14 eV atomic oxygen from various gaseous targets. At present little is known about atomic oxygen scattering with kinetic energies of a few eV. This apparatus is designed to increase the understanding of collisions in this energy region. Atomic oxygen scattering processes are of vital interest to NASA because the space shuttle as well as other low earth orbit satellites will be subjected to a flux of 5 eV atomic oxygen on the ram surfaces while in orbit. The primary experiments will involve the measurements of ADCS for atomic oxygen scattering from gaseous targets (in particular, molecular nitrogen). These, as well as the related initial experiments involving thermal He scattering from N2 and O2 targets will be described.

  1. Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation of measuring small angle deviations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Fan; Tan Jiubin; Cui Jiwen

    2013-06-15

    Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation is proposed in this article to improve the measurement accuracy and stability of small angle deviations. A beam splitting target reflector is used to replace the plane mirror in laser autocollimation to generate a reference beam when returning the measurement beam. The reference beam and measurement beam have the same angular drift, but have different sensitivities to the rotation angle of the reflector due to the unique characteristics of the reflector. Thus, the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation can be compensated in real time by using the drift of reference beam. Experimental results indicate that an output stability of 0.085 arc sec in 2 h can be achieved after compensation. And a measurement accuracy of {+-}0.032 arc sec can be obtained over the range of {+-}1190 arc sec with an effective resolution of 0.006 arc sec. It is confirmed that the compensation method for the angular drift of laser beam is necessary for improving the measurement accuracy and stability in laser autocollimation.

  2. Angular dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter and its impact on in vivo surface dose measurement in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Qin, S; Chen, T; Wang, L; Tu, Y; Yue, N; Zhou, J

    2014-08-01

    The focus of this study is the angular dependence of two types of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters (MOSFET20 and OneDose/OneDosePlus) when used for surface dose measurements. External beam radiationat different gantry angles were delivered to a cubic solid water phantom with a MOSFET placed on the top surface at CAX. The long axis of the MOSFET was oriented along the gantry axis of rotation, with the dosimeter (bubble side) facing the radiation source. MOSFET-measured surface doses were compared against calibrated radiochromic film readings. It was found that both types of MOSFET dosimeters exhibited larger than previously reported angular dependence when measuring surface dose in beams at large oblique angles. For the MOSFET20 dosimeter the measured surface dose deviation against film readings was as high as 17% when the incident angle was 72 degrees to the norm of the phantom surface. It is concluded that some MOSFET dosimeters may have a strong angular dependence when placed on the surface of water-equivalent material, even though they may have an isotropic angular response when surrounded by uniform medium. Extra on-surface calibration maybe necessary before using MOSFET dosimeters for skin dose measurement in tangential fields. PMID:24206205

  3. Probing the anisotropic behaviors of black phosphorus by transmission electron microscopy, angular-dependent Raman spectra, and electronic transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wanglin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Fei, Zhen; Zhou, Jianguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Ze

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we correlated the angular dependence of the Raman response of black phosphorus to its crystallographic orientation by using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the intensity of the Ag 2 mode reached a maximum when the polarization direction of the incident light was parallel to the zigzag crystallographic orientation. Notably, it was further confirmed that the zigzag crystallographic direction exhibited superior conductance and carrier mobility. Because of the lattice extension along the armchair direction, an intensification of the anisotropic Raman response was observed. This work provides direct evidence of the correlation between anisotropic properties and crystallographic direction and represents a turning point in the discussion of the angular-dependent electronic properties of black phosphorus.

  4. Harmonic decomposition of two particle angular correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, K.; Abelev, B.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergmann, C.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biolcati, E.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bortolin, C.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Boyer, B.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Bugaiev, K.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Coffin, J.-P.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Erasmo, G. D.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Azevedo Moregula, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Del Castillo Sanchez, E.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; di Bari, D.; di Giglio, C.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Harmanova, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jancurová, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, M. A.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Larsen, D. T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Leistam, L.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mayer, C.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Midori, J.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Muhuri, S.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nagle, J. L.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Obayashi, H.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Øvrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Tagridis, C.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Tosello, F.; Traczyk, T.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernekohl, D. C.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger (t) and associated (a) particles are measured by the ALICE experiment in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV for transverse momenta 0.25 < pTt,a < 15 GeV / c, where pTt >pTa. The shapes of the pair correlation distributions are studied in a variety of collision centrality classes between 0 and 50% of the total hadronic cross section for particles in the pseudorapidity interval | η | < 1.0. Distributions in relative azimuth Δϕ ≡ϕt -ϕa are analyzed for | Δη | ≡ |ηt -ηa | > 0.8, and are referred to as "long-range correlations". Fourier components VnΔ ≡ < cos (nΔϕ) > are extracted from the long-range azimuthal correlation functions. If particle pairs are correlated to one another through their individual correlation to a common symmetry plane, then the pair anisotropy VnΔ (pTt ,pTa) is fully described in terms of single-particle anisotropies vn (pT) as VnΔ (pTt ,pTa) =vn (pTt)vn (pTa). This expectation is tested for 1 ⩽ n ⩽ 5 by applying a global fit of all VnΔ (pTt ,pTa) to obtain the best values vn { GF } (pT). It is found that for 2 ⩽ n ⩽ 5, the fit agrees well with data up to pTa ˜ 3- 4 GeV / c, with a trend of increasing deviation as pTt and pTa are increased or as collisions become more peripheral. This suggests that no pair correlation harmonic can be described over the full 0.25

  5. Measurements of partial cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions for the photodetachment of Fe- and Cu- at visible photon wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, A. M.; Duvvuri, Srividya S.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Williams, W. W.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Carpenter, D. L.; Collier, R. D.; Kvale, T. J.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-02-01

    Photodetachment cross sections and the angular distributions of photoelectrons produced by the single-photon detachment of the transition metal negative ions Fe- and Cu- have been measured at four discrete photon wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1nm (2.71-1.92eV) using a crossed-beams laser photodetachment electron spectrometry (LPES) apparatus. Photodetachment cross sections were determined by comparing the photoelectron yields from the photodetachment of Fe- to those of Cu- and C- , which have known absolute photodetachment cross sections. Using the measured photodetachment cross sections, radiative electron attachment cross sections were calculated using the principle of detailed balance. Angular distributions were determined by measurements of laboratory frame, angle-, and energy-resolved photoelectrons as a function of the angle between the linear laser polarization vector and the momentum vector of the collected photoelectrons. Values of the asymmetry parameter have been determined by nonlinear least-squares fits to these angular distributions. The measured asymmetry parameters are compared to predictions of photodetachment models including Cooper and Zare’s dipole approximation theory [J. Cooper and R. N. Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 48, 942 (1968)], and the angular momentum transfer theory developed by Fano and Dill [Phys. Rev. A 6, 185 (1972)].

  6. A measurement by BOOMERANG of multiple peaks in the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netterfield, C. B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Bernardis, P. de; Farese, P.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V. V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Lange, A. E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Montroy, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background from l = 75 to l = 1025 (10' to 5 degrees) from a combined analysis of four 150 GHz channels in the BOOMERANG experiment. The spectrum contains multiple peaks and minima, as predicted by standard adiabatic-inflationary models in which the primordial plasma undergoes acoustic oscillations.

  7. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE ANGULAR POWER SPECTRUM OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPIES IN THE WMAP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Lung-Yih; Chen, Fei-Fan

    2012-05-20

    The angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies is one of the most important characteristics in cosmology that can shed light on the properties of the universe such as its geometry and total density. Using flat sky approximation and Fourier analysis, we estimate the angular power spectrum from an ensemble of the least foreground-contaminated square patches from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe W and V frequency band map. This method circumvents the issue of foreground cleaning and that of breaking orthogonality in spherical harmonic analysis because we are able to mask out the bright Galactic plane region, thereby rendering a direct measurement of the angular power spectrum. We test and confirm the Gaussian statistical characteristic of the selected patches, from which the first and second acoustic peaks of the power spectrum are reproduced, and the third peak is clearly visible, albeit with some noise residual at the tail.

  8. Polarization Imaging over Sea Surface - A Method for Measurements of Stokes Components Angular Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, W.; Piskozub, J.; Toczek, H.

    2015-12-01

    This article describes a method for determining the angular distribution of light polarization over a roughened surface of the sea. Our method relies on measurements of the Stokes vector elements using a polarization imaging camera that operates using the Division of Focal Plane (DoFP) method. It uses special monochrome CCD array in which the neighbouring cells, instead of recording different colours (red green and blue), are equipped with micropolarizers of four directions (0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees). We combined the camera with a fish-eye lens of Field of View (FoV) > 180 deg. Such a large FoV allowed us to crop out the fragment of the frame along the circular horizon, showing a view covering all directions of the hemisphere. Because of complicated optical design of the fish-eye lens (light refraction on surfaces of parts of the lens) connected to the sensor we checked the accuracy of the measurement system. A method to determine the accuracy of measured polarization is based on comparison of the experimentally obtained rotation matrix with its theoretical form. Such a comparison showed that the maximum error of Stokes vector elements depended on zenith angle and reached as much as 24% for light coming from just above the horizon, but decreased rapidly with decreasing zenith angle to the value of 12% for the angles 10° off the edge of FoV. Moreover we present the preliminary results prepared over rough sea surface. These results include total intensity of light, Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) and their standard deviations. The results have been averaged over one thousand frames of a movie. These results indicate that the maximum polarization is observed near the reflection of the sun, and the signal coming from below the surface may be observed at zenith angles far from the vertical direction.

  9. Optic-electronic systems for measurement the three-dimension angular deformation of axles at the millimeter wave range radiotelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor A.; Kopylova, Tatyana V.; Konyakhin, Alexsey I.; Smekhov, Andrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Researches in the millimetre wave range require the high accuracy for position of the mirror components of the radiotelescope. A mirror weight is the cause of the three-dimension angular deformation of the elevation axle and azimuth axle relatively bearings. At result the elevation angle and azimuth angle of a parabolic mirror axis orientation is not equal to the set values. For the measuring roll, pitch and yaw angular deformations the autocollimation system with new type of the reflector are used. Reflector for autocollimation measurements as compositions of the anamorphic prism and special tetrahedral reflector is described. New methods for roll, pitch, yaw angles measuring are discussed. Optical scheme for the measurement system, structure the anamorphic prism and tetrahedral reflector are proposed. Equations for the static characteristic of the measuring system are shown.

  10. Electric field gradients at 181Ta probe in ZrNi: Results from perturbed angular correlation and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, C. C.; Das, Rakesh; Srivastava, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    Results of temperature dependent perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in the equiatomic ZrNi alloy have been reported for the first time using 181Hf probe. At room temperature, values of quadrupole frequency and asymmetry parameter for the major component (~80%) are found to be ωQ=26.8(4) Mrad/s, and η=0.413(7). The resulting electric field gradient comes out to be Vzz=2.99 ×1017 V/cm2 and this corresponds to the probe nuclei occupying the regular substitutional Zr sites. In ZrNi system, no magnetic interaction is observed down to 77 K indicating absence of any magnetism in this material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies on an inactive but similarly prepared sample confirm the dominant presence of the orthorhombic ZrNi phase in the sample. A complementary density functional theory (DFT) calculation results in Vzz=-2.35×1017 V/cm2, η=0.46 at the 181Ta probe impurity site and zero magnetic moment on each atomic site, in close agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, it is found that electric field gradient for the regular component follows a T3/2 temperature dependence between 77 and 353 K, beyond which it varies linearly with temperature.

  11. The source-sample stage of the new two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation spectrometer at Technische Universität München

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Böni, Peter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) is a well established technique for the investigation of the electronic structure. A major limitation of ACAR studies is the available positron flux at a small spot on the sample. For this reason, the focus of this work is put on the discussion of a newly developed source-sample stage of the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at Technische Universität München which uses an optimized static magnetic field configuration to guide the positrons onto the sample. The achieved spot diameter is dFWHM = 5.4 mm, with a high efficiency over the whole energy spectrum of the 22Na positron source. The implications of the performance of the source-sample stage are discussed with regard to 2D-ACAR measurements of single crystalline α-quartz, which serves as a model system for the determination of the total resolution. A value of (1.53 × 1.64) mrad2 FWHM was achieved at room temperature.

  12. The source-sample stage of the new two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation spectrometer at Technische Universitaet Muenchen

    SciTech Connect

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Boeni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2013-04-15

    Angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) is a well established technique for the investigation of the electronic structure. A major limitation of ACAR studies is the available positron flux at a small spot on the sample. For this reason, the focus of this work is put on the discussion of a newly developed source-sample stage of the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at Technische Universitaet Muenchen which uses an optimized static magnetic field configuration to guide the positrons onto the sample. The achieved spot diameter is d{sub FWHM}= 5.4 mm, with a high efficiency over the whole energy spectrum of the {sup 22}Na positron source. The implications of the performance of the source-sample stage are discussed with regard to 2D-ACAR measurements of single crystalline {alpha}-quartz, which serves as a model system for the determination of the total resolution. A value of (1.53 Multiplication-Sign 1.64) mrad{sup 2} FWHM was achieved at room temperature.

  13. Oxygen ordering in the high-Tc superconductor HgBa2CaCu2O6+δ as revealed by perturbed angular correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, T. M.; Correia, J. G.; Haas, H.; Odier, P.; Tavares, P. B.; da Silva, M. R.; Lopes, A. M. L.; Pereira, A. M.; Gonçalves, J. N.; Amaral, J. S.; Darie, C.; Araujo, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    Lattice sites and collective ordering of oxygen atoms in HgBa2CaCu2O6+δ were studied using the perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique at ISOLDE/CERN. The electric field gradients (EFG) at 199mHg nuclei have been measured as functions of oxygen doping on the Hg planes, above and below Tc. In comparison with the results obtained for oxygen and fluorine doping in Hg-1201, the analysis shows a different oxygen ordering exhibited by Hg-1212. Moreover, for all studied cases, the experimental results show that at a local scale there is non uniform oxygen distribution. A series of ab initio EFG calculations allowed to infer that at low concentrations, regions without oxygen coexist with regions where O2δ dumbbell molecules are located at the center of the Hg mesh. On the other side, at high concentrations, O2δ dumbbell molecules coexist with single Oδ atoms occupying the center of the Hg mesh. The present results suggest that oxygen sits on the Hg planes in the form of a molecule and not as a single atom.

  14. Magnetic behavior of La-doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} studied by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy with {sup 111}Cd and {sup 140}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, I. T. Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2015-05-07

    In this paper, the local magnetic properties of La-doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (5% and 10%) bulk and Nanoparticles (NPs) samples were studied by measuring hyperfine interactions in a wide range of temperature from 10 to 900 K with perturbed γ-γ angular correlation spectroscopy using {sup 111}In({sup 111}Cd) and {sup 140}La({sup 140}Ce) as probe nuclei. Results for the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (B{sub hf}) for bulk and NP samples, pure and doped with La show that its behavior follows a second order Brillouin-like transition from which the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) was determined (T{sub C} ∼ 855 K). Results also show two different regions in NP samples: the core where a minor fraction of probe nuclei with well defined magnetic dipole frequency was observed and the shell where a major fraction with broad distributed electric quadrupolar frequency (surface effect in NP) was observed. The Verwey transition T{sub V} ∼ 120 K, due the order disorder phase, was also observed in all samples. The results are discussed in terms of the magnetic exchange interaction between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions in the two regions of NP.

  15. Magnetic behavior of La-doped Fe3O4 studied by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy with 111Cd and 140Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, I. T.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the local magnetic properties of La-doped Fe3O4 (5% and 10%) bulk and Nanoparticles (NPs) samples were studied by measuring hyperfine interactions in a wide range of temperature from 10 to 900 K with perturbed γ-γ angular correlation spectroscopy using 111In(111Cd) and 140La(140Ce) as probe nuclei. Results for the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (Bhf) for bulk and NP samples, pure and doped with La show that its behavior follows a second order Brillouin-like transition from which the Curie temperature (TC) was determined (TC ˜ 855 K). Results also show two different regions in NP samples: the core where a minor fraction of probe nuclei with well defined magnetic dipole frequency was observed and the shell where a major fraction with broad distributed electric quadrupolar frequency (surface effect in NP) was observed. The Verwey transition TV ˜ 120 K, due the order disorder phase, was also observed in all samples. The results are discussed in terms of the magnetic exchange interaction between Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions in the two regions of NP.

  16. Precise angular position measurement of a point source in an optoelectronic system with CCD arrays upon a single readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedko, Evgeny G.; Zvereva, Elena N.

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the method of angular position measuring of a point source in a system with a CCD array by means of linear dimension - time slot - code transformation and assessment of the potential accuracy of the method, which is determined by instrumental irremovable random errors of measurement in terms of optimal processing of incoming information with a single reading it with CCD - lines. This work introduces an optoelectronic system circuit with CCD arrays with stretched sensing elements and a point of reference for angular position measuring. In this case the arrays have images projections of both the reference point source and the target point source, whose angular position is measured with high precision. From the CCD array output the signals arrive at an optimal (or apt) linear filter, and then to the signal peak position detection circuit, which provides the minimum error due to noise impact. Pulse edges, corresponding to the signals maximum, make a time interval filled with high-frequency counting pulses. The number of pulses in this interval will correspond to the measured angular position of the target point source. In terms of the statistical decision theory this work analyses random errors given the signals spectral function that, in turn, accounts for the transfer function of the optical system and the CCD array as an image analyzer. This article also presents analysis of how measurement accuracy depends on frequency of information readout from the CCD-arrays for different values of signal-to-noise ratio. Error analysis of the proposed optoelectronic circuits showed that measurements can be made upon a single readout with an accuracy of 0.01 and even 0,001 pixels.

  17. Determination of Sea Ice Thickness from Angular and Frequency Correlation Functions and by Genetic Algorithm: A Theoretical Study of New Instrument Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Z. A.; Kuga, Y.; Ishimaru, A.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; McDonald, K. C.; Holt, B.; Pak, K.; Jordan, R.; Perovich, D.; Sturm, M.

    2004-12-01

    Thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice play a critical role in Earth's climate and ocean circulation. An accurate measurement of these parameters on synoptic scales at regular intervals would enable characterization of this important component for the understanding of ocean circulation and global heat balance. Currently, IceSAT (laser altimeter) and EnviSAT (radar altimeter) and the upcoming CryoSAT (radar altimeter) measurement systems provide estimates of the sea ice freeboard, i.e. that portion of the ice that is above the sea level. The sea ice thickness and changes in thickness are inferred from these measurements. In this paper, we develop the theoretical basis for application of radar interferometry in the VHF band to the direct estimation of sea ice thickness. We employ angular and frequency correlation functions (ACF/FCF) of the electromagnetic wave scattered from sea-ice, using small perturbation and Kirchhoff rough surface scattering and Rayleigh volume scattering models. The medium is modeled as multi-layered stratification consisting of snow, sea ice (including spherical particles of air bubbles and brine inclusions), and sea water. Each surface interface is modeled as a rough surface with a Gaussian roughness spectrum. To characterize the ACF/FCF, the correlation between two waves with different frequencies, incidence and observation angles, is employed, forming a combined spatial- and frequency-domain interferometer. This technique exploits the difference in the correlation properties (phase matching conditions) of surface and volume scattering. The surface correlation function exhibits a strong correlation along a "memory line." The volume scattering shows a strong correlation at specific points - "memory dots." The effect of volume scattering can be suppressed by choosing appropriate combinations of frequencies and angles. The phase of the surface correlation function depends on the scattering geometry (location of the antennas), and provides

  18. Measurements of eight early-type stars angular diameters using VEGA/CHARA interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challouf, M.; Nardetto, N.; Mourard, D.; Aroui, H.; Delaa, O.

    2014-12-01

    The surface brightness color (SBC) relation is an important tool to derive the distance of extragalatic eclipsing binaries. We determined the uniform disc angular diameter of the eight following early-type stars using VEGA/CHARA interferometric observations: θ_{UD}[δ Cyg] = 0.766 ± 0.047 mas, θ_{UD}[γ Lyr] = 0.742& ± 0.010 mas, θ_{UD}[γ Ori] = 0.701 ± 0.005 mas, θ_{UD}[ζ Peg] = 0.539 ± 0.009 mas, θ_{UD}[λ Aql] = 0.529 ± 0.003 mas, θ_{UD}[ζ Per] = 0.531 ± 0.007 mas, θ_{UD}[ι Her] = 0.304 ± 0.010 mas and θ_{UD}[8 Cyg] = 0.229 ± 0.011 mas (by extending V-K range from -0.76 to 0.02) with typical precision of about 1.5%. By combining these data with previous angular diameter determinations available in the literature, Challouf et al. (2014) provide for the very first time a SBC relation for early-type stars (-1≤V-K≤0) with a precision of about 0.16 magnitude or 7% in term of angular diameter (when using this SBC relation to derive the angular diameter of early-type stars).

  19. Measurement of the rotational Doppler frequency shift of a spinning object using a radio frequency orbital angular momentum beam.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingyang; Gao, Xinlu; Xie, Mutong; Zhai, Wensheng; Xu, Wenjing; Huang, Shanguo; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-06-01

    An indirect approach based on phase measurement is proposed to measure the rotational Doppler frequency shift, which takes full advantage of the phase structure of orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams in radio domain, using a vector network analyzer (VNA) as a phase discriminator. A proof-of-concept experiment is established by an optical-controlled system with the OAM state of 1. By analyzing the experiment's results, the rotational Doppler frequency shift is measured as 24.83 Hz (max error rate 0.67%) at 50π rad/s rotational velocity, deducing the rotational velocity as 50.18π (average error rate 0.36%). PMID:27244411

  20. Toward the measurement of angular dependence of in-plane ultrasonic properties of unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Boghosian, Jeffrey S.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2000-05-01

    Modern textile-based composite materials have complex fiber architectures, which present new challenges for ultrasonic characterization. As a step toward developing a measurement scheme for examining in detail the ultrasonic properties of textile composites, the present work addresses measurement of the angular dependence of the angular dependence of ultrasonic properties in unidirectional composite specimens. Cylindrical composite specimens of diameter 19 mm were fabricated, some with the fibers parallel to the cylinder axis and others with the fibers perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Additional specimens of varying diameters were made from acrylic. Small-diameter holes were drilled along the center axis of some specimens to serve as fiducial markers for the geometrical center of the cylinder. The measurement apparatus consisted of a ring of 100 matched transducers, spaced by 3.6°, facing the center of the ring. Each specimen was placed in turn at the center of the ring. Transmission measurements of attenuation and sound speed were performed by transmitting and receiving using pairs of transducers opposite each other on the ring. Backscattered waves were measured by transmitting and receiving with each transducer alone. The ultrasonic backscatter, attenuation and speed measured along a diameter of the cylinders were found to qualitatively and quantitatively match values measured in flat specimens. Angular "scattering" measurements were made by transmitting with one transducer and receiving with all 100 transducers. Substantial ultrasonic signals were generated in the "scattered" waves by phenomena related to the geometry of the cylindrical water/composite or water/acrylic interfaces, and at several angles these overlapped the desired scattered waves arising from the center of the cylinder.

  1. Failure of the Cross Correlation Measurement Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Ken; Ham, Katie; Schock, Kris

    2014-03-01

    The experiment involves creating a sound wave that propagates down a pipe with 8 transducers attached at equally spaced intervals of 0.01016 meters. The numerical method used to solve for the phase component, the Cross Correlation Method, creates a high correlation value, but the speed of sound varies immensely. The method involves a Fast Fourier Transform of the collected data, which is used to find the phase of the sound wave, and the slope of the position versus time graph, which is used to calculate the speed of sound. This high correlation values shows that the data is correct, but the numerical method for analyzing the data is incorrect. We would like to thank Dr. Ken McGill for all of his time, help, and guidance with this research project. We would also like to thank Georgia College and State University for both the resources and space necessary for this experiment.

  2. Harmonic decomposition of two particle angular correlations in Pb Pb collisions at s_NN = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, K.; Awes, Terry C; Read, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; ALICE, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger (t) and associated (a) particles are measured by the ALICE experiment in Pb-Pb collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.76 TeV for transverse momenta 0.25 < p{sub T}{sup t,a} < 15 GeV/c, where p{sub T}{sup t} > p{sub T}{sup a}. The shapes of the pair correlation distributions are studied in a variety of collision centrality classes between 0 and 50% of the total hadronic cross section for particles in the pseudorapidity interval |{eta}| < 1.0. Distributions in relative azimuth {Delta}{phi}{triple_bond}{phi}t-{phi}a are analyzed for |{Delta}{eta}|{triple_bond}|{eta}t-{eta}a| > 0.8, and are referred to as 'long-range correlations'. Fourier components Vn{Delta} {triple_bond} are extracted from the long-range azimuthal correlation functions. If particle pairs are correlated to one another through their individual correlation to a common symmetry plane, then the pair anisotropy V{sub n{Delta}}(p{sub T}{sup t},p{sub T}{sup a}) is fully described in terms of single-particle anisotropies vn(pT) as V{sub n{Delta}}(p{sub T}{sup t},p{sub T}{sup a}) = v{sub n}(p{sub T}{sup t})v{sub n}(p{sub T}{sup a}). This expectation is tested for 1 {le} n {le} 5 by applying a global fit of all V{sub n{Delta}}(p{sub T}{sup t},p{sub T}{sup a}) to obtain the best values vn{l_brace}GF{r_brace}(p{sub T}). It is found that for 2 {le} n {le} 5, the fit agrees well with data up to p{sub T}{sup a} {approx} 3-4 GeV/c, with a trend of increasing deviation as p{sub T}{sup t} and p{sub T}{sup a} are increased or as collisions become more peripheral. This suggests that no pair correlation harmonic can be described over the full 0.25 < pT < 15 GeV/c range using a single vn(pT) curve; such a description is however approximately possible for 2 {le} n {le} 5 when p{sub T}{sup a} < 4 GeV/c. For the n = 1 harmonic, however, a single v{sub 1}(pT) curve is not obtained even within the reduced range p{sub T}{sup a} < 4 GeV/c.

  3. Correlations between measures of dynamic balance in individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Vistamehr, Arian; Kautz, Steven A; Bowden, Mark G; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-02-01

    Mediolateral balance control during walking is a challenging task in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals. To detect and treat dynamic balance disorders, it is important to assess balance using reliable methods. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), margin-of-stability (MoS), and peak-to-peak range of angular-momentum (H) are some of the most commonly used measures to assess dynamic balance and fall risk in clinical and laboratory settings. However, it is not clear if these measures lead to similar conclusions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess dynamic balance in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals using BBS, DGI, MoS and the range of H and determine if these measure are correlated. BBS and DGI were collected from 19 individuals post-stroke. Additionally, kinematic and kinetic data were collected while the same individuals walked at their self-selected speed. MoS and the range of H were calculated in the mediolateral direction for each participant. Correlation analyses revealed moderate associations between all measures. Overall, a higher range of angular-momentum was associated with a higher MoS, wider step width and lower BBS and DGI scores, indicating poor balance control. Further, only the MoS from the paretic foot placement, but not the nonparetic foot, correlated with the other balance measures. Although moderate correlations existed between all the balance measures, these findings do not necessarily advocate the use of a single measure as each test may assess different constructs of dynamic balance. These findings have important implications for the use and interpretation of dynamic balance assessments. PMID:26795124

  4. Perturbed Angular Correlation Study of the Static and Dynamic Aspects of Cadmium and Mercury Atoms Inside and Attached to a C60 Fullerene Cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satyendra K.; Guin, Rashmohan; Banerjee, Debasish; Johnston, Karl; Das, Parnika; Butz, Tilman; Amaral, Vitor S.; Correia, Joao G.; Barbosa, Marcelo B.

    2014-11-01

    30 keV 111mCd and 50 keV 199mHg beams from ISOLDE were used to implant on preformed targets of C60 with a thickness of 1 mg cm-2. Endofullerene compounds, viz. 111mCd@C60 and 199mHg@C60 formed during implantation were separated by filtration through micropore filter paper followed by solvent extraction. Dried samples of the endofullerene compounds were counted for the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) measurement using the coincidence of the 151 - 245 keV cascade of 111mCd and the 374 - 158 keV cascade of 199mHg on a six LaBr3(Ce) detector system coupled with digital electronics. The results for 111mCd@C60 indicate a single static component (27%) and a fast relaxing component (73%), the latter implying that the cadmium atom moves rapidly inside the cage at room temperature. The quadrupole interaction frequency and asymmetry parameter of the cadmium atom occupying the static site in C60 are wQ=8.21(36) Mrad s-1 and η = 0.41(9), respectively. The fast relaxation constant is 0.0031(4) ns-1. Similarly, mercury atoms also exhibit a single static and a fast component. The static site has a quadrupole frequency wQ=283.0(12.4) Mrad s-1 and η =0 with a fraction of 30%. The fast relaxation constant is 0.045(8) ns-1 with a fraction of 70%, very similar to that of cadmium.

  5. aCORN: A Measurement of the Beta-Antineutrino Correlation in Neutron Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    The aCORN experiment has measured the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient (the ``a'' coefficient) in free neutron decay. aCORN uses the dependence of the recoil proton momentum on the opening angle between the electron and the neutrino to form an asymmetry. The apparatus accepts decays where the antineutrino is restricted to two momentum groups having equal solid angle. In this geometry, proton time of flight distinguishes between decays with a large or small opening angle between the electron and the antineutrino. The correlation coefficient is determined from the asymmetry between two branches of the time of flight spectrum. The asymmetry was measured on the NG-6 neutron beam at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), and a subsequent measurement has been started on the higher flux NG-C beam. An overview of the method and systematic effects will be presented, including results from the NG-6 dataset. National Science Foundation.

  6. Connection between measurement disturbance relation and multipartite quantum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Li; Du, Kun; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2015-01-01

    It is found that the measurement disturbance relation (MDR) determines the strength of quantum correlation and hence is one of the essential facets of the nature of quantum nonlocality. In reverse, the exact form of MDR may be ascertained through measuring the correlation function. To this aim, an optical experimental scheme is proposed. Moreover, by virtue of the correlation function, we find that the quantum entanglement, the quantum nonlocality, and the uncertainty principle can be explicitly correlated.

  7. Are the WMAP Angular Magnification Measurements Consistent with an Inhomogeneous Critical Density Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, Richard; Mittaz, Jonathan P. D.

    2005-04-01

    The propagation of light through a universe of isothermal mass spheres amidst a homogeneous matter component is considered. We demonstrate by an analytical proof that as long as a small light bundle passes through a sufficient number of isothermal mass spheres at various impact parameters-a criterion of great importance-its average convergence will exactly compensate the divergence within a homogeneous matter component. The net effect on the light is statistically the same as if all the matter in isothermal mass spheres were ``fully homogenized.'' When applying the above ideas toward understanding the angular size of the primary acoustic peaks of the microwave background, however, caution is needed. The reason is that (by mass) most isothermal mass spheres are in galaxies-their full mass profiles are not sampled by passing light-and at least the inner 20 kpc regions of these systems are missed by the majority of rays, while the rest of the rays would map back to unresolvable but magnified, randomly located spots to compensate for the loss in angular size. Therefore, a scanning pair of WMAP beams finds most frequently that the largest temperature difference occurs when each beam is placed at diametrically opposite points of the Dyer-Roeder collapsed sections. This is the mode magnification, which corresponds to the acoustic peaks, and is less than the mean (or the homogeneous preclumping angular size). Since space was seen to be Euclidean without taking the said adjustment into account, the true density of the universe should be supercritical. Our analysis gives Ωm=0.278+/-0.040 and ΩΛ=0.782+/-0.040.

  8. Directly measuring mean and variance of infinite-spectrum observables such as the photon orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Piccirillo, Bruno; Slussarenko, Sergei; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Santamato, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The standard method for experimentally determining the probability distribution of an observable in quantum mechanics is the measurement of the observable spectrum. However, for infinite-dimensional degrees of freedom, this approach would require ideally infinite or, more realistically, a very large number of measurements. Here we consider an alternative method which can yield the mean and variance of an observable of an infinite-dimensional system by measuring only a two-dimensional pointer weakly coupled with the system. In our demonstrative implementation, we determine both the mean and the variance of the orbital angular momentum of a light beam without acquiring the entire spectrum, but measuring the Stokes parameters of the optical polarization (acting as pointer), after the beam has suffered a suitable spin–orbit weak interaction. This example can provide a paradigm for a new class of useful weak quantum measurements. PMID:26477715

  9. Directly measuring mean and variance of infinite-spectrum observables such as the photon orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Bruno; Slussarenko, Sergei; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Santamato, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The standard method for experimentally determining the probability distribution of an observable in quantum mechanics is the measurement of the observable spectrum. However, for infinite-dimensional degrees of freedom, this approach would require ideally infinite or, more realistically, a very large number of measurements. Here we consider an alternative method which can yield the mean and variance of an observable of an infinite-dimensional system by measuring only a two-dimensional pointer weakly coupled with the system. In our demonstrative implementation, we determine both the mean and the variance of the orbital angular momentum of a light beam without acquiring the entire spectrum, but measuring the Stokes parameters of the optical polarization (acting as pointer), after the beam has suffered a suitable spin-orbit weak interaction. This example can provide a paradigm for a new class of useful weak quantum measurements. PMID:26477715

  10. Directly measuring mean and variance of infinite-spectrum observables such as the photon orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccirillo, Bruno; Slussarenko, Sergei; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Santamato, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    The standard method for experimentally determining the probability distribution of an observable in quantum mechanics is the measurement of the observable spectrum. However, for infinite-dimensional degrees of freedom, this approach would require ideally infinite or, more realistically, a very large number of measurements. Here we consider an alternative method which can yield the mean and variance of an observable of an infinite-dimensional system by measuring only a two-dimensional pointer weakly coupled with the system. In our demonstrative implementation, we determine both the mean and the variance of the orbital angular momentum of a light beam without acquiring the entire spectrum, but measuring the Stokes parameters of the optical polarization (acting as pointer), after the beam has suffered a suitable spin-orbit weak interaction. This example can provide a paradigm for a new class of useful weak quantum measurements.

  11. Angular-resolution and material-characterization measurements for a dual-particle imaging system with mixed-oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson-Rivière, Alexis; Polack, J. Kyle; Hamel, Michael C.; Klemm, Dietrich D.; Ito, Kai; McSpaden, Alexander T.; Flaska, Marek; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Tomanin, Alice; Peerani, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    A dual-particle imaging (DPI) system, capable of simultaneously imaging fast neutrons and gamma rays, has been operated in the presence of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel to assess the system's angular resolution and material-characterization capabilities. The detection principle is based on the scattering physics of neutrons (elastic scattering) and gamma rays (Compton scattering) in organic and inorganic scintillators. The detection system is designed as a combination of a two-plane Compton camera and a neutron-scatter camera. The front plane consists of EJ-309 liquid scintillators and the back plane consists of interleaved EJ-309 and NaI(Tl) scintillators. MCNPX-PoliMi was used to optimize the geometry of the system and the resulting prototype was built and tested using a Cf-252 source as an SNM surrogate. A software package was developed to acquire and process data in real time. The software was used for a measurement campaign to assess the angular resolution of the imaging system with MOX samples. Measurements of two MOX canisters of similar isotopics and intensity were performed for 6 different canister separations (from 5° to 30°, corresponding to distances of 21 cm and 131 cm, respectively). The measurements yielded a minimum separation of 20° at 2.5 m (86-cm separation) required to see 2 separate hot spots. Additionally, the results displayed good agreement with MCNPX-PoliMi simulations. These results indicate an angular resolution between 15° and 20°, given the 5° step. Coupled with its large field of view, and its capability to differentiate between spontaneous fission and (α,n) sources, the DPI system shows its potential for nuclear-nonproliferation applications.

  12. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Anne M. Sickles

    2014-05-13

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v2 at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v2 in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  13. MAXIMA-1: A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy on Angular Scales of 10' to 5 degrees

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Bock, J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Ferreira, P. G.; Hanany, S.; Hristov, V. V.; Jaffe, A. H.; Lange, A. E.; Lee, A. T.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Netterfield, C. B.; Oh, S.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Stompor, R.; Winant,C. D.; Wu, J. H. P.

    2005-06-04

    We present a map and an angular power spectrum of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first flight of MAXIMA. MAXIMA is a balloon-borne experiment with an array of 16 bolometric photometers operated at 100 mK. MAXIMA observed a 124 deg{sup 2} region of the sky with 10' resolution at frequencies of 150, 240 and 410 GHz. The data were calibrated using in-flight measurements of the CMB dipole anisotropy. A map of the CMB anisotropy was produced from three 150 and one 240 GHz photometer without need for foreground subtractions.

  14. Dynamic light scattering and angular dissymmetry for the in situ measurement of silicon dioxide particle synthesis in flames.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, M R; Chin, D; Semerjian, H G; Katz, J L

    1989-02-01

    Particle size measurements have been made of silica formation in a counterflow diffusion flame reactor utilizing dynamic light scattering and angular dissymmetry methods. The results suggest that the techniques compare quite favorably in conditions of high signal to noise. However, the dynamic light scattering technique degrades rapidly as the signal strength declines, resulting in erroneously small particle diameters. As a general rule dynamic light scattering does not seem to possess the versatility and robustness of the classical techniques as a possible on-line diagnostic for process control. The drawbacks and limitations of the two techniques are also discussed. PMID:20548515

  15. Complete angular distribution measurements of two-body deuteron photodisintegration between 0.5 and 3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mirazita; F. Ronchetti; P. Rossi; E. De Sanctis; CLAS Collaboration

    2004-07-12

    Nearly complete angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section have been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer detector and the tagged photon beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The data cover photon energies between 0.5 and 3.0 GeV and center-of-mass proton scattering angles 10{sup o}-160{sup o}. The data show a persistent forward-backward angle asymmetry over the explored energy range, and are well described by the nonperturbative quark gluon string model.

  16. Design, fabrication, and measurement of reflective metasurface for orbital angular momentum vortex wave in radio frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shixing; Li, Long; Shi, Guangming; Zhu, Cheng; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Yan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a reflective metasurface is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated to generate an orbital angular momentum (OAM) vortex wave in radio frequency domain. Theoretical formula of phase-shift distribution is deduced and used to design the metasurface producing vortex radio waves. The prototype of a practical configuration is designed, fabricated, and measured to validate the theoretical analysis at 5.8 GHz. The simulated and experimental results verify that the vortex waves with different OAM mode numbers can be flexibly generated by using sub-wavelength reflective metasurfaces. The proposed method and metasurface pave a way to generate the OAM vortex waves for radio and microwave wireless communication applications.

  17. Attribute-Based Time Series Cross-Correlation Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, G. R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Datasets are usually compared using cross-correlation, often using a moving window to calculate the correlation as a function of time or space. However, signals can be considered as being composed of sinusoids which possess amplitudes, frequencies and phases. All these three attributes can be computed at each point in time, and then used as the basis of a cross-correlation method. By using all the three measures of correlation together, their individual disadvantages can be minimised. By combining these measures with the continuous wavelet transform, information on the correlation as a function of wavelength can be obtained.

  18. High angular accuracy manufacture method of micro v-grooves based on tool alignment by on-machine measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Lili; Zeng, Zhen; Fang, Fengzhou; Liu, Xianlei

    2015-10-19

    Micro v-groove has found wide applications in optical areas as one of the most important structures. However, its performance is significantly affected by its angular geometry accuracy. The diamond cutting has been commonly used as the fabrication method of micro v-groove, but it is still difficult to guarantee the cutting tool angle, which is limited by the measurement accuracy in the manufacture and mounting of the diamond tool. A cutting tool alignment method based on the on-machine measurement is proposed to improve the fabricated quality of the v-groove angle. An on-machine probe is employed to scan the v-groove geometrical deviation precisely. The system errors model, data processing algorithm and tool alignment methods are analyzed in details. Experimental results show that the measurement standard deviation within 0.01° can be achieved. Retro-reflection mirrors are fabricated and measured finally by the proposed method for verification. PMID:26480443

  19. Measurement of angular asymmetries in the decays B →K*ℓ+ℓ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We study the lepton forward-backward asymmetry AF B and the longitudinal K* polarization FL , as well as an observable P2 derived from them, in the rare decays B →K*ℓ+ℓ- , where ℓ+ℓ- is either e+e- or μ+μ-, using the full sample of 471 million B B ¯ events collected at the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the BABAR, detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. We separately fit and report results for the K*0(892 )ℓ+ℓ- and K*+(892 )ℓ+ℓ- final states, as well as their combination K*ℓ+ℓ-, in five disjoint dilepton mass-squared bins. An angular analysis of B+ →K*+ℓ+ℓ- decays is presented here for the first time.

  20. Effects of momentum conservation and flow on angular correlations observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Scott; Schlichting, Soeren; Gavin, Sean

    2011-08-15

    Correlations of azimuthal angles observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have gained great attention due to the prospect of identifying fluctuations of parity-odd regions in the field sector of QCD. Whereas the observable of interest related to parity fluctuations involves subtracting opposite-sign from same-sign correlations, the STAR collaboration reported the same-sign and opposite-sign correlations separately. It is shown here how momentum conservation combined with collective elliptic flow contributes significantly to this class of correlations, although not to the difference between the opposite- and same-sign observables. The effects are modeled with a crude simulation of a pion gas. Although the simulation reproduces the scale of the correlation, the centrality dependence is found to be sufficiently different in character to suggest additional considerations beyond those present in the pion gas simulation presented here.

  1. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-15

    We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

  2. Comparison of linear and angular measurements using two-dimensional conventional methods and three-dimensional cone beam CT images reconstructed from a volumetric rendering program in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oz, U; Orhan, K; Abe, N

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the linear and angular measurements made on two-dimensional (2D) conventional cephalometric images and three-dimensional (3D) cone beam CT (CBCT) generated cephalograms derived from a 3D volumetric rendering program. Methods Pre-treatment cephalometric digital radiographs of 11 patients and their corresponding CBCT images were randomly selected. The digital cephalometric radiographs were traced using Vista Dent OC (GAC International, Inc Bohemia, NY) and by hand. CBCT and Maxilim® (Medicim, Sint-Niklass, Belgium) software were used to generate cephalograms from the CBCT data set that were then linked to the 3D hard-tissue surface representations. In total, 16 cephalometric landmarks were identified and 18 widely used measurements (11 linear and 7 angular) were performed by 2 independent observers. Intraobserver reliability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), interobserver reliability was assessed with Student t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Mann–Whitney U-tests and Kruskal–Wallis H tests were also used to compare the three methods (P < 0.05). Results The results demonstrated no statistically significant difference between interobserver analyses for CBCT-generated cephalograms (P < 0.05), except for Gonion-Menton (Go-Me) and Condylion-Gnathion (Co-Gn). Intraobserver examinations showed low ICCs, which was an indication of poor reproducibility for Go-Me and Sella-Nasion (S-N) in CBCT-generated cephalograms and poor reproducibility for Articulare-Gonion (Ar-Go) in the 2D hand tracing method (P < 0.05). No statistical significance was found for Vista Dent OC measurements (P > 0.05). Conclusions Measurements from in vivo CBCT-generated cephalograms from Maxilim® software were found to be similar to conventional images. Thus, owing to higher radiation exposure, CBCT examinations should only be used when the inherent 3D information could improve the outcome of treatment. PMID

  3. Measuring correlations between non-stationary series with DCCA coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    In this short report, we investigate the ability of the DCCA coefficient to measure correlation level between non-stationary series. Based on a wide Monte Carlo simulation study, we show that the DCCA coefficient can estimate the correlation coefficient accurately regardless the strength of non-stationarity (measured by the fractional differencing parameter d). For a comparison, we also report the results for the standard Pearson correlation coefficient. The DCCA coefficient dominates the Pearson coefficient for non-stationary series.

  4. Facilities for the performance of Fano measurements as a probe of electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Chung, B.W.; Morton, S.A.; Waddill, G.D.

    2008-10-30

    Fano Effect measurements are the key to direct observation of the Kondo or spin shielding intrinsic to models of electron correlation. The Fano Effect is the observation of spin polarized photoelectron emission from NONMAGNETIC materials, under chirally selective excitation, such as circularly polarized photons. Below are described three spectrometers, with which Fano Effects measurements have been made. The key measurements are based upon spin-resolving and photon-dichroic photoelectron spectroscopy. True spin-resolution is achieved by the use of a Mini-Mott detection scheme. The photon-dichroic measurements include the variants x-ray magnetic circular and linear dichroism angular distributions (XMCDAD and XMLDAD). Both a multichannel, energy dispersive collection scheme as well as the spin-detecting Mini-Mott apparatus are used in data collection.

  5. Angular dependence of the response of the nanoDot OSLD system for measurements at depth in clinical megavoltage beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; Dunn, Leon; Lye, Jessica E.; Kenny, John W.; Alves, Andrew D. C.; Cole, Andrew; Asena, Andre; Kron, Tomas; Williams, Ivan M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to assess the angular dependence of a commercial optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) dosimetry system in MV x-ray beams at depths beyondd{sub max} and to find ways to mitigate this dependence for measurements in phantoms. Methods: Two special holders were designed which allow a dosimeter to be rotated around the center of its sensitive volume. The dosimeter's sensitive volume is a disk, 5 mm in diameter and 0.2 mm thick. The first holder rotates the disk in the traditional way. It positions the disk perpendicular to the beam (gantry pointing to the floor) in the initial position (0°). When the holder is rotated the angle of the disk towards the beam increases until the disk is parallel with the beam (“edge on,” 90°). This is referred to as Setup 1. The second holder offers a new, alternative measurement position. It positions the disk parallel to the beam for all angles while rotating around its center (Setup 2). Measurements with five to ten dosimeters per point were carried out for 6 MV at 3 and 10 cm depth. Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 were performed to simulate the response of the active detector material for several angles. Detector and housing were simulated in detail based on microCT data and communications with the manufacturer. Various material compositions and an all-water geometry were considered. Results: For the traditional Setup 1 the response of the OSLD dropped on average by 1.4% ± 0.7% (measurement) and 2.1% ± 0.3% (Monte Carlo simulation) for the 90° orientation compared to 0°. Monte Carlo simulations also showed a strong dependence of the effect on the composition of the sensitive layer. Assuming the layer to completely consist of the active material (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) results in a 7% drop in response for 90° compared to 0°. Assuming the layer to be completely water, results in a flat response within the simulation uncertainty of about 1%. For the new Setup 2

  6. Measurement and Correlation of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Hentschel, Daniel B.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the roughness characteristics of ice accreted on NACA 0012 airfoils in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Tests were conducted with size scaled, using models with chords of 26.7, 53.3, and 80.0 cm, and with liquid-water content scaled, both according to previously-tested scaling methods. The width of the smooth zone which forms on either side of the leading edge of the airfoil and the diameter of the roughness elements are presented in non-dimensional form as functions of the accumulation parameter. The smooth-zone width was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. The roughness-element diameter increased with accumulation parameter until a plateau was reached. This maximum diameter was about 0.06 times twice the model leading-edge radius. Neither smooth-zone width nor element diameter were affected by a change in freezing fraction from 0.2 to 0.4. Both roughness characteristics appeared to scale with model size and with liquid-water content.

  7. Measurement and limitations of optical orbital angular momentum through corrected atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Neo, Richard; Goodwin, Michael; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there have been a series of proposals to exploit the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for astronomical applications. The OAM of light potentially represents a new way in which to probe the universe. The study of this property of light entails the development of new instrumentation and problems which must be addressed. One of the key issues is whether we can overcome the loss of the information carried by OAM due to atmospheric turbulence. We experimentally analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the OAM content of a signal over a range of realistic turbulence strengths typical for astronomical observations. With an adaptive optics system we are able to recover up to 89% power in an initial non-zero OAM mode (ℓ = 1) at low turbulence strengths (0.30" FWHM seeing). However, for poorer seeing conditions (1.1" FWHM seeing), the amount of power recovered is significantly lower (5%), showing that for the terrestrial detection of astronomical OAM, a careful design of the adaptive optics system is needed. PMID:26906859

  8. Method for high-accuracy multiplicity-correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbrandsen, K.; Søgaard, C.

    2016-04-01

    Multiplicity-correlation measurements provide insight into the dynamics of high-energy collisions. Models describing these collisions need these correlation measurements to tune the strengths of the underlying QCD processes which influence all observables. Detectors, however, often possess limited coverage or reduced efficiency that influence correlation measurements in obscure ways. In this paper, the effects of nonuniform detection acceptance and efficiency on the measurement of multiplicity correlations between two distinct detector regions (termed forward-backward correlations) are derived. An analysis method with such effects built in is developed and subsequently verified using different event generators. The resulting method accounts for acceptance and efficiency in a model-independent manner with high accuracy, thereby shedding light on the relative contributions of the underlying processes to particle production.

  9. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  10. N N correlations measured in He-3 (e, e-prime p p) n

    SciTech Connect

    L.B. Weinstein; R. Niyazov

    2003-05-01

    We have measured the $^3$He(e,e$'$pp)n{} reaction in the Jefferson Lab CLAS with 2.2 and 4.4 GeV electrons. We looked at the energy distribution of events with all three nucleons at high momentum (p > 250 MeV/c). This distribution has peaks where two nucleons each have 20% or less of the energy transfer (ie: the third or `leading' nucleon carries most of the kinetic energy). The angular distribution of these two `fast' nucleons shows a very large back-to-back peak, indicating the effect of correlations. While there is some theoretical disagreement, experimental evidence, plus calculations at lower energy by W. Glockle, indicates that these events are primarily sensitive to NN correlations.

  11. NN correlations measured in 3He(e, e'pp)n

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Weinstein; Rustam Niyazov

    2003-07-15

    We have measured the 3He (e, e'pp)n reaction in the Jefferson Lab CLAS with 2.2 and 4.4 GeV electrons. We looked at the energy distribution of events with all three nucleons at high momentum (p > 250 MeV/c). This distribution has peaks where two nucleons each have 20% or less of the energy transfer (i.e., the third or ?leading? nucleon carries most of the kinetic energy). The angular distribution of these two ?fast? nucleons shows a very large back-to-back peak, indicating the effect of correlations. While there is some theoretical disagreement, experimental evidence, plus calculations at lower energy by W. Gloeckle, indicates that these events are primarily sensitive to NN correlations.

  12. Correlation measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay using traps and polarized low energy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar

    2013-05-06

    Precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay provide sensitive means to test discrete symmetries in the weak interaction and to determine some of the fundamental constants in semi-leptonic decays, like the coupling of the lightest quarks to charged weak bosons. The main motivation of such measurements is to find deviations from Standard Model predictions as possible indications of new physics. In this contribution I will focus on two topics related to precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay: i) the determination of the V{sub ud} element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix from nuclear mirror transitions and ii) the search for exotic scalar or tensor contributions from {beta}{nu} angular correlations. The purpose is to underline the role being played by experimental techniques based on the confinement of radioactive species with atom and ion traps as well as the plans to use low energy polarized beams.

  13. Proposed Measurement of the Beta-Neutrino Correlation in Neutron Decay

    PubMed Central

    Collett, B.; Anderman, R.; Balashov, S.; Bateman, F. B.; Byrne, J.; Dewey, M. S.; Fisher, B. M.; Goldin, L.; Jones, G.; Komives, A.; Konopka, T.; Leuschner, M.; Mostovoy, Yu.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Wilson, R.; Yerozolimsky, B. G.

    2005-01-01

    Currently, the beta-neutrino asymmetry has the largest uncertainty (4 %) of the neutron decay angular correlations. Without requiring polarimetry this decay parameter can be used to measure λ (ga/gv), test Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity limit scalar and tensor currents, and search for Charged Vector Current (CVC) violation. We propose to measure the beta-neutrino asymmetry coeffcient, a, using time-of-flight for the recoil protons. We hope to achieve a systematic uncertainty of σa / a ≈ 1.0 %. After tests at Indiana University’s Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS), the apparatus will be moved to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where the measurement can achieve a statistical uncertainty of 1 % to 2 % in about 200 beam days. PMID:27308157

  14. Fission Fragment Angular Distribution measurements of 235U and 238U at CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Durán, I.; Paradela, C.; Tarrío, D.; Leong, L. S.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lo Meo, S.; Losito, R.; Mallick, A.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Robles, M. S.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2016-03-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 238U and 235U are used as standards in the fast neutron region up to 200 MeV. A high accuracy of the standards is relevant to experimentally determine other neutron reaction cross sections. Therefore, the detection effciency should be corrected by using the angular distribution of the fission fragments (FFAD), which are barely known above 20 MeV. In addition, the angular distribution of the fragments produced in the fission of highly excited and deformed nuclei is an important observable to investigate the nuclear fission process. In order to measure the FFAD of neutron-induced reactions, a fission detection setup based on parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPACs) has been developed and successfully used at the CERN-n_TOF facility. In this work, we present the preliminary results on the analysis of new 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) data in the extended energy range up to 200 MeV compared to the existing experimental data.

  15. GroundBIRD: an experiment for CMB polarization measurements at a large angular scale from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Osamu; Choi, Jhoon; Hazumi, Masashi; Ishitsuka, Hikaru; Kawai, Masanori; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro

    2012-09-01

    Odd-parity patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, B-modes, could provide important cosmological information. Detection of the primordial B-mode power at a large angular scale would be a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. In particular, detecting a reionization bump (at a multipole of <= 10) should be a clear evidence of it. GroundBIRD is designed to detect the B-mode signal at this large angular scale from the ground. We will use superconducting detector arrays with small telescope that will also be cooled down to 4K. Therefore, the basic design can be extended to a satellite experiment. GroundBIRD employs a high-speed (20 rpm) rotation scan instead of the usual left-right azimuthal scan; this allows us to maintain a high-speed scan without any deceleration, resulting in a significant expansion of the scan range to 60° without any effect of the detector 1/f noise. Our target is measuring the CMB polarization power in a multipole (l) range of 6 <= l <= 300. We plan to start commissioning the instruments in Japan in early 2014; they will then be moved to the Atacama Desert in Chile for scientific observations.

  16. Angular dependent torque measurements on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Gao, B.; Ma, Y. H.; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    2016-08-01

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF (Ca1 1 1 1) single crystals. In the normal state, the torque data shows \\sin 2θ angular dependence and H 2 magnetic field dependence, as a result of paramagnetism. In the mixed state, the torque signal is a combination of the vortex torque and paramagnetic torque, and the former allows the determination of the anisotropy parameter γ. At T   =  11.5 K, γ (11.5 K ≃ 0.5 T c)  =  19.1, which is similar to the result of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2, γ ≃ 23 at T≃ 0.4{{T}\\text{c}} . So the 11 1 1 is more anisotropic compared to 11 and 122 families of iron-based superconductors. This may suggest that the electronic coupling between layers in 1 1 1 1 is less effective than in 11 and 122 families.

  17. Angular dependent torque measurements on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Gao, B; Ma, Y H; Li, X J; Mu, G; Hu, T

    2016-08-17

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF (Ca1 1 1 1) single crystals. In the normal state, the torque data shows [Formula: see text] angular dependence and H (2) magnetic field dependence, as a result of paramagnetism. In the mixed state, the torque signal is a combination of the vortex torque and paramagnetic torque, and the former allows the determination of the anisotropy parameter γ. At T   =  11.5 K, γ (11.5 K ≃ 0.5 T c)  =  19.1, which is similar to the result of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2, [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. So the 11 1 1 is more anisotropic compared to 11 and 122 families of iron-based superconductors. This may suggest that the electronic coupling between layers in 1 1 1 1 is less effective than in 11 and 122 families. PMID:27346165

  18. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  19. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parametermore » dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.« less

  20. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parameter dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  1. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of charged and neutral baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Manriquez, J. J. Torres; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Garcia, A.

    2008-07-02

    Because of the near future work of the NA48 experimental group, we have calculated the radiative corrections (RC) to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers the two cases, charged and neutral decaying baryons, and it is restricted to the so called three body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the c.m. frame of the emitted baryon. We consider terms up to ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglect terms of the order ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup n}, n = 1,2,.... The analytical expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for a model-independent experimental analysis.

  2. Radiative corrections to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, M.; Martinez, A.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Garcia, A.

    2008-09-01

    We have calculated the radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers both charged and neutral decaying baryons and is restricted to the so-called three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the center-of-mass frame of the emitted baryon. We have considered terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  3. Online time-differential perturbed angular correlation study with an 19O beam - Residence sites of oxygen atoms in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Ueno, H.; Watanabe, H.; Miyoshi, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Kameda, D.; Ito, T.; Shimada, K.; Kaihara, J.; Suda, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shinohara, A.; Ohkubo, Y.; Asahi, K.

    2008-01-01

    The online time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method was applied to a study of the physical states of a probe 19F, the β- decay product of 19O (t1/2 = 26.9 s), implanted in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The observed magnitude of the electric field gradient at the probe nucleus, ∣Vzz∣ = 2.91(17) × 1022 V m-2, suggests that the incident 19O atoms are stabilized at an interlayer position with point group C3v. Exhibiting observed TDPAC spectra having a clear sample-to-detector configuration dependence, we demonstrate the applicability of the present online method with a short-lived radioactive 19O beam.

  4. Dynamic lattice distortions in Sr2RuO4: microscopic studies by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. N.; Rots, M.; Cottenier, S.

    2010-09-01

    Applying time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we have investigated possible lattice instabilities in Sr2RuO4 by studying the electric quadrupole interaction of a 111Cd probe at the Ru site. We find evidence for a dynamic lattice distortion, revealed from the observations of: (i) a rapidly fluctuating electric-field gradient (EFG) tensor showing non-Arrhenius relaxation, (ii) an anomalous temperature dependence of the quadrupole interaction frequency, and (iii) a monotonic increase of the EFG asymmetry (η) below 300 K. We argue that the observed dynamic lattice distortion is caused by strong spin fluctuations associated with the inherent magnetic instability in Sr2RuO4.

  5. Dynamic lattice distortions in Sr2RuO4: microscopic studies by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S N; Rots, M; Cottenier, S

    2010-09-29

    Applying time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we have investigated possible lattice instabilities in Sr(2)RuO(4) by studying the electric quadrupole interaction of a (111)Cd probe at the Ru site. We find evidence for a dynamic lattice distortion, revealed from the observations of: (i) a rapidly fluctuating electric-field gradient (EFG) tensor showing non-Arrhenius relaxation, (ii) an anomalous temperature dependence of the quadrupole interaction frequency, and (iii) a monotonic increase of the EFG asymmetry (η) below 300 K. We argue that the observed dynamic lattice distortion is caused by strong spin fluctuations associated with the inherent magnetic instability in Sr(2)RuO(4). PMID:21386555

  6. Visual Decisions in the Presence of Measurement and Stimulus Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Manisha; Carroll, Samuel; Ma, Wei Ji; Josić, Krešimir

    2015-01-01

    Humans and other animals base their decisions on noisy sensory input. Much work has been devoted to understanding the computations that underlie such decisions. The problem has been studied in a variety of tasks and with stimuli of differing complexity. However, how the statistical structure of stimuli, along with perceptual measurement noise, affects perceptual judgments is not well understood. Here we examine how correlations between the components of a stimulus—stimulus correlations—together with correlations in sensory noise, affect decision making. As an example, we consider the task of detecting the presence of a single or multiple targets among distractors. We assume that both the distractors and the observer’s measurements of the stimuli are correlated. The computations of an optimal observer in this task are nontrivial yet can be analyzed and understood intuitively. We find that when distractors are strongly correlated, measurement correlations can have a strong impact on performance. When distractor correlations are weak, measurement correlations have little impact unless the number of stimuli is large. Correlations in neural responses to structured stimuli can therefore have a strong impact on perceptual judgments. PMID:26378875

  7. Enhancing robustness of multiparty quantum correlations using weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam; Mishra, Utkarsh; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar

    2014-11-15

    Multipartite quantum correlations are important resources for the development of quantum information and computation protocols. However, the resourcefulness of multipartite quantum correlations in practical settings is limited by its fragility under decoherence due to environmental interactions. Though there exist protocols to protect bipartite entanglement under decoherence, the implementation of such protocols for multipartite quantum correlations has not been sufficiently explored. Here, we study the effect of local amplitude damping channel on the generalized Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger state, and use a protocol of optimal reversal quantum weak measurement to protect the multipartite quantum correlations. We observe that the weak measurement reversal protocol enhances the robustness of multipartite quantum correlations. Further it increases the critical damping value that corresponds to entanglement sudden death. To emphasize the efficacy of the technique in protection of multipartite quantum correlation, we investigate two proximately related quantum communication tasks, namely, quantum teleportation in a one sender, many receivers setting and multiparty quantum information splitting, through a local amplitude damping channel. We observe an increase in the average fidelity of both the quantum communication tasks under the weak measurement reversal protocol. The method may prove beneficial, for combating external interactions, in other quantum information tasks using multipartite resources. - Highlights: • Extension of weak measurement reversal scheme to protect multiparty quantum correlations. • Protection of multiparty quantum correlation under local amplitude damping noise. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum teleportation in one sender and many receivers setting. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum information splitting protocol.

  8. Estimators for Two Measures of Association for Set Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jacob; Nee, John C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Two measures of association between sets of variables have been proposed for set correlation: the proportion of generalized variance, and the proportion of additionive variance. Because these measures are strongly positively biased, approximate expected values and estimators of these measures are derived and checked. (Author/BW)

  9. Semi-automatic laboratory goniospectrometer system for performing multi-angular reflectance and polarization measurements for natural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Q; Wu, Z F; Zhao, Y S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design and operation of the Northeast Normal University Laboratory Goniospectrometer System for performing multi-angular reflected and polarized measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A semi-automatic arm, which is carried on a rotated circular ring, enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements of surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) over the full hemisphere. In addition, a set of polarizing optics enables the linear polarization over the spectrum from 350 nm to 2300 nm. Because of the stable measurement condition in the laboratory, the BRF and linear polarization has an average uncertainty of 1% and less than 5% depending on the sample property, respectively. The polarimetric accuracy of the instrument is below 0.01 in the form of the absolute value of degree of linear polarization, which is established by measuring a Spectralon plane. This paper also presents the reflectance and polarization of snow, soil, sand, and ice measured during 2010-2013 in order to illustrate its stability and accuracy. These measurement results are useful to understand the scattering property of natural surfaces on Earth. PMID:24517791

  10. Semi-automatic laboratory goniospectrometer system for performing multi-angular reflectance and polarization measurements for natural surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. Q.; Wu, Z. F.; Zhao, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design and operation of the Northeast Normal University Laboratory Goniospectrometer System for performing multi-angular reflected and polarized measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A semi-automatic arm, which is carried on a rotated circular ring, enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements of surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) over the full hemisphere. In addition, a set of polarizing optics enables the linear polarization over the spectrum from 350 nm to 2300 nm. Because of the stable measurement condition in the laboratory, the BRF and linear polarization has an average uncertainty of 1% and less than 5% depending on the sample property, respectively. The polarimetric accuracy of the instrument is below 0.01 in the form of the absolute value of degree of linear polarization, which is established by measuring a Spectralon plane. This paper also presents the reflectance and polarization of snow, soil, sand, and ice measured during 2010-2013 in order to illustrate its stability and accuracy. These measurement results are useful to understand the scattering property of natural surfaces on Earth.

  11. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  12. Angular calibration of surface slope measuring profilers with a bendable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Chow, Ken P.; Lacey, Ian; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2014-09-01

    Performance of state-of-the-art surface slope measuring profilers, such as the Advanced Light Source's (ALS) long trace profiler (LTP-II) and developmental LTP (DLTP) is limited by the instrument's systematic error. The systematic error is specific for a particular measurement arrangement and, in general, depends on both the measured surface slope value and the position along a surface under test. Here we present an original method to characterize or measure the instrument's systematic error using a bendable X-ray mirror as a test surface. The idea of the method consists of extracting the systematic error from multiple measurements performed at different mirror bendings. An optimal measurement strategy for the optic, under different settings of the benders, and the method of accurate fitting of the measured slope variations with characteristic functions are discussed. We describe the procedure of separation of the systematic error of an actual profiler from surface slope variation inherent to the optic. The obtained systematic error, expressed as a function of the angle of measurement, is useful as a calibration of the instrument arranged to measure an optic with a close curvature and length. We show that accounting for the systematic error enables the optimal setting of bendable optics to the desired ideal shape with accuracy limited only by the experimental noise. Application of the method in the everyday metrology practice increases the accuracy of the measurements and allows measurements of highly curved optics with accuracy similar to those achieved with flat optics. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  13. Angular-resolved XANES measurements of the polar and azimuthal orientation of alkanethiols on InP(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerulla, D.; Mayer, D.; Hallmeier, K. H.; Chassé, T.

    1999-09-01

    This Letter describes investigations of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure of adsorbed hexadecanethiol monolayers on InP(110). The angular (azimuthal and polar)-resolved measurements reveal the substrate-dependent tilt-angle of the alkyl C-C backbone (about 34° from normal). A unique feature observed on these monolayers is the nearly complete alignment of the alkyl chains with respect to the azimuthal orientation. We suggest that this adsorbate system represents the case of a single-domain organic monolayer. We interpret this behaviour, which deviates strongly from the well-known thiol films on gold, silver or copper, in terms of structural constraints and dangling-bond-induced pre-orientation of the alkanethiol chains.

  14. Detection of an ENSO Signal in Seasonal Atmospheric Angular Momentum Varitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.; Marcus, S. L.; Dickey, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Intro list: Investigate use of Earth rotation measurements as proxy measures of atmospheric angular momentum in global climate change studies. Examine role of observed length-of-day changes. Study observed changes in strength of seasonal lod signal. Investigate origin of this correlation by examining angular momentum of NCEP zonal winds.

  15. A measurement of correlation parameters in the decay of polarized free neutrons: The abBA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, L.; Chávez, E.; Crawford, C.; Curiel-García, Q.; Huerta, A.; Juárez-Rosete, M. A.; Marín-Lámbarri, D. J.; Martin, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Penttilä, S. I.; Rodríguez-Zamora, P.; Salas, A.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2010-07-01

    The abBA experiment will measure, in the same apparatus, four correlation parameters in the free neutron β-decay: the electron-antineutrino angular correlation (a), the Fierz interference term (6), and the asymmetries, with respect to the neutron spin direction, of the electron (A)and antineutrino (B).The precise determination of these parameters, together with the neutron lifetime, will provide important information about the Standard Model (SM) and will establish constraints for new physics. In this paper we describe the experimental methodology of abBA as well as some of the advances that have been done so far.

  16. Computable measure of total quantum correlations of multipartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behdani, Javad; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Quantum discord as a measure of the quantum correlations cannot be easily computed for most of density operators. In this paper, we present a measure of the total quantum correlations that is operationally simple and can be computed effectively for an arbitrary mixed state of a multipartite system. The measure is based on the coherence vector of the party whose quantumness is investigated as well as the correlation matrix of this part with the remainder of the system. Being able to detect the quantumness of multipartite systems, such as detecting the quantum critical points in spin chains, alongside with the computability characteristic of the measure, makes it a useful indicator to be exploited in the cases which are out of the scope of the other known measures.

  17. Angular measurement of the cobalt-60 emitted radiation spectrum from a radiosurgery irradiator.

    PubMed

    Drzymala, R E; Sohn, J W; Guo, C; Sobotka, L G; Purdy, J A

    2001-04-01

    The photon energy spectrum emanating from a Leksell Gamma Knife, Model 23004B, was measured between 0.250 and 3.5 MeV with the sources exposed. Measurements were made using a 2x2 inch NaI detector enclosed in a lead-shielded apparatus having a 1/4 inch diameter measurement aperture, which reduced the amount of radiation received by the crystal. All measurements were made one meter above the floor within a quadrant toward one side of the Gamma Knife couch. The measured spectra displayed the expected 60Co doublet of photon peaks at energies of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. These peaks appeared in spectra beginning at approximately 50 degrees, as one proceeds from a point directly lateral to the source enclosure (0 degrees) toward the foot of the couch (90 degrees). The average photon energy of the spectrum shifts to lower values as the doublet decreases in magnitude with increasing angle until almost vanishing at an angle equal to 90 degrees. Inserting a 16 cm diameter plastic sphere phantom, provided with the Gamma Knife, into the radiation beams increases the low energy photon emissions appearing in the spectrum, especially for measurements at the foot of the couch. Implications for the design of shielding a treatment room containing the Gamma Knife, Model B, and estimation of the radiation exposure to personnel during an emergency procedure in the treatment room with the sources exposed are discussed. PMID:11339760

  18. Challenging claims of ‘elliptic flow’ by comparing azimuth quadrupole and jet-related angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at \\sqrt{{{s}_{NN}}} = 62 and 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Kettler, David T.; Prindle, Duncan J.; Ray, R. L.

    2015-02-01

    Background: A component of azimuth correlations from high-energy heavy ion collisions varying as cos (2φ ) and denoted by symbol v2 is conventionally interpreted to represent ‘elliptic flow,’ a hydrodynamic manifestation of the initial-state A-A overlap geometry. Several numerical methods are used to estimate v2, resulting in various combinations of ‘flow’ and ‘nonflow’ that reveal systematic biases in the v2 estimates. QCD jets contribute strongly to azimuth correlations and specifically to the cos (2φ ) component. Purpose: We question the extent of jet-related (‘nonflow’) bias in and hydrodynamic ‘flow’ interpretations of v2 measurements. Method: We introduce two-dimensional model fits to angular correlation data that distinguish accurately between jet-related correlation components and a nonjet (NJ) azimuth quadrupole that might represent ‘elliptic flow’ if that were relevant. We compare measured jet-related and ‘flow’-related data systematics and determine the jet-related contribution to v2 measurements. Results: Jet structure does introduce substantial bias to conventional v2 measurements, making interpretation difficult. The NJ quadrupole exhibits very simple systematics on centrality and collision energy—the two variables factorize. Within a Au-Au centrality interval where jets show no indication of rescattering or medium effects the NJ quadrupole amplitude rises to 60% of its maximum value. Conclusions: Disagreements between NJ quadrupole systematics and hydro theory expectations, the large quadrupole amplitudes observed in more-peripheral Au-Au collisions and a significant nonzero value in N-N ≈ p-p collisions strongly suggest that the NJ quadrupole does not arise from a hydrodynamic flow mechanism.

  19. Magnetic and Structural Properties of LANTHANUM(2-X) Strontium(x) Copper OXYGEN(4+DELTA) Studied with Time - Perturbed Angular Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Janet Marie

    Structural and magnetic properties of the high temperature superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x} CuO_{4-y} have been studied with ^{111} In/^{111}Cd perturbed angular gammagamma-correlations (PAC). In these measurements ppm of the radioactive probe, ^{111}In, is diffused into small samples by heat treatment. During the 2.8 day half-life of ^{111}In, the hyperfine spectrum of the I = 5/2, 85 ns. excited state of ^{111}Cd can be studied. A number of complex combined magnetic-dipole -electric-quadrupole interactions are observed. These depend simply on the sample preparation which controls the types and concentration of oxygen defects which exist in the sample. In particular, we have found that vacuum annealing results in a unique PAC spectrum. In this case, which only occurs when the samples are nearly exactly oxygen stoichiometric, the ^{111}Cd probe sits at the La site with no oxygen defects nearby. The principle axis of the electric field gradient ( omega_{o} = 240 Mrad/s) is found to be nearly parallel to the tetragonal c-axis and perpendicular to the hyperfine field ( omega_{L} = 10 Mrad/s). The temperature dependence and orientation of the hyperfine field, the electric field gradient and its asymmetry parameter (eta~ 0.1) have been studied for lightly doped La_{2-x }Sr_{x}CuO _4. We found first that hyperfine field is proportional to bulk magnetization, and second that eta is proportional orthorhombic distortion (To = 530 K). This unique sensitivity of our probe to both the magnetic and structural phase transitions in La _2CuO_{4+delta }, combined with the microscopic information on oxygen stoichiometry it can provide, have made ^{111}In/^{111 }Cd PAC ideal for studies of complex phase diagram of La_{2-x}Sr _{x}CuO _4. Results from these investigations include the first microscopic determination of the oxygen stoichiometry of La_{2-x}Sr _{x}CuO _4 and observation of the maximum Neel temperature; measurement of the magnetic critical exponent, beta = 0.50(4), and the

  20. Determination of the Electron-Antineutrino Angular Correlation Coefficient a0 in Unpolarized Neutron β-Decay

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J.

    2005-01-01

    The coefficient a0 has been derived from a measurement of the integral spectrum of recoil protons stored in a quasi-Penning trap with inhomogeneous magnetic field and adiabatic focusing onto an electro-static mirror of potential variable in 10 V steps between 0 V and 850 V. Correction for incomplete transfer of energy from transverse to longitudinal degrees of freedom, and the violation of the adiabatic conditions on reflection at the mirror, is carried out by alternately measuring the spectrum at trapping times of 1 ms and 2 ms. The results a0 = −0.1054 ± 0.0055 and |λ | = 1.271 ± 0.018 are comparable in precision with existing measurements of a0. PMID:27308156

  1. Determination of the Electron-Antineutrino Angular Correlation Coefficient a0 in Unpolarized Neutron β-Decay.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J

    2005-01-01

    The coefficient a 0 has been derived from a measurement of the integral spectrum of recoil protons stored in a quasi-Penning trap with inhomogeneous magnetic field and adiabatic focusing onto an electro-static mirror of potential variable in 10 V steps between 0 V and 850 V. Correction for incomplete transfer of energy from transverse to longitudinal degrees of freedom, and the violation of the adiabatic conditions on reflection at the mirror, is carried out by alternately measuring the spectrum at trapping times of 1 ms and 2 ms. The results a 0 = -0.1054 ± 0.0055 and |λ | = 1.271 ± 0.018 are comparable in precision with existing measurements of a 0. PMID:27308156

  2. Time differential perturbed angular correlation of 111In-EDTA linked to the single free cysteine of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ceolín, M; Martínez, J A; Ermácora, M R

    1997-09-25

    By means of a facile chemical modification of the bovine serum albumin molecule, it was possible to measure its hydrodynamic radius with high accuracy (approximately 3%) using the TDPAC technique. The new approach presented here allows a wide use of the TDPAC technique to perform high precision studies of backbone dynamics of almost any protein. PMID:9350519

  3. An investigation of the effects of measurement noise in the use of instantaneous angular speed for machine diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Fengshou; Yesilyurt, Isa; Li, Yuhua; Harris, Georgina; Ball, Andrew

    2006-08-01

    In order to discriminate small changes for early fault diagnosis of rotating machines, condition monitoring demands that the measurement of instantaneous angular speed (IAS) of the machines be as accurate as possible. This paper develops the theoretical basis and practical implementation of IAS data acquisition and IAS estimation when noise influence is included. IAS data is modelled as a frequency modulated signal of which the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by using a high-resolution encoder. From this signal model and analysis, optimal configurations for IAS data collection are addressed for high accuracy IAS measurement. Simultaneously, a method based on analytic signal concept and fast Fourier transform is also developed for efficient and accurate estimation of IAS. Finally, a fault diagnosis is carried out on an electric induction motor driving system using IAS measurement. The diagnosis results show that using a high-resolution encoder and a long data stream can achieve noise reduction by more than 10 dB in the frequency range of interest, validating the model and algorithm developed. Moreover, the results demonstrate that IAS measurement outperforms conventional vibration in diagnosis of incipient faults of motor rotor bar defects and shaft misalignment.

  4. Measurement of surface roughness and correlation length using dichromatic speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, M.

    1980-03-01

    A computer simulation study of the dichromatic speckle was conducted and the surface roughness and correlation length of sample surfaces were measured using a stylus instrument and similar measurements with dichromatic speckle. The rms difference of the two speckle intensities was analyzed for spot sizes smaller than, comparable and larger than the correlation length of the surface. The rms roughness of the sample ground glasses was calculated from the data obtained from the stylus instrument. The correlation length was obtained from an online multichannel FFT processor connected to the stylus instrument. The correlation length was estimated from the correlation function. The rms difference between the speckle intensities of two different wavelengths were measured for various spot sizes. For each intensity 64 K data samples was collected and processed in a PDP 11/40 computer. These data were used to calculate the second moment of the monochromatic speckle, the cross correlation of these and the rms difference. The roughness and the correlation length of the surface were estimated from these results. The results obtained from the dichromatic speckle are in good agreement with the values obtained from the stylus instrument.

  5. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  6. The Measurement and Correlates of Career Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harren, Vincent A.; Kass, Richard A.

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding career decision making (CDM); introduces an instrument, Assessment of Career Decision Making (ACDM) to measure CDM with college students; and presents correlational data on sex role and cognitive style factors hypothesized to influence CDM. The ACDM, designed to measure the Tiedeman and…

  7. Internalized Heterosexism: Measurement, Psychosocial Correlates, and Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Dawn M.; Kashubeck-West, Susan; Meyer, Jill

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an integrated critical review of the literature on internalized heterosexism/internalized homophobia (IH), its measurement, and its psychosocial correlates. It describes the psychometric properties of six published measures used to operationalize the construct of IH. It also critically reviews empirical studies on correlates…

  8. Statistical measures of Planck scale signal correlations in interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig J.; Kwon, Ohkyung

    2015-06-22

    A model-independent statistical framework is presented to interpret data from systems where the mean time derivative of positional cross correlation between world lines, a measure of spreading in a quantum geometrical wave function, is measured with a precision smaller than the Planck time. The framework provides a general way to constrain possible departures from perfect independence of classical world lines, associated with Planck scale bounds on positional information. A parametrized candidate set of possible correlation functions is shown to be consistent with the known causal structure of the classical geometry measured by an apparatus, and the holographic scaling of information suggested by gravity. Frequency-domain power spectra are derived that can be compared with interferometer data. As a result, simple projections of sensitivity for specific experimental set-ups suggests that measurements will directly yield constraints on a universal time derivative of the correlation function, and thereby confirm or rule out a class of Planck scale departures from classical geometry.

  9. Interaction of positronium atoms, with paramagnetic molecules, measured by perturbed angular distribution in 3γ annihilation decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Eugeniu; Vata, Ion; Teodorian, Stefan; Rusen, Ion; Stefan, Nitisor

    2009-01-01

    Positronium in the triplet spin state (S = 1) decays by 3γ annihilation having a life time of about 140 ns in vacuum. Positronium annihilation is affected by magnetic fields which mix the M = 0 state of ortho-positronium with the M = 0 state of para-positronium. The mixing fraction depends on the magnetic field intensity and causes quantum beats in the time distribution of γ annihilation decay. This effect was predicted by Barishevsky et al. [V.G. Barishevsky, O.N. Metelitsa, V.V. Tikhomirov, J. Phys. B Atom. Mol. Opt. Phys. 22 (1989) 2835]. The time differential perturbed angular correlation method (TDPAC), combined with long-lived positron life time spectroscopy (PLTS), has been used to observe these quantum beats. It is found that the characteristics of the annihilation time distribution are not influenced by the presence of diamagnetic species such as Ar, N2 and H2 but are affected by the presence of the paramagnetic O2 molecule. Our results are encouraging in developing a new method for investigating magnetic fields on an atomic scale.

  10. Measurements and calculations of neutron scattering angular distributions over a wide mass and energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-05-01

    Neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for targets between /sup 9/Be and /sup 239/Pu at energies, E > 14 MeV have been measured using the Livermore and Ohio University neutron time-of-flight facilities. We review here the data and the analyses based on two local microscopic optical potentials: that of Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux, and that of Brieva and Rook. The results are also compared with calculations using global potentials. Coupled channel formalism has been used in the analysis of targets with strong deformations, such as Be, C, Ta, and actinides. The value of the microscopic optical potentials as a tool to predict elastic and inelastic neutron cross sections over a wide mass and energy range is discussed. The need for neutron measurements up to higher energies and their analysis in conjunction with (p,p) and charge exchange (p,n) data is addressed. 17 refs.

  11. Measurements and Calculations of Neutron Scattering Angular Distributions over a Wide Mass and Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. F.

    Neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for targets between (9)Be and (239)Pu at energies, E 14 MeV have been measured using the Livermore and Ohio University neutron time-of-flight facilities. We review here the data and the analyses based on two local microscopic optical potentials: that of Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux, and that of Brieva and Rook. The results are also compared with calculations using global potentials. Coupled channel formalism has been used in the analysis of targets with strong deformations, such as Be, C, Ta, and actinides. The value of the microscopic optical potentials as a tool to predict elastic and inelastic neutron cross sections over a wide mass and energy range is discussed. The need for neutron measurements up to higher energies and their analysis in conjunction with (p,p) and charge exchange (p,n) data is addressed.

  12. Effect of refraction parallax on the accuracy of measuring the angular coordinates of artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vygon, V. G.; Deryugina, A. I.

    1994-03-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of optical refraction in the earth's atmosphere on the accuracy of astronometric measurements, and presents the results of calculations that were used to investigate the accuracy with which the orbits of artificial satellites are reconstructed from the data of goniometric observations. It is shown that, in a number of cases, neglecting the effect of refraction parallax results in fundamental errors in the character of the reconstructed trajectories.

  13. Recovering refractive index correlation function from measurement of tissue scattering phase function (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jeremy D.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous methods have been developed to quantify the light scattering properties of tissue. These properties are of interest in diagnostic and screening applications due to sensitivity to changes in tissue ultrastructure and changes associated with disease such as cancer. Tissue is considered a weak scatterer because that the mean free path is much larger than the correlation length. When this is the case, all scattering properties can be calculated from the refractive index correlation function Bn(r). Direct measurement of Bn(r) is challenging because it requires refractive index measurement at high resolution over a large tissue volume. Instead, a model is usually assumed. One particularly useful model, the Whittle-Matern function includes several realistic function types such as mass fractal and exponential. Optical scattering properties for weakly scattering media can be determined analytically from Bn(r) by applying the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) or Born Approximation, and so measured scattering properties are used to fit parameters of the model function. Direct measurement of Bn(r) would provide confirmation that the function is a good representation of tissue or help in identifying the length scale at which changes occur. The RGD approximation relates the scattering phase function to the refractive index correlation function through a Fourier transform. This can be inverted without approximation, so goniometric measurement of the scattering can be converted to Bn(r). However, geometric constraints of the measurement of the phase function, angular resolution, and wavelength result in a band limited measurement of Bn(r). These limits are discussed and example measurements are described.

  14. Fluid flow vorticity measurement using laser beams with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabtsev, A.; Pouya, S.; Safaripour, A.; Koochesfahani, M.; Dantus, M.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the direct measurements of fluid flow vorticity using a spatially shaped beam with a superposition of Laguerre-Gaussian modes that reports on the rotational Doppler shift from microparticles intersecting the beam focus. Experiments are carried out on fluid flows with well-characterized vorticity and the experimental results are found to be in excellent agreement with the expected values even for 200 ms integration times. This method allows for localized real-time determination of vorticity in a fluid flow.

  15. Application of Laser Correlation Spectroscopy for Measuring Virus Size.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, V N; Vinogradov, S E; Ivanov, A V; Efremova, E V; Kalnina, L B; Bychenko, A B; Tentsov, Yu Yu; Manykin, A A

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic light scattering method or laser correlation spectroscopy was applied to evaluation of the size of viruses. We measured correlation functions of the light scattered by human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and hepatitis A viruses (HAV) and found that size of HIV-1 (subtype A and B) and HAV virions were 104 nm and 28 nm, respectively. Comparison of these findings with electron microscopy data for fixed samples of the same viruses showed good agreement of the results. PMID:27270934

  16. First Measurements of Pion Correlations by the PHENIX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S C

    2001-04-11

    First identical-pion correlations measured at RHIC energies by PHENIX are presented. Two analyses with separate detectors, systematics, and statistics provide consistent results. The resulting HBT radii are moderately larger than those measured at lower energies. The k{sub t} dependence of the Bertsch-Pratt HBT radii is also similar to previous measures and is consistent with the conjecture of an expanding source.

  17. Analyzing complex networks through correlations in centrality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan Ronqui, José Ricardo; Travieso, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Many real world systems can be expressed as complex networks of interconnected nodes. It is frequently important to be able to quantify the relative importance of the various nodes in the network, a task accomplished by defining some centrality measures, with different centrality definitions stressing different aspects of the network. It is interesting to know to what extent these different centrality definitions are related for different networks. In this work, we study the correlation between pairs of a set of centrality measures for different real world networks and two network models. We show that the centralities are in general correlated, but with stronger correlations for network models than for real networks. We also show that the strength of the correlation of each pair of centralities varies from network to network. Taking this fact into account, we propose the use of a centrality correlation profile, consisting of the values of the correlation coefficients between all pairs of centralities of interest, as a way to characterize networks. Using the yeast protein interaction network as an example we show also that the centrality correlation profile can be used to assess the adequacy of a network model as a representation of a given real network.

  18. Measurements of the Angular Distributions of Muons from Υ Decays in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-11

    The angular distributions of muons from Υ(1S,2S,3S)→μ⁺μ⁻ decays are measured using data from pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ and collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This analysis is the first to report the full angular distributions as functions of transverse momentum pT for Υ mesons in both the Collins-Soper and s-channel helicity frames. This is also the first measurement of the spin alignment of Υ(3S) mesons. Within the kinematic range of Υ rapidity |y|<0.6 and pT up to 40 GeV/c, the angular distributions are found to be nearlymore » isotropic.« less

  19. Measurements of the Angular Distributions of Muons from Υ Decays in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2012-04-11

    The angular distributions of muons from Υ(1S,2S,3S)→μ⁺μ⁻ decays are measured using data from pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ and collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This analysis is the first to report the full angular distributions as functions of transverse momentum pT for Υ mesons in both the Collins-Soper and s-channel helicity frames. This is also the first measurement of the spin alignment of Υ(3S) mesons. Within the kinematic range of Υ rapidity |y|<0.6 and pT up to 40 GeV/c, the angular distributions are found to be nearly isotropic.

  20. SMALL ANGULAR SCALE MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRUM FROM QUaD

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R. B.; Culverhouse, T.; Ade, P.; Bowden, M.; Gear, W. K.; Gupta, S.; Orlando, A.; Bock, J.; Leitch, E.; Brown, M. L.; Cahill, G.; Murphy, J. A.; Castro, P. G.; Memari, Y.; Church, S.; Hinderks, J.; Ganga, K.; Melhuish, S. J.

    2009-08-01

    We present measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature anisotropy in the multipole range 2000 < l < 3000 from the QUaD telescope's second and third observing seasons. After masking the brightest point sources our results are consistent with the primary {lambda}CDM expectation alone. We estimate the contribution of residual (un-masked) radio point sources using a model calibrated to our own bright source observations, and a full simulation of the source finding and masking procedure. Including this contribution slightly improves the {chi}{sup 2}. We also fit a standard Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) template to the bandpowers and see no strong evidence of an SZ contribution, which is as expected for {sigma}{sub 8} {approx} 0.8.

  1. Measuring bipartite quantum correlations of an unknown state.

    PubMed

    Silva, I A; Girolami, D; Auccaise, R; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Bonagamba, T J; deAzevedo, E R; Soares-Pinto, D O; Adesso, G

    2013-04-01

    We report the experimental measurement of bipartite quantum correlations of an unknown two-qubit state. Using a liquid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance setup and employing geometric discord, we evaluate the quantum correlations of a state without resorting to prior knowledge of its density matrix. The method is applicable to any 2 ⊗ d system and provides, in terms of number of measurements required, an advantage over full state tomography scaling with the dimension d of the unmeasured subsystem. The negativity of quantumness is measured as well for reference. We also observe the phenomenon of sudden transition of quantum correlations when local phase and amplitude damping channels are applied to the state. PMID:25166969

  2. Modulation and correlation of the radial and angular motions of a Rydberg electron in a resonance microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, P A; Efremov, M A; Fedorov, Mikhail V

    2006-08-31

    We discuss the physical sense and interpretation of the Maeda-Gallagher experiment (2004) in which the probability of ionisation of Rydberg Li atoms perturbed by the resonance microwave field by a short half-cycle pulse was measured. The periodic dependence of the ionisation probability w{sub i} on the delay time t{sub 0} of the half-cycle pulse with respect to the instant of switching on the microwave field is found. The oscillation period of the function w{sub i}(t{sub 0}) is equal to the Kepler period of a Rydberg electron. It is shown that the interpretation of this experiment by the authors in terms of localised wave packets has no grounds and neglects basic processes proceeding in the microwave field. An alternative interpretation is proposed and, as the first step, the structure of the Rydberg wave function formed in the resonance microwave field is studied. (papers devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m.prokhorov)

  3. Measurement of angular distribution of soft X-ray radiation from thin targets in the tabletop storage ring MIRRORCLE-20SX.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hironari; Minkov, Dorian; Shimura, Yuki; Scourtis, Chris; Ejike, Okoye Kenneth; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Yamada, Mami; Hanashima, Takayasu; Atkinson, Ken

    2011-09-01

    The only available tabletop electron storage rings are the machines from the MIRRORCLE series. The electrons are accelerated in a microtron and injected into the storage ring. During its circulation, each electron passes through a tiny target many times, emitting a photon beam. Both the spectrum and the angular distribution of the radiation depend on the material, the thickness and the shape of the target. In this paper measured angular distributions of the radiation from several different targets in the magnetic field of the 20 MeV storage ring MIRRORCLE-20SX are presented. The detector comprises a 3 mm × 3 mm × 8.5 µm plastic scintillator (PS) coupled to a photomultiplier by a bundle of optical fibers. The output of the photomultiplier is digitized by an IF converter. This detector is sensitive mostly to soft X-ray radiation, and its PS is moved by a mechanical system in a plane perpendicular to the radiation axis. The measured angular distributions for Mo and Sn targets contain an annulus which is attributed to transition radiation. The angular distributions for Al, carbon nanotube and diamond-like carbon (DLC) targets show some suppression of the radiation along the magnetic field. This is the first evidence of observation of the angular distribution of synchrotron Cherenkov radiation, which represents Cherenkov radiation in a magnetic field. The power radiated from the DLC target is estimated. PMID:21862848

  4. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-01-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. PMID:23520268

  5. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-09-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. PMID:23520268

  6. A hemispherical Langmuir probe array detector for angular resolved measurements on droplet-based laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gambino, Nadia Brandstätter, Markus; Rollinger, Bob; Abhari, Reza

    2014-09-15

    In this work, a new diagnostic tool for laser-produced plasmas (LPPs) is presented. The detector is based on a multiple array of six motorized Langmuir probes. It allows to measure the dynamics of a LPP in terms of charged particles detection with particular attention to droplet-based LPP sources for EUV lithography. The system design permits to temporally resolve the angular and radial plasma charge distribution and to obtain a hemispherical mapping of the ions and electrons around the droplet plasma. The understanding of these dynamics is fundamental to improve the debris mitigation techniques for droplet-based LPP sources. The device has been developed, built, and employed at the Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zürich. The experimental results have been obtained on the droplet-based LPP source ALPS II. For the first time, 2D mappings of the ion kinetic energy distribution around the droplet plasma have been obtained with an array of multiple Langmuir probes. These measurements show an anisotropic expansion of the ions in terms of kinetic energy and amount of ion charge around the droplet target. First estimations of the plasma density and electron temperature were also obtained from the analysis of the probe current signals.

  7. Entanglement Measures for Single- and Multireference Correlation Effects.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Tecmer, Pawel̷; Legeza, Örs; Reiher, Markus

    2012-11-01

    Electron correlation effects are essential for an accurate ab initio description of molecules. A quantitative a priori knowledge of the single- or multireference nature of electronic structures as well as of the dominant contributions to the correlation energy can facilitate the decision regarding the optimum quantum chemical method of choice. We propose concepts from quantum information theory as orbital entanglement measures that allow us to evaluate the single- and multireference character of any molecular structure in a given orbital basis set. By studying these measures we can detect possible artifacts of small active spaces. PMID:26296018

  8. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  9. Angular Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mouth. Overview Angular cheilitis (perlèche) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the corners of the mouth. Usually associated with a fungal ( Candidal ) or bacterial ( Staphylococcal ) infection, those ... people of all ages. Chronic pooling of saliva encourages fungal and bacterial growth, ...

  10. Closed formulae to determine the angular velocity of a body-segment based on 3D measurements.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, L; Béda, G

    2001-01-01

    This paper suggests a simple method to determine the global coordinates of the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of a body segment determined by the coordinates of minimum three markers. There are commonly used calculations for the angular quantities basing on the "hypothesis" of planar motion. The usage of approximate methods can result in quantitative and qualitative errors that may completely disort the reality. The method mentioned here is theoretically absolutely correct and can be well used for smoothing noisy data. PMID:11811842

  11. Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments. PMID:21361436

  12. Electronic structure and orientation relationship of Li nanoclusters embedded in MgO studied by depth-selective positron annihilation two-dimensional angular correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falub, C. V.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Eijt, S. W.; van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.

    2002-08-01

    Quantum-confined positrons are sensitive probes for determining the electronic structure of nanoclusters embedded in materials. In this work, a depth-selective positron annihilation 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation) method is used to determine the electronic structure of Li nanoclusters formed by implantation of 1016-cm-2 30-keV 6Li ions in MgO (100) and (110) crystals and by subsequent annealing at 950 K. Owing to the difference between the positron affinities of lithium and MgO, the Li nanoclusters act as quantum dots for positrons. 2D-ACAR distributions for different projections reveal a semicoherent fitting of the embedded metallic Li nanoclusters to the host MgO lattice. Ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker calculations of the momentum density show that the anisotropies of the experimental distributions are consistent with an fcc crystal structure of the Li nanoclusters. The observed reduction of the width of the experimental 2D-ACAR distribution is attributed to positron trapping in vacancies associated with Li clusters. This work proposes a method for studying the electronic structure of metallic quantum dots embedded in an insulating material.

  13. Non-Markovianity measure using two-time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md. Manirul; Lo, Ping-Yuan; Tu, Matisse Wei-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-12-01

    We investigate non-Markovianity measure using two-time correlation functions for open quantum systems. We define non-Markovianity measure as the difference between the exact two-time correlation function and the one obtained from quantum regression theorem in the Born-Markov approximation. Such non-Markovianity can easily be measured in experiments. We found that the non-Markovianity dynamics in different time scale crucially depends on the system-environment coupling strength and other physical parameters such as the initial temperature of the environment and the initial state of the system. In particular, we obtain the short-time and long-time behaviors of non-Markovianity for different spectral densities. We find that the thermal fluctuation always reduce the non-Markovian memory effect. Also, the non-Markovianity measure shows nontrivial initial state dependence in different time scales.

  14. Measurements of partial cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions for the photodetachment of Fe{sup -} and Cu{sup -} at visible photon wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, A. M.; Duvvuri, Srividya S.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Williams, W. W.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Carpenter, D. L.; Collier, R. D.; Kvale, T. J.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-02-15

    Photodetachment cross sections and the angular distributions of photoelectrons produced by the single-photon detachment of the transition metal negative ions Fe{sup -} and Cu{sup -} have been measured at four discrete photon wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1 nm (2.71-1.92 eV) using a crossed-beams laser photodetachment electron spectrometry (LPES) apparatus. Photodetachment cross sections were determined by comparing the photoelectron yields from the photodetachment of Fe{sup -} to those of Cu{sup -} and C{sup -}, which have known absolute photodetachment cross sections. Using the measured photodetachment cross sections, radiative electron attachment cross sections were calculated using the principle of detailed balance. Angular distributions were determined by measurements of laboratory frame, angle-, and energy-resolved photoelectrons as a function of the angle between the linear laser polarization vector and the momentum vector of the collected photoelectrons. Values of the asymmetry parameter have been determined by nonlinear least-squares fits to these angular distributions. The measured asymmetry parameters are compared to predictions of photodetachment models including Cooper and Zare's dipole approximation theory [J. Cooper and R. N. Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 48, 942 (1968)], and the angular momentum transfer theory developed by Fano and Dill [Phys. Rev. A 6, 185 (1972)].

  15. Correlation of Spatially Filtered Dynamic Speckles in Distance Measurement Application

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Dmitry V.; Nippolainen, Ervin; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Miridonov, Serguei V.

    2008-04-15

    In this paper statistical properties of spatially filtered dynamic speckles are considered. This phenomenon was not sufficiently studied yet while spatial filtering is an important instrument for speckles velocity measurements. In case of spatial filtering speckle velocity information is derived from the modulation frequency of filtered light power which is measured by photodetector. Typical photodetector output is represented by a narrow-band random noise signal which includes non-informative intervals. Therefore more or less precious frequency measurement requires averaging. In its turn averaging implies uncorrelated samples. However, conducting research we found that correlation is typical property not only of dynamic speckle patterns but also of spatially filtered speckles. Using spatial filtering the correlation is observed as a response of measurements provided to the same part of the object surface or in case of simultaneously using several adjacent photodetectors. Found correlations can not be explained using just properties of unfiltered dynamic speckles. As we demonstrate the subject of this paper is important not only from pure theoretical point but also from the point of applied speckle metrology. E.g. using single spatial filter and an array of photodetector can greatly improve accuracy of speckle velocity measurements.

  16. Rheology of fluids measured by correlation force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Robbins, Brian; Honig, Christopher D. F.; Walz, John Y.; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2012-04-01

    We describe a method, correlation force spectrometry (CFS), which characterizes fluids through measurement of the correlations between the thermally stimulated vibrations of two closely spaced micrometer-scale cantilevers in fluid. We discuss a major application: measurement of the rheological properties of fluids at high frequency and high spatial resolution. Use of CFS as a rheometer is validated by comparison between experimental data and finite element modeling of the deterministic ring-down of cantilevers using the known viscosity of fluids. The data can also be accurately fitted using a harmonic oscillator model, which can be used for rapid rheometric measurements after calibration. The method is non-invasive, uses a very small amount of fluid, and has no actively moving parts. It can also be used to analyze the rheology of complex fluids. We use CFS to show that (non-Newtonian) aqueous polyethylene oxide solution can be modeled approximately by incorporating an elastic spring between the cantilevers.

  17. Measurement of electrostriction in bone using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lianyun; Hou, Zhende; Fu, Donghui; Yang, Lei; Yi, Weitian; Kang, Huimin

    2015-02-01

    The electromechanical properties of bone may play roles in the growth of bone tissue. The electrostriction effect of bone, which is one of the electromechanical properties of bone, was investigated using the digital image correlation technique (DIC). The advantage of using DIC is that the light beam used for the displacement measurement does not interfere with the electric field exerted on the bone specimen. To measure the bending deflections of a bone cantilever in an electric field, the displacement of the free end surface of the cantilever was measured using the image correlation technique. The experimental results show that the bending direction of the bone cantilevers is independent of the electric field direction and that the bending deflections are proportional to the square of the applied voltages. The attractive force between the charges on the electrode and the unlike charges in the specimen can be equivalent to a uniform distribution load regardless of the thickness of the bone specimen.

  18. Optimizing quantum correlation dynamics by weak measurement in dissipative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shao-Jiang; Xia, Yun-Jie; Duan, De-Yang; Zhang, Lu; Gao, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the protection of quantum correlations of two qubits in independent vacuum reservoirs by means of weak measurements. It is found that the weak measurement can reduce the amount of quantum correlation for one type of initial state at the beginning in a non-Markovian environment and meanwhile it can reduce the occurrence time of entanglement sudden death (ESD) in the process of time evolution. In a Markovian environment, the quantum entanglements of the two kinds of initial states decay rapidly and the weak measurement can further weaken the quantum entanglement, therefore in this case the entanglement cannot be optimized in the evolution process. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012 and No.11147019).

  19. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  20. Correlative measurement opportunities between ATLAS-1 and UARS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Edwin F.; Denn, Fred M.; Gibson, Gary G.

    1992-01-01

    The first ATmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-1) mission was flown aboard the Space Shuttle from March 24 to April 2, 1992. The ATLAS-1 instruments provided a large number of measurements which were coincident with observations from experiments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). During the ATLAS-1 mission, simulations were performed to predict when and where coincident measurements between ATLAS and UARS instruments would occur. These predictions were used to develop instrument operation schedules to maximize the correlative opportunities between the two satellites. Results of the simulations provide valuable information for the ATLAS and UARS scientists to compare measurements between various instruments on the two satellites.

  1. Development of a Detector to Measure the Angular Dependence of the Cosmic Ray Induced Neutron Background Flux at Ground Level

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J F; Gosnell, T B; Luke, S J; Archer, D E; Lochner, R T; Frank, I M; Prussin, S G; Quiter, B J; Chivers, D H

    2002-01-28

    The detection of low intensity sources of radiation in containers is of particular interest for arms control, non-proliferation and nuclear smuggling activities. Attempts to procure and smuggle nuclear materials that could be used in terrorist activities have been well documented in recent years. These incidents have included fissile materials such, as plutonium and uranium, as well as medical and industrial isotopes that could be used in a Radiation Dispersal Device. The vast majority of these incidents have been discovered through human intelligence work due to the difficulty of using radiation monitoring. The detection of radiation sources in well-shielded containers presents a difficult technological challenge. Few neutrons and gamma rays may escape from the container and these may be obscured by the naturally occurring background. The world in general is a radioactive environment. Many elements in the earth's crust, as well as in common plants and building materials, emit a constant stream of radiation. In fact the ultimate limit on the detection of hidden sources is often the background level at the location of interest. It has long been understood that knowledge of the directionality of this background can be used to improve the signal/noise ratio in detectors used for these measurements. Imaging detectors are one method of reducing the effect of the background, but this reduction comes at the expensive of a huge increase in detector complexity. Hence these systems, while important in some specific applications, are probably not suited for the deployment of many detectors over a large area. There may be another way of reducing the effect of backgrounds on monitoring measurements. This method consists of using knowledge of the directional dependence of the background flux to help reduce its effect on the detectors in question. An accurate knowledge of this angular distribution allows one to develop better shielding designs for the detectors.

  2. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  3. Shot noise measurement in a strongly correlated material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Panpan; Hardy, Will; Cho, Ethan; Cybart, Shane; Dynes, Robert; Natelson, Douglas

    In strongly correlated materials, the motion of an electron is strongly affected by interactions with other electrons, leading to many interesting phenomena including metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and high temperature superconductivity. Shot noise is one experimental probe for electronic correlations beyond simple electronic transport. Shot noise, which originates from the discrete nature of the charge-carrying particles, can be strongly affected by electronic correlations. Here we report initial shot noise measurements in tunnel junctions prepared from a YBa2Cu3O7-x film sample, with nanoscale junctions written by focused helium ion beam. We will discuss a comparison of the shot noise between the YBCO film sample and standard tunnel junctions, as a function of temperature and bias, and the implications of these results.

  4. Correlation Between NDE Measurements and Elongation of Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R. Bruce; Margetan, Frank J.; Nakagawa, Norio; Haldipur, Pranaam

    2007-03-21

    Complex aluminum forgings can have engineering properties which vary with position due to changes in the underlying local metal microstructure. Consequently, the material properties may be in compliance with production requirements in some regions of the forging, but out of compliance in others. One conical Al-7050 forging of interest was found to have elongation properties which failed required tests in certain regions. NDE measurements sensitive to microstructural changes were carried out to search for correlations with elongation properties. The results of a set of initial feasibility experiments will be reported. Both ultrasonic and eddy current NDE methods were used, with the goal being to determine which properties were sensitive to the elongation. Ultrasonic testing included the measurement of longitudinal and shear-wave velocity, longitudinal wave attenuation, and longitudinal and shear-wave backscattered grain noise. All tests were performed with the sonic beam entering through the coupon face that would be adjacent to the outer surface of the forging. Only modest differences in wave speed and attenuation values were seen among the suite of coupons, but significant differences were seen in backscattered noise levels. These appeared to indicate changes in grain structure but only exhibited partial correlation with elongation. The eddy current measurements were designed to be sensitive to the electrical resistivity. Included were a number of measurement configurations and frequencies. The signals exhibited a significant correlation with elongation.

  5. T-odd angular correlations in the emission of prompt gamma rays and neutrons in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2011-05-01

    Study of the T-odd three-vector correlation in the emission of prompt neutrons from 235U fission by polarized cold neutrons has been continued at the facility MEPHISTO of the FRM II reactor (Technical University of Munich). The sought correlation was not found within experimental error of 2.3 × 10-5. The upper limit for the asymmetry coefficient has been set to | D n | < 6 × 10-5 at 99% confidence level, whereas for ternary fission correlation coefficient D α = (170±20) × 10-5. This limit casts doubt on a model that explains the three-vector correlation in ternary fission by the Coriolis mechanism. At the same time, five-vector correlation in the emission of prompt fission neutrons has been measured, which describes the rotation of the fissioning nucleus at the moment it breaks (ROT effect). At the angle 22.5° to the fission axis, the correlation coefficient was found to be (1.57 ± 0.20) × 10-4, while at the angle of 67.5° it is zero within the experimental uncertainty. The existence of ROT effect in the emission of prompt fission neutrons can be explained by the anisotropy of neutron emission in the rest frame of the fragment (fission fragments are aligned with respect to the axis of deformation of the fissioning nucleus), similar to the mechanism of ROT effect in the emission of prompt γ-rays.

  6. Digital correlator for the portable channel prober measurement instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peo, George E., Jr.

    1987-12-01

    This document describes a Digital Correlator for the Portable Channel Prober Measurement Instrument being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory for use in experiments designed to characterize high frequency (HF) radio channels. This Digital Correlator is a digital signal processor designed and constructed by Stow Computer, 111 old Bolton Road, Stow, MA 01775, (617/508) 897-6838. Two Digital Correlators are integrated into the existing Digital Pre-processor to make a Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer. The Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer will be located at the receiving site of the channel probing experiment and is situated between the coherent radio receiver and the microcomputer used for data recording and analysis. The Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer computes the delay power spectrum of the received waveform. The in-phase and quadrature outputs of the receiver are sampled and converted to digital values by the Analog to Digital Converter, integrated by the Integrator, and correlated with a stored replica of the transmitted waveform by two Digital Correlators. The resulting tap gains are then read by the system microcomputer using the microcomputer interface.

  7. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Sakaie, Ken; Takahashi, Masaya; Remington, Gina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Conger, Amy; Conger, Darrel; Dimitrov, Ivan; Jones, Stephen; Frohman, Ashley; Frohman, Teresa; Sagiyama, Koji; Togao, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO). Methods 40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD), transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI). Results LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03). FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004). LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05) as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02). Conclusions This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity. PMID:26800522

  8. Correlations between LDEX Measurements and the Lunar Plasma Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Jamey; Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Halekas, Jasper

    2014-05-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is an impact ionization dust detector capable of measuring the mass of sub-micron sized dust grains above the lunar surface. LDEX can also search for the putative population of grains with radii on the order of ~ 0.1 μm lofted over the terminator regions by measuring the collective current of dust grains that are below the detection threshold for single impacts. This current, intended to measure the collective impact plasma from multiple small grain impacts, has also shown considerable correlations with plasma measurements from the ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, & Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission. Through LADEE's many orbits, LDEX sees time periods with very low variability, having almost no activity as well as periods with very high variability. Since this type of high activity is also observed in anti-ram pointing measurements, much of this current cannot be explained by collections of small dust grain impacts. Given this, comparisons to ARTEMIS data provide a promising way to explain such measurements. This presentation will focus on the correlations between LDEX and ARTEMIS data.

  9. Measurement and correlation of jet fuel viscosities at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schruben, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and procedures were developed to measure jet fuel viscosity for eight current and future jet fuels at temperatures from ambient to near -60 C by shear viscometry. Viscosity data showed good reproducibility even at temperatures a few degrees below the measured freezing point. The viscosity-temperature relationship could be correlated by two linear segments when plotted as a standard log-log type representation (ASTM D 341). At high temperatures, the viscosity-temperature slope is low. At low temperatures, where wax precipitation is significant, the slope is higher. The breakpoint between temperature regions is the filter flow temperature, a fuel characteristic approximated by the freezing point. A generalization of the representation for the eight experimental fuels provided a predictive correlation for low-temperature viscosity, considered sufficiently accurate for many design or performance calculations.

  10. Measurement of fluid rotation, dilation, and displacement in particle image velocimetry using a Fourier–Mellin cross-correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Giarra, Matthew N.; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2015-02-05

    Traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) uses discrete Cartesian cross correlations (CCs) to estimate the displacements of groups of tracer particles within small subregions of sequentially captured images. However, these CCs fail in regions with large velocity gradients or high rates of rotation. In this paper, we propose a new PIV correlation method based on the Fourier–Mellin transformation (FMT) that enables direct measurement of the rotation and dilation of particle image patterns. In previously unresolvable regions of large rotation, our algorithm significantly improves the velocity estimates compared to traditional correlations by aligning the rotated and stretched particle patterns prior to performing Cartesian correlations to estimate their displacements. Furthermore, our algorithm, which we term Fourier–Mellin correlation (FMC), reliably measures particle pattern displacement between pairs of interrogation regions with up to ±180° of angular misalignment, compared to 6–8° for traditional correlations, and dilation/compression factors of 0.5–2.0, compared to 0.9–1.1 for a single iteration of traditional correlations.

  11. Measurement of fluid rotation, dilation, and displacement in particle image velocimetry using a Fourier–Mellin cross-correlation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giarra, Matthew N.; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2015-02-05

    Traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) uses discrete Cartesian cross correlations (CCs) to estimate the displacements of groups of tracer particles within small subregions of sequentially captured images. However, these CCs fail in regions with large velocity gradients or high rates of rotation. In this paper, we propose a new PIV correlation method based on the Fourier–Mellin transformation (FMT) that enables direct measurement of the rotation and dilation of particle image patterns. In previously unresolvable regions of large rotation, our algorithm significantly improves the velocity estimates compared to traditional correlations by aligning the rotated and stretched particle patterns prior to performingmore » Cartesian correlations to estimate their displacements. Furthermore, our algorithm, which we term Fourier–Mellin correlation (FMC), reliably measures particle pattern displacement between pairs of interrogation regions with up to ±180° of angular misalignment, compared to 6–8° for traditional correlations, and dilation/compression factors of 0.5–2.0, compared to 0.9–1.1 for a single iteration of traditional correlations.« less

  12. Comparative Performance of the Photomultiplier Tube and the Silicon Avalanche Photodiode When Used as Detectors in Angular Scattering Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, D. O.; Nelson, R. M.; Boryta, M. D.; Hapke, B. W.; Manatt, K.; Smythe, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of a comparative study of two types of photometric detectors that are commonly used for, spacecraft, ground-based telescope, and laboratory observations in support of precise angular scattering investigations of the type described in a companion paper (Nelson et al., this meeting). The performance of the state of the art Hamamatsu C12703-01 Silicon Avalanche photodiode (SAD) was compared to that of the Hamamatsu R928 Photomultiplier tube (PMT). The Hamamatsu R928 evolved from a sequence of photometric detectors with a long history of use in support of laboratory and remote sensing studies, tracing backwards to include the RCA 1P21 and the RCA 931A. Two newly acquired SADs were bench tested along with a new R928 photomultiplier tube that was thermoelectrically cooled to -10 deg C. The SAD's employed electronic thermal compensation supplied by the manufacturer. The SADs and PMT measured electromagnetic radiation from solid-state lasers of wavelength 635 nm after the radiation was reflected from diffusely-scattering surfaces of varying albedos. The SADs were housed on tripods that were co-aligned with the PMT and laser. The photometric detectors were placed 4.3 meters from a reflecting disk. The disk was rotated to reduce the effect of laser speckle. All detectors in the experiment were equipped with notch filters that transmit light only of the wavelength emitted by the laser. Three SR830 DSP Lock-in Amplifiers were connected to the detectors and various setting configurations were compared in order to optimize signal to noise. Neutral Density filters (ND 0,3 and ND 0,9) were placed in the light path to determine the linearity in the response function of the detectors. We conclude that in this application SADs and PMTs produce comparable photometric precision and fidelity. SADs offer greater convenience because thermal compensation circuitry is integrated with the detector. This work was partially supported by NASA's Cassini Science

  13. Bunch Length Measurements With Laser/SR Cross-Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Timothy; Daranciang, Dan; Lindenberg, Aaron; Corbett, Jeff; Fisher, Alan; Goodfellow, John; Huang, Xiaobiao; Mok, Walter; Safranek, James; Wen, Haidan; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    By operating SPEAR3 in low-{alpha} mode the storage ring can generate synchrotron radiation pulses of order 1ps. Applications include pump-probe x-ray science and the production of THz radiation in the CSR regime. Measurements of the bunch length are difficult, however, because the light intensity is low and streak cameras typically provide resolution of only a few ps. Tests are now underway to resolve the short bunch length using cross-correlation between a 60-fs Ti:Sapphire laser and the visible SR beam in a BBO crystal. In this paper we report on the experimental setup, preliminary measurements and prospects for further improvement.

  14. Measuring the Hydrodynamic Size of Nanoparticles Using Fluctuation Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Blankenburg, Jan; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Landes, Christy F.; Link, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Fluctuation correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established analytical technique traditionally used to monitor molecular diffusion in dilute solutions, the dynamics of chemical reactions, and molecular processes inside living cells. In this review, we present the recent use of FCS for measuring the size of colloidal nanoparticles in solution. We review the theoretical basis and experimental implementation of this technique and its advantages and limitations. In particular, we show examples of the use of FCS to measure the size of gold nanoparticles, monitor the rotational dynamics of gold nanorods, and investigate the formation of protein coronas on nanoparticles.

  15. Measuring the Hydrodynamic Size of Nanoparticles Using Fluctuation Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Blankenburg, Jan; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2016-05-27

    Fluctuation correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established analytical technique traditionally used to monitor molecular diffusion in dilute solutions, the dynamics of chemical reactions, and molecular processes inside living cells. In this review, we present the recent use of FCS for measuring the size of colloidal nanoparticles in solution. We review the theoretical basis and experimental implementation of this technique and its advantages and limitations. In particular, we show examples of the use of FCS to measure the size of gold nanoparticles, monitor the rotational dynamics of gold nanorods, and investigate the formation of protein coronas on nanoparticles. PMID:27215820

  16. Measurement of dijet angular distributions at sqrt{s}=1.96TeV and searches for quark compositeness and extra spatial dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, D0

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of dijet angular distributions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement is based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector. Dijet angular distributions have been measured over a range of dijet masses, from 0.25 TeV to above 1.1 TeV. The data are in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD and are used to constrain new physics models including quark compositeness, large extra dimensions, and TeV{sup -1} scale extra dimensions. For all models considered, we set the most stringent direct limits to date.

  17. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-12-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in the physics laboratory. Many traditional physics experiments can now be performed very conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment while simultaneously reducing the laboratory budget substantially by using student-owned smartphones.

  18. Free-space measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol using decoy states with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Gong, Long-Yan; Cheng, Wei-Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol using orbital angular momentum (OAM) in free space links, named the OAM-MDI-QKD protocol. In the proposed protocol, the OAM states of photons, instead of polarization states, are used as the information carriers to avoid the reference frame alignment, the decoy-state is adopted to overcome the security loophole caused by the weak coherent pulse source, and the high efficient OAM-sorter is adopted as the measurement tool for Charlie to obtain the output OAM state. Here, Charlie may be an untrusted third party. The results show that the authorized users, Alice and Bob, could distill a secret key with Charlie’s successful measurements, and the key generation performance is slightly better than that of the polarization-based MDI-QKD protocol in the two-dimensional OAM cases. Simultaneously, Alice and Bob can reduce the number of flipping the bits in the secure key distillation. It is indicated that a higher key generation rate performance could be obtained by a high dimensional OAM-MDI-QKD protocol because of the unlimited degree of freedom on OAM states. Moreover, the results show that the key generation rate and the transmission distance will decrease as the growth of the strength of atmospheric turbulence (AT) and the link attenuation. In addition, the decoy states used in the proposed protocol can get a considerable good performance without the need for an ideal source. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271238 and 61475075), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20123223110003), the Natural Science Research Foundation for Universities of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. 11KJA510002), the Open Research Fund of Key Laboratory of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network Technology, Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. NYKL2015011), and the

  19. Optomechanical correlations and signal self-amplification in interferometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohadon, P.-F.; Verlot, P.; Tavernarakis, A.; Briant, T.; Heidmann, A.

    2010-05-01

    Radiation pressure exerted by light in interferometric measurements is responsible for displacements of mirrors which appear as an additional back-action noise and limit the sensitivity of the measurement. We experimentally study these effects by monitoring in a very high-finesse optical cavity the displacements of a mirror with a sensitivity at the 10-20 m/ level. This very high sensitivity is a step towards the observation of fundamental quantum effects of radiation pressure such as the standard quantum limit in interferometric measurements. We report the observation of optomechanical correlations between two optical beams sent into the same moving mirror cavity. We also observed a self-amplification of a signal, which is a consequence of dynamical back-action of radiation pressure in a detuned cavity, and may improve the interferometric measurement sensitivity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  20. Sensor Selection for Estimation with Correlated Measurement Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sijia; Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar; Fardad, Makan; Masazade, Engin; Leus, Geert; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of sensor selection for parameter estimation with correlated measurement noise. We seek optimal sensor activations by formulating an optimization problem, in which the estimation error, given by the trace of the inverse of the Bayesian Fisher information matrix, is minimized subject to energy constraints. Fisher information has been widely used as an effective sensor selection criterion. However, existing information-based sensor selection methods are limited to the case of uncorrelated noise or weakly correlated noise due to the use of approximate metrics. By contrast, here we derive the closed form of the Fisher information matrix with respect to sensor selection variables that is valid for any arbitrary noise correlation regime, and develop both a convex relaxation approach and a greedy algorithm to find near-optimal solutions. We further extend our framework of sensor selection to solve the problem of sensor scheduling, where a greedy algorithm is proposed to determine non-myopic (multi-time step ahead) sensor schedules. Lastly, numerical results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of our approach, and to reveal the effect of noise correlation on estimation performance.

  1. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  2. The XMM-Newton survey of the ELAIS-S1 field. I. Number counts, angular correlation function and X-ray spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, S.; Fiore, F.; D'Elia, V.; Pillitteri, I.; Feruglio, C.; Grazian, A.; Brusa, M.; Ciliegi, P.; Comastri, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.; La Franca, F.; Sacchi, N.; Franceschini, A.; Berta, S.; Buttery, H.; Dias, J. E.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.The formation and evolution of cosmic structures can be probed by studying the evolution of the luminosity function of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), galaxies and clusters of galaxies and of the clustering of the X-ray active Universe, compared to the IR-UV active Universe. Methods: .To this purpose, we have surveyed with XMM-Newton the central ~0.6 deg2 region of the ELAIS-S1 field down to flux limits of ~5.5 × 10-16 erg~cm-2~s-1 (0.5-2 keV, soft band, S), ~2 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (2-10 keV, hard band, H), and ~4 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (5-10 keV, ultra hard band, HH). We present here the analysis of the XMM-Newton observations, the number counts in different energy bands and the clustering properties of the X-ray sources. Results: .We detect a total of 478 sources, 395 and 205 of which detected in the S and H bands respectively. We identified 7 clearly extended sources and estimated their redshift through X-ray spectral fits with thermal models. In four cases the redshift is consistent with z=0.4, so we may have detected a large scale structure formed by groups and clusters of galaxies through their hot intra-cluster gas emission. We have computed the angular correlation function of the sources in the S and H bands finding best fit correlation angles θ_0=5.2 ± 3.8 arcsec and θ_0=12.8 ± 7.8 arcsec in the two bands respectively. The correlation angle of H band sources is therefore formally ~2.5 times that of the S band sources, although the difference is at only ~1σ confidence level. A rough estimate of the present-day correlation length r0 can be obtained inverting the Limber equation and assuming an appropriate redshift distribution dN/dz. The results range between 12.8 and 9.8 h-1 Mpc in the S band and between 17.9 and 13.4 h-1 Mpc in the H band, with 30-40% statistical errors, assuming either smooth redshift distributions or redshift distributions with spikes accounting for the presence of significant structure at z=0.4. The relative density of the

  3. Measuring Fisher Information Accurately in Correlated Neural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Adam; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Neural responses are known to be variable. In order to understand how this neural variability constrains behavioral performance, we need to be able to measure the reliability with which a sensory stimulus is encoded in a given population. However, such measures are challenging for two reasons: First, they must take into account noise correlations which can have a large influence on reliability. Second, they need to be as efficient as possible, since the number of trials available in a set of neural recording is usually limited by experimental constraints. Traditionally, cross-validated decoding has been used as a reliability measure, but it only provides a lower bound on reliability and underestimates reliability substantially in small datasets. We show that, if the number of trials per condition is larger than the number of neurons, there is an alternative, direct estimate of reliability which consistently leads to smaller errors and is much faster to compute. The superior performance of the direct estimator is evident both for simulated data and for neuronal population recordings from macaque primary visual cortex. Furthermore we propose generalizations of the direct estimator which measure changes in stimulus encoding across conditions and the impact of correlations on encoding and decoding, typically denoted by Ishuffle and Idiag respectively. PMID:26030735

  4. Goniometric and conoscopic measurements of angular display contrast for one-, three-, five-, and nine-million-pixel medical liquid crystal displays

    SciTech Connect

    Badano, Aldo; Fifadara, Dipesh H.

    2004-12-01

    Active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) have become the preferred choice for displaying digital diagnostic images because of their low cost of ownership, high contrast, and small footprint. However, the contrast and luminance of AMLCDs changes significantly with viewing direction. In this paper, we use a goniometric and a conoscopic method to measure angular contrast and luminance in one-, three-, five-, and nine-million-pixel medical AMLCDs. The viewing angle characteristics of the displays are compared by evaluating the compliance with the desired grayscale and recommended tolerance limits. Using the measured contrast responses, we determined the angle along each of the orthogonal and diagonal axes for which the luminance ratio drops to 0.5, 0.2, and 0.1 of the maximum ratio, seen at perpendicular viewing. The results show a reduction as large as 54% in available JND levels between the perpendicular and off-normal viewing directions. All of the display systems proved to have better angular response in the horizontal and vertical direction as compared to the diagonal directions, and none were able to satisfy a 20% contrast tolerance limit for any viewing direction lying in a cone at an angle of 45 deg. from the normal. Additionally, we show that the measured contrast can be significantly affected by the measurement method used to record the angular change in luminance.

  5. Detecting correlated errors in state-preparation-and-measurement tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher; van Enk, S. J.

    2015-10-01

    Whereas in standard quantum-state tomography one estimates an unknown state by performing various measurements with known devices, and whereas in detector tomography one estimates the positive-operator-valued-measurement elements of a measurement device by subjecting to it various known states, we consider here the case of SPAM (state preparation and measurement) tomography where neither the states nor the measurement device are assumed known. For d -dimensional systems measured by d -outcome detectors, we find there are at most d2(d2-1 ) "gauge" parameters that can never be determined by any such experiment, irrespective of the number of unknown states and unknown devices. For the case d =2 we find gauge-invariant quantities that can be accessed directly experimentally and that can be used to detect and describe SPAM errors. In particular, we identify conditions whose violations detect the presence of correlations between SPAM errors. From the perspective of SPAM tomography, standard quantum-state tomography and detector tomography are protocols that fix the gauge parameters through the assumption that some set of fiducial measurements is known or that some set of fiducial states is known, respectively.

  6. Estimating correlation for a real-time measure of connectivity.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Akhil; Panday, Ashish; Joshi, Bharat; Ravindran, Arun; Zaveri, Hitten P

    2012-01-01

    There has recently been considerable interest in connectivity analysis of fMRI and scalp and intracranial EEG time-series. The computational requirements of the pair-wise correlation (PWC), the core time-series measure used to estimate connectivity, presents a challenge to the real-time estimation of the PWC between all pairs of multiple time-series. We describe a parallel algorithm for computing PWC in real-time for streaming data from multiple channels. The algorithm was implemented on the Intel Xeon™ and IBM Cell Broadband Engine™ platforms. We evaluated time to estimate correlation for signals recorded with different acquisition parameters as a comparison to real-time constraints. We demonstrate that the execution time of these efficient implementations meet real-time constraints in most instances. PMID:23367098

  7. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Byoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1-10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  8. Measuring capital market efficiency: Global and local correlations structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new measure for capital market efficiency. The measure takes into consideration the correlation structure of the returns (long-term and short-term memory) and local herding behavior (fractal dimension). The efficiency measure is taken as a distance from an ideal efficient market situation. The proposed methodology is applied to a portfolio of 41 stock indices. We find that the Japanese NIKKEI is the most efficient market. From a geographical point of view, the more efficient markets are dominated by the European stock indices and the less efficient markets cover mainly Latin America, Asia and Oceania. The inefficiency is mainly driven by a local herding, i.e. a low fractal dimension.

  9. ATLAS-3 correlative measurement opportunities with UARS and surface observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Edwin F.; Denn, Fred M.; Gibson, Gary G.

    1995-01-01

    The third ATmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-3) mission was flown aboard the Space Shuttle launched on November 3, 1994. The mission length was approximately 10 days and 22 hours. The ATLAS-3 Earth-viewing instruments provided a large number of measurements which were nearly coincident with observations from experiments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Based on ATLAS-3 instrument operating schedules, simulations were performed to determine when and where correlative measurements occurred between ATLAS and UARS instruments, and between ATLAS and surface observations. Results of these orbital and instrument simulations provide valuable information for scientists to compare measurements between various instruments on the two satellites and at selected surface sites.

  10. T-odd angular correlations in the emission of prompt gamma rays and neutrons in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2011-05-15

    Study of the T-odd three-vector correlation in the emission of prompt neutrons from {sup 235}U fission by polarized cold neutrons has been continued at the facility MEPHISTO of the FRM II reactor (Technical University of Munich). The sought correlation was not found within experimental error of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. The upper limit for the asymmetry coefficient has been set to vertical bar D{sub n} vertical bar < 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} at 99% confidence level, whereas for ternary fission correlation coefficient D{sub {alpha}} = (170{+-}20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. This limit casts doubt on a model that explains the three-vector correlation in ternary fission by the Coriolis mechanism. At the same time, five-vector correlation in the emission of prompt fission neutrons has been measured, which describes the rotation of the fissioning nucleus at the moment it breaks (ROT effect). At the angle 22.5 Degree-Sign to the fission axis, the correlation coefficient was found to be (1.57 {+-} 0.20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, while at the angle of 67.5 Degree-Sign it is zero within the experimental uncertainty. The existence of ROT effect in the emission of prompt fission neutrons can be explained by the anisotropy of neutron emission in the rest frame of the fragment (fission fragments are aligned with respect to the axis of deformation of the fissioning nucleus), similar to the mechanism of ROT effect in the emission of prompt {gamma}-rays.

  11. Protecting entanglement from correlated amplitude damping channel using weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Xie, Ying-Mao; Wang, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Based on the quantum technique of weak measurement, we propose a scheme to protect the entanglement from correlated amplitude damping decoherence. In contrast to the results of memoryless amplitude damping channel, we show that the memory effects play a significant role in the suppression of entanglement sudden death and protection of entanglement under severe decoherence. Moreover, we find that the initial entanglement could be drastically amplified by the combination of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal even under the correlated amplitude damping channel. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  12. Radiative corrections to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons: The initial-baryon rest frame case

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Garcia, A.

    2009-03-01

    We complement the results for the radiative corrections to the s-circumflex{sub 2}{center_dot}l-circumflex angular correlation of baryon semileptonic decays of Neri et al.[Phys. Rev. D 78, 054018 (2008)] with the final results in the rest frame of the decaying baryon. In addition, we present an analytical result which was not possible to obtain in Neri et al.'s work.

  13. The Effect of Error Correlation on Interfactor Correlation in Psychometric Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall, Peter H.; Henning, Kevin S. S.; Howell, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how interfactor correlation is affected by error correlations. Theoretical and practical justifications for error correlations are given, and a new equivalence class of models is presented to explain the relationship between interfactor correlation and error correlations. The class allows simple, parsimonious modeling of error…

  14. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: measuring radio galaxy bias through cross-correlation with lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Rupert; Lindsay, Sam N.; Sherwin, Blake D.; de Bernardis, Francesco; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio; Henderson, Shawn; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Jarvis, Matt; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Madhavacheril, Mathew; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-07-01

    We correlate the positions of radio galaxies in the FIRST survey with the cosmic microwave background lensing convergence estimated from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope over 470 deg2 to determine the bias of these galaxies. We remove optically cross-matched sources below redshift z = 0.2 to preferentially select active galactic nuclei (AGN). We measure the angular cross-power spectrum C_l^{κ g} at 4.4σ significance in the multipole range 100 < l < 3000, corresponding to physical scales within ≈2-60 Mpc at an effective redshift zeff = 1.5. Modelling the AGN population with a redshift-dependent bias, the cross-spectrum is well fitted by the Planck best-fitting Λ cold dark matter cosmological model. Fixing the cosmology and assumed redshift distribution of sources, we fit for the overall bias model normalization, finding b(zeff) = 3.5 ± 0.8 for the full galaxy sample and b(zeff) = 4.0 ± 1.1(3.0 ± 1.1) for sources brighter (fainter) than 2.5 mJy. This measurement characterizes the typical halo mass of radio-loud AGN: we find log (M_halo / M_{⊙}) = 13.6^{+0.3}_{-0.4}.

  15. Measures of correlations in infinite-dimensional quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    Several important measures of correlations of the state of a finite-dimensional composite quantum system are defined as linear combinations of marginal entropies of this state. This paper is devoted to infinite-dimensional generalizations of such quantities and to an analysis of their properties. We introduce the notion of faithful extension of a linear combination of marginal entropies and consider several concrete examples, the simplest of which are quantum mutual information and quantum conditional entropy. Then we show that quantum conditional mutual information can be defined uniquely as a lower semicontinuous function on the set of all states of a tripartite infinite-dimensional system possessing all the basic properties valid in finite dimensions. Infinite-dimensional generalizations of some other measures of correlations in multipartite quantum systems are also considered. Applications of the results to the theory of infinite-dimensional quantum channels and their capacities are considered. The existence of a Fawzi-Renner recovery channel reproducing marginal states for all tripartite states (including states with infinite marginal entropies) is shown. Bibliography: 47 titles.

  16. Correlation spectrum analyzer for direct measurement of device current noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco

    2002-07-01

    This article analyzes the realization and the performance of a correlation spectrum analyzer specifically conceived to directly measure the current noise produced by electronic devices with maximum sensitivity. The text describes in detail and gives the design rules of the instrument input amplifiers taking into consideration noise, dynamic range, stability, and bandwidth, together with the effects that a device under test (DUT) having complex impedance introduce. This article shows that the proposed scheme may allow current noise measurements with a sensitivity improved by few orders of magnitude with respect to a standard spectrum analyzer and to a correlation analyzer in voltage scheme whenever the DUT has an impedance larger than few 10 kOmega. Such a sensitivity makes the proposed instrument ideal for the characterization of advanced devices, such as ultrashort channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, mesoscopic junctions, or spin dependent electron transfer devices where it may be necessary to detect noise levels as low as fA/RADICAL:[[RADICAND:[Hz

  17. Correlation of atmospheric optical turbulence and meteorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucher, Gail M. Tirrell

    1989-06-01

    The correlation of meteorological events such as the jet stream, gravity waves and boundary layer circulation with the optical turbulence parameters, the transverse coherence length r sub o and the isoplanatic angle is essential for interpreting and forecasting imaging and laser systems performance. In support of the United States Air Force Relay Mirror Experiment, the Naval Postgraduate School performed a series of six site characterization measurements near Kihei, Maui, during August 1987 to July 1988. Spatial and temporal summaries of atmospheric events corresponding to the optical remote sensor data are presented using meteorological data from the National Weather Service Radiosonde Observation stations, synoptic charts, GOES-WEST infrared satellite images, and four Kihei, Maui rawinsonde datasets. To quantify the correlation between optical turbulence measurements and meteorological phenomena, four methods of calculating C square (T) from rawinsonde data were investigated. Results show that existing rawinsonde systems are inadequate for direct C square (T) calculation. However, moderate improvements in the vertical resolution, the temperature resolution and probe response time, will allow direct calculations of optical turbulence parameters from rawinsonde data.

  18. Measurement of Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan $e^+e^-$ pairs in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Sudeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we present the status of the measurement of angular distributions of final state electrons in $p \\bar{p} \\to \\gamma^* Z \\to e^+ e^- + X$ events produced in the Z boson mass region at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron. For this analysis, we are using the full Run II dataset corresponding to 9.7$\\,fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. The angular distributions as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair are studied, and the Lam-Tung relation, valid only for a spin-1 description of the gluon is investigated. The final result will also describe the details of the production mechanism of Z bosons via quark anti-quark annihilation or quark-gluon Compton scattering.

  19. Recent results and prospects for correlation ECE measurements on TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porte, L.; Coda, S.; Goodman, T. P.; Pochelon, A.; Udintsev, V. S.; Vuille, V.

    2012-09-01

    The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) has a two channel correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) radiometer with a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field. The antenna pattern of this radiometer limits resolution to kθ < 112 m-1 or kθρs < 0.3 at 500 kHz. It can access the region with minor radius ρvol < 0.7. A series of measurements has been made of the turbulence spectra at positive and negative triangularity and as a function of collisionality. Also, a series of measurements has been made as a function of poloidal angle, by varying the plasma vertical position with respect to the antenna, the measurements being made on the same flux surface. It is planned to extensively upgrade the diagnostic by integrating four more channels and acquiring a new front-end for the radiometer. This upgrade should reduce the required number of shots for a radial scan by a factor four and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. It is also planned to use a high gain antenna that will extend access to kρ < 174m-1 or kθρs < 0.5 at 500 kHz. The present system, measurements and the upgrade are described in this paper.

  20. Experimental evaluation of nonclassical correlations between measurement outcomes and target observable in a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Suzuki, Yutaro; Nii, Taiki; Kinoshita, Ryuji; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2016-03-01

    In general, it is difficult to evaluate measurement errors when the initial and final conditions of the measurement make it impossible to identify the correct value of the target observable. Ozawa proposed a solution based on the operator algebra of observables which has recently been used in experiments investigating the error-disturbance trade-off of quantum measurements. Importantly, this solution makes surprisingly detailed statements about the relations between measurement outcomes and the unknown target observable. In the present paper, we investigate this relation by performing a sequence of two measurements on the polarization of a photon, so that the first measurement commutes with the target observable and the second measurement is sensitive to a complementary observable. While the initial measurement can be evaluated using classical statistics, the second measurement introduces the effects of quantum correlations between the noncommuting physical properties. By varying the resolution of the initial measurement, we can change the relative contribution of the nonclassical correlations and identify their role in the evaluation of the quantum measurement. It is shown that the most striking deviation from classical expectations is obtained at the transition between weak and strong measurements, where the competition between different statistical effects results in measurement values well outside the range of possible eigenvalues.

  1. Newly Designed Apparatus for Measuring the Angular Dependent Surface Emittance in a Wide Wavelength Range and at Elevated Temperatures up to 1400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydzek, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini-Schuster, M.; Manara, J.

    2012-11-01

    An optimized apparatus for measuring the angular dependent surface emittance up to elevated temperatures has been designed. This emittance measurement apparatus (EMMA) is coupled to a Bruker Vertex 70v FTIR-spectrometer, so that a wavelength range from about 2 μm up to 25 μm is accessible. The central part of the new apparatus is a double walled, stainless steel vessel which can be evacuated or filled with various gases or with air. Inside the vessel a cylindrical tube furnace is pivot-mounted on a system of discs, for automatically rotating up to an angle of 180°. This allows both, the measurement at different detection angles (0° to 85°) and a consecutive measurement of sample and black-body reference without ventilating and opening the pot. The aim of this work is to present the newly designed emittance measurement apparatus which enables the determination of the angular dependent spectral emittance of opaque samples at temperatures up to 1400 °C. Next to the setup of the apparatus, the measurement results of various materials are presented at different detection angles.

  2. First-principles and time-differential γ-γ perturbed-angular-correlation spectroscopy study of structural and electronic properties of Ta-doped TiO2 semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Fabricius, G.; Rentería, M.

    2009-03-01

    The, time-differential γ-γ perturbed-angular-correlation (TDPAC) technique using ion-implanted H181f(→T181a) tracers was applied to study the hyperfine interactions of T181a impurities in the rutile structure of TiO2 single crystals. The experiments were performed in air in the temperature range of 300-1273 K, allowing the electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor characterization (in magnitude, asymmetry, and orientation) at T181a probe atoms located in defect-free cation sites of the structure. The measured EFG is parallel to the [001] crystal axis, as occurs at Ti sites, but normal to the EFG orientation observed at C111d impurities in TiO2 single crystals [L. A. Errico , Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 055503 (2002)]. In addition, ab initio calculations were performed using the full-potential augmented plane wave plus local orbital method that allow us to treat the electronic structure of the doped system and the atomic relaxations induced by the Ta impurity in a fully self-consistent way. We considered different dilutions of the doped system (using the supercell approach) and studied the electronic properties and structural atomic relaxation dependence on the charge state of the impurity. The accuracy of the calculations and the excellent agreement of the predicted magnitude, asymmetry, and orientation of the EFG tensor with the experimental results enable us to infer the EFG sign, not accessible with conventional TDPAC experiments. The comparison of the measured EFG at Ta sites with experimental and ab initio theoretical results reported in the literature at Cd, Ta, and Ti sites in TiO2 allowed us to obtain a deeper insight on the role played by metal impurities in oxide semiconductors.

  3. Estimation of leaf area index using an angular vegetation index based on in situ measurements and CHRIS/PROBA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Guimin; Lin, Hui; Liang, Liang; Niu, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is widely used for Leaf Area Index (LAI) estimation. It is well documented that the NDVI is extremely subject to the saturation problem when LAI reaches a high value. A new multi-angular vegetation index, the Hotspot-darkspot Difference Vegetation Index (HDVI) is proposed to estimate the high density LAI. The HDVI, defined as the difference between the hot and dark spot NDVI, relative to the dark spot NDVI, was proposed based on the Analytical two-layer Canopy Reflectance Model (ACRM) model outputs. This index is validated using both in situ experimental data in wheat and data from the multi-angular optical Compact High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) satellite. Both indices, the Hotspot-Darkspot Index (HDS) and the NDVI were also selected to analyze the relationship with LAI, and were compared with new index HDVI. The results show that HDVI is an appropriate proxy of LAI with higher determination coefficients (R2) for both the data from the in situ experiment (R2=0.7342, RMSE=0.0205) and the CHRIS data (R2=0.7749, RMSE=0.1013). Our results demonstrate that HDVI can make better the occurrence of saturation limits with the information of multi-angular observation, and is more appropriate for estimating LAI than either HDS or NDVI at high LAI values. Although the new index needs further evaluation, it also has the potential under the condition of dense canopies. It provides the effective improvement to the NDVI and other vegetation indices that are based on the red and NIR spectral bands.

  4. Outdoor radon concentration measurements: some correlation with major urban pollutants.

    PubMed

    Garbero, V; Dellacasa, G; Bianchi, D; Magnoni, M; Erbetta, L

    2009-12-01

    Air pollutants concentration in the urban air strongly depends on the properties of the planetary boundary layer (the lower region of the atmosphere), roughly up to 1 km from Earth's surface. Radioactive radon gas has been recognised by various authors as a valuable natural tracer of transport and dispersion within this layer. To achieve a better comprehension of the urban pollution dynamic in the town of Alessandria, situated in the Po Valley in the north-west of Italy, a system for continuous measurement of radon concentration in outdoor air was experimented. This paper presents the first results obtained: the hourly trend of radon concentration in the diurnal course during different seasons and its correlation with the concentration of the major urban pollutants. PMID:19906661

  5. openBEB: open biological experiment browser for correlative measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New experimental methods must be developed to study interaction networks in systems biology. To reduce biological noise, individual subjects, such as single cells, should be analyzed using high throughput approaches. The measurement of several correlative physical properties would further improve data consistency. Accordingly, a considerable quantity of data must be acquired, correlated, catalogued and stored in a database for subsequent analysis. Results We have developed openBEB (open Biological Experiment Browser), a software framework for data acquisition, coordination, annotation and synchronization with database solutions such as openBIS. OpenBEB consists of two main parts: A core program and a plug-in manager. Whereas the data-type independent core of openBEB maintains a local container of raw-data and metadata and provides annotation and data management tools, all data-specific tasks are performed by plug-ins. The open architecture of openBEB enables the fast integration of plug-ins, e.g., for data acquisition or visualization. A macro-interpreter allows the automation and coordination of the different modules. An update and deployment mechanism keeps the core program, the plug-ins and the metadata definition files in sync with a central repository. Conclusions The versatility, the simple deployment and update mechanism, and the scalability in terms of module integration offered by openBEB make this software interesting for a large scientific community. OpenBEB targets three types of researcher, ideally working closely together: (i) Engineers and scientists developing new methods and instruments, e.g., for systems-biology, (ii) scientists performing biological experiments, (iii) theoreticians and mathematicians analyzing data. The design of openBEB enables the rapid development of plug-ins, which will inherently benefit from the “house keeping” abilities of the core program. We report the use of openBEB to combine live cell microscopy

  6. Correlation of environmental data measurements with polarimetric LWIR sensor measurements of manmade objects in natural clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, James; Woolley, Mark; Roth, Luz

    2010-04-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in using polarimetric imaging sensors for terrestrial remote sensing applications because of their ability to discriminate manmade objects in a natural clutter background. However, adverse weather limits the performance of these sensors. Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) polarimetric sensor data of a scene containing manmade objects in a natural clutter background is compared with simultaneously collected environmental data. In this paper, a metric is constructed from the Stokes parameter S1 and is correlated with some environmental channels. There are differences in the correlation outputs, with the sensor data metric positively correlated with some environmental channels, negatively correlated with some channels and uncorrelated with other channels. Results from real data measurements are presented and interpreted. An uncooled LWIR sensor using an achromatic retarder to capture the polarimetric states performed the data collection. The environmental channels include various meteorological channels, radiation loading and soil properties.

  7. Correlated Protein Motion Measurements of Dihydrofolate Reductase Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengyang; Niessen, Katherine; Pace, James; Cody, Vivian; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first direct measurements of the long range structural vibrational modes in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). DHFR is a universal housekeeping enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of 7,8-dihydrofolate to 5,6,7,8-tetra-hydrofolate, with the aid of coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). This crucial enzymatic role as the target for anti-cancer [methotrexate (MTX)], and other clinically useful drugs, has made DHFR a long-standing target of enzymological studies. The terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1), corresponds to global correlated protein motions. In our lab we have developed Crystal Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), which directly measures these large scale intra-molecular protein vibrations, by removing the relaxational background of the solvent and residue side chain librational motions. We demonstrate narrowband features in the anisotropic absorbance for mouse DHFR with the ligand binding of NADPH and MTX single crystals as well as Escherichia coli DHFR with the ligand binding of NADPH and MTX single crystals. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI2 grant DBI2959989.

  8. Flap noise characteristics measured by pressure cross correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. R.

    1980-03-01

    The aerodynamic sound generated by a realistic aircraft flap system was investigated through the use of cross correlations between surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound. Measurements were conducted in two subsonic wind tunnel studies to determine the strength, distribution, and directivity of the major sources of flap noise at speeds up to 79.0 m/sec. A pilot study was performed on a single flap model to test the measurement technique and provide initial data on the characteristics of flap noise. The major portion of this investigation studied the sound radiated by a realistic large scale model of a triple slotted flap system mounted on a sweptback 6.7 meter semispan model wing. The results of this investigation have identified the major sources of flap generated noise and their dependence of flow defining parameters. In addition, a possible avenue toward the reduction of flap generated noise has been identified via the placement of the flap actuator fairings on the flap system.

  9. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s}=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured to be 0 .37 ± 0 .07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0 .014 π ± 0 .036 π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0 .15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .36 , 0 .10] and Im[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .17 , 0 .23] with a correlation of 0 .11. The results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured tomore » be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  11. A high-significance measurement of correlation between unresolved IRAS sources and optically-selected galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hincks, Adam D.; Hajian, Amir; Addison, Graeme E. E-mail: ahajian@cita.utoronto.ca

    2013-05-01

    We cross-correlate the 100 μm Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey (IRIS) map and galaxy clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3 in the maxBCG catalogue taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, measuring an angular cross-power spectrum over multipole moments 150 < l < 3000 at a total significance of over 40σ. The cross-spectrum, which arises from the spatial correlation between unresolved dusty galaxies that make up the cosmic infrared background (CIB) in the IRIS map and the galaxy clusters, is well-fit by a single power law with an index of −1.28±0.12, similar to the clustering of unresolved galaxies from cross-correlating far-infrared and submillimetre maps at longer wavelengths. Using a recent, phenomenological model for the spectral and clustering properties of the IRIS galaxies, we constrain the large-scale bias of the maxBCG clusters to be 2.6±1.4, consistent with existing analyses of the real-space cluster correlation function. The success of our method suggests that future CIB-optical cross-correlations using Planck and Herschel data will significantly improve our understanding of the clustering and redshift distribution of the faint CIB sources.

  12. Partially correlated azimuthal vortex illumination: coherence and correlation measurements and effects in imaging.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean P; Brown, Thomas G

    2008-12-01

    Correlations in the illumination field have a profound impact on the image contrast for features near the resolution limit. The pupil polarization affects these correlations. We show that a polarization vortex has a particularly dramatic effect. A theoretical model is given for the correlation matrix of a partially correlated source created by placing an azimuthal polarization vortex mode converter in the pupil plane of a critical illumination system. We then validate this model experimentally using a reversed-wavefront Young interferometer, directly show the impact that the phase of the correlation function has on image contrast. PMID:19065180

  13. Measurement of Dijet Angular Distributions and Search for Quark Compositeness in pp Collisions at $sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-05-01

    Dijet angular distributions are measured over a wide range of dijet invariant masses in pp collisions at s√ = 7 TeV, at the CERN LHC. The event sample, recorded with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The data are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and yield no evidence of quark compositeness. With a modified frequentist approach, a lower limit on the contact interaction scale for left-handed quarks of Lambda = 5.6 TeV is obtained at the 95% confidence level.

  14. Measurement of c-axis angular orientation in calcite (CaCO3) nanocrystals using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Young, Anthony; Coppersmith, Susan N.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the ability to manipulate the polarization of synchrotron radiation can be exploited to enhance the capabilities of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, to include linear dichroism effects. By acquiring spectra at the same photon energies but different polarizations, and using a photoelectron emission spectromicroscope (PEEM), one can quantitatively determine the angular orientation of micro- and nanocrystals with a spatial resolution down to 10 nm. XANES-PEEM instruments are already present at most synchrotrons, hence these methods are readily available. The methods are demonstrated here on geologic calcite (CaCO3) and used to investigate the prismatic layer of a mollusk shell, Pinctada fucata. These XANES-PEEM data reveal multiply oriented nanocrystals within calcite prisms, previously thought to be monocrystalline. The subdivision into multiply oriented nanocrystals, spread by more than 50°, may explain the excellent mechanical properties of the prismatic layer, known for decades but never explained. PMID:21693647

  15. Measurement and analysis of energy and angular distributions of thick target neutron yields from 110 MeV {sup 19}F on {sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, C.; Nandy, Maitreyee; Sarkar, P. K.

    2008-12-15

    Energy distributions of emitted neutrons were measured for 110 MeV {sup 19}F ions incident on a thick {sup 27}Al target. Measurements were done at 0 deg., 30 deg., 60 deg., 90 deg., and 120 deg. with respect to the projectile direction employing the time-of-flight technique using a proton recoil scintillation detector. Comparison with calculated results from equilibrium nuclear reaction model codes like PACE-2 and EMPIRE 2.18 using various level-density options was carried out. It is observed that the dynamic level-density approach in EMPIRE 2.18 gives the closest approximation to the measured data. In the Fermi-gas level-density approach the best approximation of the level-density parameter is a=A/12.0, where A is the mass number of the composite system. The trend in the angular distribution of emitted neutrons is well reproduced by the projection of the angular momentum on the recoil axis as done in the PACE-2 code.

  16. Determination of concentration and size distribution of black carbon in submicron aerosol from data of nephelometric measurements of angular scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valerii S.; Rakhimov, Rustam F.; Shmargunov, Vladimir P.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of determining the Black Carbon (BC) concentration and its size distribution in submicron aerosol from data of polarization spectronephelometric measurements of angular aerosol scattering is demonstrated for the first time. The data of simultaneous nephelometric and aethalometric measurements of BC concentration in wood smoke are compared. The inverse problem is solved from measurements of 40 polarization components of spectral coefficients of angular scattering, and aerosol filling factors and the imaginary part of the complex refractive indexes are determined for subfractions of ultrafine- (radii of 30-100 nm), fine- (100-430 nm), and coarse-disperse (430-770 nm) particles. Then the total BC concentration, its size distribution, and BC fraction are estimated in the approximation of homogeneous volume internal mixture of BC and nonabsorbing matter. The analysis shows that at the long evolution of smoke aerosol, nephelometric and aethalometric estimates of the BC concentrations are in a good agreement. The discrepancy averages about 16% for concentrations varying in a range 30-1000 μg/m3.

  17. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc. PMID:26981409

  18. Measurement and correlates of empathy among female Japanese physicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The measurement of empathy is important in the assessment of physician competence and patient outcomes. The prevailing view is that female physicians have higher empathy scores compared with male physicians. In Japan, the number of female physicians has increased rapidly in the past ten years. In this study, we focused on female Japanese physicians and addressed factors that were associated with their empathic engagement in patient care. Methods The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) was translated into Japanese by using the back-translation procedure, and was administered to 285 female Japanese physicians. We designed this study to examine the psychometrics of the JSE and group differences among female Japanese physicians. Results The item-total score correlations of the JSE were all positive and statistically significant, ranging from .20 to .54, with a median of .41. The Cronbach’s coefficient alpha was .81. Female physicians who were practicing in “people-oriented” specialties obtained a significantly higher mean empathy score than their counterparts in “procedure-” or “technology-oriented” specialties. In addition, physicians who reported living with their parents in an extended family or living close to their parents, scored higher on the JSE than those who were living alone or in a nuclear family. Conclusions Our results provide support for the measurement property and reliability of the JSE in a sample of female Japanese physicians. The observed group differences associated with specialties and living arrangement may have implications for sustaining empathy. In addition, recognizing these factors that reinforce physicians’ empathy may help physicians to avoid career burnout. PMID:22726449

  19. Structure of low-lying states in 128Ba from gamma-gamma angular correlations and polarization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Zamfir, N.V.; Caprio, M.A.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D.S.; Pietralla, N.; Gill, R.L.; Casten, R.F.; Beausang, C.W.; Kruecken, R.; Zyromski, K.E.; Barton, C.J.; Cooper, J.R.; Hecht, A.A.; Newman, H.; Novak, J.R.; Cederkall, J.

    2002-08-27

    A study of the low-lying levels of 128Ba was performed using three clover detectors in a compact arrangement. The decay properties of several low-lying states were investigated, spin assignments were made for two states, and several E2/M1 mixing ratios were determined.

  20. PRIOR GENETIC CORRELATIONS AND NON-MEASURED TRAITS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current international genetic evaluations are based on how related country populations are genetically (across-country genetic correlations). Those correlations may be influenced strongly by prior expectations that were not based on sound scientific principles. Objective methods to predict prior cor...

  1. Measuring Black Smoker Fluid Flow Rates Using Image Correlation Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, T. J.; Wilcock, W. S.; McDuff, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a desire to find non-invasive methods for obtaining time-series measurements of fluid flow rates through mid-ocean ridge black smokers, we are developing an image-based velocimetry technique that will provide this information through the analysis of video sequences showing the turbulent structures of black smoker effluent jets. Our ultimate goal is to develop an autonomous seafloor instrument suitable for use with a cabled seafloor observatory that can provide extended time-series measurements of black smoker discharge rates with little user intervention. The method we are developing is based on the two-dimensional cross-correlation of an array of overlapping subimages from two sequential image frames within a sequence. For each pair of images this yields a two- dimensional representation of the instantaneous velocity field in the imaged flow. For each video sequence, the set of these "image velocity fields" from all image pairs is temporally averaged to yield a smoothed representation of the time-averaged image flow field. A transformation is then applied to convert the image flow fields into a relative discharge rate. We have developed a computational algorithm to implement this technique and have successfully applied it to video sequences collected in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing the discharge of black smokers in the Main Endeavour field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge over the course of weeks and months. We are able to resolve velocity fields that are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by plume theory from 5 seconds of video (150 image pairs), but it is difficult to calibrate or assess the precision of the technique with field data alone. In order to address these issues, as well as refine the computational algorithm, we have conducted laboratory simulations of black smoker jets with known discharge rates over a range of Reynolds numbers. We have recorded these simulations to obtain video image sequences that are similar to those

  2. Effectively classically correlated state of a measured system and a bosonic measurement apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Camalet, S.

    2011-04-15

    We consider a multilevel system coupled to a bosonic measurement apparatus. We derive exact expressions for the time-dependent expectation values of a large class of physically relevant observables that depend on degrees of freedom of both systems. We find that, for this class, though the two systems become entangled as a result of their interaction, they appear classically correlated for long enough times. The unique corresponding time-dependent separable state is determined explicitly. To better understand the physical parameters that control the time scale of this effective disentanglement process, we study a one-dimensional measurement apparatus.

  3. Charge-multiplicity dependence of single-particle transverse-rapidity yt and pseudorapidity η densities and 2D angular correlations from 200 GeV p -p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Prindle, Duncan J.

    2016-01-01

    An established phenomenology and theoretical interpretation of p -p collision data at lower collision energies should provide a reference for p -p and other collision systems at higher energies, against which claims of novel physics may be tested. The description of p -p collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider has remained incomplete even as claims for collectivity and other novelties in data from smaller systems at the large hadron collider have emerged recently. In this study we report the charge-multiplicity dependence of two-dimensional angular correlations and of single-particle (SP) densities on transverse rapidity yt and pseudorapidity η from 200 GeV p -p collisions. We define a comprehensive and self-consistent two-component (soft+hard ) model for hadron production and report a significant p -p nonjet quadrupole component as a third (angular-correlation) component. Our results have implications for p -p centrality, the underlying event, collectivity in small systems and the existence of flows in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  4. Measuring spin correlations in optical lattices using superlattice potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, K. G. L.; Andersen, B. M.; Soerensen, A. S.; Bruun, G. M.; Syljuaasen, O. F.

    2011-10-15

    We suggest two experimental methods for probing both short- and long-range spin correlations of atoms in optical lattices using superlattice potentials. The first method involves an adiabatic doubling of the periodicity of the underlying lattice to probe neighboring singlet (triplet) correlations for fermions (bosons) by the occupation of the resulting vibrational ground state. The second method utilizes a time-dependent superlattice potential to generate spin-dependent transport by any number of prescribed lattice sites, and probes correlations by the resulting number of doubly occupied sites. For experimentally relevant parameters, we demonstrate how both methods yield large signatures of antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly repulsive fermionic atoms in a single shot of the experiment. Lastly, we show how this method may also be applied to probe d-wave pairing, a possible ground-state candidate for the doped repulsive Hubbard model.

  5. Laser-doppler-velocimetry measurements in a one and a half stage transonic test turbine with different angular stator-stator positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schennach, Oliver; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Marn, Andreas; Göttlich, Emil

    2007-08-01

    A one and a half stage transonic turbine was tested using a two component laser-doppler-velocimetry system. The measurements were carried out in order to record rotor phase resolved velocity, flow angle and turbulence distributions upstream and downstream of the second stator row at several different angular stator-stator positions (“clocking” positions). Altogether, the measurements downstream of the second stator were performed for ten different clocking positions and upstream of the second stator for two different clocking positions. These different clocking positions have a significant influence on the flow field upstream and downstream of the second stator. Furthermore error estimation and a discussion of the tracer particle response are discussed.

  6. Magnetic interactions in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd) studied by time differential perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S N

    2009-03-01

    Applying the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique we have measured electric and magnetic hyperfine fields of the 111Cd impurity in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr and Gd) showing antiferro- and ferromagnetism with unusually high ordering temperatures. The Cd nuclei occupying the Sc site show high magnetic hyperfine fields with saturation values Bhf(0) = 21 kG, 45 kG and 189 kG in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe, respectively. By comparing the results with the hyperfine field data of Cd in rare-earth metals and estimations from the RKKY model, we find evidence for the presence of additional spin density at the probe nucleus, possibly due to spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The principal electric field gradient component Vzz in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe has been determined to be 5.3 × 1021 V m-2, 5.5 × 1021 V m-2 and 5.6 × 1021 V m-2, respectively. Supplementing the experimental measurements, we have carried out ab initio calculations for pure and Cd-doped RScGe compounds with R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT). From the total energies calculated with and without spin polarization we find ferrimagnetic ground states for CeScGe and PrScGe while NdScGe and GdScGe are ferromagnetic. In addition, we find a sizable magnetic moment at the Sc site, increasing from ≈0.10 μB in CeScGe to ≈0.3 μB in GdScGe, confirming the spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The calculated electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine fields of the Cd impurity closely agree with the experimental values. We believe spin polarization of Sc 3d band electrons, strongly hybridized with spin polarized 5d band electrons of the rare-earth, enables a long range Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction between RE 4f moments which in turn leads to high magnetic ordering temperatures in RScGe compounds.

  7. Magnetic interactions in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd) studied by time differential perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S N

    2009-03-18

    Applying the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique we have measured electric and magnetic hyperfine fields of the (111)Cd impurity in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr and Gd) showing antiferro- and ferromagnetism with unusually high ordering temperatures. The Cd nuclei occupying the Sc site show high magnetic hyperfine fields with saturation values B(hf)(0) = 21 kG, 45 kG and 189 kG in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe, respectively. By comparing the results with the hyperfine field data of Cd in rare-earth metals and estimations from the RKKY model, we find evidence for the presence of additional spin density at the probe nucleus, possibly due to spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The principal electric field gradient component V(zz) in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe has been determined to be 5.3 × 10(21) V m(-2), 5.5 × 10(21) V m(-2) and 5.6 × 10(21) V m(-2), respectively. Supplementing the experimental measurements, we have carried out ab initio calculations for pure and Cd-doped RScGe compounds with R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT). From the total energies calculated with and without spin polarization we find ferrimagnetic ground states for CeScGe and PrScGe while NdScGe and GdScGe are ferromagnetic. In addition, we find a sizable magnetic moment at the Sc site, increasing from ≈0.10 μ(B) in CeScGe to ≈0.3 μ(B) in GdScGe, confirming the spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The calculated electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine fields of the Cd impurity closely agree with the experimental values. We believe spin polarization of Sc 3d band electrons, strongly hybridized with spin polarized 5d band electrons of the rare-earth, enables a long range Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction between RE 4f moments which in turn leads to high magnetic ordering temperatures in

  8. Theory and Measurement of Partially Correlated Persistent Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series methods can effectively estimate temporal surface changes induced by geophysical phenomena. However, such methods are susceptible to decorrelation due to spatial and temporal baselines (radar pass separation), changes in orbital geometries, atmosphere, and noise. These effects limit the number of interferograms that can be used for differential analysis and obscure the deformation signal. InSAR decorrelation effects may be ameliorated by exploiting pixels that exhibit phase stability across the stack of interferograms. These so-called persistent scatterer (PS) pixels are dominated by a single point-like scatterer that remains phase-stable over the spatial and temporal baseline. By identifying a network of PS pixels for use in phase unwrapping, reliable deformation measurements may be obtained even in areas of low correlation, where traditional InSAR techniques fail to produce useful observations. PS identification is challenging in natural terrain, due to low reflectivity and few corner reflectors. Shanker and Zebker [1] proposed a PS pixel selection technique based on maximum-likelihood estimation of the associated signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). In this study, we further develop the underlying theory for their technique, starting from statistical backscatter characteristics of PS pixels. We derive closed-form expressions for the spatial, rotational, and temporal decorrelation of PS pixels as a function of baseline and signal-to-clutter ratio. We show that previous decorrelation and critical baseline expressions [2] are limiting cases of our result. We then describe a series of radar scattering simulations and show that the simulated decorrelation matches well with our analytic results. Finally, we use our decorrelation expressions with maximum-likelihood SCR estimation to analyze an area of the Hayward Fault Zone in the San Francisco Bay Area. A series of 38 images of the area were obtained from C

  9. Angular distributions of molecular Auger electrons: The case of C 1s Auger emission in CO

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, S. K.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Cherepkov, N. A.; Bolognesi, P.; Feyer, V.; Lahmam-Bennani, A.; Casagrande, M. E. Staicu; Avaldi, L.

    2007-03-15

    The results of a study of the Auger-electron-photoelectron angular correlations in the case of the C 1s ionization of the CO molecule are presented and compared with theoretical calculations in the Hartree-Fock approximation based on the two-step model. The measurements have been performed at two photon energies, 305 and 318 eV, respectively, and at three angles of photoelectron emission relative to the light polarization vector: namely, 0 degree sign , 30 degree sign , and 60 degree sign . A general agreement is found between theory and experiment for the coincidence angular distributions and the relative magnitudes of the Auger-electron-photoelectron angular correlations. However, both experiment and theory show that the Auger-electron-photoelectron angular correlations are not sufficiently sensitive to the details of the Auger-electron wave function to allow a 'complete' Auger experiment in molecules. On the other hand, our calculations demonstrate that the Auger-electron angular distribution measured in the molecular frame is very sensitive to the individual contributions of different partial waves of the Auger electron. Therefore we conclude that the complete experiment for the Auger decay in molecules can be realized only measuring the Auger-electron angular distributions in the molecular frame.

  10. Reexamination of the purity entanglement measure: Peculiarities of a truly thermodynamic quantum correlation measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdalla, S.

    2015-12-01

    The purity entanglement measure introduced by Los Alamos group a decade ago is reexamined in the light of interesting features. The role played by purity, reaching a real thermodynamic limit, in detecting quantum phase transitions is studied with a different system, the bond-alternating X Y model in an external magnetic field. The properties of this system are described as well. By considering the dynamics of the original X Y model, we observe that nonergodicity is also grasped by the purity measure, in accordance with other quantum correlation measures that have no common physical or mathematical relation. Adiabaticity is not recovered from the dynamic to the static case, in accordance with one of the consequences of the celebrated Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  11. Non-Markovianity: initial correlations and nonlinear optical measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Arend G.; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    By extending the response function approach developed in nonlinear optics, we analytically derive an expression for the non-Markovianity in the time evolution of a system in contact with a quantum mechanical bath, and find a close connection with the directly observable nonlinear optical response. The result indicates that memory in the bath-induced fluctuations rather than in the dissipation causes non-Markovianity. Initial correlations between states of the system and the bath are shown to be essential for a correct understanding of the non-Markovianity. These correlations are included in our treatment through a preparation function. PMID:22753819

  12. Benefits of Time Correlation Measurements for Passive Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murer, David; Blackie, Douglas; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    The “FLASH Portals Project” is a collaboration between Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd (CH), the Atomic Weapons Establishment (UK), and the Joint Research Centre (European Commission), supported by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). The program's goal was to develop and demonstrate a technology to detect shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) more efficiently and less ambiguously by exploiting time correlation. This study presents experimental results of a two-sided portal monitor equipped with in total 16 4He fast neutron detectors as well as four polyvinyltoluene (PVT) plastic scintillators. All detectors have been synchronized to nanosecond precision, thereby allowing the resolution of time correlations from timescales of tens of microseconds (such as (n, γ) reactions) down to prompt fission correlations directly. Our results demonstrate that such correlations can be detected in a typical radiation portal monitor (RPM) geometry and within operationally acceptable time scales, and that exploiting these signatures significantly improves the performance of the RPM compared to neutron counting. Furthermore, the results show that some time structure remains even in the presence of heavy shielding, thus significantly improving the sensitivity of the detection system to shielded SNM.

  13. Atmospheric pollution measurement by optical cross correlation methods - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, M. J.; Krause, F. R.

    1971-01-01

    Method combines standard spectroscopy with statistical cross correlation analysis of two narrow light beams for remote sensing to detect foreign matter of given particulate size and consistency. Method is applicable in studies of generation and motion of clouds, nuclear debris, ozone, and radiation belts.

  14. Accuracy of visual estimates of joint angle and angular velocity using criterion movements.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Craig S; Knudson, Duane; Clayburn, Colby; Haywood, Philip

    2005-06-01

    A descriptive study to document undergraduate physical education majors' (22.8 +/- 2.4 yr. old) estimates of sagittal plane elbow angle and angular velocity of elbow flexion visually was performed. 42 subjects rated videotape replays of 30 movements organized into three speeds of movement and two criterion elbow angles. Video images of the movements were analyzed with Peak Motus to measure actual values of elbow angles and peak angular velocity. Of the subjects 85.7% had speed ratings significantly correlated with true peak elbow angular velocity in all three angular velocity conditions. Few (16.7%) subjects' ratings of elbow angle correlated significantly with actual angles. Analysis of the subjects with good ratings showed the accuracy of visual ratings was significantly related to speed, with decreasing accuracy for slower speeds of movement. The use of criterion movements did not improve the small percentage of novice observers who could accurately estimate body angles during movement. PMID:16060418

  15. The Internal Structure and Correlates of Some School Climate Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Gary D.

    J. M. Richards (1989) has demonstrated that when individuals' reports about environments are aggregated to create environmental measures, the use of coefficient alpha to estimate single occasion reliability can be misleadingly elevated and that alpha cannot distinguish an environmental measure from a "disguised measure of individual differences."…

  16. Measurement of the n-p elastic scattering angular distribution at E{sub n}=14.9 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Boukharouba, N.; Bateman, F. B.; Carlson, A. D.; Brient, C. E.; Grimes, S. M.; Massey, T. N.; Haight, R. C.; Carter, D. E.

    2010-07-15

    The relative differential cross section for the elastic scattering of neutrons by protons was measured at an incident neutron energy E{sub n}=14.9 MeV and for center-of-mass scattering angles ranging from about 60 deg. to 180 deg. Angular distribution values were obtained from the normalization of the integrated data to the n-p total elastic scattering cross section. Comparisons of the normalized data to the predictions of the Arndt et al. phase-shift analysis, those of the Nijmegen group, and with the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluation are sensitive to the value of the total elastic scattering cross section used to normalize the data. The results of a fit to a first-order Legendre polynomial expansion are in good agreement in the backward scattering hemisphere with the predictions of the Arndt et al. phase-shift analysis, those of the Nijmegen group, and to a lesser extent, with the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluation. A fit to a second-order expansion is in better agreement with the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluation than with the other predictions, in particular when the total elastic scattering cross section given by Arndt et al. and the Nijmegen group is used to normalize the data. A Legendre polynomial fit to the existing n-p scattering data in the 14 MeV energy region, excluding the present measurement, showed that a best fit is obtained for a second-order expansion. Furthermore, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms the general agreement in the backward scattering hemisphere and shows that significant differences between the database and the predictions occur in the angular range between 60 deg. and 120 deg. and below 20 deg. Although there is good overall agreement in the backward scattering hemisphere, more precision small-angle scattering data and a better definition of the total elastic cross section are needed for an accurate determination of the shape and magnitude of the angular distribution.

  17. Oil film thickness measurement and analysis for an angular contact ball bearing operating in parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Scott D.

    1986-01-01

    The capacitance method is used to estimate the oil film thickness in the Hertzian contact zone of an angular contact ball bearing operating in parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime is characterized by a transient film thickness and basic speed ratio (ball spin rate over combined race speed) and the formation of a friction polymer. The experimental apparatus tests 40 mm 108 H ball bearings in the counter rotating race mode at loads of 200 and 300 lb, a film parameter of 1.6 and nominal inner and outer race speeds of 38 and 26 rps, respectively. Experimental results are presented for the capacitance, thickness, and conductance of the oil film as functions of elapsed time and for the basic speed ratios as a function of elapsed time, load, and amount of lubricant applied to the test bearing. Results indicate that a friction polymer formed from the initial lubricant has an effect on the capacitance and basic speed ratio measurements.

  18. Measurement of dijet angular distributions and search for quark compositeness in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hartl, C; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Benucci, L; Cerny, K; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Beauceron, S; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F; Dias, F A; Dias, M A F; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Marinho, F; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dyulendarova, M; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xu, M; Yang, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhang, L; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Mahmoud, M A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Wyslouch, B; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Falkiewicz, A; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Xiao, H; Megrelidze, L; Roinishvili, V; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Ata, M; Bender, W; Erdmann, M; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Magass, C; Masetti, G; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heydhausen, D; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Rennefeld, J; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Thomas, M

    2011-05-20

    Dijet angular distributions are measured over a wide range of dijet invariant masses in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV, at the CERN LHC. The event sample, recorded with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb⁻¹. The data are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and yield no evidence of quark compositeness. With a modified frequentist approach, a lower limit on the contact interaction scale for left-handed quarks of Λ⁺ = 5.6 TeV (Λ⁻ = 6.7 TeV) for destructive (constructive) interference is obtained at the 95% confidence level. PMID:21668222

  19. Measurement of Dijet Angular Distributions and Search for Quark Compositeness in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Eroe, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Haensel, S.; Hartl, C.; Hoch, M.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.

    2011-05-20

    Dijet angular distributions are measured over a wide range of dijet invariant masses in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV, at the CERN LHC. The event sample, recorded with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb{sup -1}. The data are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and yield no evidence of quark compositeness. With a modified frequentist approach, a lower limit on the contact interaction scale for left-handed quarks of {Lambda}{sup +}=5.6 TeV ({Lambda}{sup -}=6.7 TeV) for destructive (constructive) interference is obtained at the 95% confidence level.

  20. Early prediction of mandibular third molar eruption/impaction using linear and angular measurements on digital panoramic radiography: A radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Rachninder; Kumar, Anand C.; Garg, Ranjana; Sharma, Sugandha; Rastogi, Trisha; Gupta, Vivek Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Background: The impaction rate is higher for the third molars than for any other tooth in modern human population. This study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the validity of linear and angular measurements on the digital panoramic radiograph as a reference for early prediction of mandibular third molar eruption/impaction. Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 200 subjects were selected based on their status of eruption of mandibular third molars; fully erupted (Group A), partially erupted (Group B), fully developed but not erupted (Group C) and partially developed groups (Group D). Each group comprised 50 subjects with 25 males and 25 females. Nine variables (linear measurements, angles, and ratios) were determined and measured bilaterally by two observers and values were compared between the study groups and genders. Results: The data thus obtained were analyzed for comparison among all the study groups. It was found that the difference in the mean values of lower eruption space (LES) measurements, α-angle (angle between long axis of the third molar and gonial-symphyseal plane) and β-angle (angle between long axis of mandibular second and third molars) were significant (P < 0.05). The mean values of mesiodistal width, LES-ramus, LES-Xi point and β-angle were found more in males than in females. No significant difference was observed between the sides. Conclusion: α- and β-angle together with LES measurements give the accurate information on early prediction of lower third molar eruption or impaction. PMID:27433048

  1. Analysis of the atmospheric aerosol size distribution information retrievable from near-limb angular radiance measurements taken on Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.

    1981-12-01

    Angular radiance measurements of the near-limb solar aureole were analyzed for information regarding the light-scattering aerosol particles in the atmospheric column above Mauna Loa, Hawaii. The Mauna Loa Observatory, located at 19/sup 0/ 33' N latitude, 155/sup 0/ 35' W longitude, and 3460 metres elevation, is in unpolluted air above the easterly trade wind inversion and has been designated as a site for the Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) program. Circumsolar radiance and polarization measurements have been collected on Mauna Loa since 1963 by the High Altitude Observatory (HAO), National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) as part of a program for the daily observation of the solar corona. Strip charts containing radiance measurements made from January 1976 through June 1978 were made available for this study. By the use of Mie scattering theory, generalized to treat the sun as a finite diameter light source with limb-darkening, a theoretical scattering matrix was calculated for observation angles between 17' and 300' measured from the center of the solar disk, and aerosol size parameters (2..pi..r/lambda) between 10 and 300. An information content criterion is presented, based on the expected relative norm of the measurement errors and on the eigenvalues of the radiance covariance matrix of the scattering matrix. The observed aureole radiance gradients and two test gradients were inverted to obtain aerosol size distributions using a constrained linear inversion algorithm.

  2. Correlation analysis of optical absorption cross section and rate coefficient measurements in reacting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.; Ogren, P.J.

    1992-08-31

    A technique was developed for determining relative importance and correlation between reactions making up a complex kinetic system. This technique was used to investigate measurements of optical absorption cross sections and the correlation between cross sections and measured rate coefficients. It is concluded that (1) species, initial conditions, and temporal regions may be identified where cross sections may be measured without interference from the kinetic behavior of the observed species and (2) experiments designed to measure rate coefficients will always be correlated with the absorption cross section of the observed species. This correlation may reduce the accuracy of rate coefficient measurements.

  3. The validity of an assessment of maximum angular velocity of knee extension (KE) using a gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takeshi; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Omuro, Kazuya; Inaba, Yasuko; Kojima, Motonaga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is more important to assess the muscular power of the lower extremities than the strength, no simplified method for doing so has been found. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the assessment of the angular velocity of KE using a gyroscope. Participants included 105 community-dwelling older people (55 women, 50 men, age ± standard deviation (SD) 75±5.3). Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationships between the angular velocity of KE and functional performance measurements, a self-efficacy scale and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The data from the gyroscope were significantly correlated with some physical functions such as muscle strength (r=0.304, p<0.01), and walking velocity (r=0.543, p<0.001). In addition, the joint angular velocity was significantly correlated with self-efficacy (r=0.219-0.329, p<0.01-0.05) and HRQOL (r=0.207-0.359, p<0.01-0.05). The absolute value of the correlation coefficient of angular velocity tended to be greater than that of the muscle strength for mobility functions such as walking velocity and the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. In conclusion, it was found that the assessment of the angular velocity of the knee joint using a gyroscope could be a feasible and meaningful measurement in the geriatrics field. PMID:22100108

  4. Characterization of S -T+ transition dynamics via correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, Christian; Foletti, Sandra; Umansky, Vladimir; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear spins are an important source of dephasing for electron spin qubits in GaAs quantum dots. Most studies of their dynamics have focused on the relatively slow longitudinal polarization. We present a semiclassical model and experimental data showing that the dynamics of the transverse hyperfine field can be probed by correlating individual Landau-Zener sweeps across the S -T+ transition of a two-electron spin qubit. The relative Larmor precession of different nuclear spin species leads to oscillations in these correlations, which decay due to dephasing of the nuclei. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling, oscillations with the absolute Larmor frequencies whose amplitude depends on the spin-orbit coupling strength are expected. These oscillations reflect rapid dynamics of the transverse hyperfine field, which are relevant for several qubit control schemes.

  5. Uncertainty principle for angular position and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Eric; Leach, Jonathan; Courtial, Johannes; Padgett, Miles

    2004-08-01

    The uncertainty principle places fundamental limits on the accuracy with which we are able to measure the values of different physical quantities (Heisenberg 1949 The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory (New York: Dover); Robertson 1929 Phys. Rev. 34 127). This has profound effects not only on the microscopic but also on the macroscopic level of physical systems. The most familiar form of the uncertainty principle relates the uncertainties in position and linear momentum. Other manifestations include those relating uncertainty in energy to uncertainty in time duration, phase of an electromagnetic field to photon number and angular position to angular momentum (Vaccaro and Pegg 1990 J. Mod. Opt. 37 17; Barnett and Pegg 1990 Phys. Rev. A 41 3427). In this paper, we report the first observation of the last of these uncertainty relations and derive the associated states that satisfy the equality in the uncertainty relation. We confirm the form of these states by detailed measurement of the angular momentum of a light beam after passage through an appropriate angular aperture. The angular uncertainty principle applies to all physical systems and is particularly important for systems with cylindrical symmetry.

  6. Potential for measurement of the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments using Correlated X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gundolf; Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew; Doniach, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    In vivo chromosomal behavior is dictated by the organization of genomic DNA at length scales ranging from nanometers to microns. At these disparate scales, the DNA conformation is influenced by a range of proteins that package, twist and disentangle the DNA double helix, leading to a complex hierarchical structure that remains undetermined. Thus, there is a critical need for methods of structural characterization of DNA that can accommodate complex environmental conditions over biologically relevant length scales. Based on multiscale molecular simulations, we report on the possibility of measuring supercoiling in complex environments using angular correlations of scattered X-rays resulting from X-ray free electron laser (xFEL) experiments. We recently demonstrated the observation of structural detail for solutions of randomly oriented metallic nanoparticles [D. Mendez et al., Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B 360 (2014) 20130315]. Here, we argue, based on simulations, that correlated X-ray scattering (CXS) has the potential for measuring the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments, on the scale of a few persistence lengths.

  7. Correlated optical measurements and plasmon mapping of silver nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Guiton, Beth S; Iberi, Vighter; Li, Shuzhou; Leonard, Donovan N; Parish, Chad M; Kotula, Paul G; Varela del Arco, Maria; Schatz, George C.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Camden, Jon P

    2011-01-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly growing field, yet imaging of the plasmonic modes in complex nanoscale architectures is extremely challenging. Here we obtain spatial maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of high-aspect-ratio silver nanorods using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and correlate to optical data and classical electrodynamics calculations from the exact same particles. EELS mapping is thus demonstrated to be an invaluable technique for elucidating complex and overlapping plasmon modes.

  8. Accuracy of photon correlation measurements on nonergodic samples.

    PubMed

    Schätzel, K

    1993-07-20

    Three different photon correlation methods are used to obtain the dynamic structure factor of nonergodic samples, such as glasses or gels. These methods are compared in terms of their statistical accuracies and applicabilities. The scheme suggested by Pusey and van Megen [Phys. A 157, 705 (1989)] appears to be the most efficient one, but it is restricted to Gaussian light with a completely frozen nonergodic component. PMID:20830020

  9. Reduction of Gun Erosion and Correlation of Gun Erosion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, Dave; Wercinski, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Gun barrel erosion is serious problem with two-stage light gas guns. Excessive barrel erosion can lead to poor or failed launches and frequent barrel changes, with the corresponding down time. Also, excessive barrel erosion can limit the maximum velocity obtainable by loading down the hydrogen working gas with eroded barrel material. Guided by a CFD code, the operating conditions of the Ames 0.5-inch gun were modified to reduce barrel erosion. The changes implemented included: (1) reduction in the piston mass, powder mass and hydrogen fill pressure; and (2) reduction in pump tube volume, while maintaining hydrogen mass. The latter change was found, in particular, to greatly reduce barrel erosion. For muzzle velocity ranges of 6.1 - 6.9 km/sec, the barrel erosion was reduced by a factor of 10. Even for the higher muzzle velocity range of 7.0 - 8.2 km/sec, the barrel erosion was reduced by a factor of 4. Gun erosion data from the Ames 0.5-inch, 1.0-inch, and 1.5-inch guns operated over a wide variety of launch conditions was examined and it was found that this data could be correlated using four different parameters: normalized powder charge energy, normalized hydrogen energy density, normalized pump tube volume and barrel diameter. The development of the correlation and the steps used to collapse the experimental data are presented. Over a certain parameter range in the correlation developed, the barrel erosion per shot is found to increase very rapidly. The correlation should prove useful in the selection of gun operating conditions and the design of new guns. Representative shapes of eroded gun barrels are also presented.

  10. High angular resolution slope measuring deflectometry for the characterization of ultra-precise reflective x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, F.; Buchheim, J.; Höft, T.; Fiedler, S.; Bourenkov, G.; Cianci, M.; Signorato, R.

    2012-07-01

    Slope measuring deflectometry has become a standard technique for inspection of ultra-precise reflective optical elements of synchrotron applications. We will report on the inspection of ultra-precise adaptive synchrotron mirrors (bimorph mirrors) to be used under grazing incidence condition. The measurements were performed at the BESSY-II Optics Laboratory of the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin using the nanometer optical component measuring machine (NOM). Based on the data obtained by the optical measurements, we in this paper simulate the characteristics of the achievable x-ray focus by ray tracing calculations, demonstrated in the case of bimorph mirrors of the EMBL MX1 beamline for macromolecular crystallography at DESY's synchrotron radiation source PETRA III in Hamburg.

  11. Communication: Direct comparison between theory and experiment for correlated angular and product-state distributions of the ground-state and stretching-excited O(3P) + CH4 reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakó, Gábor

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [H. Pan and K. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], we report a quasiclassical trajectory study of the O(3P) + CH4(vk = 0, 1) → OH + CH3 [k = 1 and 3] reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed angular distributions and cross sections correlated to the OH(v = 0, 1) + CH3(v = 0) coincident product states can be directly compared to experiment for O + CH4(v3 = 0, 1). Both theory and experiment show that the ground-state reaction is backward scattered, whereas the angular distributions shift toward sideways and forward directions upon antisymmetric stretching (v3) excitation of the reactant. Theory predicts similar behavior for the O + CH4(v1 = 1) reaction. The simulations show that stretching excitation enhances the reaction up to about 15 kcal/mol collision energy, whereas the O + CH4(vk = 1) reactions produce smaller cross sections for OH(v = 1) + CH3(v = 0) than those of O + CH4(v = 0) → OH(v = 0) + CH3(v = 0). The former finding agrees with experiment and the latter awaits for confirmation. The computed cold OH rotational distributions of O + CH4(v = 0) are in good agreement with experiment.

  12. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  13. Accounting for Correlations across Measures of Perspective Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Samuel P.

    This study examined the development of cognitive perspective taking skills and the lack of consistency across perspective taking measures in earlier studies. Four perspective taking measures were administered to 56 children between 4 and 10 years of age under two testing conditions. The high structure condition included multiple presentation of…

  14. Correlation measurements of light transmittance in polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimyak, P. P.; Nehrych, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    The methods of correlation optics are for the first time applied to study structure of liquid crystal (LC) - polymer (P) composites at various concentrations of LC and P. Their phase correlation function (PCF) was obtained considering LC-P composite as a random phase screen. The amplitude of PCF contains information about number of LC domains and structure of LC director inside of them, while a half-width of this function is connected with a size of these domains. We studied unpowered and powered composite layers with a thickness of 5 μm. As liquid crystal and polymer were used nematic LC E7 from Merck and photopolymer composition NOA65 from Norland. Concentration of polymer φP was varied in a range 10-55 vol. %. In good agreement with previous studies by SEM technique we detected monotone decrease of LC domains with concentration of polymer. With application of electric field, amplitude of PCF behaves differently for the samples with different polymer content. For the samples with φP>35 vol. % (samples having morphology of polymer dispersed LC), this dependence is monotonic. In turn, if φP<35 vol. % (samples with polymer network LC morphology), the amplitude of PCF non-monotonically depends on the applied voltage going through a maximum. The latter fact is explained by transformation of orientational defects of LC phase with the applied voltage.

  15. Role of Weak Measurements on States Ordering and Monogamy of Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng; Tian, Dong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The information-theoretic definition of quantum correlation, e.g., quantum discord, is measurement dependent. By considering the more general quantum measurements, weak measurements, which include the projective measurement as a limiting case, we show that while weak measurements can enable one to capture more quantumness of correlation in a state, it can also induce other counterintuitive quantum effects. Specifically, we show that the general measurements with different strengths can impose different orderings for quantum correlations of some states. It can also modify the monogamous character for certain classes of states as well which may diminish the usefulness of quantum correlation as a resource in some protocols. In this sense, we say that the weak measurements play a dual role in defining quantum correlation.

  16. Measurements of Rates, Asymmetries, and Angular Distributions in B -> K l+ l- and B -> K* l+ l- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hollar, Jonathan; /SLAC /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-09-21

    This dissertation describes studies of the rare decays B{sub d} {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B{sub d} {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} is either an e{sup +}e{sup -} or a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pair. These decays are highly suppressed in the Standard Model, and could be strongly affected by physics beyond the Standard Model. The authors measure the total branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub d} {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.34 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.03) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sub d} {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.17}{sup +0.19} {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}. In addition, they measure the partial branching fractions, relative abundance of muons to electrons, direct CP asymmetry, dilepton forward-backward asymmetry, and longitudinal polarization of the K* in these modes. They also search for the lepton flavor-violating decays B{sub d} {yields} Ke{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} and B{sub d} {yields} K*e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}. The measurements were performed at the SLAC PEP II storage ring running at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

  17. Uniaxial angular accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, A. V.; Shvab, I. A.

    1985-05-01

    The basic mechanical components of an angular accelerometer are the sensor, the damper, and the transducer. Penumatic dampers are simplest in construction, but the viscosity of air is very low and, therefore, dampers with special purpose oils having a high temperature stability (synthetic silicon or organosilicon oils) are most widely used. The most common types of viscous dampers are lamellar with meshed opposed arrays of fixed and movable vanes in the dashpot, piston dampers regulated by an adjustable-length capillary tube, and dampers with paddle wheel in closed tank. Another type of damper is an impact-inertial one with large masses absorbing the rotational energy upon collision with the sensor. Conventional measuring elements are resistive, capacitive, electromagnetic, photoelectric, and penumatic or hydraulic. Novel types of angular accelerometers are based on inertia of gas jets, electron beams, and ion beams, the piezoelectric effect in p-n junctions of diode and transistors, the electrokinetic effect in fluids, and cryogenic suspension of the sensor.

  18. Reaction mechanism in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system: Measurements and analysis of excitation functions and angula