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Sample records for angular dependent nexafs

  1. Structural vs electronic origin of renormalized band widths in TTF-TCNQ: An angular dependent NEXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, M.; Meyer, J.; Hoinkis, M.; Glawion, S.; Blaha, P.; Gavrila, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.; Claessen, R.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed angle-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the Auger electron yield mode on the correlated quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) in order to determine the orientation of the molecules in the topmost surface layer. We find that the tilt angles of the molecules with respect to the one-dimensional axis are essentially the same as in the bulk. Thus, we can rule out surface relaxation as the origin of the renormalized band widths which were inferred from the analysis of photoemission data within the one-dimensional Hubbard model. Thereby, recent theoretical results are corroborated which invoke long-range Coulomb repulsion as alternative explanation to understand the spectral dispersions of TTF-TCNQ quantitatively within an extended Hubbard model.

  2. Structural vs electronic origin of renormalized band widths in TTF-TCNQ: An angular dependent NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Sing, M.; Meyer, J.; Glawion, S.; Claessen, R.; Hoinkis, M.; Blaha, P.; Gavrila, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2007-12-15

    We have performed angle-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the Auger electron yield mode on the correlated quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) in order to determine the orientation of the molecules in the topmost surface layer. We find that the tilt angles of the molecules with respect to the one-dimensional axis are essentially the same as in the bulk. Thus, we can rule out surface relaxation as the origin of the renormalized band widths which were inferred from the analysis of photoemission data within the one-dimensional Hubbard model. Thereby, recent theoretical results are corroborated which invoke long-range Coulomb repulsion as alternative explanation to understand the spectral dispersions of TTF-TCNQ quantitatively within an extended Hubbard model.

  3. Nature of the empty states and signature of the charge density wave instability and upper Peierls transition of TTF-TCNQ by temperature-dependent NEXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernenkaya, Alisa; Medjanik, Katerina; Nagel, Peter; Merz, Michael; Schuppler, Stefan; Canadell, Enric; Pouget, Jean-Paul; Schönhense, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of TTF-TCNQ was studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in order to detect a spectroscopic signature of the phase transitions, especially that occurring at 54 K, which is related to a Peierls gap opening on the TCNQ stacks. All unoccupied TCNQ orbitals predicted by first-principles calculations and, in particular the pair σ ∗( π( a g , b 3 u )), located in the cyano groups, are clearly resolved in our experimental data. The latter orbital was observed for the first time in our NEXAFS spectra. The temperature dependence of NEXAFS peak intensities gives evidence of a subtle modification of the electronic structure when the charge density wave (CDW) fluctuations develop as the Peierls transition of the TCNQ stacks is approached from higher temperatures. These changes are explained on the basis of the charge transfer, the shape of the lower empty TCNQ molecular orbitals and the deformation of TCNQ during the pre-transitional CDW fluctuations. Finally the data suggest that the internal stack deformation consisting in a substantial out of plane displacement of the central ring with respect to the cyano-groups allows to gain C α -C α bonding energy which helps the stabilization of the Peierls transition on the TCNQ stack.

  4. Angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.; Dines, E.L.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Lisle, J.C.; Schmitt, R.P.; Majka, Z.; Nebbia, G.

    1987-12-01

    The angular momentum dependence of large fragment production in long-lived reactions is studied by measurements of fragment cross sections from reactions with substantially different angular momentum distributions and the coincident ..gamma..-ray multiplicity distributions. The results indicate that the primary l-wave distributions move to larger mean values and decrease in width and skewness with increasing mass symmetry in the decay channel. The results also confirm that the partition of angular momentum kinetic energy relaxed heavy-ion reactions is that expected for a rigidly rotating intermediate.

  5. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  6. Angular dependent light emission from planar waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Jaison; Prabhu, Radhakrishna; Radhakrishnan, P.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-01-07

    We have investigated the angular dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and laser emission from an asymmetric and free-standing polymer thin films doped with rhodamine 6G, which is transversely pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A semi-leaky waveguide or quasi-waveguide structure has been developed by spin coating technique. In these waveguides, the light was confined by the film/air-film/glass substrate interfaces. At the film/substrate interface, a portion of light will reflect back into the film (guided mode) and the remaining refracted to the substrate resulting in cutoff modes. A blue-shift in ASE has been observed when the pump power was increased from 8 to 20 mW allowing a limited range of tuning of emission wavelength. To study the directionality of the ASE from the waveguide, we have measured the output intensity and FWHM of emission spectra as a function of viewing angle (θ) from the plane parallel to film. From the detailed examination of the output emission spectra, as +θ increases from 0° there has been an initial decrease in output intensity, but at a particular angle ≈10° an increase in output intensity was observed. This additional peak in output intensity as +θ is a clear indication of coexistence of the cutoff mode. We also present a compact solid-state laser based on leaky mode propagation from the dye-doped polymer free-standing film (∼50 μm thickness) waveguide. The partial reflections from the broad lateral surfaces of the free-standing films provided the optical feedback for the laser emission with high directionality. For a pump power of 22 mW, an intense line with FWHM <0.2 nm was observed at 578 nm.

  7. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Steven S.-L. Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-07

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  8. The angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sobtka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.; Dines, E.L.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Schmitt, R.P.; Majka, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Griffin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Large fragment (A > 4) production at high angular momentum is studied via the reaction, 200 MeV /sup 45/Sc + /sup 65/Cu. Comparisons of the fragment yields from this reaction (high angular momentum) to those from /sup 93/Nb + Be (low angular momentum) are used to verify the strong angular momentum dependence of large fragment production predicted by equilibrium models. Details of the coincident ..gamma..-ray distributions not only confirm a rigidly rotating intermediate but also indicate that the widths of the primary L-wave distributions decrease with increasing symmetry in the decay channel. These data are used to test the asymmetry and L-wave dependence of emission barriers calculated from a rotating, finite range corrected, liquid drop model. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Modeling of the angular dependence of plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wei; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2009-11-15

    An understanding of the angular dependence of etching yield is essential to investigate the origins of sidewall roughness during plasma etching. In this article the angular dependence of polysilicon etching in Cl{sub 2} plasma was modeled as a combination of individual angular-dependent etching yields for ion-initiated processes including physical sputtering, ion-induced etching, vacancy generation, and removal. The modeled etching yield exhibited a maximum at {approx}60 degree sign off-normal ion angle at low flux ratio, indicative of physical sputtering. It transformed to the angular dependence of ion-induced etching with the increase in the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiments was achieved for various flux ratios and ion energies. The variation of etching yield in response to the ion angle was incorporated in the three-dimensional profile simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained. The surface composition was calculated and compared to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The modeling indicated a Cl areal density of 3x10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} on the surface that is close to the value determined by the XPS analysis. The response of Cl fraction to ion energy and flux ratio was modeled and correlated with the etching yields. The complete mixing-layer kinetics model with the angular dependence effect will be used for quantitative surface roughening analysis using a profile simulator in future work.

  10. Angular dose dependence of Matrixx TM and its calibration.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberger, Luciant D; Wagar, Matthew; Nitsch, Paige; Bhagwat, Mandar S; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    One of the applications of MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry) is experimental verification of dose for IMRT, VMAT, and tomotherapy. For cumulative plan verification, dose is delivered for all the treatment gantry angles to a stationary detector. Experimental calibration of MatriXX detector recommended by the manufacturer involves only AP calibration fields and does not address angular dependency of MatriXX. Angular dependency may introduce dose bias in cumulative plan verification if not corrected. For this reason, we characterized angular dependency of MatriXX and developed a method for its calibration. We found relatively large discrepancies in responses to posterior vs. anterior fields for four MatriXX (Evolution series) detectors (up to 11%), and relatively large variability of responses as a function of gantry angle in the gantry angle ranges of 91 degrees-110 degrees and 269 degrees-260 degrees. With our calibration method, the bias due to angular dependency is effectively removed in experimental verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. PMID:20160692

  11. Pump/Probe Angular Dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Richard; Campbell, Kaleb; Crescimanno, Michael; Bali, Samir

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) on angular separation between pump and probe field propagation directions in room-temperature Rb vapor. We observe the FWHM of the probe transmission spectrum and the amplitude of the EIT signal while varying the angular separation from 0 to 1 milliradian. Following the work of Ref., we examine potential applications in information storage and retrieval. We are grateful to Miami University for their generous financial support, and to the Miami University Instrumentation lab for their invaluable contributions.

  12. Time and 'angular' dependent backgrounds from stationary axisymmetric solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Obregon, Octavio; Quevedo, Hernando; Ryan, Michael P.

    2004-09-15

    Backgrounds depending on time and on angular variable, namely, polarized and unpolarized S{sup 1}xS{sup 2} Gowdy models, are generated as the sector inside the horizons of the manifold corresponding to axisymmetric solutions. As is known, an analytical continuation of ordinary D-branes, iD-branes allow one to find S-brane solutions. Simple models have been constructed by means of analytic continuation of the Schwarzschild and the Kerr metrics. The possibility of studying the i-Gowdy models obtained here is outlined with an eye toward seeing if they could represent some kind of generalized S-branes depending not only on time but also on an angular variable.

  13. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  14. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  15. Angular-dependent magnetization reversal processes in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, D. M.; Chadha, M.; Branford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetization reversal in interconnected kagome artificial spin ice structures has been studied through experimental MOKE measurements and micromagnetic simulations. This reversal is mediated by the propagation of magnetic domain walls along the interconnecting bars, which either nucleate at the vertex or arrive following an interaction in a neighboring vertex. The physical differences in these processes show a distinct angular dependence allowing the different contributions to be identified. The configuration of the initial magnetization state, either locally or on a full sublattice of the system, controls the reversal characteristics of the array within a certain field window. This shows how the available magnetization reversal routes can be manipulated and the system can be trained.

  16. Angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Lena R.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-04-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that combines tomography with conventional digital mammography. In developing DBT dosimetry, a direct application of mammographic dosimetry has appeal. However, DBT introduces rotation of the x-ray tube relative to the dosimeter, thus raising questions about the angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters. To measure this dependence, two ionization chambers, two solid-stated detectors, and one photodiode were rotated relative to an incident Mo/Mo x-ray beam. In this isocentric DBT simulation, the signal of each dosimeter was studied over an angular range of 180° for tube voltages of 26 to 34 kV. One ionization chamber was then modeled numerically to study the response to various monoenergetic beams. The results show that all dosimeters underestimate dose to varying degrees; solid-state detectors show the greatest angular dependence while ionization chambers show the least. Correction factors were computed from the data for isocentric DBT images using projection angles up to +/-25° these factors ranged from 1.0014 to 1.1380. The magnitude of the angular dependence generally decreased with increasing energy, as shown with both the measured and modeled data. As a result, the error arising in measuring DBT dose with a mammographic dosimeter varies significantly; it cannot always be disregarded. The use of correction factors may be possible but is largely impractical, as they are specific to the dosimeter, x-ray beam, and DBT geometry. Instead, an angle-independent dosimeter may be more suitable for DBT.

  17. Angular dependence of the nanoDot OSL dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Kry, Stephen F.; Sahoo, Narayan; Followill, David S.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs) are quickly gaining popularity as passive dosimeters, with applications in medicine for linac output calibration verification, brachytherapy source verification, treatment plan quality assurance, and clinical dose measurements. With such wide applications, these dosimeters must be characterized for numerous factors affecting their response. The most abundant commercial OSLD is the InLight∕OSL system from Landauer, Inc. The purpose of this study was to examine the angular dependence of the nanoDot dosimeter, which is part of the InLight system.Methods: Relative dosimeter response data were taken at several angles in 6 and 18 MV photon beams, as well as a clinical proton beam. These measurements were done within a phantom at a depth beyond the build-up region. To verify the observed angular dependence, additional measurements were conducted as well as Monte Carlo simulations in MCNPX.Results: When irradiated with the incident photon beams parallel to the plane of the dosimeter, the nanoDot response was 4% lower at 6 MV and 3% lower at 18 MV than the response when irradiated with the incident beam normal to the plane of the dosimeter. Monte Carlo simulations at 6 MV showed similar results to the experimental values. Examination of the results in Monte Carlo suggests the cause as partial volume irradiation. In a clinical proton beam, no angular dependence was found.Conclusions: A nontrivial angular response of this OSLD was observed in photon beams. This factor may need to be accounted for when evaluating doses from photon beams incident from a variety of directions. PMID:21858992

  18. Volume Dependence of Bound States with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Sebastian; Hammer, H.-W.; Lee, Dean

    2011-09-09

    We derive general results for the mass shift of bound states with angular momentum l{>=}1 in a finite periodic volume. Our results have direct applications to lattice simulations of hadronic molecules as well as atomic nuclei. While the binding of S-wave bound states increases at finite volume, we show that the binding of P-wave bound states decreases. The mass shift for D-wave bound states as well as higher partial waves depends on the representation of the cubic rotation group. Nevertheless, the multiplet-averaged mass shift for any angular momentum l can be expressed in a simple form, and the sign of the shift alternates for even and odd l. We verify our analytical results with explicit numerical calculations. We also show numerically that similar volume corrections appear in three-body bound states.

  19. Angular Dependence of Superconductivity in Superconductor / Spin Valve Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Alejandro; Safranski, Christopher; Krivorotov, Ilya; Wu, Chien-Te; Valls, Oriol

    2014-03-01

    The superconducting condensate in superconductor / ferromagnet (S/F) multilayers consists of singlet and triplet components. For a non-collinear state of magnetization of the multilayer, all three spin components Sz =(0 , +/- 1) of the triplet condensate are generally non-zero, which can result in a long range proximity effect in S/F multilayers. Indeed, the Sz = +/- 1 triplet components of the condensate are immune to pair breaking by the exchange field and, unlike the singlet and the Sz = 0 triplet components, they can penetrate deep into the ferromagnetic layers. Here we report measurements demonstrating magnetic control of the triplet component amplitude in Nb/Co/Cu/Co/CoOx superconducting spin valves. We find that for all values of the layer thicknesses employed in the experiment, Tc shows non-monotonic angular dependence with a minimum near perpendicular orientation of the Co layers. This drop in Tc is evidence of the enhanced long-range triplet amplitude in the maximally non-collinear configuration of the spin valve. We will present detailed measurements of the magnitude of this effect as a function of thicknesses of both Co and Cu layers of the spin valve. We will also compare our data to theoretical predictions of the angular dependence of Tc for this system.

  20. Engineering of angular dependence of high-contrast grating mirror for transverse mode control of VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    We present our recent activity on highly angular-dependent high contrast grating (HCG) for the transverse mode control of VCSELs. The modeling and the experiment show the design flexibility of HCG to manage the angular dependence of HCG. The optimized angular dependent HCG functions as a spatial frequency filter. We are able to use the engineered angular dependence of HCG for the transverse-mode control of VCSELs by filtering out high-order transverse-modes. We fabricated and characterized amorphous Si HCG mirrors, which clearly show the large angular dependence. We demonstrated single-mode 980nm VCSELs with a HCG mirror functioning as a spatial frequency filter.

  1. Angular Dependence of Quantum Oscillations in SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartstein, M.; Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y.-T.; Zeng, B.; Ciomaga Hatnean, M.; Harrison, N.; Zhu, Z.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J.-H.; Balicas, L.; Shitsevalova, N.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, S. E.

    Recent proposals of low-dimensional electronic states in the Kondo insulator, SmB6 have lead to renewed interest in the material. In this study we present quantum oscillation measurements of high quality single-crystals of SmB6. Magnetic torque was measured in magnetic fields up to 40 T, allowing the observation of quantum oscillation frequencies ranging from 50 T to 15,000 T in multiple samples prepared by different groups. The size and the angular dependence of the oscillations indicate the striking concurrence of an electronically insulating bulk and a large, bulk Fermi surface. Comparison of the measured oscillations with similar measurements of metallic rare-earth hexaborides supports such a Fermi surface. Our model, previously employed for the metallic hexaborides, describes large ellipsoidally distorted spheres centred at X-points of the Brillouin zone, and smaller ellipsoids positioned at neck points, and gives a good account of the observed frequencies.

  2. Nanoscale spectroscopy with polarized X-rays by NEXAFS-TXM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Peter; Bittencourt, Carla; Rehbein, Stefan; Umek, Polona; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris P.; Schneider, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is an essential analytical tool in material science. Combining NEXAFS with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) adds spatial resolution and the possibility to study individual nanostructures. Here, we describe a full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) that generates high-resolution, large-area NEXAFS data with a collection rate two orders of magnitude faster than is possible with STXM. The TXM optical design combines a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 1 × 104 with a spatial resolution of 25 nm in a field of view of 15-20 µm and a data acquisition time of ~1 s. As an example, we present image stacks and polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectra from individual anisotropic sodium and protonated titanate nanoribbons. Our NEXAFS-TXM technique has the advantage that one image stack visualizes a large number of nanostructures and therefore already contains statistical information. This new high-resolution NEXAFS-TXM technique opens the way to advanced nanoscale science studies.

  3. Angular distribution anisotropy of fragments ejected from methyl iodide clusters: Dependence on fs laser intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Kosmidis, C.

    2010-10-01

    The angular distribution of the fragment ions ejected from the interaction of methyl iodide clusters with 20 fs strong laser pulses is studied by means of a mass spectrometer. Three types of angular distributions, one isotropic and two anisotropic, have been observed and their dependence on the laser intensity has been studied. There is strong evidence that the ions exhibiting anisotropic angular distribution with a maximum in the direction parallel to the laser polarization vector are produced via an electron impact ionization process.

  4. Angular dependent transport of auroral electrons in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.; Anderson, H. R.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of auroral electrons through the upper atmosphere is analyzed. The transport equation is solved using a discrete-ordinate method, including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons (resulting in changes of pitch angle) and degradation in energy as the electrons penetrate into the atmosphere. The transport equation is solved numerically for the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle, and energy. In situ measurements of the pitch angle and energy distribution of precipitating electrons over an auroral arc provide boundary conditions for the calculation. Model calculations were carried out with various different phase functions for elastic and inelastic collisions to attempt changing the angular scattering, but the observed pitch angle distributions remain unexplained. It is suggested that mechanisms other than collisional scattering influence the angular distribution of auroral electrons at or below 300 km altitude in the low-energy domain.

  5. Depth and latitude dependence of the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1990-01-01

    One of the design goals for the dedicated helioseismology observing state located at Mount Wilson Observatory was the measurement of the internal solar rotation using solar p-mode oscillations. In this paper, the first p-mode splittings obtained from Mount Wilson are reported and compared with those from several previously published studies. It is demonstrated that the present splittings agree quite well with composite frequency splittings obtained from the comparisons. The splittings suggest that the angular velocity in the solar equatorial plane is a function of depth below the photosphere. The latitudinal differential rotation pattern visible at the surface appears to persist at least throughout the solar convection zone.

  6. Density functional theory study of NEXAFS spectra of 4-methylbenzenethiol molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiuneng; Wang, Guangwei; Ma, Yong; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Xu, Shicai; Wang, Chuankui

    2016-02-01

    We have employed density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectroscopy of 4-methylbenzenethiol (4-MBT) on gold surface. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectra of 4-MBT at different orientation angles are systematically analyzed. The π* resonance at 285 eV, which is the result of the transitions from 1s orbitals of carbon atoms in benzene ring to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), is selected to study the orientation of 4-MBT molecule on the gold surface. In comparison with the experimental results, it is found that the benzene ring of 4-MBT is tilted by 33° with respect to the gold surface.

  7. Sensitivity in frequency dependent angular rotation of optical vortices.

    PubMed

    Rumala, Yisa S

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity (and resolution) of a coherent superposition of optical vortices emerging from a single spiral phase plate (SPP) device when light's optical frequency (or wavelength) going into the SPP device is varied. The paper discusses the generation and measurement of ultrasmall rotation. Factors that affect the ability to perform precision rotation measurements include the linewidth and stability of the input light source, the number of photon counts making position rotation measurements on the CCD detector, SPP reflectivity, the length of SPP device, and the angular modulation frequency of the intensity pattern due to a coherent superposition of optical vortices in a single SPP device. This paper also discusses parameters to obtain a high-sensitivity single shot measurement and multiple measurements. Furthermore, it presents what I believe is a new scaling showing the enhancement in sensitivity (and resolution) in the standard quantum limit and Heisenberg limit. With experimentally realizable parameters, there is an enhancement of rotation sensitivity by at least one order of magnitude compared to previous rotation measurements with optical vortices. Understanding robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity in an SPP device is important to metrology in general and for building compact SPP sensors such as gyroscopes, molecular sensors, and thermal sensors. PMID:26974798

  8. Angular dependence of surfactant-mediated forces between carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Müter, Dirk; Angelikopoulos, Panagiotis; Bock, Henry

    2012-12-27

    We employ dissipative particle dynamics to examine surfactant-mediated forces between two carbon nanotubes. Calculations are performed varying both the distance and the angle between the nanotubes. For small distances, a repulsive region is observed, followed by an overall attractive interval with strong oscillations in the force. Decreasing the angle between the tubes leads to a steady increase in the force, but the relative dependence on the separation distance is preserved. We find that the force scales linearly with the size of the overlap area between the tubes. This allows us to express the angle dependence by a simple equation, whereas the distance dependence is represented by a master curve. For the parallel case, the behavior is significantly different. PMID:23116052

  9. Higher order treatment on temporal derivative of angular flux for time-dependent MOC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Kamiyama, Y.; Kirimura, K.

    2013-07-01

    A new kinetic analysis method, whose angular dependence of temporal derivative for angular flux is accurately treated within practical memory requirement, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, the computational resources, i.e., the memory capacity, can be still a crucial problem for rigorous kinetic calculations using MOC. In the straightforward approach for kinetic calculation using MOC, the segment-averaged angular fluxes should be stored on the memory in order to explicitly calculate the temporal derivative of the angular flux, which would require huge memory. Thus, in the conventional kinetic calculation code using MOC, the temporal derivative of the angular flux has been approximated as angularly isotropic in order to reduce the memory requirement (isotropic assumption). However, the approximation error caused by the conventional isotropic assumption has not been thoroughly and quantitatively investigated so far and an accurate kinetic calculation method, which can quantitatively estimate the above approximation error within practical memory storage, has not been developed. The present study tries to address this issue with a newly developed approach. Effect of the approximate treatment for the temporal derivative of angular flux is evaluated through benchmark calculations. (authors)

  10. Generalization of Equivalent Crystal Theory to Include Angular Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-01-01

    In the original Equivalent Crystal Theory, each atomic site in the real crystal is assigned an equivalent lattice constant, in general different from the ground state one. This parameter corresponds to a local compression or expansion of the lattice. The basic method considers these volumetric transformations and, in addition, introduces the possibility that the reference lattice is anisotropically distorted. These distortions however, were introduced ad-hoc. In this work, we generalize the original Equivalent Crystal Theory by systematically introducing site-dependent directional distortions of the lattice, whose corresponding distortions account for the dependence of the energy on anisotropic local density variations. This is done in the spirit of the original framework, but including a gradient term in the density. This approach is introduced to correct a deficiency in the original Equivalent Crystal Theory and other semiempirical methods in quantitatively obtaining the correct ratios of the surface energies of low index planes of cubic metals (100), (110), and (111). We develop here the basic framework, and apply it to the calculation of Fe (110) and Fe (111) surface energy formation. The results, compared with first principles calculations, show an improvement over previous semiempirical approaches.

  11. A study of angular dependence in the ablation rate of polymers by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedder, James E. A.; Holmes, Andrew S.

    2006-02-01

    Measurements of ablation rate have traditionally been carried out only at normal incidence. However, in real-world applications ablation is often carried out at oblique angles, and it is useful to have prior knowledge of the ablation rate in this case. Detailed information about the angular dependence is also important for the development of ablation simulation tools, and can provide additional insight into the ablation mechanism. Previously we have reported on the angular dependence of direct-write ablation at 266 nm wavelength in solgel and polymer materials. In this paper we present a systematic study of angular dependence for excimer laser ablation of two polymer materials of interest for microfabrication: polycarbonate and SU8 photoresist. The results are used to improve simulation models to aid in mask design.

  12. An angular frequency dependence on the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, P.M.T.; Bakke, K.

    2015-10-15

    A quantum effect characterized by a dependence of the angular frequency associated with the confinement of a neutral particle to a quantum ring on the quantum numbers of the system and the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase is discussed. Then, it is shown that persistent spin currents can arise in a two-dimensional quantum ring in the presence of a Coulomb-type potential. A particular contribution to the persistent spin currents arises from the dependence of the angular frequency on the geometric quantum phase.

  13. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  14. Effects of angular dependence of surface diffuseness in deformed nuclei on Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Malov, L. A.; Scamps, G.; Lacroix, D.

    2014-09-01

    The angular dependence of surface diffuseness is further discussed. The results of self-consistent calculations are compared with those obtained with the phenomenological mean-field potential. The rather simple parametrizations are suggested. The effects of surface polarization and hexadecapole deformation on the height of the Coulomb barrier are revealed.

  15. Fit formulas for the angular dependence of the sticking coefficient of energetic hydrocarbon molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichmann, K.; von Toussaint, U.; Jacob, W.

    2011-08-01

    The angular dependence of the sticking coefficient of CHx projectiles on a prototypical amorphous hydrocarbon surface was studied using molecular dynamics. The resulting datasets are fitted to appropriate fit formulas to allow interpolation and lookup of sticking coefficients at arbitrary parameter values.

  16. Helicity-dependent angular distributions in double-charged-pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen Strauch

    2003-05-01

    Two-pion photoproduction in the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} has been studied at Jefferson Lab Hall B using a circularly-polarized tagged photon beam in the energy range between 0.6 GeV and 2.3 GeV. Owing to the large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector, complete beam-helicity-dependent angular distributions of the final-state particles were measured. The large cross-section asymmetries exhibit strong sensitivity to the kinematics of the reaction and provide valuable information on the reaction dynamics. Preliminary results are presented.

  17. Angular dependence of coercivity with temperature in Co-based nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran, C.; Espejo, A. P.; Palmero, E. M.; Escrig, J.; Vázquez, M.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic behavior of arrays of Co and CoFe nanowire arrays has been measured in the temperature range between 100 and 300 K. We have paid particular attention to the angular dependence of magnetic properties on the applied magnetic field orientation. The experimental angular dependence of coercivity has been modeled according to micromagnetic analytical calculations, and we found that the propagation of a transversal domain wall mode gives the best fitting with experimental observations. That reversal mode holds in the whole measuring temperature range, for nanowires with different diameters and crystalline structure. Moreover, the quantitative strength of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetization easy axis are determined to depend on the crystalline structure and nanowires diameter. The evolution of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with temperature for nanowires with different composition gives rise to an opposite evolution of coercivity with increasing temperature: it decreases for CoFe while it increases for Co nanowire arrays.

  18. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    SciTech Connect

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M. Arvanitidis, J.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ves, S.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.

    2015-02-21

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane (11{sup ¯}20) and semipolar s-plane (101{sup ¯}1) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup h} on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 2}{sup h} Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  19. Instability in the dense supernova neutrino gas with flavor-dependent angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2012-06-01

    The usual description of self-induced flavor conversions for neutrinos (ν's) in supernovae is based on the simplified assumption that all the ν's of the different species are emitted "half-isotropically" by a common neutrinosphere, in analogy to a blackbody emission. However, realistic supernova simulations show that ν angular distributions at decoupling are far from being half-isotropic and, above all, are flavor dependent. We show that flavor-dependent angular distributions may lead to crossing points in the angular spectra of different ν species (where F(ν(e))=F(ν(x)) and F(ν(e))=F(ν(x))) around which a new multiangle instability can develop. To characterize this effect, we carry out a linearized flavor stability analysis for different supernova neutrino angular distributions. We find that this instability can shift the onset of the flavor conversions toward low radii and produce a smearing of the splitting features found with trivial ν emission models. As a result the spectral differences among ν's of different flavors could be strongly reduced. PMID:23003940

  20. Angular dependence of hysteresis shift in oblique deposited ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupled bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. B.; Rodriguez-Suarez, R. L.; Michea, S.; Vega, H.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.; Aliaga, C.; Denardin, J.

    2014-07-01

    The angular dependence of the hysteresis shift has been investigated in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (NiFe/IrMn) bilayers grown by oblique deposition under the influence of a static magnetic field applied perpendicular to the uniaxial anisotropy direction induced during the growth process. It was found that at low oblique deposition angles, the unidirectional anisotropy field is much greater than the uniaxial anisotropy field and the corresponding anisotropies directions are noncollinear. In these conditions, the angular dependence of the hysteresis loop shift exhibits the well know cosine like shape but demanding a phase shift. Contrary to this, at high oblique deposition angle (70°), the uniaxial anisotropy plays the fundamental role and the anisotropies directions are collinear. In this case, the exchange bias displays a jump phenomenon. The numerical calculations are consistent with the experimental data obtained from magneto-optical Kerr effect and ferromagnetic resonance.

  1. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D.W. Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; C.W. de Jager; M.K. Jones; L.J. Kaufman; E.R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K.D. Paschke; C.F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I.A. Qattan; R.D. Ransome; P.E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E.C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G.M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Zhu

    2007-02-26

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  2. Dependence of electric potentials at trench surfaces on ion angular distribution in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palov, A. P.; Mankelevich, Yu A.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Baklanov, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    Ion-stimulated etching of dielectrics in radio frequency plasma results in positive charging of a trench bottom because of the significant difference in the angular distribution functions of ions and electrons. They are anisotropic for ions and quasi-isotropic for electrons. The charging leads to a decrease in the energy of the ions bombarding the trench bottom and to undesirable sputtering of the walls near the trench bottom because of the curving of the ion trajectories. This process is normally investigated by Monte Carlo methods in the absence of experimental data. In this paper the analytical dependence of the ion flux bombarding the trench bottom on a trench aspect ratio and ion angular distribution function is obtained. Numerical calculations of the electric potential on the trench bottom for a set of trench aspect ratios and angles of the ion angular distribution function were performed based on a Monte Carlo method to demonstrate the ion flux and electric potential correlated well with each other. The proposed formula for an ion flux is suggested to be helpful for analyzing charging the trenches with different aspect ratios in plasma with an arbitrary angular ion distribution function.

  3. Angular dependence of electromagnetic torque in a bulk high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postrekhin, Y. V.; Ma, Ki; Ye, Hong; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2002-05-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetic torque has been measured in cubic shaped YBaCuO samples. The bulk sample was prepared by a seeded-melt growth process in which a small NdBaCuO seed was used to induce domain growth of YBaCuO. The sample had cubic shape so that its edges coincided with basic crystallographic directions. The measurements were conducted in static and dynamic modes. Under static mode, the angular dependencies of the torque have been obtained in a series of zero field cooled magnetic hysteresis measurements. Between each measurement at a specific angle, the sample was warmed up above critical temperature. Under dynamic mode, the magnetic field was increased up to a certain point and then the sample was turned around its axis continuously. It was found that the static torque was a sinusoidal function of the double angle between the external field and one of basic directions of the crystal structure. It also exhibited prominent anisotropy in relation to the crystal structure of the high-temperature superconductor. The dynamic torque-angle relation is not only a result of the anisotropic structure of the superconductor but also a result of the strong intrinsic pinning of this material. Based on Kogan's theory for the anisotropic superconductors and the Bean model approach, a physical model has been developed to describe the angular dependence of the magnetic torque.

  4. Multiple-scattering distributions and angular dependence of the energy loss of slow protons in copper and silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, E. D.; Lantschner, G. H.; Eckardt, J. C.; Lovey, F. C.; Arista, N. R.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of angular distributions and of the angular dependence of the energy loss of 4-, 6-, and 9-keV protons transmitted through thin Cu and Ag polycrystalline foils are presented. By means of standard multiple-scattering model calculations it is found that a V(r)∝r-2.8 potential leads to significantly better fits of the angular distributions than the standard Thomas Fermi, Lenz-Jensen, or Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potentials. A theoretical model for the angular dependence of the energy loss based on considering geometric effects on a frictional inelastic energy loss plus an angular-dependent elastic contribution and the effects of foil roughness reproduces the experimental data. This agrees with previous results in Au and Al, therefore extending the applicability of the model to other metallic elements.

  5. Multiple-scattering distributions and angular dependence of the energy loss of slow protons in copper and silver

    SciTech Connect

    Cantero, E. D.; Lantschner, G. H.; Eckardt, J. C.; Lovey, F. C.; Arista, N. R.

    2010-04-15

    Measurements of angular distributions and of the angular dependence of the energy loss of 4-, 6-, and 9-keV protons transmitted through thin Cu and Ag polycrystalline foils are presented. By means of standard multiple-scattering model calculations it is found that a V(r){proportional_to}r{sup -2.8} potential leads to significantly better fits of the angular distributions than the standard Thomas Fermi, Lenz-Jensen, or Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potentials. A theoretical model for the angular dependence of the energy loss based on considering geometric effects on a frictional inelastic energy loss plus an angular-dependent elastic contribution and the effects of foil roughness reproduces the experimental data. This agrees with previous results in Au and Al, therefore extending the applicability of the model to other metallic elements.

  6. Energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions for 19F, 24Mg and 28Si induced reactions on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, M. B.; Utsunomiya, H.; Gelbke, C. K.; Lynch, W. G.; Back, B. B.; Saini, S.; Baisden, P. A.; McMahan, M. A.

    1983-09-01

    The energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions was measured for reaction induced by 19F, 24Mg, and 28Si on 208Pb over the range of incident energies of {E}/{A} = 5.6-10 MeV. For all three systems the angular distributions are inconsistent with the saddle point deformations of the rotating liquid drop model.

  7. Highly angular dependent high-contrast grating mirror and its application for transverse-mode control of VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shunya; Kashino, Junichi; Matsutani, Akihiro; Ohtsuki, Hideo; Miyashita, Takahiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-09-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a highly angular dependent high contrast grating (HCG) mirror. The modeling and experiment on amorphous-Si/SiO2 HCG clearly show the large angular dependence of reflectivity, which enables single transverse-mode operations of large-area VCSELs. We fabricate 980 nm VCSELs with the angular dependent HCG functioning as a spatial frequency filter. We obtained the single transverse mode operation of the fabricated device in contrast to conventional VCSELs with semiconductor multilayer mirrors.

  8. Influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in API5L steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ortiz, P.; Pérez-Benítez, J. A.; Espina-Hernández, J. H.; Caleyo, F.; Mehboob, N.; Grössinger, R.; Hallen, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    This work studies the influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of the energy of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal in three different API5L pipeline steels. The results show that the shape of the angular dependence of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise energy changes with the increase of the amplitude of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon is a consequence of the presence of unlike magnetization processes at different magnitudes of the applied magnetic field. The outcomes reveal the importance of controlling the value of the maximum applied field as parameter for the improvement of the MBN angular dependence measurements.

  9. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  10. Angular dependence of the spin textures in two-dimensional chiral magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Dan; Qi, Yang

    2015-05-28

    The angular dependence of spin textures in thin helimagnetic films is investigated by a Monte Carlo simulation. When an external field is applied at an angle relative to the film normal, we find that the skyrmion states with broken axis-symmetric structure are able to persist over a wide range of angles by changing the spin orientation. In addition, the uniaxial anisotropy is able to stabilize the distorted skyrmions. This behavior reflects the robust topological stability of skyrmion states in helimagnets and favors their application in spintronic devices.

  11. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  12. Angular-dependent interatomic potential for the aluminum-hydrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, F.; Mishin, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the development of an angular-dependent interatomic potential for hydrogen and the aluminum-hydrogen system. The potential reproduces properties of diatomic hydrogen gas, accurate solution energies of hydrogen atoms in crystalline Al, the energetic preference of the tetrahedral interstitial site occupation over octahedral, the hydrogen diffusion barrier in Al, and a number of other properties. Some of the results predicted by the potential have been tested by molecular dynamics simulations. It is suggested that the new potential can be used in atomistic simulations of the effect of dissolved hydrogen on deformation and fracture of Al, a problem which is relevant to hydrogen-induced degradation of Al alloys.

  13. Daily and seasonal performance of angularly dependent fixed mount dual aperture holographic planar concentrator photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Juan M.; Castillo, Jose E.; Aspnes, Eric D.; Kostuk, Raymond K.; Rosenberg, Glenn

    2010-08-01

    Dual aperture holographic planar concentrator (DA-HPC) technology consists of bifacial cells separated by strips of holographic film that diffract the light from the spacing into the cells for direct incident, diffuse, roof-reflected and albedo irradiance. The holographic film is angularly dependent of the seasonal sun angle. DA-HPC modules are compared to single aperture conventional modules for clear and cloudy days as well as for a seasonal period of eight months. Direct-current IV and alternating-current power curves are used to compare modules with comparable silicon active area and cell efficiency.

  14. Effect of angular velocity on sensors based on morphology dependent resonances.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amir R; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2014-01-01

    We carried out an analysis to investigate the morphology dependent optical resonances shift (MDR) of a rotating spherical resonator. The spinning resonator experiences an elastic deformation due to the centrifugal force acting on it, leading to a shift in its MDR. Experiments are also carried out to demonstrate the MDR shifts of a spinning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microsphere. The experimental results agree well with the analytical prediction. These studies demonstrated that spinning sensor based on MDR may experience sufficient shift in the optical resonances, therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Also the results show that angular velocity sensors could be designed using this principle. PMID:24759108

  15. Effect of Angular Velocity on Sensors Based on Morphology Dependent Resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amir R.; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2014-01-01

    We carried out an analysis to investigate the morphology dependent optical resonances shift (MDR) of a rotating spherical resonator. The spinning resonator experiences an elastic deformation due to the centrifugal force acting on it, leading to a shift in its MDR. Experiments are also carried out to demonstrate the MDR shifts of a spinning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microsphere. The experimental results agree well with the analytical prediction. These studies demonstrated that spinning sensor based on MDR may experience sufficient shift in the optical resonances, therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Also the results show that angular velocity sensors could be designed using this principle. PMID:24759108

  16. Improved angular momentum evolution model for solar-like stars. II. Exploring the mass dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.; Bouvier, J.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Understanding the physical processes that dictate the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars from birth to maturity remains a challenge for stellar physics. Aims: We aim to account for the observed rotational evolution of low-mass stars over the age range from 1 Myr to 10 Gyr. Methods: We developed angular momentum evolution models for 0.5 and 0.8 M⊙ stars. The parametric models include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetised stellar winds, specific dynamo and mass-loss rate prescriptions, as well as core-envelope decoupling. We compare model predictions to the distributions of rotational periods measured for low-mass stars belonging to star-forming regions and young open clusters. Furthermore, we explore the mass dependence of model parameters by comparing these new models to the solar-mass models we developed earlier. Results: Rotational evolution models are computed for slow, median, and fast rotators at each stellar mass. The models reproduce reasonably well the rotational behaviour of low-mass stars between 1 Myr and 8-10 Gyr, including pre-main sequence to zero-age main sequence spin up, prompt zero-age main sequence spin down, and early-main sequence convergence of the surface rotation rates. Fast rotators are found to have systematically shorter disk lifetimes than moderate and slow rotators, thus enabling dramatic pre-main sequence spin up. They also have shorter core-envelope coupling timescales, i.e., more uniform internal rotation. As for the mass dependence, lower mass stars require significantly longer core-envelope coupling timescales than solar-type stars, which results in strong differential rotation developing in the stellar interior on the early main sequence. Lower mass stars also require a weaker braking torque to account for their longer spin-down timescale on the early main sequence, while they ultimately converge towards lower rotational velocities than solar-type stars in the longer term

  17. Angular dependence of the attosecond time delay in the H 2 + ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, Anatoli; Serov, Vladislav

    2016-05-01

    Angular dependence of attosecond time delay relative to polarization of light can now be measured using combination of RABBITT and COLTRIMS techniques. This dependence brings particularly useful information in molecules where it is sensitive to the orientation of the molecular axis. Here we extend the theoretical studies of and consider a molecular ion H2+in combination of an attosecond pulse train and a dressing IR field which is a characteristic set up of a RABBIT measurement. We solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a fast spherical Bessel transformation (SBT) for the radial variable, a discrete variable representation for the angular variables and a split-step technique for the time evolution. The use of SBT ensures correct phase of the wave function for a long time evolution which is especially important in time delay calculations. To speed up computations, we implement an expanding coordinate (EC) system which allows us to reach space sizes and time periods unavailable by other techniques. Australian Research Council DP120101805.

  18. Angular dependence of the FMR linewidth and the anisotropy of the relaxation time in iron garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, A. V.; Shvachko, Yu. N.; Ustinov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the problem of extracting the contribution of the anisotropy of relaxation to the angular dependence of the FMR linewidth and to the opportunity of determining the values of the parameters of relaxation. The results of the FMR study of films based on the yttrium iron garnet prepared by the method of liquid-phase epitaxy are given. The orientational dependence of the linewidth has been calculated using the traditional method of measuring an FMR spectrum and a method based on scanning at an angle to the resonance field for obtaining the minimum linewidth. A model for calculating the linewidth has been proposed that takes into account the anisotropy of the relaxation term in the equation of motion of the magnetic moment. The model leads to a dependence that agrees well with the experimental data, which makes it possible to state that the anisotropy of relaxation most likely takes place in the samples under consideration at the temperatures employed.

  19. NEXAFS and XPS studies of nitrosyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Schio, Luca; Li, Cui; Monti, Susanna; Salén, Peter; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Feifel, Raimund; Alagia, Michele; Richter, Robert; Falcinelli, Stefano; Stranges, Stefano; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2015-04-14

    The electronic structure of nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) has been investigated in the gas phase by X-ray Photoelectron (XPS) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Cl 2p, Cl 2s, N 1s and O 1s edges in a combined experimental and theoretical study. The theoretical calculations at different levels of approximation predict ionization potential values in good agreement with the experimental data and allow us to assign the main features of the absorption spectra. An unexpected failure of the density functional model is, however, observed in the calculation of the Cl 2s binding energy, which is related to a large self-interaction error. Largely different photoabsorption cross-section patterns are experimentally observed in core excitations from the investigated quantum shells (n = 1, 2). This finding is confirmed by the oscillator strength distributions calculated at different absorption edges; in the case of the n = 2 shell the bands below the threshold are extremely weak and most of the absorption intensity is due to excitations in the continuum. PMID:25754872

  20. Relation between the alignment dependence of coercive force decrease ratio and the angular dependence of coercive force of ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yutaka; Kitai, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Seiichi; Hoshijima, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The relation of the coercive force decrease ratio (CFDR) and the angular dependence of the coercive force (ADCF) of ferrite magnets and their temperature properties were investigated. When we compared that against the angle of the magnetization reverse area obtained from these calculation results, which was obtained from the Gaussian distribution of the grain alignment and the postulation that every grain follows the Kondorskii law or the 1/cos θ law, and against the angle of the reverse magnetization area calculated from the experiment CFDR data of these magnets, it was found that this latter expanded at room temperature, to 36° from the calculated angle, for magnet with α=0.96. It was also found that, as temperature increased from room temperature to 413 K, the angle of the reverse magnetization area of ferrite magnets obtained from the experiment data expanded from 36° to 41°. When we apply these results to the temperature properties of ADCF, it seems that the calculated ADCF could qualitatively and reasonably explain these temperature properties, even though the difference between the calculated angular dependence and the experimental data still exists in the high angle range. These results strongly suggest that the coercive force of these magnets is determined by the magnetic domain wall motion. The magnetic domain walls are strongly pinned at tilted grains, and when the domain walls are de-pinned from their pinning sites, the coercive force is determined.

  1. Inference of stress and texture from angular dependence of ultrasonic plate mode velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Smith, J. F.; Lee, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory for the angular dependence of the ultrasonic wave velocity in a symmetry plane of an orthorhombic, stressed material is presented. The two waves having polarizations in this plane are shown to have velocities which can be estimated from measurements of the SH sub 0 and S sub 0 guided modes of a thin plate: the relationship being exact for the SH sub 0 mode and requiring a 10% correction for the S sub 0 mode at long wavelength. It is then shown how stress and texture can be independently inferred from various features of the angular dependence of these two velocities. From the SH sub 0 data, the ability to determine the directions and differences in magnitudes of principal stresses is described and supported by experimental data on several materials. From a combination of the SH sub 0 and S sub 0 data, a procedure is proposed for determining the coefficients W sub 400, W sub 420 and W sub 440 of an expansion of the crystallite orientation distribution function in terms of generalized Legendre functions. Possible applications in process control are indicated.

  2. Tailoring Rydberg interactions via Förster resonances: state combinations, hopping and angular dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Gorniaczyk, Hannes; Tresp, Christoph; Mirgorodskiy, Ivan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Förster resonances provide a highly flexible tool to tune both the strength and the angular shape of interactions between two Rydberg atoms. We give a detailed explanation about how Förster resonances can be found by searching through a large range of possible quantum number combinations. We apply our search method to SS, SD and DD pair states of 87Rb with principal quantum numbers from 30 to 100, taking into account the fine structure splitting of the Rydberg states. We find various strong resonances between atoms with a large difference in principal quantum numbers. We quantify the strength of these resonances by introducing a figure of merit {\\tilde{C}}3 which is independent of the magnetic quantum numbers and geometry to classify the resonances by interaction strength. We further predict to what extent excitation exchange is possible on different resonances and point out limitations of the coherent hopping process. Finally, we discuss the angular dependence of the dipole–dipole interaction and its tunability near resonances.

  3. Angular dependent potential for α-boron and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokatashkin, P.; Kuksin, A.; Yanilkin, A.

    2015-06-01

    Both quantum mechanical and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of α-boron are done at this work. Angular dependent interatomic potential (ADP) for boron is obtained using force-matching technique. Fitting data are based on ab initio results within  -20..100 GPa pressure range and temperatures up to 2000 K. Characteristics of α-boron, obtained using ADP potential such as bond lengths at equilibrium condition, bulk modulus, pressure-volume relations, Gruneisen coefficient, thermal expansion coefficient are in good agreement with both ab initio data, obtained in this work and known experimental data. As an example of application, the propagation of shock waves through a single crystal of α-boron is also explored by large-scale MD simulations.

  4. Unusual angular dependent magnetoresistance in single-crystalline Co/Pt bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Liang, J. H.; Sun, L.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of the single-crystalline Co/Pt(111) bilayers was studied systematically as a function of Co or Pt thickness at room temperature. For Co thickness dCo < 6 nm, the resistances with in-plane magnetization M parallel ( R∥ ) and transverse ( R⊥ ) to current and with a perpendicular M normal ( RP ) to film show the unconventional behavior of RP>R∥>R⊥ . This MR behavior can be attributed to the combination effect of spin Hall MR with RP≈R∥>R⊥ and the geometrical size effect. In addition, the angular dependent magnetoresistance behavior of the (111)-oriented Co/Pt bilayer shows striking difference with that of the (001)-oriented Co/Pt bilayer.

  5. On the angular dependence and scattering model of polar mesospheric summer echoes at VHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Svenja; Stober, Gunter; Chau, Jorge L.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular dependence of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). Our results are based on multireceiver and multibeam observations using beam pointing directions with off-zenith angles up to 25° as well as on spatial correlation analysis (SCA) from vertical beam observations. We consider a beam filling effect at the upper and lower boundaries of PMSE in tilted beams, which determines the effective mean angle of arrival. Comparing the average power of the vertical beam to the oblique beams suggests that PMSE are mainly not as aspect sensitive as in contrast to previous studies. However, from SCA, times of enhanced correlation are found, indicating aspect sensitivity or a localized scattering mechanism. Our results suggest that PMSE consist of nonhomogeneous isotropic scattering and previously reported aspect sensitivity values might have been influenced by the inhomogeneous nature of PMSE.

  6. Versatile, high sensitivity, and automatized angular dependent vectorial Kerr magnetometer for the analysis of nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, J. M.; Lusche, R.; Ventura, J.; Fermento, R.; Carpinteiro, F.; Araujo, J. P.; Sousa, J. B.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2011-04-01

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometry is an indispensable, reliable, and one of the most widely used techniques for the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. Information, such as the magnitude of coercive fields or anisotropy strengths, can be readily obtained from MOKE measurements. We present a description of our state-of-the-art vectorial MOKE magnetometer, being an extremely versatile, accurate, and sensitivity unit with a low cost and comparatively simple setup. The unit includes focusing lenses and an automatized stepper motor stage for angular dependent measurements. The performance of the magnetometer is demonstrated by hysteresis loops of Co thin films displaying uniaxial anisotropy induced on growth, MnIr/CoFe structures exhibiting the so called exchange bias effect, spin valves, and microfabricated flux guides produced by optical lithography.

  7. Angular-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations in Na0.48CoO2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F.; Liu, G. T.; Luo, J. L.; Wu, D.; Wang, N. L.; Xiang, T.

    2006-06-01

    We have measured the c -axis angular-dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) of a Na0.48CoO2 single crystal, with a magnetic field of 10T rotating within Co-O planes. Below the metal-insulator transition temperature at 40K , the AMR is dominated by a twofold oscillation due to the charge ordering. The fourfold and sixfold oscillations in AMR become pronounced below 25K . The presence of this fourfold oscillation is consistent with the picture proposed by Choy (cond-mat/0502164) that the Co lattice will split into two orthogonal sublattices with one occupied by Co3+ ions and the other by Co4+ ions in low temperatures. Embedded in these orthogonal sublattices, a hexagonal lattice, formed by Co4+ spins, leads to the sixfold oscillation in AMR.

  8. Angular dependence of metamagnetic transitions in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, P.C.; Budko, S.L.; Cho, B.K.; Lacerda, A.; Farrell, D.; Johnston-Halperin, E.; Kalatsky, V.A.; Pokrovsky, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed measurements of M(2 K, H, {theta}) of HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, where {theta} is the angle that the applied field H makes with the [110] axis while remaining perpendicular to the crystallographic c axis, reveal three metamagnetic transitions with angular dependences H{sub c1}=(4.1{plus_minus}0.1 kG)/cos({theta}), H{sub c2}=8.4{plus_minus}0.2 kG/cos({phi}), and H{sub c3}=(6.6{plus_minus}0.2 kG)/sin({phi}), where {phi}={theta}{minus}45 is the angle from the [100] axis. The high-field saturated moment, M{sub sat}{approx}10{mu}{sub B}cos{theta} is consistent with the local moments being confined to the [110] direction. The locally saturated moments for fields between H{sub ci} (i=1,2,3) also manifest angular dependences that are consistent with combinations of local moments along [110] axes. Analysis of these data lead us to infer that the net distribution of moments is ({up_arrow}{down_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}) for H{lt}H{sub c1}, ({up_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}) for H{sub c1}{lt}H{lt}H{sub c2}, ({up_arrow}{up_arrow}{r_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{r_arrow}) for H{sub c2}{lt}H{lt}H{sub c3}, and ({up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}) for H{gt}H{sub c3}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. NEXAFS Study of Air Oxidation for Mg Nanoparticle Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, S.; Murakami, S.; Shirai, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Ohta, T.; Yagi, S.

    2013-03-01

    The air oxidation reaction of Mg nanoparticle thin film has been investigated by Mg K-edge NEXAFS technique. It is revealed that MgO is formed on the Mg nanoparticle surfaces at the early stage of the air oxidation for Mg nanoparticle thin film. The simulation of NEXAFS spectrum using standard spectra indicates the existence of complex magnesium carbonates (x(MgCO3).yMg(OH2).z(H2O)) in addition to MgO at the early stage of the air oxidation.

  10. Angular radiation temperature simulation for time-dependent capsule drive prediction in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Longfei; Yang, Dong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Zhiwei; Li, Liling; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2015-02-15

    The x-ray drive on a capsule in an inertial confinement fusion setup is crucial for ignition. Unfortunately, a direct measurement has not been possible so far. We propose an angular radiation temperature simulation to predict the time-dependent drive on the capsule. A simple model, based on the view-factor method for the simulation of the radiation temperature, is presented and compared with the experimental data obtained using the OMEGA laser facility and the simulation results acquired with VISRAD code. We found a good agreement between the time-dependent measurements and the simulation results obtained using this model. The validated model was then used to analyze the experimental results from the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. More specifically, the variations of the peak radiation temperatures at different view angles with the albedo of the hohlraum, the motion of the laser spots, the closure of the laser entrance holes, and the deviation of the laser power were investigated. Furthermore, the time-dependent radiation temperature at different orientations and the drive history on the capsule were calculated. The results indicate that the radiation temperature from “U20W112” (named according to the diagnostic hole ID on the target chamber) can be used to approximately predict the drive temperature on the capsule. In addition, the influence of the capsule on the peak radiation temperature is also presented.

  11. A study of the angular dependence problem in effective dose equivalent assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.G.; Reece, W.D.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1995-02-01

    The newly revised American National Standard N13.11 (1993) includes measurements of angular response as part of personnel dosimeter performance testing. However, data on effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), the principle limiting quantity defined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 26 and later adopted by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for radiation incident on the body from off-normal angles are little seen in the literature. The absence of scientific data has led to unnecessarily conservative approaches in radiation protection practices. This paper presents a new set of fluence-to-H{sub E} conversion factors as a function of radiation angles and sex for monoenergetic photon beams of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV. A Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP) and sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms were used in this study. Results indicate that Anterior-posterior (AP) exposure produces the highest H{sub E} per unit photon fluence in all cases. Posterior-anterior (PA) exposure produces the highest H{sub E} among beams incident from the rear half-plane of the body. H{sub E} decreases dramatically as one departs from the AP and PA orientations. Results also indicate that overestimations caused by using isotropic dosimeters in assessing effective dose equivalent from near-overhead and near-underfoot exposures are 550%, 390%, and 254% for 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV, respectively. Comparisons of the angular dependence of H{sub E} with those based on the secondary quantities defined in International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Reports 39, 43, and 47 show significant differences. This paper discusses why more accurate assessments of H{sub E} are necessary and possible. An empirical equation is proposed which can be used as the optimum dosimeter angular response function for radiation angles ranging from 0{degrees} to 90{degrees} for dosimeter calibration, performance testing, and design. 27 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (δFC) and zero-field-cooled (δZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher δ-ratio (δ = δFC/δZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower δ-ratio, larger δFC and δZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  13. Modeling angular-dependent spectral emissivity of snow and ice in the thermal infrared atmospheric window.

    PubMed

    Hori, Masahiro; Aoki, Teruo; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sugiura, Konosuke; Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Niwano, Masashi

    2013-10-20

    A model of angular-dependent emissivity spectra of snow and ice in the 8-14 μm atmospheric window is constructed. Past field research revealed that snow emissivity varies depending on snow grain size and the exitance angle. Thermography images acquired in this study further revealed that not only welded snow particles such as sun crust, but also disaggregated particles such as granular snow and dendrite crystals exhibit high reflectivity on their crystal facets, even when the bulk snow surface exhibits blackbody-like behavior as a whole. The observed thermal emissive behaviors of snow particles suggest that emissivity of the bulk snow surface can be expressed by a weighted sum of two emissivity components: those of the specular and blackbody surfaces. Based on this assumption, a semi-empirical emissivity model was constructed; it is expressed by a linear combination of specular and blackbody surfaces' emissivities with a weighting parameter characterizing the specularity of the bulk surface. Emissivity spectra calculated using the model succeeded in reproducing the past in situ measured directional spectra of various snow types by employing a specific weighting parameter for each snow type. PMID:24216578

  14. A filter for reducing the angular dependence of LiF; Ti, Mg for beta radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports on an improvement in the angular dependence of LiF:Ti,Mg (TAD-100) for beta radiation which was achieved by using a special filter design which produced a constant dosimeter response over a range of +70{degrees} and {minus}70{degrees}. The filter material used was acetate. The filter design was tested with three different beta sources, Sr/Y-90, Tl-204 and Pm-147 with average energies of 0.8, 0.24 and 0.06 MeV, respectively. The average response at 180 degrees of the new filtered dosimeter differed by less than 5% when compared to the response at zero degrees. An average decrease in sensitivity of 53% for Sr-90, 70% for Tl-204 and 67% for Pm-147 was obtained due to filter use. All doses were calculated for a depth dose in tissue of 0.07 mm equivalent to 7 mg/cm{sup 2} as is recommended in ICRP Publication 26. A comparison of the energy dependence for a bare TAD-100 at 0.0 mm and 0.07 mm depth in tissue was obtained.

  15. An Analysis of the NEXAFS Spectra of a molecular crystal: alpha-Glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2010-06-18

    The nitrogen K-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectrum of alpha-crystalline glycine has been calculated for temperatures ranging from 0 K to 450 K. Significant temperature dependent spectral changes are predicted. The calculated room temperature spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. At high temperatures, molecular motions strongly influence the spectrum, as any unique spectrum from an individual instantaneous configuration does not resemble the experimental result or the average calculated spectrum; complex coupled motions in this prototypical molecular crystal underlie the observed spectral changes.

  16. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. Methods: The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. Results: No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433–0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42–2.58 g/cm{sup 3} and relative sensitivity of 0.92–1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. Conclusions: When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92–1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm{sup 3}. The angular dependence is not related to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  17. Angular Dependence of the Sharply Directed Emission in Organic Light Emitting Diodes with a Microcavity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Laih, Li-Hong; Lin, Chia-Ju; Hsu, Yu-Jen

    2002-04-01

    An optical microcavity structure was used in organic light emitting diodes. We succeeded in fabricating a device with sharply directed emission vertical to an emission surface. The device shows green emission (bright green) at normal position which turns red (bright red) at the 30° position. The angular dependences of the electroluminescence and the emission patterns versus viewing angle in the microcavity OLED were studied. The resonance wavelength λ decreases with viewing angle. The emission peak at 490 nm is directed vertically to the device surface more sharply than that at 632 nm. The microcavity structure shows non-Lambertian emission. The spectra appear more blue off-axis and the intensity of the green-like emission decreases rapidly with increasing viewing angle. A significantly narrow linewidth of 7.4 nm in the 0° direction for the 490 nm peak was observed. The full-widths at half maximum (FWHM) of the green-like spectra are much smaller than those of the red-like ones, indicating better cavity quality.

  18. Angular Dependence of the Facular-Sunspot Coverage Relation as Derived by MDI Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscuoli, S.

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the variation over the solar magnetic activity cycle of the area of facular/network features identified from broad-band and narrow-band imagery is positively correlated with the sunspot area and number, the relation being described as either linear or quadratic. On the other hand, the temporal variation of the spatial distributions of faculae, network and sunspots follows patterns that are less obviously correlated, so that we expect the relation that describes variation of the area coverage of different types of magnetic features to vary with the position over the disk. In this work we employ Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI) full-disk magnetograms acquired during solar cycle 23 and at the beginning of cycle 24 to investigate the relation between the coverage of magnetic elements characterized by different amounts of magnetic flux and located at different angular distances from disk center with the sunspot number. In agreement with some previous studies we find that daily data are best described by a quadratic function while data averaged over six months are best described by a linear function. In both cases the coefficients of the fits show large dependence on the position over the disk and the magnetic flux. We also find that toward disk center six-month averaged data show asymmetries between the ascending and the descending phases. The implications for solar irradiance modeling are discussed.

  19. Angular Dependence of the Facular-Sunspot Coverage Relation as Derived by MDI Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscuoli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the variation over the solar magnetic activity cycle of the area of facular/network features identified from broad-band and narrow-band imagery is positively correlated with the sunspot area and number, the relation being described as either linear or quadratic. On the other hand, the temporal variation of the spatial distributions of faculae, network and sunspots follows patterns that are less obviously correlated, so that we expect the relation that describes variation of the area coverage of different types of magnetic features to vary with the position over the disk. In this work we employ Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI) full-disk magnetograms acquired during solar cycle 23 and at the beginning of cycle 24 to investigate the relation between the coverage of magnetic elements characterized by different amounts of magnetic flux and located at different angular distances from disk center with the sunspot number. In agreement with some previous studies we find that daily data are best described by a quadratic function while data averaged over six months are best described by a linear function. In both cases the coefficients of the fits show large dependence on the position over the disk and the magnetic flux. We also find that toward disk center six-month averaged data show asymmetries between the ascending and the descending phases. The implications for solar irradiance modeling are discussed.

  20. Light Scattering by Fractal Dust Aggregates. I. Angular Dependence of Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Ryo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Kataoka, Akimasa; Nomura, Hideko

    2016-06-01

    In protoplanetary disks, micron-sized dust grains coagulate to form highly porous dust aggregates. Because the optical properties of these aggregates are not completely understood, it is important to investigate how porous dust aggregates scatter light. In this study, the light scattering properties of porous dust aggregates were calculated using a rigorous method, the T-matrix method, and the results were then compared with those obtained using the Rayleigh–Gans–Debye (RGD) theory and Mie theory with the effective medium approximation (EMT). The RGD theory is applicable to moderately large aggregates made of nearly transparent monomers. This study considered two types of porous dust aggregates—ballistic cluster–cluster agglomerates (BCCAs) and ballistic particle–cluster agglomerates. First, the angular dependence of the scattered intensity was shown to reflect the hierarchical structure of dust aggregates; the large-scale structure of the aggregates is responsible for the intensity at small scattering angles, and their small-scale structure determines the intensity at large scattering angles. Second, it was determined that the EMT underestimates the backward scattering intensity by multiple orders of magnitude, especially in BCCAs, because the EMT averages the structure within the size of the aggregates. It was concluded that the RGD theory is a very useful method for calculating the optical properties of BCCAs.

  1. Tomographic imaging of the angular-dependent coherent-scatter cross section.

    PubMed

    Westmore, M S; Fenster, A; Cunningham, I A

    1997-01-01

    A new special-purpose computed tomographic (CT) imaging system is described which produces images based on measurements of the low-angle (0-10 degrees) x-ray diffraction properties of an object. Low-angle scatter in the diagnostic x-ray energy range is dominated by coherent scatter, and the system uses first-generation CT geometry to acquire a diffraction pattern for each pencil beam. The patterns are used to reconstruct a series of images which represent the coherent-scatter intensity at a series of scatter angles. To demonstrate the potential of coherent-scatter CT (CSCT), the scanner has been built and used to image a phantom consisting of a water-filled Lucite cylinder containing rods of polyethylene, Lucite, polycarbonate, and nylon. In this paper, the system is described and a sequence of CSCT images of this phantom is shown. Coherent-scatter cross sections of these materials are generated for each pixel from this sequence of images and compared with cross sections measured separately. The resulting excellent agreement shows that the angular-dependent coherent-scatter cross section can be accurately imaged in a tomographic slice through an object. These cross sections give material-specific information about the object. The long-term goal of this research is to make measurements of bone-mineral content for every pixel in a tomographic slice. PMID:9029536

  2. A comparison of the angular dependence of effective dose and effective dose equivalent

    SciTech Connect

    Sitek, M.A.; Gierga, D.P.; Xu, X.G.

    1996-06-01

    In ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) Publication 60, the set of critical organs and their weighing factors were changed, defining the quantity effective dose, E. This quantity replaced the effective dose equivalent, H{sub E}, as defined by ICRP 26. Most notably, the esophagus was added to the list of critical organs. The Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code MCNP was used to determine the effective dose to sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms, developed in previous research, were modified to include the esophagus. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for monoenergetic photon beams of energies 0.08 MeV, 0.3 MeV, and 1.0 MeV for various azimuthal and polar angles. Separate organ equivalent doses were determined for male and female phantoms. The resulting organ equivalent doses were calculated from arithmetic mean averages. The angular dependence of effective dose was compared with that of effective dose equivalent reported in previous research. The differences between the two definitions and possible implications to regulatory agencies were summarized.

  3. Angular dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter and its impact on in vivo surface dose measurement in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Qin, S; Chen, T; Wang, L; Tu, Y; Yue, N; Zhou, J

    2014-08-01

    The focus of this study is the angular dependence of two types of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters (MOSFET20 and OneDose/OneDosePlus) when used for surface dose measurements. External beam radiationat different gantry angles were delivered to a cubic solid water phantom with a MOSFET placed on the top surface at CAX. The long axis of the MOSFET was oriented along the gantry axis of rotation, with the dosimeter (bubble side) facing the radiation source. MOSFET-measured surface doses were compared against calibrated radiochromic film readings. It was found that both types of MOSFET dosimeters exhibited larger than previously reported angular dependence when measuring surface dose in beams at large oblique angles. For the MOSFET20 dosimeter the measured surface dose deviation against film readings was as high as 17% when the incident angle was 72 degrees to the norm of the phantom surface. It is concluded that some MOSFET dosimeters may have a strong angular dependence when placed on the surface of water-equivalent material, even though they may have an isotropic angular response when surrounded by uniform medium. Extra on-surface calibration maybe necessary before using MOSFET dosimeters for skin dose measurement in tangential fields. PMID:24206205

  4. Measurement of Neutron-Induced, Angular-Momentum-Dependent Fission Probabilities Direct Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Jovanovic, Igor; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The surrogate method has previously been used to successfully measure (n , f) cross sections of a variety of difficult to produce actinide isotopes. These measurements are inaccurate at excitation energies below 1.5 MeV where the distribution of angular momentum states populated in the compound nucleus created by neutron absorption significantly differs from that arising from direct reactions. A method to measure the fission probability of individual angular momentum states arising from 239 Pu(d , pf) and 239 Pu(α ,α' f) reactions has been developed. This method consists on charged particle detectors with 40 keV FWHM resolution at 13 angles up and downstream of the beam. An array of photovoltaic (solar) cells is used to measure the angular distribution of fission fragments with high angular resolution. This distribution uniquely identifies the populated angular momentum states. These are fit to expected distributions to determine the contribution of each state. The charged particle and fission matrix obtained from these measurements determines fission probabilities of specific angular momentum states in the transition nucleus. Development of this scheme and first results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number 2012-DN-130-NF0001.

  5. Tunable angular-dependent magnetoresistance correlations in magnetic films and their implications for spin Hall magnetoresistance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. K.; Zhang, Y.; Gu, L.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, L.

    2016-02-01

    Angular-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) is considered to be intrinsic to spintronic materials, represented by the classical anisotropic MR (AMR) phenomenon and the recently emerged spin Hall MR (SMR). So far, isotropic AMR, AMR with geometric size effect and interfacial effect, and SMR have been treated separately to explain distinct MR correlations observed in various systems. Current study shows all four types of MR correlations can be reproduced in Fe thin films depending on the film thickness, texture, interface, and morphology. Results suggest previous explanations of the thin-film MR correlations are incomplete and it is inappropriate to use a specific MR angular-dependent correlation as the sole criterion in determining the origin of AMR or ascertaining the exclusive existence of SMR.

  6. Surrogate Reaction Measurement of Angular Dependent 239Pu (n , f) Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    The surrogate method has previously been used to measure (n , f) cross sections of difficult to produce actinide isotopes. These measurements have inaccuracies at excitation energies below 1.5 MeV where the distribution of angular momentum states populated in the compound nucleus created by neutron absorption significantly differs from that arising from direct reactions. A method to measure the fission probability of individual angular momentum states arising from 239Pu (d , pf) and 239Pu (α ,α' f) reactions has been developed. This experimental apparatus consists of charged particle detectors with 40 keV FWHM resolution at 13 angles up and downstream of the particle beam. A segmented array of photovoltaic (solar) cells is used to measure the angular distribution of fission fragments. This distribution uniquely identifies the populated angular momentum states. These are fit to expected distributions to determine the contribution of each state. The charged particle and fission rates matrix obtained from this analysis determines fission probabilities of specific angular momentum states in the transition nucleus. Development of this scheme and first results will be discussed.

  7. TXM-NEXAFS of TiO2-Based Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, P.; Bittencourt, C.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Umek, P.; Arcon, D.; Ewels, C. P.; Rehbein, S.; Heim, S.; Schneider, G.

    2011-09-01

    In this work, electronic properties of individual TiOx-pristine nanoribbons (NR) prepared by hydrothermal treatment of anatase TiO2 micro-particles were studied using the HZB transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) at the BESSY II undulator beamline U41-FSGM. NEXAFS is ideally suited to study TiO2-based materials because both the O K-edge and Ti L-edge features are very sensitive to the local bonding environment, providing diagnostic information about the crystal structures and oxidation states of various forms of titanium oxides and sub-oxides. TXM-NEXAFS combines full-field x-ray microscopy with spectroscopy, allowing the study of the electronic structure of individual nanostructures with spatial resolution better than 25 nm and a spectral resolution of up to E/ΔE = 10000. The typical image field in TXM-NEXAFS measurements is about 10 μm×10 μm, which is large compared to the individual nanoparticle. Therefore, one image stack already contains statistically significant data. In addition, the directional electric field vector (Ē) of the x-rays can be used as a "search tool" for the direction of chemical bonds of the atom selected by its absorption edge.

  8. Probing the anisotropic behaviors of black phosphorus by transmission electron microscopy, angular-dependent Raman spectra, and electronic transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wanglin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Fei, Zhen; Zhou, Jianguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Ze

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we correlated the angular dependence of the Raman response of black phosphorus to its crystallographic orientation by using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the intensity of the Ag 2 mode reached a maximum when the polarization direction of the incident light was parallel to the zigzag crystallographic orientation. Notably, it was further confirmed that the zigzag crystallographic direction exhibited superior conductance and carrier mobility. Because of the lattice extension along the armchair direction, an intensification of the anisotropic Raman response was observed. This work provides direct evidence of the correlation between anisotropic properties and crystallographic direction and represents a turning point in the discussion of the angular-dependent electronic properties of black phosphorus.

  9. Di-Hadron Angular Correlation Dependence on Leading Hadron Identity in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauder, Kolja

    A unique state of matter is created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). It displays the properties of a near-perfect liquid of quarks and gluons (partons) interacting collectively via the strong force. Properties of this medium can be explored using high-energy probes created in the form of back-to-back pairs (jets) in hard scatterings. A distinct feature of the QGP is jet quenching, which describes the large energy loss of such probes observed in measurements of hadron distributions in head-on heavy ion collisions. A more differential measurement of jet quenching is achieved using di-hadron correlations, where relative angular distributions are studied with respect to a leading (high energy) "trigger" hadron. Two striking features found in di-hadron correlations are the emergence of a long-range plateau on the near-side (at small relative azimuth), the so-called "ridge", and a broadening and deformation of the away-side, back to back with the trigger. Using 200 GeV central gold-gold and minimum bias deuteron-gold collision data collected by the STAR detector at RHIC, a systematic study of the dependence of di-hadron correlation structures on the identity of the trigger particle is carried out in this work by statistically separating pion from non-pion (i.e. proton and kaon) triggers, offering new insights into the hadronization mechanisms in the QGP. The jet-like yield at small relative angles is found enhanced for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference, while leading non-pions (protons and kaons) do not elicit such an enhancement. These findings are discussed within the context of quark recombination. At large angles, the correlated yield is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. Parameters extracted from two-dimensional model fits are used to test consistency with the constituent quark scaling assumptions

  10. Angular Dependence of Transport AC Losses in Superconducting Wire with Position-Dependent Critical Current Density in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xing-liang; Xiong, Li-ting; Gao, Yuan-wen; Zhou, You-he

    2013-07-01

    Transport AC losses play a very important role in high temperature superconductors (HTSs), which usually carry AC transport current under applied magnetic field in typical application-like conditions. In this paper, we propose the analytical formula for transport AC losses in HTS wire by considering critical current density of both inhomogeneous and anisotropic field dependent. The angular dependence of critical current density is described by effective mass theory, and the HTS wire has inhomogeneous distribution cross-section of critical current density. We calculate the angular dependence of normalized AC losses under different DC applied magnetic fields. The numerical results of this formula agree well with the experiment data and are better than the results of Norris formula. This analytical formula can explain the deviation of experimental transport current losses from the Norris formula and apply to calculate transport AC losses in realistic practical condition.

  11. Irreversible evolution of angular-dependent coercivity in Fe80Ni20 nanowire arrays: Detection of a single vortex state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhani, M.; Ramazani, A.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Samanifar, S.; Montazer, A. H.

    2016-09-01

    The irreversible evolution of magnetic coercivity in arrays of 75 nm diameter Fe80Ni20 nanowires (NWs) has been explored by means of first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis as a function of the angle between the magnetic field and the NW axis (0°≤θ≤90°). The Fe80Ni20 NWs with lengths up to 60 μm were fabricated using a pulsed electrodeposition method into hard-anodic aluminum oxide templates with an interpore distance of 275 nm. Investigating the interwire and intrawire magnetostatic interactions, the angular FORC (AFORC) diagrams indicated enhanced intrawire interactions with increasing length and θ (<90°), induced by a magnetization reversal through vortex domain wall (VDW) propagation. Intriguingly, in addition to the VDW mode, a single vortex state with broad irreversible switching of nucleation and annihilation fields was detected at θ=83° for 60 μm long NWs. At θ=90°, the NWs reversed magnetization through transverse domain wall, involving a reversible component by a fraction of 95%. Furthermore, the transition angle between the reversal modes was found to decrease with increasing aspect ratio from 200 to 800. The irreversible angular-dependent coercivity (HcIrrev(θ)) of Fe80Ni20 NWs was extracted from the AFORC measurements and compared with the major angular dependence of coercivity (HcMajor(θ)) obtained from the conventional hysteresis loop measurements. While HcMajor(θ) showed a non-monotonic behavior, HcIrrev(θ) constantly increased with increasing θ (<90°). On the other hand, using analytical models, a 93% agreement was obtained between the theoretical angular-dependent nucleation field and experimental HcIrrev(θ) for irreversible switching of VDW when 0°≤θ≤86°.

  12. Angular dependence of pump-induced bottomside and topside ionospheric plasma turbulence at EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, M. J.; MjøLhus, E.; Ashrafi, M.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T.; Nozawa, S.

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally observe the location and angular size of the high-frequency (HF) radio window in the bottomside ionosphere, which permits radio wave propagation to the topside ionosphere, with high angular resolution at the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) facility. HF pump-induced ion line enhancements were observed by the EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar on the ionospheric bottomside and topside. The radar zenith angle was scanned in small steps in the magnetic meridian. The HF pump duty cycle was deliberately kept low enough to minimize the growth of artificial field-aligned irregularities. The locations of the bottomside radio window and topside enhanced radar echoes are consistent with the expected position determined by ray tracing performed using the observed plasma densities.

  13. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T{sub c}-films

    SciTech Connect

    Geerkens, A.; Frenck, H.J.; Ewert, S.

    1994-12-31

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T{sub c}-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle {Theta} between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the {Theta}-rotation plane is discussed.

  14. Angular dependence of optical scattering in mixed nematic-cholesteric liquid crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oron, N.; Yu, J. L.; Labes, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The basic ternary cholesteric mixture used in the investigations reported contained by weight 1.1 parts of cholesteryl chloride, 0.9 parts of cholesteryl nonanoate, and 2.0 parts cholesteryl oleyl carbonate. Samples were prepared by adding a nematic dopant to the cholesteric mixture. Measurements of the wavelength of maximum scattering at different angles for the doped samples show that the angular color distortion is reduced with increasing concentrations of nematic dopant.

  15. RADIUS-DEPENDENT ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN LOW-MASS STARS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, Ansgar; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2012-02-10

    Angular momentum evolution in low-mass stars is determined by initial conditions during star formation, stellar structure evolution, and the behavior of stellar magnetic fields. Here we show that the empirical picture of angular momentum evolution arises naturally if rotation is related to magnetic field strength instead of to magnetic flux and formulate a corrected braking law based on this. Angular momentum evolution then becomes a strong function of stellar radius, explaining the main trends observed in open clusters and field stars at a few Gyr: the steep transition in rotation at the boundary to full convection arises primarily from the large change in radius across this boundary and does not require changes in dynamo mode or field topology. Additionally, the data suggest transient core-envelope decoupling among solar-type stars and field saturation at longer periods in very low mass stars. For solar-type stars, our model is also in good agreement with the empirical Skumanich law. Finally, in further support of the theory, we show that the predicted age at which low-mass stars spin down from the saturated to unsaturated field regimes in our model corresponds remarkably well to the observed lifetime of magnetic activity in these stars.

  16. Monte Carlo study of the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Klein, David; Beddar, A. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: By using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors investigated the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in photon beams. Methods: Three PSDs were modeled in this study: A plastic scintillator (BC-400) and a scintillating fiber (BCF-12), both attached by a plastic-core optical fiber stem, and a plastic scintillator (BC-400) attached by an air-core optical fiber stem with a silica tube coated with silver. The authors then calculated, with low statistical uncertainty, the energy and angular dependences of the PSDs’ responses in a water phantom. For energy dependence, the response of the detectors is calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose. The perturbation caused by the optical fiber stem connected to the PSD to guide the optical light to a photodetector was studied in simulations using different optical fiber materials. Results: For the energy dependence of the PSDs in photon beams, the PSDs with plastic-core fiber have excellent energy independence within about 0.5% at photon energies ranging from 300 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD with an air-core optical fiber with a silica tube also has good energy independence within 1% in the same photon energy range. For the angular dependence, the relative response of all the three modeled PSDs is within 2% for all the angles in a 6 MV photon beam. This is also true in a 300 keV monoenergetic photon beam for PSDs with plastic-core fiber. For the PSD with an air-core fiber with a silica tube in the 300 keV beam, the relative response varies within 1% for most of the angles, except in the case when the fiber stem is pointing right to the radiation source in which case the PSD may over-response by more than 10%. Conclusions: At ±1% level, no beam energy correction is necessary for the response of all three PSDs modeled in this study in the photon energy ranges from 200 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD would be even closer

  17. Angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment topolyatomic molecules: application to the 2B1 metastable state of the H2Oand H2S anions

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2006-01-12

    The angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to polyatomic targets is formulated in the local complex potential model, under the assumption that the axial recoil approximation describes the dissociation dynamics. An additional approximation, which is found to be valid in the case of H2O but not in the case of H2S, makes it possible to describe the angular dependence of DEA solely from an analysis of the fixed-nuclei entrance amplitude, without carrying out nuclear dynamics calculations. For H2S, the final-vibrational-state-specific angular dependence of DEA is obtained by incorporating the variation of the angular dependence of the entrance amplitude with nuclear geometry into the nuclear dynamics. Scattering calculations using the complex Kohn method and, for H2S, full quantum calculations of the nuclear dynamics using the Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree method, are performed.

  18. Investigation on the angular dependent reflectance of coupled high-contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroker, Stefanie; Käsebier, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    In this contribution we discuss configurations of stacked silicon high contrast gratings (HCGs) which are separated by a thin silicon dioxide grating such that they are coupled via their near-fields. For a given configuration altering incidence angle allows to either benefit from the optical performance of two separated HCGs or one single grating with enhanced thickness. This effect can serve to realize filters with tailored optical properties and for diffractive cavity couplers. We experimentally demonstrate the coupling effect on a stack of two HCGs for a wavelength of 1550nm and transverse-magnetic polarization. The investigated structure provides a nearly angular independent high reflectance.

  19. Aging induced changes on NEXAFS fingerprints in individual combustion particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, V.; Mooser, R.; Tritscher, T.; Křepelová, A.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Huthwelker, T.; Ammann, M.

    2011-11-01

    Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political) importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing of the combustion exhaust gases is still a subject of discussion. In this work, individual soot particles emitted from two different vehicles, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger car, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of NEXAFS spectra from the unprocessed particles and those resulting from exhaust photooxidation in the chamber revealed changes in the carbon functional group content. For the wood stove emissions, these changes were minor, related to the relatively mild oxidation conditions. For the EURO 2 transporter emissions, the most apparent change was that of carboxylic carbon from oxidized organic compounds condensing on the primary soot particles. For the EURO 3 car emissions oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging has likely contributed as well. Overall, the changes in the NEXAFS fingerprints were in qualitative agreement with data from an aerosol mass spectrometer. Furthermore, by taking full advantage of our in situ microreactor concept, we show that the soot particles from all three combustion sources changed their ability to take up water under humid conditions upon photochemical aging of the exhaust. Due to the selectivity and sensitivity of the NEXAFS technique for the water mass, also small amounts of water taken up into the internal voids of agglomerated particles could be

  20. Response of semicircular canal dependent units in vestibular nuclei to rotation of a linear acceleration vector without angular acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Benson, A. J.; Guedry, F. E.; Jones, G. Melvill

    1970-01-01

    1. Recent experiments have shown that rotation of a linear acceleration vector round the head can generate involuntary ocular nystagmus in the absence of angular acceleration. The present experiments examine the suggestion that adequate stimulation of the semicircular canals may contribute to this response. 2. Decerebrate cats were located in a stereotaxic device on a platform, slung from four parallel cables, which could be driven smoothly round a circular orbit without inducing significant angular movement of the platform. This Parallel Swing Rotation (PSR) generated a centripetal acceleration of 4·4 m/sec2 which rotated round the head at 0·52 rev/sec. 3. The discharge frequency of specifically lateral canal-dependent neural units in the vestibular nuclei of cats was recorded during PSR to right and left, and in the absence of motion. The dynamic responses to purely angular motion were also examined on a servo-driven turntable. 4. Without exception all proven canal-dependent cells examined (twenty-nine cells in nine cats) were more active during PSR in the direction of endolymph circulation assessed to be excitatory to the unit, than during PSR in the opposite direction. 5. The observed changes in discharge frequency are assessed to have been of a magnitude appropriate for the generation of the involuntary oculomotor response induced by the same stimulus in the intact animal. 6. The findings suggest that a linear acceleration vector which rotates in the plane of the lateral semicircular canals can be an adequate stimulus to ampullary receptors, though an explanation which invokes the modulation of canal cells by a signal dependent upon the sequential activation of macular receptors cannot be positively excluded. PMID:5501270

  1. Angular dependence in proton-proton correlation functions in central 40Ca + 40Ca and 48Ca + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, V.; Kilburn, M. A.; Chajęcki, Z.; Henzlova, D.; Lynch, W. G.; Brown, D.; Chbihi, A.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Danielewicz, P.; Desouza, R. T.; Famiano, M.; Herlitzius, C.; Hudan, S.; Lee, Jenny; Lukyanov, S.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sobotka, L. G.; Sun, Z. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Vander Molen, A.; Verde, G.; Wallace, M. S.; Youngs, M.

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of proton-proton correlation functions is studied in central 40Ca+40Ca and 48Ca+48Ca nuclear reactions at E/A=80 MeV. Measurements were performed with the High Resolution Array (HiRA) complemented by the 4π Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. A striking angular dependence in the laboratory frame is found within proton-proton correlation functions for both systems that greatly exceeds the measured and expected isospin dependent difference between the neutron-rich and neutron-deficient systems. Sources measured at backward angles reflect the participant zone of the reaction, while much larger sources observed at forward angles reflect the expanding, fragmenting, and evaporating projectile remnants. The decrease of the size of the source with increasing momentum is observed at backward angles while a weaker trend in the opposite direction is observed at forward angles. The results are compared to the theoretical calculations using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model.

  2. Angular dependent torque measurements on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Gao, B.; Ma, Y. H.; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    2016-08-01

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF (Ca1 1 1 1) single crystals. In the normal state, the torque data shows \\sin 2θ angular dependence and H 2 magnetic field dependence, as a result of paramagnetism. In the mixed state, the torque signal is a combination of the vortex torque and paramagnetic torque, and the former allows the determination of the anisotropy parameter γ. At T   =  11.5 K, γ (11.5 K ≃ 0.5 T c)  =  19.1, which is similar to the result of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2, γ ≃ 23 at T≃ 0.4{{T}\\text{c}} . So the 11 1 1 is more anisotropic compared to 11 and 122 families of iron-based superconductors. This may suggest that the electronic coupling between layers in 1 1 1 1 is less effective than in 11 and 122 families.

  3. Angular dependent torque measurements on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Gao, B; Ma, Y H; Li, X J; Mu, G; Hu, T

    2016-08-17

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF (Ca1 1 1 1) single crystals. In the normal state, the torque data shows [Formula: see text] angular dependence and H (2) magnetic field dependence, as a result of paramagnetism. In the mixed state, the torque signal is a combination of the vortex torque and paramagnetic torque, and the former allows the determination of the anisotropy parameter γ. At T   =  11.5 K, γ (11.5 K ≃ 0.5 T c)  =  19.1, which is similar to the result of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2, [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. So the 11 1 1 is more anisotropic compared to 11 and 122 families of iron-based superconductors. This may suggest that the electronic coupling between layers in 1 1 1 1 is less effective than in 11 and 122 families. PMID:27346165

  4. Angular dependences of the motion of the anisotropic flux line lattice and the peak effect in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.-J.; Lee, H.-S.; Kang, B.; Lee, H.-G.; Cho, M.-H.; Lee, S.-I.

    2008-12-01

    We have studied the angle-dependent motion of the anisotropic flux line lattice (FLL) and the peak effect (PE) in MgB2 single crystals. For arbitrary angles (θ), we measured the resistance (R(H)) and critical current (Ic(H)) with AC and DC currents, respectively. At low fields below the PE, R(H) and Ic(H) showed a weak angular dependence, regardless of the type of excitation current, because of the stable vortex state. At intermediate fields near the PE, R(H) and Ic(H) at the onset of the PE varied with θ, depending on the type of external current, due to the metastability of the disordered vortex lattice near the PE. At high fields above the PE and near the upper critical field Hc2, the R(H) curves showed a simple scaling behavior with θ.

  5. Angular dependence of electron emission induced by grazing-ion surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.; Otero, G. G.; Sánchez, E. A.; Grizzi, O.

    2004-04-01

    In this work, electron emission spectra produced by impact of fast protons on Al(111) surfaces are theoretically and experimentally studied. Contributions coming from the different electronic sources of the metal—atomic inner shells and valence band—are analyzed as a function of the angle of electron emission. In the forward direction, the inner-shell ionization process is the dominant mechanism. The valence emission, instead, becomes important when the ejection angle is separated from the specular-reflection direction. In both angular regions, theoretical and experimental values are in reasonable agreement. The energy shift and broadening of the convoy electron peak at glancing observation angles are well described by the present model, which takes into account the influence of the induced surface field on the ionized electron.

  6. Toward the measurement of angular dependence of in-plane ultrasonic properties of unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Boghosian, Jeffrey S.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2000-05-01

    Modern textile-based composite materials have complex fiber architectures, which present new challenges for ultrasonic characterization. As a step toward developing a measurement scheme for examining in detail the ultrasonic properties of textile composites, the present work addresses measurement of the angular dependence of the angular dependence of ultrasonic properties in unidirectional composite specimens. Cylindrical composite specimens of diameter 19 mm were fabricated, some with the fibers parallel to the cylinder axis and others with the fibers perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Additional specimens of varying diameters were made from acrylic. Small-diameter holes were drilled along the center axis of some specimens to serve as fiducial markers for the geometrical center of the cylinder. The measurement apparatus consisted of a ring of 100 matched transducers, spaced by 3.6°, facing the center of the ring. Each specimen was placed in turn at the center of the ring. Transmission measurements of attenuation and sound speed were performed by transmitting and receiving using pairs of transducers opposite each other on the ring. Backscattered waves were measured by transmitting and receiving with each transducer alone. The ultrasonic backscatter, attenuation and speed measured along a diameter of the cylinders were found to qualitatively and quantitatively match values measured in flat specimens. Angular "scattering" measurements were made by transmitting with one transducer and receiving with all 100 transducers. Substantial ultrasonic signals were generated in the "scattered" waves by phenomena related to the geometry of the cylindrical water/composite or water/acrylic interfaces, and at several angles these overlapped the desired scattered waves arising from the center of the cylinder.

  7. Asymmetric angular dependence of spin-transfer torques in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ling; Xu, Zhi-Jun; Zuo, Xian-Jun; Yang, Ze-Jin; Gao, Qing-He; Linghu, Rong-Feng; Guo, Yun-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Using a first-principles noncollinear wave-function-matching method, we studied the spin-transfer torques (STTs) in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe(001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), where three different types of B-doped MgO in the spacer are considered, including B atoms replacing Mg atoms (Mg3BO4), B atoms replacing O atoms (Mg4BO3), and B atoms occupying interstitial positions (Mg4BO4) in MgO. A strong asymmetric angular dependence of STT can be obtained both in ballistic CoFe/Mg3BO4 and CoFe/Mg4BO4 based MTJs, whereas a nearly symmetric STT curve is observed in the junctions based on CoFe/Mg4BO3. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the angular dependence of STT can be suppressed significantly by the disorder of B distribution. Such skewness of STTs in the CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe MTJs could be attributed to the interfacial resonance states induced by the B diffusion into MgO spacer.

  8. NEXAFS spectroscopy and site-specific fragmentation of N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, and N,N-dimethylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salén, Peter; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Schio, Luca; Feifel, Raimund; Richter, Robert; Alagia, Michele; Stranges, Stefano; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-06-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra measured at the C, N, and O K-edges for three molecules containing the amide moiety, N-methylformamide (HCONHCH3), N,N-dimethylformamide (HCON(CH3)2), and N,N-dimethylacetamide (CH3CON(CH3)2) are presented. These molecules have similar structures and differ by the number of methyl groups located at the molecular ends. The fragmentation of these molecules after resonant excitation at different K-edge resonances is also investigated, using a 3D-ion imaging time-of-flight spectrometer. A comparison between the molecules with respect to the relative contributions of the fragments created upon excitation at distinct resonances reveals site-specific fragmentation. Further information about the character of the core-excitation and dissociation process is obtained from the angular distributions of the ion fragments.

  9. Primary and Secondary Contributions to the Organic Aerosol Over the Amazon Determined by STXM-NEXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Sinha, B.; Artaxo, P.; Kilcoyne, D.; Smith, M. L.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the morphology and chemical composition of aerosol samples from a pristine tropical environment, the Amazon Basin, using Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy - Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (STXMNEXAFS) analysis. The NEXAFS spectra were used to estimate the elemental ratios of C, N and O, as well as the chemical bonding state of these elements. The aim of this study was to investigate the microphysical and chemical properties of a tropical background aerosol and its internal mixing state. The samples were collected in the Amazonian rainforest during the rainy season and can be regarded as a nearly pristine background aerosol. Lab-generated SOA-samples (produced by the (photo)oxidation of isoprene, alpha-pinene and beta-caryophyllene), microtome slices of fungal spores, and aerosolized authentic organic compounds were measured as reference samples. The STXM-NEXAFS results of the lab-generated SOA have been analyzed and compared to SOA from the Amazonian region. In the lab samples, SOA occurred as droplets of different sizes, sometimes exhibiting internal structures ('raisin-like' structure). The spectral characteristics of the lab samples depend on the precursors applied for their generation. The Amazonian aerosol was found to be dominated by drop-like organic particles in the fine mode (often in internal mixture with solid particles), and Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAP) in the coarse mode. Liquid organic aerosol coatings were also frequently observed on the PBAPs. Unexpectedly, many ambient SOA samples show a high content of N (around 20% or even more) as well as the frequent occurrence of potassium. Furthermore, the spectra exhibit characteristic signal patterns for different functional groups. In most cases, the spectrum near the C-edge is dominated by either the hydroxyl or the carboxylate signal, but prominent peaks for ketone carbonyls, alkanes and alkenes have also been observed. Based on these results, a new

  10. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  11. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  12. High-Throughput Analysis of Molecular Orientation on Surfaces by NEXAFS Imaging of Curved Sample Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy provides detailed information about the orientation and alignment of thin films. NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique—the availability of beam-time per user is typically limited to no more than a few weeks per year. The limited availability is currently a true barrier for using NEXAFS in combinatorial studies of molecular alignment. We have recently demonstrated how large area full field NEXAFS imaging allows users to pursue combinatorial studies of surface chemistry. Now we report an extension of this approach which allows the acquisition of orientation information from a single NEXAFS image. An array with 80 elements (samples), containing eight series of different surface modifications, was mounted on a curved substrate allowing the collection of NEXAFS spectra with a range of orientations with respect to the X-ray beam. Images collected from this array show how hyperspectral NEXAFS data collected from curved surfaces can be used for high-throughput molecular orientation analysis. PMID:25046426

  13. Angular dependence of the response of the nanoDot OSLD system for measurements at depth in clinical megavoltage beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; Dunn, Leon; Lye, Jessica E.; Kenny, John W.; Alves, Andrew D. C.; Cole, Andrew; Asena, Andre; Kron, Tomas; Williams, Ivan M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to assess the angular dependence of a commercial optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) dosimetry system in MV x-ray beams at depths beyondd{sub max} and to find ways to mitigate this dependence for measurements in phantoms. Methods: Two special holders were designed which allow a dosimeter to be rotated around the center of its sensitive volume. The dosimeter's sensitive volume is a disk, 5 mm in diameter and 0.2 mm thick. The first holder rotates the disk in the traditional way. It positions the disk perpendicular to the beam (gantry pointing to the floor) in the initial position (0°). When the holder is rotated the angle of the disk towards the beam increases until the disk is parallel with the beam (“edge on,” 90°). This is referred to as Setup 1. The second holder offers a new, alternative measurement position. It positions the disk parallel to the beam for all angles while rotating around its center (Setup 2). Measurements with five to ten dosimeters per point were carried out for 6 MV at 3 and 10 cm depth. Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 were performed to simulate the response of the active detector material for several angles. Detector and housing were simulated in detail based on microCT data and communications with the manufacturer. Various material compositions and an all-water geometry were considered. Results: For the traditional Setup 1 the response of the OSLD dropped on average by 1.4% ± 0.7% (measurement) and 2.1% ± 0.3% (Monte Carlo simulation) for the 90° orientation compared to 0°. Monte Carlo simulations also showed a strong dependence of the effect on the composition of the sensitive layer. Assuming the layer to completely consist of the active material (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) results in a 7% drop in response for 90° compared to 0°. Assuming the layer to be completely water, results in a flat response within the simulation uncertainty of about 1%. For the new Setup 2

  14. Mixed optical Cherenkov-Bremsstrahlung radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone from relativistic heavy ions: Unusual dependence of the angular distribution width on the radiator thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkova, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov radiation (ChR) angular distribution is usually described by the Tamm-Frank (TF) theory, which assumes that relativistic charged particle moves uniformly and rectilinearly in the optically transparent radiator. According to the TF theory, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the ChR angular distribution inversely depends on the radiator thickness. In the case of relativistic heavy ions (RHI) a slowing-down in the radiator may sufficiently change the angular distribution of optical radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone, since there appears a mixed ChR-Bremsstrahlung radiation. As a result, there occurs a drastic transformation of the FWHM of optical radiation angular distribution in dependence on the radiator thickness: from inversely proportional (TF theory) to the linearly proportional one. In our paper we present the first analysis of this transformation taking account of the gradual velocity decrease of RHI penetrating through a radiator.

  15. Angular dependent study on spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanian, S. M.; Shokri, A. A.; Mikaili Agah, K.; Elahi, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) on the spin-dependent current and shot noise through II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor/nonmagnetic semiconductor (DMS/NMS) barrier structures. The calculation of transmission probability is based on an effective mass quantum-mechanical approach in the presence of an external magnetic field applied along the growth direction of the junction and also applied voltage. We also study the dependence of spin-dependent properties on external magnetic field and relative angle between the magnetizations of two DMS layers in CdTe/CdMnTe heterostructures by including the DSOC effect. The results show that the DSOC has great different influence on transport properties of electrons with spin up and spin down in the considered system and this aspect may be utilized in designing new spintronics devices.

  16. Angular dependence of L X-rays emission for Ag by 10 keV electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Chengwei

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic X-ray intensities of Ag-Lα, Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 are measured in electron-impact ionization at energy of 10 keV. The emission angle in this work ranges from 0° to 20° at interval of 5°. The angular dependence of L X-ray intensity ratios has been investigated for Lα / Lβ1, Lβ2 / Lβ1 and Lγ1 / Lβ1. It is found from the experimental results that the emissions of Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 X-rays are spatially isotropic, while the Lα X-rays exhibit anisotropic emission. Consequently, the alignment behavior of vacancy states is discussed with thorough analysis of vacancy transfer process.

  17. Angular dependence of novel magnetic quantum oscillations in a quasi-two-dimensional multiband Fermi liquid with impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovsky, A. M.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2002-03-01

    The semiclassical Lifshitz-Kosevich-type description is given for the angular dependence of quantum oscillations with combination frequencies in a multiband quasi-two-dimensional Fermi liquid with a constant number of electrons. The analytical expressions are found for the Dingle, thermal, spin, and amplitude (Yamaji) reduction factors of the novel combination harmonics, where the latter two strongly oscillate with the direction of the field [1]. At the magic angles those factors reduce to the purely two-dimensional expressions given earlier. The combination harmonics are suppressed in the presence of the nonquantized background states, and they decay exponentially faster with temperature and/or disorder compared to the standard harmonics, providing an additional tool for electronic structure determination. The theory is applied to Sr2RuO4. [1] A.M. Bratkovsky and A.S. Alexandrov, Phys. Rev. B 65, xxxx (2002); cond-mat/0104520.

  18. Skyshine analysis using energy and angular dependent dose-contribution fluxes obtained from air-over-ground adjoint calculation.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Mikio; Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    A generalised and convenient skyshine dose analysis method has been developed based on forward-adjoint folding technique. In the method, the air penetration data were prepared by performing an adjoint DOT3.5 calculation with cylindrical air-over-ground geometry having an adjoint point source (importance of unit flux to dose rate at detection point) in the centre. The accuracy of the present method was certified by comparing with DOT3.5 forward calculation. The adjoint flux data can be used as generalised radiation skyshine data for all sorts of nuclear facilities. Moreover, the present method supplies plenty of energy-angular dependent contribution flux data, which will be useful for detailed shielding design of facilities. PMID:16604693

  19. Improved model for the angular dependence of excimer laser ablation rates in polymer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pedder, J. E. A.; Holmes, A. S.; Dyer, P. E.

    2009-10-26

    Measurements of the angle-dependent ablation rates of polymers that have applications in microdevice fabrication are reported. A simple model based on Beer's law, including plume absorption, is shown to give good agreement with the experimental findings for polycarbonate and SU8, ablated using the 193 and 248 nm excimer lasers, respectively. The modeling forms a useful tool for designing masks needed to fabricate complex surface relief by ablation.

  20. Angular confinement and direction-dependent transmission in graphene nanostructures with magnetic barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masir, M. Ramezani; Vasilopoulos, P.; Matulis, A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the transmission through magnetic barriers in graphene-based nanostructures. Several particular cases are considered: a magnetic step, single and double barriers, δ -function barriers as well as barrier structures with inhomogeneous magnetic field profiles but with average magnetic field equal to zero. The transmission exhibits a strong dependence on the direction of the incident wave vector. In general the resonant structure of the transmission is significantly more pronounced for (Dirac) electrons with linear spectrum compared to that for electrons with a parabolic one.

  1. Study of Iron Dimers Reveals Angular Dependence of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a developing technique that probes the occupied molecular orbitals of a metal complex. As an element-specific probe of metal centers, Kβ XES is finding increasing applications in catalytic and, in particular, bioinorganic systems. For the continued development of XES as a probe of these complex systems, however, the full range of factors which contribute to XES spectral modulations must be explored. In this report, an investigation of a series of oxo-bridged iron dimers reveals that the intensity of valence-to-core features is sensitive to the Fe–O–Fe bond angle. The intensity of these features has a well-known dependence on metal–ligand bond distance, but a dependence upon bond angle has not previously been documented. Herein, we explore the angular dependence of valence-to-core XES features both experimentally and computationally. Taken together, these results show that, as the Fe–O–Fe angle decreases, the intensity of the Kβ″ feature increases and that this effect is modulated by increasing amounts of Fe np mixing into the O 2s orbital at smaller bond angles. The relevance of these findings to the identification of oxygenated intermediates in bioinorganic systems is highlighted, with special emphasis given to the case of soluble methane monooxygenase. PMID:25211540

  2. THE MASS-DEPENDENCE OF ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN SUN-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Matt, Sean P.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Chabrier, Gilles; Brun, A. Sacha

    2015-02-01

    To better understand the observed distributions of the rotation rate and magnetic activity of Sun-like and low-mass stars, we derive a physically motivated scaling for the dependence of the stellar wind torque on the Rossby number. The torque also contains an empirically derived scaling with stellar mass (and radius), which provides new insight into the mass-dependence of stellar magnetic and wind properties. We demonstrate that this new formulation explains why the lowest mass stars are observed to maintain rapid rotation for much longer than solar-mass stars, and simultaneously why older populations exhibit a sequence of slowly rotating stars, in which the low-mass stars rotate more slowly than solar-mass stars. The model also reproduces some previously unexplained features in the period-mass diagram for the Kepler field, notably: the particular shape of the ''upper envelope'' of the distribution, suggesting that ∼95% of Kepler field stars with measured rotation periods are younger than ∼4 Gyr; and the shape of the ''lower envelope'', corresponding to the location where stars transition between magnetically saturated and unsaturated regimes.

  3. Angular dependence of coercivity and remanence of Ni nanowire arrays and its relevance to magnetoviscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.; Monz, S.; Tschöpe, A.; Birringer, R.; Michels, A.

    Ni nanowire arrays with varying wire dimensions (diameter d, length l) and center-to-center distances dCC were synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition of Ni in porous Al templates. The magnetization-reversal behavior of the arrays was investigated by means of magnetometry for different angles θ between the wire axes and the applied magnetic field. The functional dependences of the characteristic parameters coercivity HC( θ) and reduced remanence mR/mS( θ) exhibit a strong dependence on the wire dimensions and the center-to-center distance. For instance, for nanowire arrays with d=40 nm, dCC=100 nm, and for θ=0°, the coercivity takes on a rather large value of μ0HC=85 mT and mR/mS≅94%; reducing dCC to 30 nm and d to 17 nm results in μ0HC=49 mT and mR/mS≅57%, an observation which suggests an increasing magnetostatic interwire interaction at increased ( d/ dCC)-ratio. The potential application of nanowires as the constituents of ferrofluids is discussed.

  4. Simulations of the angular dependence of the dipole-dipole interaction among Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Jacob L.; Hollingsworth, Jacob; Paul, Jacob T.; Peleg, Matan; Sanford, Veronica L.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction between two Rydberg atoms depends on the relative orientation of the atoms and on the change in the magnetic quantum number. We simulate the effect of this anisotropy on the energy transport in an amorphous many atom system of ultracold Rydberg atoms subject to a homogeneous applied electric field. We consider two experimentally feasible geometries and find that the effects should be measurable in current generation imaging experiments. We also examine evidence for Anderson localization. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897 and used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number OCI-1053575.

  5. Simulations of the angular dependence of the dipole–dipole interaction among Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Jacob L.; Paul, Jacob T.; Peleg, Matan; Sanford, Veronica L.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-08-01

    The dipole–dipole interaction between two Rydberg atoms depends on the relative orientation of the atoms and on the change in the magnetic quantum number. We simulate the effect of this anisotropy on the energy transport in an amorphous many atom system subject to a homogeneous applied electric field. We consider two experimentally feasible geometries and find that the effects should be measurable in current generation imaging experiments. In both geometries atoms of p character are localized to a small region of space which is immersed in a larger region that is filled with atoms of s character. Energy transfer due to the dipole–dipole interaction can lead to a spread of p character into the region initially occupied by s atoms. Over long timescales the energy transport is confined to the volume near the border of the p region which suggests Anderson localization. We calculate a correlation length of 6.3 μm for one particular geometry.

  6. Angular emission and polarization dependence of harmonics from laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easter, J. H.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B. X.; Mordovanakis, A.; Mourou, G.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2013-02-01

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been performed to characterize high order harmonic emission up to the 18th order using high rep rate mJ level laser pulses at relativistic intensities. The experiments were compared to two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The harmonic divergence was found to be less than 4° (full-width at half-maximum) at highest intensity and increased as the laser was defocused (i.e. as the intensity was reduced). The polarization dependence on the harmonic generation efficiency and divergence was also measured. Circular polarization was found to cause a deflection in the angle of emission of the harmonics—an effect which may be beneficial in the use of such harmonics for efficient isolated attosecond pulse production.

  7. Angular and Frequency-Dependent Wave Velocity and Attenuation in Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Gurevich, Boris; Santos, Juan E.; Picotti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow generates a dominant attenuation mechanism in porous media. It consists of energy loss due to P-wave conversion to Biot (diffusive) modes at mesoscopic-scale inhomogeneities. Fractured poroelastic media show significant attenuation and velocity dispersion due to this mechanism. The theory has first been developed for the symmetry axis of the equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium corresponding to a poroelastic medium containing planar fractures. In this work, we consider the theory for all propagation angles by obtaining the five complex and frequency-dependent stiffnesses of the equivalent TI medium as a function of frequency. We assume that the flow direction is perpendicular to the layering plane and is independent of the loading direction. As a consequence, the behaviour of the medium can be described by a single relaxation function. We first consider the limiting case of an open (highly permeable) fracture of negligible thickness. We then compute the associated wave velocities and quality factors as a function of the propagation direction (phase and ray angles) and frequency. The location of the relaxation peak depends on the distance between fractures (the mesoscopic distance), viscosity, permeability and fractures compliances. The flow induced by wave propagation affects the quasi-shear (qS) wave with levels of attenuation similar to those of the quasi-compressional (qP) wave. On the other hand, a general fracture can be modeled as a sequence of poroelastic layers, where one of the layers is very thin. Modeling fractures of different thickness filled with CO2 embedded in a background medium saturated with a stiffer fluid also shows considerable attenuation and velocity dispersion. If the fracture and background frames are the same, the equivalent medium is isotropic, but strong wave anisotropy occurs in the case of a frameless and highly permeable fracture material, for instance a suspension of solid particles in the fluid.

  8. Angular Dependence of Jet Quenching Indicates Its Strong Enhancement Near the QCD Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shuryak, Edward

    2008-10-22

    We study dependence of jet quenching on matter density, using 'tomography' of the fireball provided by RHIC data on azimuthal anisotropy v{sub 2} of high p{sub t} hadron yield at different centralities. Slicing the fireball into shells with constant (entropy) density, we derive a 'layer-wise geometrical limit' v{sub 2}{sup max} which is indeed above the data v{sub 2} < v{sub x}{sup max}. Interestingly, the limit is reached only if quenching is dominated by shells with the entropy density exactly in the near-T{sub c} region. We show two models that simultaneously describe the high p{sub t} v{sub 2} and R{sub AA} data and conclude that such a description can be achieved only if the jet quenching is few times stronger in the near-T{sub c} region relative to QGP at T > T{sub c}. One possible reason for that may be recent indications that the near-T{sub c} region is a magnetic plasma of relatively light color-magnetic monopoles.

  9. Angular dependence of optical modes in metal-insulator-metal coupled quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, YouLiang; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Qian; Chen, PingPing; Zhou, XiaoHao; Wang, Han; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We report the dependence of the near-field optical modes in metal-insulator-metal quantum well infrared photodetector (MIM-QWIP) on the incident angles. Three optical modes are observed and attributed to the 2nd- and the 3rd-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes and the localized surface polariton (LSP) mode. In addition to the observation of a responsivity enhancement of 14 times by the LSP mode, the varying pattern of the three modes against the incident angle are revealed, in which the LSP mode is fixed while the 2nd SPP mode splits into two branches and the 3rd SPP mode red-shifts. The detailed mechanisms are analyzed and numerically simulated. The results fit the experiments very well, demonstrating the wavevector coupling effect between the incident light and the metal gratings on the SPP modes. Our work will pave the way to fully understanding the influence of incident angles on a detector's response for applying the MIM-QWIP to focal plane arrays.

  10. GEANT4 simulation of the angular dependence of TLD-based monitor response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, C. C.; Moralles, M.; Okuno, E.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, the response of thermoluminescent (TL) monitors to X-ray beams impinging on them at different angles was investigated and compared with results of simulations performed with the GEANT4 radiation transport toolkit. Each monitor used contains four TL detectors (TLD): two CaF 2 pellets and two TLD-100 (one of each type within lead filter and the other without filter). Monitors were irradiated free-in-air with X-ray beams of the narrow and wide spectrum with effective energy of 61 and 130 keV and angles of incidence of 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°. Curves of TL response relative to air kerma as a function of photon effective energy for each detector, with and without filter, are used to correct the energetic dependence of TL response. Such curves were also obtained from the data of radiation energy stored in the TLDs provided by the simulations. The attenuation increases with the increase of the incidence angle, since the thickness of lead filter traversed by the beam also enlarges. As the monitor calibration is usually performed with the beams impinging the monitor at 0°, changes in the attenuation become a source of error in the energy determination and consequently in the value of dose equivalent obtained with this monitor. The changes in attenuation observed in experiments were corroborated by the Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Self-association of organic solutes in solution: a NEXAFS study of aqueous imidazole.

    PubMed

    Thomason, M J; Seabourne, C R; Sattelle, B M; Hembury, G A; Stevens, J S; Scott, A J; Aziz, E F; Schroeder, S L M

    2015-01-01

    N K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra of imidazole in concentrated aqueous solutions have been acquired. The NEXAFS spectra of the solution species differ significantly from those of imidazole monomers in the gas phase and in the solid state of imidazole, demonstrating the strong sensitivity of NEXAFS to the local chemical and structural environment. In a concentration range from 0.5 to 8.2 mol L(-1) the NEXAFS spectrum of aqueous imidazole does not change strongly, confirming previous suggestions that imidazole self-associates are already present at concentrations more dilute than the range investigated here. We show that various types of electronic structure calculations (Gaussian, StoBe, CASTEP) provide a consistent and complete interpretation of all features in the gas phase and solid state spectra based on ground state electronic structure. This suggests that such computational modelling of experimental NEXAFS will permit an incisive analysis of the molecular interactions of organic solutes in solutions. It is confirmed that microhydrated clusters with a single imidazole molecule are poor models of imidazole in aqueous solution. Our analysis indicates that models including both a hydrogen-bonded network of hydrate molecules, and imidazole-imidazole interactions, are necessary to explain the electronic structure evident in the NEXAFS spectra. PMID:25873522

  12. Effects of anisotropic fluences and angular depended spectra of beta-particles in the use of large area reference sources.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahiro; Kawada, Yasushi; Ishizu, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Shinich; Yunoki, Akira; Sato, Yasushi; Unno, Yasuhiro; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    Calibrations of instrument efficiency of surface contamination meters are usually made with extended reference sources which are standardized in terms of 2π surface β-particle emission rates from the source surface including backscattered particles. Extended sources supplied from various metrology institutes or calibration laboratories, but the source-types such as structure, preparation method, backing and covering materials vary between manufacturers. In this work first we show how the calibration results are dependent on the source type. Second, in order to clarify the possible reason of such discrepancy, we examined the isotropy of β-particle fluences by the use of a proportional counter and also observed the angular dependence of β-particle spectra by the use of small plastic scintillation spectrometer, where the source mount can rotate relative to the detector window at various obliquities. The discrepancy in the instrument-calibration of surface contamination meters, which are mainly used under the conditions of large source-to-detector geometry, can be explained. PMID:22424745

  13. Development of a standard method for nanoparticle sizing by using the angular dependence of dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kayori; Kato, Haruhisa; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    A standard method for nanoparticle sizing based on the angular dependence of dynamic light scattering was developed. The dependences of the diffusion coefficients for aqueous suspensions of polystyrene latex on the concentration and scattering angle were accurately measured by using a high-resolution dynamic light-scattering instrument. Precise measurements of the short-time correlation function at seven scattering angles and five concentrations were made for suspensions of polystyrene latex particles with diameters from 30 to 100 nm. The apparent diffusion coefficients obtained at various angles and concentrations showed properties characteristic of polystyrene latex particles with electrostatic interactions. A simulation was used to calculate a dynamic structure factor representing the long-range interactions between particles. Extrapolations to infinite dilution and to low angles gave accurate particle sizes by eliminating the effects of long-range interactions. The resulting particle sizes were consistent with those measured by using a differential mobility analyzer and those obtained by pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. PMID:21747185

  14. Shubnikov-de Haas Effect and Angular-Dependent Magnetoresistance in Layered Organic Conductor β''-(ET)(TCNQ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuzuka, Syuma; Uji, Shinya; Konoike, Takako; Terashima, Taichi; Graf, David; Choi, Eun Sang; Brooks, James S.; Yamamoto, Hiroshi M.; Kato, Reizo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect and angular-dependent magnetoresistance oscillation (AMRO) for the organic conductor β''-(ET)(TCNQ). We observed several two dimensional (2D) SdH frequencies, whose cross-sectional areas of the Fermi surfaces (FSs) correspond to only a few percent of the first Brillouin zone. Such small 2D FSs are not predicted by band-structure calculations, suggesting that these FS pockets are created by an imperfect nesting of FSs at low temperatures. It is found that the AMRO consists of a long-period oscillation and a short-period one. The long-period oscillation is associated with the Yamaji oscillation corresponding to the α orbit, whose shape and area are consistent with previous magneto-optical measurement. The short-period oscillation is not caused by peaks instead but dips. The dip structure is discussed in terms of the AMRO of a quasi-2D electron system with a periodic potential caused by the possible density-wave related to the ET layers or the 4kF charge-density-wave associated with the TCNQ layers.

  15. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  16. The impact of surface-polish on the angular and wavelength dependence of fiber focal ratio degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenbrot, Arthur D.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wood, Corey M.

    2012-09-01

    We present measurements of how multimode fiber focal-ratio degradation (FRD) and throughput vary with levels of fiber surface polish from 60 to 0.5 micron grit. Measurements used full-beam and laser injection methods at wavelengths between 0.4 and 0.8 microns on 17 meter lengths of Polymicro FBP 300 and 400 μm core fiber. Full-beam injection probed input focal-ratios between f/3 and f/13.5, while laser injection allowed us to isolate FRD at discrete injection angles up to 17 degrees (f/1.6 marginal ray). We find (1) FRD effects decrease as grit size decreases, with the largest gains in beam quality occurring at grit sizes above 5 μm (2) total throughput increases as grit size decreases, reaching 90% at 790 nm with the finest polishing levels; (3) total throughput is higher at redder wavelengths for coarser polishing grit, indicating surface-scattering as the primary source of loss. We also quantify the angular dependence of FRD as a function of polishing level. Our results indicate that a commonly adopted micro-bending model for FRD is a poor descriptor of the observed phenomenon.

  17. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  18. Observation of a Change in Twist of an RNA Kissing Complex Using the Angular Dependence of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Milas, Peker; Parrot, Louis; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of a change in the bend angle of an RNA kissing complex upon Rop binding using single-molecular-pair FRET. The angular relationship between the dyes, rather than the distance between them, is shown to be responsible for the observed change in energy transfer. It has long been thought that Rop increases the bend angle of the R1inv-R2inv complex upon binding, but this has never been directly observed. In contrast, we find an increase in FRET upon the addition of Rop that is shown via modeling to be consistent with a decrease in the bend angle of the complex of $-15^{\\circ}\\pm7^{\\circ}$. The model predicts FRET from dye trajectories generated using molecular dynamics simulations of Cy3 and Cy5 attached to $5'$ terminal cytosine or guanosine on RNA. While FRET is commonly used to observe global changes in molecular structure attributed to changes in the distance between dyes, it is rarely, if ever, used to elucidate angular changes. Subtle global changes in molecular structure upon binding are generally difficult to discern using NMR or crystallography, but FRET is well suited to observe these changes because of its sensitivity at interdye distance around the F\\"orster radius, $R_F\\approx5$ nm. While FRET is often referred to and used as a ``molecular ruler" for distances around $R_F$, for dye pairs that have minimal rotational freedom, FRET can also be used to observe changes in structure for which there is no significant change in distance between the dyes. This is the case for the R1inv-R2inv kissing complex studied here. This complex is derived from the RNA I - RNA II complex in E. coli. RNA II is a primer for replication of the ColE1 plasmid; its function is modulated by interaction with RNA II. Rop is known to stabilize the complex, and it is also known to bind kissing complexes in a structure, but not sequence, dependent fashion.

  19. Temperature dependence of electric field gradient in LaCoO3 perovskite investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, Astrogildo C.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Saxena, Rajendra N.; Mestnik-Filho, José; Dogra, Rakesh

    2005-11-01

    The time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique was used to study the temperature dependence of electric field gradient (EFG) in LaCoO3 perovskite using {}^{111}\\mathrm {In}\\rightarrow {}^{111}\\mathrm {Cd} and {}^{181}\\mathrm {Hf} \\rightarrow {}^{181}\\mathrm {Ta} nuclear probes. The radioactive parent nuclei 111In and 181Hf were introduced into the oxide lattice through a chemical process during sample preparation and were found to occupy only the Co sites in LaCoO3. The PAC measurements with 111Cd and 181Ta probes were made in the temperature range of 4.2-1146 K and 4.2-1004 K, respectively. No long-range magnetic order was observed up to 4.2 K. The EFGs at 111Cd and 181Ta show very similar temperature dependences. They increase slowly between 4.2 and about 77 K and then decrease almost linearly with increasing temperature until about 500-600 K, where a broad peak-like structure is observed, followed by linear decrease at still higher temperatures. These discontinuities at about 77 K and 500-600 K have been interpreted as thermally activated spin state transitions from the low-spin (t2g6eg0) ground state configuration to the intermediate-spin (t2g5eg1) state and from the intermediate-spin to the high-spin (t2g4eg2) state of the Co3+ ion, confirming previous observation in other recent studies. An indication of a Jahn-Teller distortion, which stabilizes the intermediate-spin state with orbital ordering, is also pointed out.

  20. Time-Dependent and Time-Integrated Angular Analysis of B -> phi Ks pi0 and B -> phi K+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V

    2008-08-04

    We perform a time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of the B{sup 0} {yields} {psi}K*(892){sup 0}, {psi}K*{sub 2}(1430{sup 0}), and {psi}(K{pi}){sub S-wave}{sup 0} decays with the final sample of about 465 million B{bar B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay, nine parameters for the vector-tensor decay, and three parameters for the vector-scalar decay, including the branching fractions, CP-violation parameters, and parameters sensitive to final state interaction. We use the dependence on the K{pi} invariant mass of the interference between the scalar and vector or tensor components to resolve discrete ambiguities of the strong and weak phases. We use the time-evolution of the B {yields} {psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel to extract the CP-violation phase difference {Delta}{phi}{sub 00} = 0.28 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.04 between the B and {bar B} decay amplitudes. When the B {yields} {psi}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} channel is included, the fractions of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} of the vector-vector and vector-tensor decay modes are measured to be 0.494 {+-} 0.034 {+-} 0.013 and 0.901{sub -0.058}{sup +0.046} {+-} 0.037, respectively. This polarization pattern requires the presence of a helicity-plus amplitude in the vector-vector decay from a presently unknown source.

  1. Energy and angular dependences of common types of personal dosemeters in the mirror of the First national intercomparison of individual dosimetric monitoring laboratories in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Deniachenko, N; Volosky, V

    2015-12-01

    In depth analysis of the results of the First National Intercomparison of individual dosimetry laboratories in Ukraine has revealed energy and angular responses of the most common types of personal dosemeters and dosi metric systems. Participating laboratories use 9 different types of dosimetric systems - automatic, semi automat ic and manual. If was found that energy dependences of the most common dosemeter types in Ukraine generally correspond to the literature data on respective TLD materials (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, LiF:Mg,TiandAl2O3:С), however, due to peculiarities of holders (filters) and dose algorithms, for some dosimetry systems the energy dependences can be improved (compensated). Angular dependences proved to be more pronounced: only two systems revealed weak dependence of response on the incident angle, for other systems at large angles (α=60°) dosemeters overestimate true dose values. PMID:26695907

  2. Nuclear quantum effects in the structure and lineshapes of the N2 NEXAFS spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fatehi, Shervin; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-12-04

    We study the relative ability of several models of the X-ray absorption spectrum to capture the Franck-Condon structure apparent from an experiment on gaseous nitrogen. In doing so, we adopt the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a constrained density functional theory method for computing the energies of the X-ray-excited molecule. Starting from an otherwise classical model for the spectrum, we systematically introduce more realistic physics, first by substituting the quantum mechanical nuclear radial density in the bond separation R for the classical radial density, then by adding the effect of zero-point energy and other level shifts, and finally by including explicit rovibrational quantization of both the ground and excited states. The quantization is determined exactly, using a discrete variable representation. We show that the NEXAFS spectrum can be predicted semiquantiatively within this framework. We also address the possibility of non-trivial temperature dependence in the spectrum. Finally, we show that it is possible to improve the predicted spectrum by using constrained DFT in combination with more accurate potentials.

  3. Development of a Detector to Measure the Angular Dependence of the Cosmic Ray Induced Neutron Background Flux at Ground Level

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J F; Gosnell, T B; Luke, S J; Archer, D E; Lochner, R T; Frank, I M; Prussin, S G; Quiter, B J; Chivers, D H

    2002-01-28

    The detection of low intensity sources of radiation in containers is of particular interest for arms control, non-proliferation and nuclear smuggling activities. Attempts to procure and smuggle nuclear materials that could be used in terrorist activities have been well documented in recent years. These incidents have included fissile materials such, as plutonium and uranium, as well as medical and industrial isotopes that could be used in a Radiation Dispersal Device. The vast majority of these incidents have been discovered through human intelligence work due to the difficulty of using radiation monitoring. The detection of radiation sources in well-shielded containers presents a difficult technological challenge. Few neutrons and gamma rays may escape from the container and these may be obscured by the naturally occurring background. The world in general is a radioactive environment. Many elements in the earth's crust, as well as in common plants and building materials, emit a constant stream of radiation. In fact the ultimate limit on the detection of hidden sources is often the background level at the location of interest. It has long been understood that knowledge of the directionality of this background can be used to improve the signal/noise ratio in detectors used for these measurements. Imaging detectors are one method of reducing the effect of the background, but this reduction comes at the expensive of a huge increase in detector complexity. Hence these systems, while important in some specific applications, are probably not suited for the deployment of many detectors over a large area. There may be another way of reducing the effect of backgrounds on monitoring measurements. This method consists of using knowledge of the directional dependence of the background flux to help reduce its effect on the detectors in question. An accurate knowledge of this angular distribution allows one to develop better shielding designs for the detectors.

  4. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Byoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1-10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  5. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in

  6. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-01-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. PMID:23520268

  7. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-09-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. PMID:23520268

  8. A detailed assignment of NEXAFS resonances of imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Christopher; Holzweber, Markus; Lippitz, Andreas; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Saalfrank, Peter

    2016-03-16

    In Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy X-Ray photons are used to excite tightly bound core electrons to low-lying unoccupied orbitals of the system. This technique offers insight into the electronic structure of the system as well as useful structural information. In this work, we apply NEXAFS to two kinds of imidazolium based ionic liquids ([CnC1im](+)[NTf2](-) and [C4C1im](+)[I](-)). A combination of measurements and quantum chemical calculations of C K and N K NEXAFS resonances is presented. The simulations, based on the transition potential density functional theory method (TP-DFT), reproduce all characteristic features observed by the experiment. Furthermore, a detailed assignment of resonance features to excitation centers (carbon or nitrogen atoms) leads to a consistent interpretation of the spectra. PMID:26948544

  9. Role of muscle pulleys in producing eye position-dependence in the angular vestibuloocular reflex: a model-based study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurtell, M. J.; Kunin, M.; Raphan, T.; Wall, C. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    the roll gain of the angular vestibuloocular reflex was modified during the initial period of the response, while pulley coefficient was maintained at 0.5. Hence a roll gain modification allows stabilization of the retinal image without requiring a change in the pulley effect. Our results therefore indicate that the eye position-dependent velocity axis tilts could arise due to the effects of the pulleys and that a roll gain modification in the central vestibular structures may be responsible for countering the pulley effect.

  10. Insight into the photoelectron angular dependent energy distribution of negative-electron-affinity InP photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhanghui; Jiang, Xiangwei; Dong, Shan; Li, Jingbo Li, Shushen; Wang, Linwang

    2014-01-13

    Energy distribution and angular distribution of the photoelectrons from InP photocathodes are investigated using a precise Monte Carlo model. It is found that Γ-valley electrons contribute to the first peak of the energy distribution curve, but the second peak is contributed by both Γ-valley and L-valley electrons rather than only L-valley electrons. L valley electrons are shown to have a smaller angular spread than Γ-valley electrons, which is attributed to the much higher potential energy of L-valley minimum. The further simulation indicates that the performance of InP photocathodes can be improved by increasing the hole concentration or decreasing the temperature, but the activation layer thickness variation only has very slight influence on either energy or angular distribution.

  11. Angular and temperature dependence of current induced spin-orbit effective fields in Ta/CoFeB/MgO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuepeng; Deorani, Praveen; Narayanapillai, Kulothungasagaran; Lee, Ki-Seung; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-01-01

    Current induced spin-orbit effective magnetic fields in metal/ferromagnet/oxide trilayers provide a new way to manipulate the magnetization, which is an alternative to the conventional current induced spin transfer torque arising from noncollinear magnetization. Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures are expected to be useful for non-volatile memories and logic devices due to its perpendicular anisotropy and large current induced spin-orbit effective fields. However many aspects such as the angular and temperature dependent phenomena of the effective fields are little understood. Here, we evaluate the angular and temperature dependence of the current-induced spin-orbit effective fields considering contributions from both the anomalous and planar Hall effects. The longitudinal and transverse components of effective fields are found to have strong angular dependence on the magnetization direction at 300 K. The transverse field decreases significantly with decreasing temperature, whereas the longitudinal field shows weaker temperature dependence. Our results reveal important features and provide an opportunity for a more comprehensive understanding of current induced spin-orbit effective fields. PMID:24670317

  12. Angular and local spectroscopic analysis to probe the vertical alignment of N-doped well-separated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Minea, T M; Bouchet-Fabre, B; Lazar, S; Point, S; Zandbergen, H W

    2006-08-17

    Vertically aligned well-separated N-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on a silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Angular near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) was used to investigate the vertical alignment of as-grown CNTs. In addition, both individual tubes and tube bundles were characterized by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Simultaneous analysis of both spectroscopic techniques provides information on chemical environment, orbital orientation between carbon and heteroatoms, and local curvature effects. We demonstrate the utility of NEXAFS as an in situ probe of CNTs. PMID:16898707

  13. Impact of scale dependent bias and nonlinear structure growth on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect: Angular power spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert E.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Seljak, Uros

    2009-09-15

    We investigate the impact of nonlinear evolution of the gravitational potentials in the {lambda}CDM model on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum, and on the cross-power spectrum of the CMB and a set of biased tracers of the mass. We use an ensemble of N-body simulations to directly follow the potentials and compare the results to analytic PT methods. The predictions from the PT match the results to high precision for k<0.2h Mpc{sup -1}. We compute the nonlinear corrections to the angular power spectrum and find them to be <10% of linear theory for l<100. These corrections are swamped by the cosmic variance. On scales l>100 the departures are more significant; however, the CMB signal is more than a factor 10{sup 3} larger at this scale. Nonlinear ISW effects therefore play no role in shaping the CMB power spectrum for l<1500. We analyze the CMB-density tracer cross spectrum using simulations and renormalized bias PT, and find good agreement. The usual assumption is that nonlinear evolution enhances the growth of structure and counteracts the linear ISW on small scales, leading to a change in sign of the CMB large-scale structure cross spectrum at small scales. However, PT analysis suggests that this trend reverses at late times when the logarithmic growth rate f=dlnD/dlna<0.5 or {omega}{sub m}(z)<0.3. Numerical results confirm these expectations and we find no sign change in ISW large-scale structure cross power for low redshifts. Corrections due to nonlinearity and scale dependence of the bias are found to be <10% for l<100, and are therefore below the signal to noise of the current and future measurements. Finally, we estimate the cross-correlation coefficient between the CMB and halos and show that it can be made to match that for the dark matter and CMB to within 5% for thin redshift shells, thus mitigating the need to model bias evolution.

  14. Processing of atmospheric particles caught in the act via STXM/NEXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimer, S.; Lampimäki, M.; Grzinic, G.; Coz, E.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Ammann, M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are an important focus of environmental research due to their effect on climate and human health. Among their main constituents are mineral dust and organic particles. Both types of particles directly and indirectly affect our climate through scattering and absorption of radiation and through acting as cloud condensation nuclei respectively. Organic particles are also of significant concern with respect to their health effects. Mineral dust particles in addition serve as a primary external iron source to the open ocean and the bioavailability of iron from these particles is highly dependent on the oxidation state of the metal. The environmental impact of atmospheric particles depends on their physical and chemical properties, which might change upon chemical ageing. In this study we therefore investigated the changes in chemical composition and morphology of mineral dust and organic particle proxies (Arizona test dust and shikimic acid, respectively) upon in situ exposure to ozone or nitrogen oxides in presence of humidity. This was achieved by monitoring changes at the C and O K-edges as well as the metal L-edges via scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Measurements were conducted at the PolLux beamline at Swiss Light Source. All experiments were conducted in an environmental micro reactor, designed specifically for the end station, to enable the investigation in situ. We observed oxidation of shikimic acid particles in situ during exposure to ozone at different humidities, whereby humidity was found to be a critical factor controlling the rate of the reaction. We also obtained well resolved iron distribution maps from the individual submicrometer size mineral dust particles before and after exposure to nitrogen oxides.

  15. Overview of nanoscale NEXAFS performed with soft X-ray microscopes.

    PubMed

    Guttmann, Peter; Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Today, in material science nanoscale structures are becoming more and more important. Not only for the further miniaturization of semiconductor devices like carbon nanotube based transistors, but also for newly developed efficient energy storage devices, gas sensors or catalytic systems nanoscale and functionalized materials have to be analysed. Therefore, analytical tools like near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has to be applied on single nanostructures. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM) as well as full-field transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM) allow the required spatial resolution to study individual nanostructures. In the soft X-ray energy range only STXM was used so far for NEXAFS studies. Due to its unique setup, the TXM operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II is the first one in the soft X-ray range which can be used for NEXAFS spectroscopy studies which will be shown in this review. Here we will give an overview of the different microscopes used for NEXAFS studies and describe their advantages and disadvantages for different samples. PMID:25821700

  16. Overview of nanoscale NEXAFS performed with soft X-ray microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Summary Today, in material science nanoscale structures are becoming more and more important. Not only for the further miniaturization of semiconductor devices like carbon nanotube based transistors, but also for newly developed efficient energy storage devices, gas sensors or catalytic systems nanoscale and functionalized materials have to be analysed. Therefore, analytical tools like near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has to be applied on single nanostructures. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM) as well as full-field transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM) allow the required spatial resolution to study individual nanostructures. In the soft X-ray energy range only STXM was used so far for NEXAFS studies. Due to its unique setup, the TXM operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II is the first one in the soft X-ray range which can be used for NEXAFS spectroscopy studies which will be shown in this review. Here we will give an overview of the different microscopes used for NEXAFS studies and describe their advantages and disadvantages for different samples. PMID:25821700

  17. Spectral and angular dependence of mid-infrared diffuse scattering from explosives residues for standoff detection using external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of scattered mid-infrared light from surfaces coated with explosives residues (TNT, RDX, and tetryl) detected at a 2 m standoff distance. An external cavity quantum cascade laser provided tunable illumination between 7 and 8 μm. Important differences were identified in the spectral features between specular reflection and diffuse scattering which will impact most practical testing scenarios and complicate material identification. We discuss some of the factors influencing the dependence of observed spectra on the experimental geometry.

  18. Spectral and angular dependence of mid-infrared diffuse scattering from explosives residues for standoff detection using external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of scattered mid-infrared light from surfaces coated with explosives residues (TNT, RDX, and tetryl) detected at a 2 meter standoff distance. An external cavity quantum cascade laser provided tunable illumination between 7 and 8 µm. Important differences were identified in the spectral features between specular reflection and diffuse scattering which will impact most practical testing scenarios and complicate material identification. We discuss some of the factors influencing the dependence of observed spectra on the experimental geometry.

  19. Angular Dependence of the Photoelectron Energy Distribution of InP(100) and GaAs(100) Negative Electron Affinity Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Ick; Sun, Yun; Lu, Zhi; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-15

    Energy distribution of the photoelectrons from InP(100) photocathodes are investigated with a photon energy range from 0.62eV to 2.76eV. When the photon energy is less than 1.8eV, only electrons emitted from the Gamma valley are observed in the energy distribution curves (EDC). At higher photon energies, electrons from the L valley are observed. The angular dependence of the electron energy distributions of InP and GaAs photocathodes are studied and compared. The electrons emitted from the L valley have a larger angular spread than the ones from the Gamma valley due to the larger effective mass of the L valley minimum.

  20. A velocity map ion-imaging study on ketene photodissociation at 208 and 213 nm: Rotational dependence of product angular anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Fengyan; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Bo; Yang, Xueming

    2005-03-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of ketene following excitation at 208.59 and 213.24 nm have been investigated using the velocity map ion-imaging method. Both the angular distribution and translational energy distribution of the CO products at different rotational and vibrational states have been obtained. No significant difference in the translational energy distributions for different CO rotational state products has been observed at both excitation wavelengths. The anisotropy parameter beta is, however, noticeably different for different CO rotational state products at both excitation wavelengths. For lower rotational states of the CO product, beta is smaller than zero, while beta is larger than zero for CO at higher rotational states. The observed rotational dependence of angular anisotropy is interpreted as the dynamical influence of a peculiar conical intersection between the (1)B(1) excited state and (1)A(2) state along the C(S)-I coordinate. PMID:15836317

  1. Multielectron effects on the orientation dependence and photoelectron angular distribution of multiphoton ionization of CO{sub 2} in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chu, S.-I

    2009-07-15

    We perform an ab initio study of multiphoton ionization (MPI) of carbon dioxide in intense linearly polarized laser pulses with arbitrary molecular orientation by means of a time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) with proper long-range potential. We develop a time-dependent Voronoi-cell finite difference method with highly adaptive molecular grids for accurate solution of the TDDFT equations. Our results demonstrate that the orientation dependence of MPI is determined by multiple orbital contributions and that the electron correlation effects are significant. The maximum peak of MPI is predicted to be at 40 deg. in good agreement with recent experimental data. Photoelectron angular distribution reveals the delicate relation between the orientation dependence and the molecular orbital symmetry.

  2. Experimental results and theoretical model to describe angular dependence of light scattering by monolayer of nematic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, V. A.; Krakhalev, M. N.; Konkolovich, A. V.; Prishchepa, O. O.; Miskevich, A. A.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    Light scattering by a monolayer of bipolar nematic droplets encapsulated in polymer film is examined both experimentally and theoretically. A method for the simulation of the angular distribution of scattered light is based on the anomalous diffraction and interference approximations taking into account the director configuration within liquid crystal droplets and their bipolar axes orientation. The director configuration in nematic droplets is calculated using the relaxation method of the free energy minimization. The characteristics of the sample, including distribution of droplet sizes and shape anisometry, are measured in details. The experimental results and theoretical data agree closely with each other.

  3. Ion fluence dependence of the total sputtering yield and differential angular sputtering yield of bismuth due to 50 keV argon ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoli, Naresh T.; Phinney, Lucas C.; Weathers, Duncan L.

    2014-08-01

    The dependences of the total sputtering yield of Bi and the differential angular distribution of these sputtered Bi atoms on the fluence of 50 keV Ar+ ions at normal incidence have been experimentally measured. Polycrystalline Bi targets were used for these purposes. The collector technique and accurate current integration methods were adopted for the determination of angular distributions of sputtered Bi atoms. The ion fluence was varied from 1.9 × 1019 to 3.1 × 1020 ions/cm2. The sputtered atoms were collected on high purity aluminum foils under ultra-high vacuum (∼5 × 10-9 Torr). The collector foils were subsequently analyzed using heavy ion Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The shape of the angular distribution of sputtered atoms was found not to change significantly with the fluence, but the sputtering yield increased significantly from 2.2 ± 0.2 to 9.6 ± 0.6 atoms/ion over the fluence range studied.

  4. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  5. Determination of the texture of arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes from the angular dependence of the X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Okotrub, A. V. Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Gusel'nikov, A. V.; Kudashov, A. G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    The properties of materials containing carbon nanotubes depend on the degree of alignment and the internal structure of nanotubes. It is shown that the degree of misorientation of carbon nanotubes in samples can be evaluated from the measurements of the angular dependences of the carbon X-ray emission and carbon X-ray absorption spectra. The CK{sub {alpha}} emission and CK X-ray absorption spectra of the array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic thermolysis of a mixture of fullerene and ferrocene are measured. A comparison of the calculated model dependences of the relative intensities of the {pi} and {sigma} bands in the spectra with the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate the degree of misorientation of nanotubes in the sample and their internal texture.

  6. Oxidation of a potassium monolayer on Ru(001) studied with photoemission, NEXAFS and vibrational EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Weisel, M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fu, Zugen

    1990-08-01

    The interaction of oxygen with a monolayer of potassium on a Ru(001) surface has been investigated with photoemission and NEXAFS. O 1s core-level data exhibit for low exposures of oxygen a single peak at 531.8 eV. This indicates together with the earlier observation of KO bond formation by EELS that a single K xO y species with equivalent oxygen atoms is formed. NEXAFS data indicate a partially filled O π* orbital and a strongly shifted σ-resonance. Photoemission, vibrational and Auger data suggest an ionic species which is close to potassium Superoxide with the OO bond oriented parallel to the surface.

  7. Dopamine adsorption on anatase TiO2(101): a photoemission and NEXAFS spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Syres, K; Thomas, A; Bondino, F; Malvestuto, M; Grätzel, M

    2010-09-21

    The adsorption of dopamine onto an anatase TiO(2)(101) single crystal has been studied using photoemission and NEXAFS techniques. Photoemission results suggest that the dopamine molecule adsorbs on the surface in a bidentate geometry, resulting in the removal of band gap states in the TiO(2) valence band. Using the searchlight effect, carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectra indicate that the phenyl rings in the dopamine molecules are orientated normal to the surface. A combination of experimental and computational results indicates the appearance of new unoccupied states arising following adsorption. The possible role of these states in the charge-transfer mechanism of the dopamine-TiO(2) system is discussed. PMID:20735026

  8. NEXAFS and XPS of p-Aminobenzoic Acid Polymorphs: The Influence of Local Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Jaye, C.; Fischer, D. A.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen K-edge XPS and NEXAFS of the two polymorphic forms of para- aminobenzoic acid (PABA) are significantly different reflecting variation in hydrogen bonding. Alteration in hydrogen bonding at the amino group leads to a shift to high energy for both the XPS N 1s core level and the 3π* NEXAFS resonance with β-PABA. Participation of the amine group in the aromatic system causes the 1π* resonance to be sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular bonding at the para-carboxylic acid group, and a shift to low energy for α- PABA is observed due to hydrogen-bonded carboxylic acid dimer formation. FEFF calculations also successfully reproduce both the energy and intensity variations observed for the σ* shape resonance associated with the C-N bond, with the majority of the decrease in energy observed for b-PABA arising from the longer C-N bond.

  9. Angular dependant micro-ESR characterization of a locally doped Gd3+:Al2O3 hybrid system for quantum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisby, I. S.; de Graaf, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Meeson, P. J.; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Lindstrom, T.

    Rare-earth doped crystals interfaced with superconducting quantum circuitry are an attractive platform for quantum memory and transducer applications. Here we present a detailed characterization of a locally implanted Gd3+ in Al2O3 system coupled to a superconducting micro-resonator, by performing angular dependent micro-electron-spin-resonance (micro-ESR) measurements at mK temperatures. The device is fabricated using a hard Si3N4 mask to facilitate a local ion-implantation technique for precision control of the dopant location. The technique is found not to degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remains above 105 (1). We find the measured angular dependence of the micro-ESR spectra to be in excellent agreement with the modelled Hamiltonian, supporting the conclusion that the dopant ions are successfully integrated into their relevant lattice sites whilst maintaining crystalline symmetries. Furthermore, we observe clear contributions from individual microwave field components of our micro-resonator, emphasising the need for controllable local implantation. 1 Wisby et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 102601 (2014)

  10. Newly Designed Apparatus for Measuring the Angular Dependent Surface Emittance in a Wide Wavelength Range and at Elevated Temperatures up to 1400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydzek, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini-Schuster, M.; Manara, J.

    2012-11-01

    An optimized apparatus for measuring the angular dependent surface emittance up to elevated temperatures has been designed. This emittance measurement apparatus (EMMA) is coupled to a Bruker Vertex 70v FTIR-spectrometer, so that a wavelength range from about 2 μm up to 25 μm is accessible. The central part of the new apparatus is a double walled, stainless steel vessel which can be evacuated or filled with various gases or with air. Inside the vessel a cylindrical tube furnace is pivot-mounted on a system of discs, for automatically rotating up to an angle of 180°. This allows both, the measurement at different detection angles (0° to 85°) and a consecutive measurement of sample and black-body reference without ventilating and opening the pot. The aim of this work is to present the newly designed emittance measurement apparatus which enables the determination of the angular dependent spectral emittance of opaque samples at temperatures up to 1400 °C. Next to the setup of the apparatus, the measurement results of various materials are presented at different detection angles.

  11. Bonding and charge transfer in nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes: insights from NEXAFS spectra.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, C D; Copping, Roy; Wang, Shuao; Janousch, Markus; Teat, Simon J; Tyliszcak, Tolek; Canning, Andrew; Shuh, David K; Prendergast, David

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of three newly synthesized nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes [(UO2)(H2bbp)Cl2], [(UO)2(Hbbp)(Py)Cl], and [(UO2)(bbp)(Py)2] using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments and simulations. The complexes studied feature derivatives of the tunable tridentate N-donor ligand 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazyl)pyridine (bbp) and exhibit discrete chemical differences in uranyl coordination. The sensitivity of the N K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum to local bonding and charge transfer is exploited to systematically investigate the evolution of structural as well as electronic properties across the three complexes. A thorough interpretation of the measured experimental spectra is achieved via ab initio NEXAFS simulations based on the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach and enables the assignment of spectral features to electronic transitions on specific absorbing sites. We find that ligand-uranyl bonding leads to a signature blue shift in the N K-edge absorption onset, resulting from charge displacement toward the uranyl, while changes in the equatorial coordination shell of the uranyl lead to more subtle modulations in the spectral features. Theoretical simulations show that the flexible local chemistry at the nonbinding imidazole-N sites of the bbp ligand is also reflected in the NEXAFS spectra and highlights potential synthesis strategies to improve selectivity. In particular, we find that interactions of the bbp ligand with solvent molecules can lead to changes in ligand-uranyl binding geometry while also modulating the K-edge absorption. Our results suggest that NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with first-principles interpretation can offer insights into the coordination chemistry of analogous functionalized conjugated ligands. PMID:25330350

  12. NEXAFS Sensitivity to Bond Lengths in Complex Molecular Materials: A Study of Crystalline Saccharides.

    PubMed

    Gainar, Adrian; Stevens, Joanna S; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2015-11-12

    Detailed analysis of the C K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of a series of saccharides (fructose, xylose, glucose, galactose, maltose monohydrate, α-lactose monohydrate, anhydrous β-lactose, cellulose) indicates that the precise determination of IPs and σ* shape resonance energies is sensitive enough to distinguish different crystalline saccharides through the variations in their average C-OH bond lengths. Experimental data as well as FEFF8 calculations confirm that bond length variations in the organic solid state of 10(-2) Å can be experimentally detected, opening up the possibility to use NEXAFS for obtaining incisive structural information for molecular materials, including noncrystalline systems without long-range order such as dissolved species in solutions, colloids, melts, and similar amorphous phases. The observed bond length sensitivity is as good as that originally reported for gas-phase and adsorbed molecular species. NEXAFS-derived molecular structure data for the condensed phase may therefore be used to guide molecular modeling as well as to validate computationally derived structure models for such systems. Some results indicate further analytical value in that the σ* shape resonance analysis may distinguish hemiketals from hemiacetals (i.e., derived from ketoses and aldoses) as well as α from β forms of otherwise identical saccharides. PMID:26459024

  13. TXM-NEXAFS of TiO{sub 2}-Based Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, P.; Rehbein, S.; Heim, S.; Schneider, G.; Bittencourt, C.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Umek, P.; Arcon, D.; Ewels, C. P.

    2011-09-09

    In this work, electronic properties of individual TiO{sub x}-pristine nanoribbons (NR) prepared by hydrothermal treatment of anatase TiO{sub 2} micro-particles were studied using the HZB transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) at the BESSY II undulator beamline U41-FSGM. NEXAFS is ideally suited to study TiO{sub 2}-based materials because both the O K-edge and Ti L-edge features are very sensitive to the local bonding environment, providing diagnostic information about the crystal structures and oxidation states of various forms of titanium oxides and sub-oxides. TXM-NEXAFS combines full-field x-ray microscopy with spectroscopy, allowing the study of the electronic structure of individual nanostructures with spatial resolution better than 25 nm and a spectral resolution of up to E/{Delta}E = 10000. The typical image field in TXM-NEXAFS measurements is about 10 {mu}mx10 {mu}m, which is large compared to the individual nanoparticle. Therefore, one image stack already contains statistically significant data. In addition, the directional electric field vector (E-bar) of the x-rays can be used as a 'search tool' for the direction of chemical bonds of the atom selected by its absorption edge.

  14. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; de Simone, Monica; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-28

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach. PMID:26627945

  15. Adsorption of acetic acid on ice studied by ambient-pressure XPS and partial-electron-yield NEXAFS spectroscopy at 230-240 K.

    PubMed

    Křepelová, Adéla; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Brown, Matthew A; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ammann, Markus

    2013-01-17

    Ice plays a key role in the environment, and the ice-air interface influences heterogeneous chemical reactions between snowpack or cirrus clouds and the surrounding air. Soluble gases have been suspected to affect the topmost, disordered layer on ice (often referred to as a quasiliquid layer, QLL). Changes are especially expected in the hydrogen-bonding structure of water in the presence of solutes at the ice surface. Here, we used ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to detect acetic acid at the ice surface at 230-240 K under atmospheric conditions for the first time. Electron-kinetic-energy-dependent C 1s spectra indicate that acetic acid remains confined to the topmost ice surface layers. Spectral analysis provides information about the protonation state of acetate at the ice surface. Surface-sensitive Auger-electron-yield C-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra were recorded to probe the molecular state of the adsorbed species. The O-edge NEXAFS spectra show only minor differences between clean ice and ice with adsorbed acetic acid and thus indicate that acetic acid does not lead to an extended disordered layer on the ice surface between 230 and 240 K. PMID:23252403

  16. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; de Simone, Monica; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach.

  17. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; Simone, Monica de; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-28

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach.

  18. Angular dependent study of spatial order-disorder transitions in the vortex matter of superconducting Yb3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Ravi P.; Thamizhavel, A.; Tomy, C. V.; Grover, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present here the results of angular-dependent magnetization measurements (both ac and dc) carried out in a weakly-pinned single crystal of a low Tc superconductor, Yb3Rh4Sn13. Both dc magnetization data (M-H) as well as the ac magnetic susceptibility plots (χ´(H)) have revealed the fingerprints of an order-disorder transition in the vortex matter for various orientations of the crystal with respect to the external magnetic field. Our findings show that the quality of the ordered Bragg glass (BG) phase in this isotropic compound depends significantly on the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the crystallographic axes; a better spatially ordered vortex configuration is obtained when the magnetic field is applied along the [110] direction than that when the magnetic field is applied along the [100] axis. The present findings in Yb3Rh4Sn13 bear resemblance with similar results reported earlier for borocarbide superconductors.

  19. Electron-beam transmission through a micrometer-sized tapered-glass capillary: Dependence on incident energy and angular tilt angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Ikeda, T.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental study of 500- and 1000-eV incident electrons transmitted through a micrometer-sized funnel-shaped (tapered) glass capillary with inlet diameter 0.80 mm, outlet diameter 0.10 mm, and a length of 35 mm is reported. The properties of the electron beam transmitted were measured as a function of the emerging angle and the incident energy dependence. The angular profiles were found to be comprised of up to three peaks for both 500 and 1000 eV showing evidence for transmission going straight through the capillary without interacting with the walls (direct), as well as transmission resulting from Coulomb deflection of the electrons from a negative charge patch or by scattering from nuclei close to the surface of the capillary (indirect). The energy spectra show that elastically transmitted electrons dominate at 500 eV for increasing sample tilt angles up to ˜5.0°, while inelastic processes dominate for 1000 eV already at tilt angles of ˜1.0°. The angular width of the emitted electrons was found to constitute a narrow beam for direct (˜0.4°) and indirect (<0.6° for 500 eV and <1.0° for 1000 eV) transmission for both energies with the widths decreasing for the largest tilt angles measured and approaching the inherent resolution (˜0.3°) of the electron analyzer.

  20. SU-E-T-644: Evaluation of Angular Dependence Correction for 2D Array Detector Using for Quality Assurance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Karthikeyan, N; Ganesh, K M; Vikraman, S; Shariff, MH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector in quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT). Methods: Total ten patients comprising of different sites were planned for VMAT and taken for the study. Each plan was exposed on Matrix Evolution 2D array detector with Omnipro IMRT software based on the following three different methods using 6MV photon beams from Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. First method, VMAT plan was delivered on Matrix Evolution detector as it gantry mounted with dedicated holder with build-up of 2.3cm. Second, the VMAT plan was delivered with the static gantry angle on to the table mounted setup. Third, the VMAT plan was delivered with actual gantry angle on Matrix Evolution detector fixed in Multicube phantom with gantry angle sensor and angular dependence correction were applied to quantify the plan quality. For all these methods, the corresponding QA plans were generated in TPS and the dose verification was done for both point and 2D fluence analysis with pass criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. Results: The measured point dose variation for the first method was observed as 1.58±0.6% of mean and SD with TPS calculated. For second and third method, the mean and standard deviation(SD) was observed as 1.67±0.7% and 1.85±0.8% respectively. The 2D fluence analysis of measured and TPS calculated has the mean and SD of 97.9±1.1%, 97.88±1.2% and 97.55±1.3% for first, second and third methods respectively. The calculated two-tailed Pvalue for point dose and 2D fluence analysis shows the insignificance with values of 0.9316 and 0.9015 respectively, among the different methods of QA. Conclusion: The qualitative evaluation of angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector shows its competency in accuracy of quality assurance measurement of composite dose distribution of volumetric modulated arc therapy.

  1. SU-E-J-206: A Comparison of Different Hardware Design Approaches for Feature-Supported Optical Head-Tracking with Respect to Angular Dependencies

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, P; Wissel, T; Wagner, B; Bruder, R; Schweikard, A; Ernst, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that optical features significantly improve marker-less optical head-tracking for cranial radiotherapy. Simulations, however, showed that these optical features, which are used to derive tissue thickness, depend on the incident angle of the IR scanning laser beam and the perspective of the camera analyzing the reflective patterns. We present an experimental analysis determining which is the most robust optical setup concerning angular influences. Methods: In three consecutive experiments, the incident angle of the laser (1), the perspective of the camera (2) or both simultaneously (3, ‘inBeam’-perspective) were changed with respect to the target. We analyzed how this affects feature intensity. These intensities were determined from seven concentric regions of interest (ROIs) around the laser spot. Two targets were used: a tissue-like silicone phantom and a human's forehead. Results: For each experiment, the feature intensity generally decreases with increasing angle. We found that the optical properties of the silicone phantom do not fit the properties of human skin. Furthermore, the angular influence of the laser on the features is significantly higher than the perspective of the camera. With the ‘inBeam’- perspective, the smoothest decays of feature intensity were found. We suppose that this is because of a fixed relationship between both devices. This smoothness, suggesting a predictable functional relationship, may simplify angle compensation for machine learning algorithms. This is particularly prominent for the medial ROIs. The inner ROIs highly depend on the angle and power of the laser. The outer ROIs show less angular dependency but the signal strength is critically low and prone to artifacts. Therefore and because of the smooth decays, medial ROIs are a suitable tradeoff between susceptibility, signal-noise-ratio and distance to the center of the laser spot. Conclusion: For tissue thickness correlated feature

  2. Surface chemistry of alanine on Cu{111}: Adsorption geometry and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Cornish, Alix; Nicklin, Richard E. J.; Zheleva, Zhasmina V.; Held, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption of L-alanine on the Cu{111} single crystal surface was investigated as a model system for interactions between small chiral modifier molecules and close-packed metal surfaces. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy are used to determine the chemical state, bond coordination and out-of-plane orientation of the molecule on the surface. Alanine adsorbs in its anionic form at room temperature, whilst at low temperature the overlayer consists of anionic and zwitterionic molecules. NEXAFS spectra exhibit a strong angular dependence of the π* resonance associated with the carboxylate group, which allows determining the tilt angle of this group with respect to the surface plane (48° ± 2°) at room temperature. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) shows a p(2√{ 13} × 2√{ 13}) R 13 ° superstructure with only one domain, which breaks the mirror symmetry of the substrate and, thus, induces global chirality to the surface. Temperature-programmed XPS (TP-XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments indicate that the zwitterionic form converts into the anionic species (alaninate) at 293 K. The latter desorbs/decomposes between 435 K and 445 K.

  3. Topological dependence of Kepler's third law for collisionless periodic three-body orbits with vanishing angular momentum and equal masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrašinović, V.; Šuvakov, Milovan

    2015-09-01

    We present results of numerical calculations showing a three-body orbit's period's T dependence on its topology. This dependence is a simple linear one, when expressed in terms of appropriate variables, suggesting an exact mathematical law. This is the first known relation between topological and kinematical properties of three-body systems. We have used these results to predict the periods of several sets of as yet undiscovered orbits, but the relation also indicates that the number of periodic three-body orbits with periods shorter than any finite number is countable.

  4. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  5. Angular Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mouth. Overview Angular cheilitis (perlèche) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the corners of the mouth. Usually associated with a fungal ( Candidal ) or bacterial ( Staphylococcal ) infection, those ... people of all ages. Chronic pooling of saliva encourages fungal and bacterial growth, ...

  6. Large anisotropic Fe orbital moments in perpendicularly magnetized Co2FeAl Heusler alloy thin films revealed by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, Jun; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wen, Zhenchao; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2013-09-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in Heusler alloy Co2FeAl thin films sharing an interface with a MgO layer is investigated by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Orbital and spin magnetic moments are deduced separately for Fe and Co 3d electrons. In addition, the PMA energies are estimated using the orbital magnetic moments parallel and perpendicular to the film surfaces. We found that PMA in Co2FeAl is determined mainly by the contribution of Fe atoms with large orbital magnetic moments, which are enhanced at the interface between Co2FeAl and MgO. Furthermore, element specific magnetization curves of Fe and Co are found to be similar, suggesting the existence of ferromagnetic coupling between Fe and Co PMA directions.

  7. Electrically Addressable Optical Devices Using A System Of Composite Layered Flakes Suspended In A Fluid Host To Obtain Angularly Depende

    DOEpatents

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-12-07

    Composite or layered flakes having a plurality of layers of different materials, which may be dielectric materials, conductive materials, or liquid crystalline materials suspended in a fluid host and subjected to an electric field, provide optical effects dependent upon the angle or orientation of the flakes in the applied electric field. The optical effects depend upon the composition and thickness of the layers, producing reflectance, interference, additive and/or subtractive color effects. The composition of layered flakes may also be selected to enhance and/or alter the dielectric properties of flakes, whereby flake motion in an electric field is also enhanced and/or altered. The devices are useful as active electro-optical displays, polarizers, filters, light modulators, and wherever controllable polarizing, reflecting and transmissive optical properties are desired.

  8. On the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. P.; Tavares, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Students of mechanics usually have difficulties when they learn about the rotation of a rigid body. These difficulties are rooted in the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity, because these vectors are not parallel, and we need in general to utilize a rotating frame of reference or a time dependent inertia tensor. We discuss a series of problems that introduce both difficulties.

  9. SU-E-T-44: Angular Dependence of Surface Dose Enhancement Measured On Several Inhomogeneities Using Radiochromic EBT3 Films

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, A; Schoenfeld, A; Poppinga, D; Chofor, N; Poppe, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quantification of the relative surface dose enhancement in dependence on the angle of incidence and the atomic number Z of the surface material. Methods: Experiments were performed with slabs made of aluminum, titanium, copper, silver, dental gold and lead. The metal slabs with equal sizes of 1.0×8.0×8.8mm{sup 3} were embedded in an Octavius 4D phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany). Radiochromic EBT3 films were used to measure the surface dose for angles of incidence ranging from 0° to 90°. The setup with the metals slabs at the isocenter was irradiated with acceleration voltages of 6MV and 10MV. Water reference measurements were taken under equal conditions. Results: The surface dose enhancement is highest for angles of incidence below 30° and drops significantly for higher. The surface dose enhancement produced by lead and dental gold at 6MV showed a peak of 65%. At 90°, the surface dose enhancement dropped to 15% for both materials. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 32%, 22% and 12% at 0°, respectively. At an angle of incidence of 80°, the values dropped to 22%, 18%, 12% und 6%. The values for 10MV were very similar. Lead and dental gold showed peaks of 65% und 60%. Their values dropped to 18% at an angle of 90°. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 30%, 20% and 8% at 0°. At 80° the values dropped to 30%, 20%, 12% and 5%. A dependence of the magnitude of the surface dose enhancement on the atomic number of the surface material can be seen, which is in consistence with literature. Conclusion: The results show that the surface dose enhancements near implant materials with high Z-values should be taken into consideration in radio therapy, even when the angle of incidence is flat.

  10. Angular-Dependent Phase Factor of Shubnikov-de Haas Oscillations in the Dirac Semimetal Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Z. J.; Zhao, D.; Jin, Z.; Shang, C.; Ma, L. K.; Ye, G. J.; Lei, B.; Wu, T.; Xia, Z. C.; Chen, X. H.

    2015-11-01

    We measure the magnetotransport properties of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 single crystal under magnetic fields up to 36 T. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations are clearly resolved and the n =1 Landau level is reached. A detailed analysis on the intercept of the Landau index plot reveals a significant dependence of the SdH phase factor on the orientation of the applied magnetic field. When the magnetic field is applied in the [001] direction, i.e., along the fourfold screw axis of the tetragonal crystal structure, a nontrivial π Berry phase, as predicted for the Dirac fermions, is observed. However, in a magnetic field tilted away from the [001] direction, the π Berry phase is evidently reduced, and a considerable enhancement of the effective mass is also revealed. Our observations demonstrate that the Dirac dispersion in Cd3As2 is effectively modified in a tilted magnetic field, whereas the preserved π Berry phase in a magnetic field along the [001] direction can be related to the realization of the Weyl fermions. The sudden change of the SdH phase also indicates a possible topological phase transition induced by the symmetry-breaking effect.

  11. Time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of B→φKS0π0 and φK±π∓

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Schott, G.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2008-11-01

    We perform a time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of the decays B0→φK*(892)0, φK2*(1430)0, and φ(Kπ)0*0 with the final sample of about 465×106 B Bmacr pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Twenty-four parameters are investigated, including the branching fractions, CP-violation parameters, and parameters sensitive to final-state interactions. We use the dependence on the Kπ invariant mass of the interference between the scalar and vector or tensor components to resolve discrete ambiguities of the strong and weak phases. We use the time evolution of the B→φKS0π0 channel to extract the CP-violation phase difference Δϕ00=0.28±0.42±0.04 between the B and Bmacr decay amplitudes. When the B→φK±π∓ channel is included, the fractions of longitudinal polarization fL of the vector-vector and vector-tensor decay modes are measured to be 0.494±0.034±0.013 and 0.901-0.058+0.046±0.037, respectively. This polarization pattern requires the presence of a positive-helicity amplitude in the vector-vector decay from a currently unknown source.

  12. Probing the Orientation of Surface-Immobilized Protein G B1 Using ToF-SIMS Sum Frequency Generation and NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    L Baugh; T Weidner; J Baio; P Nguyen; L Gamble; P Stayton; D Castner

    2011-12-31

    The ability to orient active proteins on surfaces is a critical aspect of many medical technologies. An important related challenge is characterizing protein orientation in these surface films. This study uses a combination of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to characterize the orientation of surface-immobilized Protein G B1, a rigid 6 kDa domain that binds the Fc fragment of IgG. Two Protein G B1 variants with a single cysteine introduced at either end were immobilized via the cysteine thiol onto maleimide-oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized gold and bare gold substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to measure the amount of immobilized protein, and ToF-SIMS was used to measure the amino acid composition of the exposed surface of the protein films and to confirm covalent attachment of protein thiol to the substrate maleimide groups. SFG and NEXAFS were used to characterize the ordering and orientation of peptide or side chain bonds. On both substrates and for both cysteine positions, ToF-SIMS data showed enrichment of mass peaks from amino acids located at the end of the protein opposite to the cysteine surface position as compared with nonspecifically immobilized protein, indicating end-on protein orientations. Orientation on the maleimide substrate was enhanced by increasing pH (7.0-9.5) and salt concentration (0-1.5 M NaCl). SFG spectral peaks characteristic of ordered {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet elements were observed for both variants but not for cysteine-free wild type protein on the maleimide surface. The phase of the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet peaks indicated a predominantly upright orientation for both variants, consistent with an end-on protein binding configuration. Polarization dependence of the NEXAFS signal from the N 1s to {pi}* transition of {beta}-sheet peptide bonds also

  13. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-12-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in the physics laboratory. Many traditional physics experiments can now be performed very conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment while simultaneously reducing the laboratory budget substantially by using student-owned smartphones.

  14. Study of CP Symmetry Violation in the Charmonium-K*(892) Channel By a Complete Time Dependent Angular Analysis (BaBar Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    T'Jampens, Stephane; /Orsay

    2006-09-18

    This thesis presents the full-angular time-dependent analysis of the vector-vector channel B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0}. After a review of the CP violation in the B meson system, the phenomenology of the charmonium-K*(892) channels is exposed. The method for the measurement of the transversity amplitudes of the B {yields} J/{psi}K*(892), based on a pseudo-likelihood method, is then exposed. The results from a 81.9 fb{sup -1} of collected data by the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance peak are |A{sub 0}|{sup 2} = 0.565 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.004, |A{sub {parallel}}|{sup 2} = 0.206 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, |A{sub {perpendicular}}|{sup 2} = 0.228 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, {delta}{sub {parallel}} = -2.766 {+-} 0.105 {+-} 0.040 and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.935 {+-} 0.067 {+-} 0.040. Note that ({delta}{sub {parallel}}, {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) {yields} (-{delta}{sub {parallel}}, {pi} - {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) is also a solution. The strong phases {delta}{sub {parallel}} and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} are at {approx}> 3{sigma} from {+-}{pi}, signing the presence of final state interactions and the breakdown of the factorization hypothesis. The forward-backward analysis of the K{pi} mass spectrum revealed the presence of a coherent S-wave interfering with the K*(892). It is the first evidence of this wave in the K{pi} system coming from a B meson. The particularity of the B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0} channel is to have a time-dependent but also an angular distribution which allows to measure sin 2{beta} but also cos2{beta}. The results from an unbinned maximum likelihood fit are sin 2{beta} = -0.10 {+-} 0.57 {+-} 0.14 and cos 2{beta} = 3.32{sub -0.96}{sup +0.76} {+-} 0.27 with the transversity amplitudes fixed to the values given above. The other solution for the strong phases flips the sign of cos 2{beta}. Theoretical considerations based on the s-quark helicity

  15. The nature of nitrate at the ice surface studied by XPS and NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Krepelová, Adéla; Newberg, John; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ammann, Markus

    2010-08-21

    Trace contaminants such as strong acids have been suggested to affect the thickness of the quasi-liquid layer at the ice/air interface, which is at the heart of heterogeneous chemical reactions between snowpacks or cirrus clouds and the surrounding air. We used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron yield near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to probe the ice surface in the presence of HNO(3) formed from the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO(2) at 230 K. We studied the nature of the adsorbed species at the ice/vapor interfaces as well as the effect of HNO(3) on the hydrogen bonding environment at the ice surface. The NEXAFS spectrum of ice with adsorbed HNO(3) can be represented as linear combination of the clean ice and nitrate solution spectrum, thus indicating that in the presence of HNO(3) the ice surface consists of a mixture of clean ice and nitrate ions that are coordinated as in a concentrated solution at the same temperature but higher HNO(3) pressures. PMID:20532376

  16. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  17. NEXAFS and XMCD studies of single-phase Co doped ZnO thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav Pratap; Kumar, Ravi; Thakur, P; Brookes, N B; Chae, K H; Choi, W K

    2009-05-01

    A study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Co doped ZnO thin films synthesized by ion implantation followed by swift heavy ion irradiation is presented using near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements. The spectral features of NEXAFS at the Co L(3,2)-edge show entirely different features than that of metallic Co clusters and other Co oxide phases. The atomic multiplet calculations are performed to determine the valence state, symmetry and the crystal field splitting, which show that in the present system Co is in the 2+ state and substituted at the Zn site in tetrahedral symmetry with 10Dq = -0.6 eV. The ferromagnetic character of these materials is confirmed through XMCD spectra. To rule out the possibilities of defect induced magnetism, the results are compared with Ar annealed and Ar-ion implanted pure ZnO thin films. The presented results confirm the substitution of Co at the Zn site in the ZnO matrix, which is responsible for room temperature ferromagnetism. PMID:21825451

  18. Vibrationally resolved high-resolution NEXAFS and XPS spectra of phenanthrene and coronene

    SciTech Connect

    Fronzoni, Giovanna; Baseggio, Oscar; Stener, Mauro; Hua, Weijie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi; Apicella, Barbara; Alfé, Michela; Simone, Monica de; Kivimäki, Antti; Coreno, Marcello

    2014-07-28

    We performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the C1s Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy in the gas phase of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and coronene), typically formed in combustion reactions. In the NEXAFS of both molecules, a double-peak structure appears in the C1s → LUMO region, which differ by less than 1 eV in transition energies. The vibronic coupling is found to play an important role in such systems. It leads to weakening of the lower-energy peak and strengthening of the higher-energy one because the 0 − n (n > 0) vibrational progressions of the lower-energy peak appear in nearly the same region of the higher-energy peak. Vibrationally resolved theoretical spectra computed within the Frank-Condon (FC) approximation and linear coupling model agree well with the high-resolution experimental results. We find that FC-active normal modes all correspond to in-plane vibrations.

  19. Direct measurement of the angular dependence of the single-photon ionization of aligned N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, I.; Lock, R.; Sharma, V.; Gagnon, E.; Pratt, S. T.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Murnane, M. M.; Li, W.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Colorado; NIST

    2008-01-01

    By combining a state-of-the-art high-harmonic ultrafast soft X-ray source with field-free dynamic alignment, we map the angular dependence of molecular photoionization yields for the first time for a nondissociative molecule. The observed modulation in ion yield as a function of molecular alignment is attributed to the molecular frame transition dipole moment of single-photon ionization to the X, A and B states of N{sub 2}{sup +} and CO{sub 2}{sup +}. Our data show that the transition dipoles for single-photon ionization of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at 43 eV have larger perpendicular components than parallel ones. A direct comparison with published theoretical partial wave ionization cross-sections confirms these experimental observations, which are the first results to allow such comparison with theory for bound cation states. The results provide the first step toward a novel method for measuring molecular frame transition dipole matrix elements.

  20. C K-edge NEXAFS spectra of graphene with physical and chemical defects: a study based on density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Christopher; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Saalfrank, Peter

    2014-07-21

    Recently, C K-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of graphite (HOPG) surfaces have been measured for the pristine material, and for HOPG treated with either bromine or krypton plasmas (Lippitz et al., Surf. Sci., 2013, 611, L1). Changes of the NEXAFS spectra characteristic for physical (krypton) and/or chemical/physical modifications of the surface (bromine) upon plasma treatment were observed. Their molecular origin, however, remained elusive. In this work we study by density functional theory, the effects of selected point and line defects as well as chemical modifications on NEXAFS carbon K-edge spectra of single graphene layers. For Br-treated surfaces, also Br 3d X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) are simulated by a cluster approach, to identify possible chemical modifications. We observe that some of the defects related to plasma treatment lead to characteristic changes of NEXAFS spectra, similar to those in experiment. Theory provides possible microscopic origins for these changes. PMID:24901898

  1. Angular dependence of the flux pinning for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}/PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Horng, H.E.; Wu, J.M.; Yang, H.C.

    1997-06-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetic relaxation for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}/PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (YBCO/PBCO) superlattice was measured under magnetic field to investigate the flux pinning. The applied magnetic field was 0.1 Tesla. The direction of the applied magnetic field makes an angle of 10{degrees}, 20{degrees}, 30{degrees}, 45{degrees}... with the c-axis of YBCO/PBCO superlattice. Based on the Anderson-Kim model the authors derive the pinning energy of this film. The pinning energy is angular independent. The results are discussed.

  2. NEXAFS Depth Profiling of Surface Segregation in Block Copolymer Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Paik, M; Ober, C; Martinelli, E; Galli, G; Sohn, K; Kramer, E; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    NEXAFS spectroscopy was used to probe the surface composition and under-water surface reconstruction of thin films of comb-like diblock copolymers with cylindrical and spherical microphases. The polymers consisted of a polystyrene block, and a second block prepared from a styrenic monomer grafted with fluoroalkyl-tagged poly(ethylene glycol) side chains. Compositional depth profiling of the microphase separated block copolymer films, in the top 1-3 nm of the film, was performed to understand the role of block copolymer microstructure and self-assembly on surface composition. Using experimentally determined concentration profiles, the surface concentration of phenyl ring carbon atoms was quantified and compared with those of homopolymer and random copolymer controls. The carbon atoms from the relatively high surface energy phenyl groups were depleted or excluded from the surface, in favor of the low surface-energy fluoroalkyl groups. While it is expected that block copolymer surfaces will be completely covered by a wetting lamellar layer of the lower surface energy block, a significant amount of the higher surface energy polystyrene block was found to be present in the surface region of the cylinder-forming block copolymer. Evidently, the spontaneous formation of the cylindrical polystyrene microdomains in the near-surface region compensated for the lowering of the free energy that could have been achieved by completely covering the surfaces with a lamellar layer of the lower surface energy fluorinated block. All surfaces underwent molecular reconstruction after immersion in water. The experimental concentration depth profiles indicated an increased surface depletion of phenyl ring carbon atoms in the water-immersed thin films, due to the tendency of hydrophilic PEG side groups to be present at the polymer-water interface. Such a detailed characterization of the outermost layers of the block copolymer surfaces was possible because of the exceptional depth resolution

  3. Measurements of the angular dependence of the nonlinear transverse magnetic moment of YBCO as a probe of the pairing-state symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anand

    The symmetry of the superconducting order parameter reflects the symmetries in the underlying mechanism of electron pairing, such as 's-wave ' symmetry for conventional BCS superconductors with a phonon mediated pairing mechanism. The High-Tc superconductors are widely believed to be unconventional, inasmuch the conventional BCS theory fails to describe their physical properties. Amongst the proposed theories for describing these novel superconductors, the leading candidate for the pairing state symmetry is dx2-y2 or 'd-wave'. This state has a lower symmetry than the underlying Fermi surface, has nodes where the order parameter changes sign and the gap goes to zero on the Fermi surface, with a finite density of states for the lowest lying excitations. In order to study the pairing symmetry, we have developed a technique that uses the nonlinear Meissner effect in the transverse magnetic moment (NLTM) as a probe of the low energy excitations, below 1 meV. The predictions for this effect are known from exact numerical calculations based on the ideas of Yip and Sauls. In this thesis, our experiment is motivated with a brief overview of the pairing state problem. Techniques for sample preparation as also the development of various instrumentation techniques to study the angular dependence of the NLTM are described, and the results of our experiments are presented. Our data on high quality single crystals of YBa2Cu3O6.95 support a minimum gap of 0.5--0.75 meV in the quasiparticle excitation spectrum at all points on the Fermi surface. This is contrary to pure ' d-wave' symmetry, but does not rule out gap functions with deep minima or 'quasinode'.

  4. Angular dependences in auger electron emission from the Ni(001) face. II. Angular distribution of auger electron emission from the Ni(001) face for different temperatures and different electron energies in M 2,3VV transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mróz, S.; Mróz, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Fritzsche, V.

    1989-12-01

    Angular-resolved Auger electron spectroscopy (ARAES) was applied for the investigation of the Ni(001) face of both a clean surface and a surface covered with a c(2 × 2) sulphur layer at different sample temperatures. Polar ARAES profiles measured for the NiM 2,3VV transition are presented for the [100] and [110] azimuths, for the full Auger current and for particular Auger energies as well. These latter profiles are theoretically calculated and compared with experiment. An increase of the temperature up to 980 K does not influence appreciably the polar ARAES profiles for the c(2 × 2) {S}/{Ni}(001) sample. It indicates that the atomic structure of the surface investigated is not changed in this temperature region.

  5. The Dependence of Stellar Mass and Angular Momentum Losses on Latitude and the Interaction of Active Region and Dipolar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2015-11-01

    Rotation evolution of late-type stars is dominated by magnetic braking and the underlying factors that control this angular momentum loss are important for the study of stellar spin-down. In this work, we study angular momentum loss as a function of two different aspects of magnetic activity using a calibrated Alfvén wave-driven magnetohydrodynamic wind model: the strengths of magnetic spots and their distribution in latitude. By driving the model using solar and modified solar surface magnetograms, we show that the topology of the field arising from the net interaction of both small-scale and large-scale field is important for spin-down rates and that angular momentum loss is not a simple function of large scale magnetic field strength. We find that changing the latitude of magnetic spots can modify mass and angular momentum loss rates by a factor of two. The general effect that causes these differences is the closing down of large-scale open field at mid- and high-latitudes by the addition of the small-scale field. These effects might give rise to modulation of mass and angular momentum loss through stellar cycles, and present a problem for ab initio attempts to predict stellar spin-down based on wind models. For all the magnetogram cases considered here, from dipoles to various spotted distributions, we find that angular momentum loss is dominated by the mass loss at mid-latitudes. The spin-down torque applied by magnetized winds therefore acts at specific latitudes and is not evenly distributed over the stellar surface, though this aspect is unlikely to be important for understanding spin-down and surface flows on stars.

  6. Angular momentum projected semiclassics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasse, Rainer W.

    1987-06-01

    By using angular momentum projected plane waves as wave functions, we derive semiclassical expressions for the single-particle propagator, the partition function, the nonlocal density matrix, the single-particle density and the one particle-one hole level density for fixed angular momentum and fixed z-component or summed over the z-components. Other quantities can be deduced from the propagator. In coordinate space ( r, r') the relevant quantities depend on |r-r'| instead of | r- r'| and in Wigner space ( R, P) they become proportional to the angular momentum constraints δ(| R × P|/ h̵-l) and δ( R × P) z/ h̵-m) . As applications we calculate the single-particle and one-particle-one hole level densities for harmonic oscillator and Hill-Wheeler box potentials and the imaginary part of the optical potential and its volume integral with an underlying harmonic oscillator potential and a zero range two-body interaction.

  7. On the importance of nuclear quantum motions in near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-02-26

    We report the effects of sampling nuclear quantum motion with path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) on calculations of the nitrogen K-edge spectra of two isolated organic molecules. S-triazine, a prototypical aromatic molecule occupying primarily its vibrational ground state at room temperature, exhibits substantially improved spectral agreement when nuclear quantum effects are included via PIMD, as compared to the spectra obtained from either a single fixed-nuclei based calculation or from a series of configurations extracted from a classical molecular dynamics trajectory. Nuclear quantum dynamics can accurately explain the intrinsic broadening of certain features. Glycine, the simplest amino acid, is problematic due to large spectral variations associated with multiple energetically accessible conformations at the experimental temperature. This work highlights the sensitivity of NEXAFS to quantum nuclear motions in molecules, and the necessity of accurately sampling such quantum motion when simulating their NEXAFS spectra.

  8. Vulcanization reaction of squalene and S8 powder studied by Sulfur K-edge NEXAFS under liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, S.; Menjo, Y.; Tsukada, C.; Ogawa, S.; Kutluk, G.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Vulcanized rubber materials are useful in our surroundings. However, detail structure and reaction are not revealed even in present. Since squalene molecule possesses some same properties compared with natural rubber, we have prepared the samples of vulcanized squalene at 140 °C for several hours. To understand the vulcanization reaction,sulfur K-edge NEXAFS measurements have been carried out for the vulcanized squalene under liquid phase with He-path system and fluorescence detection mode. Moreover, we have tried curve fitting analysis of NEXAFS spectra. The results indicate that the squalene has been vulcanized by the S8 molecule at 140 °C and the S8 molecule length is shortened from 8 to 5-6 after the vulcanization reaction.

  9. The Structure of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Water: Studies Combining UV-Vis, NEXAFS and RIXS Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainar, A.; Stevens, J. S.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    NEXAFS-RIXS and home laboratory-based UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy are combined to examine the speciation and electronic structure of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) in aqueous solution as a function of pH. DFT and TD-DFT electronic structure calculations reproduce the experimental trends and provide a correlation between the experimental HOMO↔LUMO gap as well as the electronic transitions between molecular orbitals in the non-ionic, anionic and cationic forms of PABA.

  10. Characterization of microscale wear in a ploysilicon-based MEMS device using AFM and PEEM-NEXAFS spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, D. S.; Konicek, A. R.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Sumant, A. V.; de Boer, M. P.; Corwin, A. D.; Carpick, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms of microscale wear in silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are elucidated by studying a polysilicon nanotractor, a device specifically designed to conduct friction and wear tests under controlled conditions. Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) was combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantitatively probe chemical changes and structural modification, respectively, in the wear track of the nanotractor. The ability of PEEM-NEXAFS to spatially map chemical variations in the near-surface region of samples at high lateral spatial resolution is unparalleled and therefore ideally suited for this study. The results show that it is possible to detect microscopic chemical changes using PEEM-NEXAFS, specifically, oxidation at the sliding interface of a MEMS device. We observe that wear induces oxidation of the polysilicon at the immediate contact interface, and the spectra are consistent with those from amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The oxidation is correlated with gouging and debris build-up in the wear track, as measured by AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  11. Plasma bromination of HOPG surfaces: A NEXAFS and synchrotron XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippitz, Andreas; Friedrich, Jörg F.; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Br bonding on plasma brominated graphite surfaces has been studied by using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Br2 and bromoform were used as plasma gases in an r.f. cw low pressure plasma process. Kr plasma had been used to study separately the physical and chemical plasma etching effects. At early steps of plasma bromination which lead to only small XPS Br surface concentration values a quick decay of aromaticity has been observed. At low Br surface concentration radical or even electrophilic addition of bromine onto sp2 carbon atoms is discussed as the dominating reaction pathway. At higher Br surface concentrations the inherent formation of sp3 defects in the graphene network by chemical etching processes promotes nucleophilic substitution of bromine at sp3 carbons as a competing reaction pathway. Both reaction pathways lead to C-Br species characterized by the same Br 3d XPS binding energy. However more than one Br 3d component in XP spectra has been found at lower Br2 plasma induced Br surface concentrations and complexation of bromine at HOPG is assumed as a third way of interaction with Br2 plasma.

  12. Phenomenology of preequilibrium angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbach, C.; Mann, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    The systematics of continuum angular distributions from a wide variety of light ion nuclear reactions have been studied. To first order, the shape of the angular distributions have been found to depend only on the energy of the outgoing particle and on the division of the cross section into multi-step direct and multi-step compound parts. The angular distributions can be described in terms of Legendre polynomials with the reduced polynomial coefficients exhibiting a simple dependence on the outgoing particle energy. Two integer and four continuous parameters with universal values are needed to describe the coefficients for outgoing energies of 2 to 60 MeV in all the reaction types studied. This parameterization combined with a modified Griffin model computer code permits the calculation of double differential cross sections for light ion continuum reactions where no data is available.

  13. Optical devices having flakes suspended in a host fluid to provide a flake/fluid system providing flakes with angularly dependent optical properties in response to an alternating current electric field due to the dielectric properties of the system

    DOEpatents

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2006-05-09

    Optical devices utilizing flakes (also called platelets) suspended in a host fluid have optical characteristics, such as reflective properties, which are angular dependent in response to an AC field. The reflectivity may be Bragg-like, and the characteristics are obtained through the use of flakes of liquid crystal material, such as polymer liquid crystal (PLC) materials including polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) and polymer nematic liquid crystal (PNLC) material or birefringent polymers (BP). The host fluid may be propylene carbonate, poly(ethylene glycol) or other fluids or fluid mixtures having fluid conductivity to support conductivity in the flake/host system. AC field dependent rotation of 90.degree. can be obtained at rates and field intensities dependent upon the frequency and magnitude of the AC field. The devices are useful in providing displays, polarizers, filters, spatial light modulators and wherever switchable polarizing, reflecting, and transmission properties are desired.

  14. Angular Momentum and Topological Dependence of Kepler's Third Law in the Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon Family of Periodic Three-Body Orbits.

    PubMed

    Janković, Marija R; Dmitrašinović, V

    2016-02-12

    We use 57 recently found topological satellites of Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon's periodic orbits with values of the topological exponent k ranging from k=3 to k=58 to plot the angular momentum L as a function of the period T, with both L and T rescaled to energy E=-0.5. Upon plotting L(T/k) we find that all our solutions fall on a curve that is virtually indiscernible by the naked eye from the L(T) curve for nonsatellite solutions. The standard deviation of the satellite data from the sixth-order polynomial fit to the progenitor data is σ=0.13. This regularity supports Hénon's 1976 conjecture that the linearly stable Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon orbits are also perpetually, or Kol'mogorov-Arnol'd-Moser, stable. PMID:26918993

  15. Angular Momentum and Topological Dependence of Kepler's Third Law in the Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon Family of Periodic Three-Body Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Marija R.; Dmitrašinović, V.

    2016-02-01

    We use 57 recently found topological satellites of Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon's periodic orbits with values of the topological exponent k ranging from k =3 to k =58 to plot the angular momentum L as a function of the period T , with both L and T rescaled to energy E =-0.5 . Upon plotting L (T /k ) we find that all our solutions fall on a curve that is virtually indiscernible by the naked eye from the L (T ) curve for nonsatellite solutions. The standard deviation of the satellite data from the sixth-order polynomial fit to the progenitor data is σ =0.13 . This regularity supports Hénon's 1976 conjecture that the linearly stable Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon orbits are also perpetually, or Kol'mogorov-Arnol'd-Moser, stable.

  16. Model-Dependent Constraint on Quark Total Angular Momentum Based on the Transverse Target-spin Asymmetry Measured in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Wolf-Dieter

    2007-06-13

    Results are reported on the transverse target-spin asymmetry (TTSA) associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. The data have been accumulated in the years 2002-2004 by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV e+ beam scattered on a transversely polarized hydrogen target. Two azimuthal amplitudes of the TTSA appearing to LO in 1/Q and {alpha}s, A{sub UT}{sup sin({phi}-{phi}{sub S})cos{phi}} and A{sub UT}{sup cos({phi} -{phi}{sub S})sin{phi}}, are given as a function of -t,xB,Q2 in the kinematic range |t| < 0.7 GeV2, 0.03 < xB < 0.35 and 1 < Q2 < 10 GeV2. The first amplitude is found to be sensitive to the generalized parton distribution (GPD) E of the proton, which can be parameterized in a GPD model through quark total angular momentum Jq(q = u, d). Within the context of this model, a constraint in the (Ju,Jd) plane is obtained from HERMES TTSA data.

  17. Partonic orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh; Shahveh, Abolfazl

    2013-04-01

    Ji's decomposition of nucleon spin is used and the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluon are calculated. We have utilized the so called valon model description of the nucleon in the next to leading order. It is found that the average orbital angular momentum of quarks is positive, but small, whereas that of gluon is negative and large. Individual quark flavor contributions are also calculated. Some regularities on the total angular momentum of the quarks and gluon are observed.

  18. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  19. Charge-multiplicity dependence of single-particle transverse-rapidity yt and pseudorapidity η densities and 2D angular correlations from 200 GeV p -p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Prindle, Duncan J.

    2016-01-01

    An established phenomenology and theoretical interpretation of p -p collision data at lower collision energies should provide a reference for p -p and other collision systems at higher energies, against which claims of novel physics may be tested. The description of p -p collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider has remained incomplete even as claims for collectivity and other novelties in data from smaller systems at the large hadron collider have emerged recently. In this study we report the charge-multiplicity dependence of two-dimensional angular correlations and of single-particle (SP) densities on transverse rapidity yt and pseudorapidity η from 200 GeV p -p collisions. We define a comprehensive and self-consistent two-component (soft+hard ) model for hadron production and report a significant p -p nonjet quadrupole component as a third (angular-correlation) component. Our results have implications for p -p centrality, the underlying event, collectivity in small systems and the existence of flows in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  20. Angular Acceleration Without Torque?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.2

  1. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  2. Determination of g-tensors of low-symmetry Nd{sup 3+} centers in LiNbO{sub 3} by rectification of angular dependence of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, V. Malovichko, G.; Munro, M.; Kokanyan, E.

    2015-07-28

    Two procedures for facilitation of line tracing and deciphering of complicated spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were developed: a correction of microwave frequencies for every orientation of external magnetic field on the base of known values of g-tensor components for a reference paramagnetic center and followed rectification of measured angular dependences using plots of effective deviation of g{sup 2}-factors of observed lines from effective g{sup 2}-factors of the reference center versus angles or squared cosines of angles describing magnetic field orientations. Their application to EPR spectra of nearly stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals doped with neodymium allowed identifying two axial and six different low-symmetry Nd{sup 3+} centers, to determine all components of their g-tensors, and to propose common divacancy models for a whole family of Nd{sup 3+} centers.

  3. Influence of the FFLO-like state on the upper critical field of a superconductor/ferromagnet bilayer: Angular and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenk, D.; Hemmida, M.; Morari, R.; Zdravkov, V. I.; Ullrich, A.; Müller, C.; Sidorenko, A. S.; Horn, S.; Tagirov, L. R.; Loidl, A.; von Nidda, H.-A. Krug; Tidecks, R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the upper critical magnetic field Hc of a superconductor-ferromagnet (S/F) bilayer of Nb/Cu41Ni59 and a Nb film (as reference). We obtained the dependence of Hc ⊥ and Hc ∥ (perpendicular and parallel to the film plane, respectively) on the temperature T by measurements of the resistive transitions and the dependence on the inclination angle θ of the applied field to the film plane, by nonresonant microwave absorption. Over a wide range, Hc ⊥ and Hc ∥ show the temperature dependence predicted by the Ginzburg-Landau theory. At low temperatures and close to the critical temperature, deviations are observed. While Hc(θ ) of the Nb film follows the Tinkham prediction for thin superconducting films, the Nb/Cu41Ni59 -bilayer data exhibit deviations when θ approaches zero. We attribute this finding to the additional anisotropy induced by the quasi-one-dimensional Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO)-like state and propose a new vortex structure in S/F bilayers, adopting the segmentation approach from high-temperature superconductors.

  4. Stellar Angular Diameter Relations for Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Arthur; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2016-01-01

    Determining the physical properties of microlensing events depends on having accurate angular radii of the source star. Using long-baseline optical interferometry we are able to determine the angular sizes of nearby stars with uncertainties less than 2 percent. We present empirical estimates of angular diameters for both dwarfs/subgiants and giant stars as functions of five color indices which are relevant to planned microlensing surveys. We find in all considered colors that metallicity does not play a statistically significant role in predicting stellar size for the samples of stars considered.

  5. Electronic quenching of O({sup 1}D) by Xe: Oscillations in the product angular distribution and their dependence on collision energy

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Lauren A.; Smith, Mica C.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.; Boering, Kristie A.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-08-07

    The dynamics of the O({sup 1}D) + Xe electronic quenching reaction was investigated in a crossed beam experiment at four collision energies. Marked large-scale oscillations in the differential cross sections were observed for the inelastic scattering products, O({sup 3}P) and Xe. The shape and relative phases of the oscillatory structure depend strongly on collision energy. Comparison of the experimental results with time-independent scattering calculations shows qualitatively that this behavior is caused by Stueckelberg interferences, for which the quantum phases of the multiple reaction pathways accessible during electronic quenching constructively and destructively interfere.

  6. Improve angular dependence of emission intensity in top-emitting organic light-emitting devices by using curved surfaces as substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifan; Yang, Tong; Ou, Xiali; Gao, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have demonstrated an effective way to suppress the viewing angle dependence of the emission intensity of top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (TOLEDs) by fabricating devices on curved surfaces. From this approach, curved light emission surface has been obtained and TOLEDs with curved surface exhibit a relatively dispersed light emission pattern. As a result, the variation of emission intensity with viewing angles can be relieved. In addition, we can almost observe the same luminance and efficiency in OLEDs with and without curved surface light emission.

  7. Neoclassical Angular Momentum Flux Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2004-11-01

    The toroidal angular momentum flux in neoclassical transport theory of small rotations depends on the second order (in ion poloidal gyroradius over plasma scale length) ion distribution function. Owing to the complexity of the calculation, the result obtained a long time ago for circular cross-section tokamak plasmas in the banana regime [M.N. Rosenbluth, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, Vienna, 1971), Vol. 1, p. 495] has never been reproduced. Using a representation of the angular momentum flux based on the solution of an adjoint equation to the usual linearized drift kinetic equation, and performing systematically a large-aspect-ratio expansion, we have obtained the flux for flux surfaces of arbitrary shape. We have found the same analytic form for the temperature gradient driven part of the flux, but the overall numerical multiplier is different and has the opposite sign. Implications for rotations in discharges with no apparent momentum input will be discussed.

  8. Study of angular dependence of exchange bias and misalignment in uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropy in NiFe(111)/FeMn(111)/CoFeB(amorphous) stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Braj Bhusan; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2015-07-01

    We report the investigation of the in-plane azimuthal angular dependence of the magnetization reversal in the ion beam sputtered exchanged biased NiFe(111)/FeMn(111)/CoFeB(amorphous) stack. Compared to the as-deposited case, the magnetic annealing resulted in 3 fold enhancement in exchange bias but decrease in coercivity. The observed cosine dependence of exchange biased CoFeB layer on the in-plane azimuthal angle of applied field is corroborated with Meiklejohn and Bean model. The training effect associated with the exchange bias showed unconventional increase in coercivity after first cycle of hysteresis loop, while the exchange bias decreases sharply, and for subsequent cycles the exchange bias follows the empirical relation based on the energy dissipation in the AF layer. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements also exhibited the in-plane azimuthal angle dependence of the magnetic resonance field indicating that the uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropies are not collinear, although they lie in the same plane. However, no misalignment between the unidirectional anisotropy and the exchange bias direction is observed. The misalignment angle between the uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropy, as measured by FMR, is found to be 10° and 14° for CoFeB and NiFe, respectively. This misalignment is attributed to the interface roughness as revealed by x-ray reflectance measurements.

  9. Conformations of polyaniline molecules adsorbed on Au(111) probed by in situ STM and ex situ XPS and NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Lee, YiHui; Chang, ChinZen; Yau, ShuehLin; Fan, LiangJen; Yang, YawWen; Yang, LiangYueh Ou; Itaya, Kingo

    2009-05-13

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) have been used to examine the conformation of a monolayer of polyaniline (PAN) molecules produced on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode by anodization at 1.0 V [vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)] in 0.10 M H(2)SO(4) containing 0.030 M aniline. The as-produced PAN molecules took on a well-defined linear conformation stretching for 500 A or more, as shown by in situ and ex situ STM. The XPS and NEXAFS results indicated that the linear PAN seen at 1.0 V assumed the form of an emeraldine salt made of PAN chains and (bi)sulfate anions. Shifting the potential from 1.0 to 0.7 V altered the shape of the PAN molecules from straight to crooked, which was ascribed to restructuring of the Au(111) electrified interface on the basis of voltammetric and XPS results. In situ STM showed that further decreasing the potential to 0.5 V transformed the crooked PAN threads into a mostly linear form again, with preferential alignment and formation of some locally ordered structures. PAN molecules could be reduced from emeraldine to leucoemeraldine as the potential was decreased to 0.2 V or less. In situ STM showed that the fully reduced PAN molecules were straight but mysteriously shortened to approximately 50 A in length. The conformation of PAN did not recuperate when the potential was shifted positively to 1.0 V. PMID:19361217

  10. Nanoscale Biogeocomplexity of the Organomineral Assemblage in Soil: Application of STXM Microscopy and C 1s-NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyangi,J.; Solomon, D.; Liang, B.; Lerotic, M.; Wirick, S.; Lehmann, J.

    2006-01-01

    Methodological constraints limit the extent to which existing soil aggregation models explain carbon (C) stabilization in soil. We hypothesize that the physical infrastructure of microaggregates plays a major role in determining the chemistry of the occluded C and intimate associations between particulate C, chemically stabilized C and the soil mineral matrix. We employed synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (C 1s-NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate the nanoscale physical assemblage and C chemistry of 150-{micro}m microaggregates from a Kenyan Oxisol. Ultra-thin sections were obtained after embedding microaggregates in a sulfur block and sectioning on a cryo-microtome at -55 degrees C. Principal component and cluster analyses revealed four spatially distinct features: pore surfaces, mineral matter, organic matter, and their mixtures. The occurrence of these features did not vary between exterior and interior locations; however, the degree of oxidation decreased while the complexity and occurrence of aliphatic C forms increased from exterior to interior regions of the microaggregate. At both locations, compositional mapping rendered a nanoscale distribution of oxidized C clogging pores and coating pore cavities on mineral surface. Hydrophobic organic matter of aromatic and aliphatic nature, representing particulate C forms appeared physically occluded in 2- to 5-{micro}m pore spaces. Our findings demonstrate that organic matter in microaggregates may be found as either oxidized C associated with mineral surfaces or aromatic and aliphatic C in particulate form. Using STXM and C 1s-NEXAFS we are for the first time able to resolve the nanoscale biogeocomplexity of unaltered soil microaggregates.

  11. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  12. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  13. One-dimensional photonic crystals with a planar oriented nematic layer: Temperature and angular dependence of the spectra of defect modes

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipkin, V. G. Gunyakov, V. A.; Myslivets, S. A.; Gerasimov, V. P.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Vetrov, S. Ya.; Shabanov, V. F.

    2008-02-15

    Transmission spectra of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) formed by two multilayer dielectric mirrors and a planar oriented layer of 5CB nematic liquid crystal (LC) that is sandwiched between these mirrors and serves as a structure defect are investigated experimentally. Specific features of the behavior of the spectrum of defect modes as a function of the angle of incidence of light on the crystal are studied for two polarizations: parallel and perpendicular to the director of the LC; the director either lies in the plane of incidence or is perpendicular to it. It is shown that, for the configurations considered, the maxima of the defect modes shift toward the short-wavelength region as the tilt angle of incidence radiation increases; this tendency is more manifest for the parallel-polarized component, when the director lies in the plane of incidence. In the latter case, the width of the photonic band gap (PBG) appreciably decreases. The temperature dependence of the polarization components of the transmission spectra of a PC is investigated in the case of normal incidence of light. The spectral shift of defect modes due to the variation of the refractive index of the LC at the nematic-isotropic liquid phase transition point is measured. It is shown that, in real PCs, the amplitude of defect modes decreases when approaching the center of the band gap, as well as when the number of layers in the dielectric mirrors increases. Theoretical transmission spectra of the PCs calculated by the method of recurrence relations with regard to the decay of defect modes are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. One-dimensional photonic crystals with a planar oriented nematic layer: Temperature and angular dependence of the spectra of defect modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, V. G.; Gunyakov, V. A.; Myslivets, S. A.; Gerasimov, V. P.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Vetrov, S. Ya.; Shabanov, V. F.

    2008-02-01

    Transmission spectra of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) formed by two multilayer dielectric mirrors and a planar oriented layer of 5CB nematic liquid crystal (LC) that is sandwiched between these mirrors and serves as a structure defect are investigated experimentally. Specific features of the behavior of the spectrum of defect modes as a function of the angle of incidence of light on the crystal are studied for two polarizations: parallel and perpendicular to the director of the LC; the director either lies in the plane of incidence or is perpendicular to it. It is shown that, for the configurations considered, the maxima of the defect modes shift toward the short-wavelength region as the tilt angle of incidence radiation increases; this tendency is more manifest for the parallel-polarized component, when the director lies in the plane of incidence. In the latter case, the width of the photonic band gap (PBG) appreciably decreases. The temperature dependence of the polarization components of the transmission spectra of a PC is investigated in the case of normal incidence of light. The spectral shift of defect modes due to the variation of the refractive index of the LC at the nematic-isotropic liquid phase transition point is measured. It is shown that, in real PCs, the amplitude of defect modes decreases when approaching the center of the band gap, as well as when the number of layers in the dielectric mirrors increases. Theoretical transmission spectra of the PCs calculated by the method of recurrence relations with regard to the decay of defect modes are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Angular momentum radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thidé, B.; Tamburini, F.; Then, H.; Someda, C. G.; Mari, Elletra; Parisi, G.; Spinello, F.; Romanato, Fra

    2014-02-01

    Wireless communication amounts to encoding information onto physical observables carried by electromagnetic (EM) fields, radiating them into surrounding space, and detecting them remotely by an appropriate sensor connected to an informationdecoding receiver. Each observable is second order in the fields and fulfills a conservation law. In present-day radio only the EM linear momentum observable is fully exploited. A fundamental physical limitation of this observable, which represents the translational degrees of freedom of the charges (typically an oscillating current along a linear antenna) and the fields, is that it is single-mode. This means that a linear-momentum radio communication link comprising one transmitting and one receiving antenna, known as a single-input-single-output (SISO) link, can provide only one transmission channel per frequency (and polarization). In contrast, angular momentum, which represents the rotational degrees of freedom, is multi-mode, allowing an angular-momentum SISO link to accommodate an arbitrary number of independent transmission channels on one and the same frequency (and polarization). We describe the physical properties of EM angular momentum and how they can be exploited, discuss real-world experiments, and outline how the capacity of angular momentum links may be further enhanced by employing multi-port techniques, i.e., the angular momentum counterpart of linear-momentum multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO).

  16. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  17. Metamaterial broadband angular selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yichen; Ye, Dexin; Wang, Li; Celanovic, Ivan; Ran, Lixin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate how broadband angular selectivity can be achieved with stacks of one-dimensionally periodic photonic crystals, each consisting of alternating isotropic layers and effective anisotropic layers, where each effective anisotropic layer is constructed from a multilayered metamaterial. We show that by simply changing the structure of the metamaterials, the selective angle can be tuned to a broad range of angles; and, by increasing the number of stacks, the angular transmission window can be made as narrow as desired. As a proof of principle, we realize the idea experimentally in the microwave regime. The angular selectivity and tunability we report here can have various applications such as in directional control of electromagnetic emitters and detectors.

  18. Dirac Green function for angular projection potentials.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Rudolf

    2015-11-25

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, it is shown that the angular dependence of the Dirac Green function can be described analytically for potentials with non-local dependence on the angular variables if they are chosen as projection potentials in angular momentum space. Because the local dependence on the radial variable can be treated to any precision with present computing capabilities, this means that the Green function can be calculated practically exactly. Second, it is shown that a result of this kind not only holds for a single angular projection potential but also more generally, for instance if space is divided into non-overlapping cells and a separate angular projection potential is used in each cell. This opens the way for relativistic density-functional calculations within a different perspective than the conventional one. Instead of trying to obtain the density for a given potential approximately as well as possible, the density is determined exactly for non-local potentials which can approximate arbitrary local potentials as well as desired. PMID:26523824

  19. Dirac Green function for angular projection potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Rudolf

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, it is shown that the angular dependence of the Dirac Green function can be described analytically for potentials with non-local dependence on the angular variables if they are chosen as projection potentials in angular momentum space. Because the local dependence on the radial variable can be treated to any precision with present computing capabilities, this means that the Green function can be calculated practically exactly. Second, it is shown that a result of this kind not only holds for a single angular projection potential but also more generally, for instance if space is divided into non-overlapping cells and a separate angular projection potential is used in each cell. This opens the way for relativistic density-functional calculations within a different perspective than the conventional one. Instead of trying to obtain the density for a given potential approximately as well as possible, the density is determined exactly for non-local potentials which can approximate arbitrary local potentials as well as desired.

  20. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  1. Nano-Scale Spatial Assessment of Calcium Distribution in Coccolithophores Using Synchrotron-Based Nano-CT and STXM-NEXAFS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyong; Yao, Yanchen; Zou, Xiang; Fan, Shenglan; Zhou, Qing; Dai, Qunwei; Dong, Faqin; Liu, Mingxue; Nie, Xiaoqin; Tan, Daoyong; Li, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Calcified coccolithophores generate calcium carbonate scales around their cell surface. In light of predicted climate change and the global carbon cycle, the biomineralization ability of coccoliths has received growing interest. However, the underlying biomineralization mechanism is not yet well understood; the lack of non-invasive characterizing tools to obtain molecular level information involving biogenic processes and biomineral components remain significant challenges. In the present study, synchrotron-based Nano-computed Tomography (Nano-CT) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy-Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectromicroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) techniques were employed to identify Ca spatial distribution and investigate the compositional chemistry and distinctive features of the association between biomacromolecules and mineral components of calcite present in coccoliths. The Nano-CT results show that the coccolith scale vesicle is similar as a continuous single channel. The mature coccoliths were intracellularly distributed and immediately ejected and located at the exterior surface to form a coccoshpere. The NEXAFS spectromicroscopy results of the Ca L edge clearly demonstrate the existence of two levels of gradients spatially, indicating two distinctive forms of Ca in coccoliths: a crystalline-poor layer surrounded by a relatively crystalline-rich layer. The results show that Sr is absorbed by the coccoliths and that Sr/Ca substitution is rather homogeneous within the coccoliths. Our findings indicate that synchrotron-based STXM-NEXAFS and Nano-CT are excellent tools for the study of biominerals and provide information to clarify biomineralization mechanism. PMID:25530614

  2. Nano-scale spatial assessment of calcium distribution in coccolithophores using synchrotron-based nano-CT and STXM-NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Yao, Yanchen; Zou, Xiang; Fan, Shenglan; Zhou, Qing; Dai, Qunwei; Dong, Faqin; Liu, Mingxue; Nie, Xiaoqin; Tan, Daoyong; Li, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Calcified coccolithophores generate calcium carbonate scales around their cell surface. In light of predicted climate change and the global carbon cycle, the biomineralization ability of coccoliths has received growing interest. However, the underlying biomineralization mechanism is not yet well understood; the lack of non-invasive characterizing tools to obtain molecular level information involving biogenic processes and biomineral components remain significant challenges. In the present study, synchrotron-based Nano-computed Tomography (Nano-CT) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy-Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectromicroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) techniques were employed to identify Ca spatial distribution and investigate the compositional chemistry and distinctive features of the association between biomacromolecules and mineral components of calcite present in coccoliths. The Nano-CT results show that the coccolith scale vesicle is similar as a continuous single channel. The mature coccoliths were intracellularly distributed and immediately ejected and located at the exterior surface to form a coccoshpere. The NEXAFS spectromicroscopy results of the Ca L edge clearly demonstrate the existence of two levels of gradients spatially, indicating two distinctive forms of Ca in coccoliths: a crystalline-poor layer surrounded by a relatively crystalline-rich layer. The results show that Sr is absorbed by the coccoliths and that Sr/Ca substitution is rather homogeneous within the coccoliths. Our findings indicate that synchrotron-based STXM-NEXAFS and Nano-CT are excellent tools for the study of biominerals and provide information to clarify biomineralization mechanism. PMID:25530614

  3. Geometric absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konz, C.; Benford, Gregory

    2003-10-01

    Circularly polarized electromagnetic fields carry both energy and angular momentum. We investigate the conditions under which a circularly polarized wave field transfers angular momentum to a perfectly conducting macroscopic object, using exact electromagnetic wave theory in a steady-state calculation. We find that axisymmetric perfect conductors cannot absorb or radiate angular momentum when illuminated. However, any asymmetry allows absorption. A rigorous, steady-state solution of the boundary value problem for the reflection from a perfectly conducting infinite wedge shows that waves convey angular momentum at the edges of asymmetries. Conductors can also radiate angular momentum, so their geometric absorption coefficient for angular momentum can be negative. Such absorption or radiation depends solely on the specific geometry of the conductor. The geometric absorption coefficient can be as high as 0.8, and the coefficient for radiation can be -0.4, larger than typical material absorption coefficients. We apply the results to recent experiments which spun roof-shaped aluminum sheets with polarized microwave beams. Applications of geometric, instead of material, absorption can be quite varied. Though experiments testing these ideas will be simpler at microwavelengths, the ideas work for optical ones as well.

  4. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure. PMID:24656273

  5. Investigation of reactions between trace gases and functional CuO nanospheres and octahedrons using NEXAFS-TXM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzler, Katja; Heilemann, Axel; Kneer, Janosch; Guttmann, Peter; Jia, He; Bartsch, Eckhard; Lu, Yan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In order to take full advantage of novel functional materials in the next generation of sensorial devices scalable processes for their fabrication and utilization are of great importance. Also understanding the processes lending the properties to those materials is essential. Among the most sought-after sensor applications are low-cost, highly sensitive and selective metal oxide based gas sensors. Yet, the surface reactions responsible for provoking a change in the electrical behavior of gas sensitive layers are insufficiently comprehended. Here, we have used near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with x-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) for ex-situ measurements, in order to reveal the hydrogen sulfide induced processes at the surface of copper oxide nanoparticles, which are ultimately responsible for triggering a percolation phase transition. For the first time these measurements allow the imaging of trace gas induced reactions and the effect they have on the chemical composition of the metal oxide surface and bulk. This makes the new technique suitable for elucidating adsorption processes in-situ and under real operating conditions.

  6. Investigation of reactions between trace gases and functional CuO nanospheres and octahedrons using NEXAFS-TXM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Henzler, Katja; Heilemann, Axel; Kneer, Janosch; Guttmann, Peter; Jia, He; Bartsch, Eckhard; Lu, Yan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In order to take full advantage of novel functional materials in the next generation of sensorial devices scalable processes for their fabrication and utilization are of great importance. Also understanding the processes lending the properties to those materials is essential. Among the most sought-after sensor applications are low-cost, highly sensitive and selective metal oxide based gas sensors. Yet, the surface reactions responsible for provoking a change in the electrical behavior of gas sensitive layers are insufficiently comprehended. Here, we have used near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with x-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) for ex-situ measurements, in order to reveal the hydrogen sulfide induced processes at the surface of copper oxide nanoparticles, which are ultimately responsible for triggering a percolation phase transition. For the first time these measurements allow the imaging of trace gas induced reactions and the effect they have on the chemical composition of the metal oxide surface and bulk. This makes the new technique suitable for elucidating adsorption processes in-situ and under real operating conditions. PMID:26631608

  7. Investigation of reactions between trace gases and functional CuO nanospheres and octahedrons using NEXAFS-TXM imaging.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Heilemann, Axel; Kneer, Janosch; Guttmann, Peter; Jia, He; Bartsch, Eckhard; Lu, Yan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In order to take full advantage of novel functional materials in the next generation of sensorial devices scalable processes for their fabrication and utilization are of great importance. Also understanding the processes lending the properties to those materials is essential. Among the most sought-after sensor applications are low-cost, highly sensitive and selective metal oxide based gas sensors. Yet, the surface reactions responsible for provoking a change in the electrical behavior of gas sensitive layers are insufficiently comprehended. Here, we have used near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with x-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) for ex-situ measurements, in order to reveal the hydrogen sulfide induced processes at the surface of copper oxide nanoparticles, which are ultimately responsible for triggering a percolation phase transition. For the first time these measurements allow the imaging of trace gas induced reactions and the effect they have on the chemical composition of the metal oxide surface and bulk. This makes the new technique suitable for elucidating adsorption processes in-situ and under real operating conditions. PMID:26631608

  8. Uncertainty relations for angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammeier, Lars; Schwonnek, René; Werner, Reinhard F.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we study various notions of uncertainty for angular momentum in the spin-s representation of SU(2). We characterize the ‘uncertainty regions’ given by all vectors, whose components are specified by the variances of the three angular momentum components. A basic feature of this set is a lower bound for the sum of the three variances. We give a method for obtaining optimal lower bounds for uncertainty regions for general operator triples, and evaluate these for small s. Further lower bounds are derived by generalizing the technique by which Robertson obtained his state-dependent lower bound. These are optimal for large s, since they are saturated by states taken from the Holstein-Primakoff approximation. We show that, for all s, all variances are consistent with the so-called vector model, i.e., they can also be realized by a classical probability measure on a sphere of radius \\sqrt{s(s+1)}. Entropic uncertainty relations can be discussed similarly, but are minimized by different states than those minimizing the variances for small s. For large s the Maassen-Uffink bound becomes sharp and we explicitly describe the extremalizing states. Measurement uncertainty, as recently discussed by Busch, Lahti and Werner for position and momentum, is introduced and a generalized observable (POVM) which minimizes the worst case measurement uncertainty of all angular momentum components is explicitly determined, along with the minimal uncertainty. The output vectors for the optimal measurement all have the same length r(s), where r(s)/s\\to 1 as s\\to ∞ .

  9. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  10. Angular Distribution and Angular Dispersion in Collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Dong, Yu-Chuan; Li, Song-Lin; Duan, Li-Min; Xu, Hu-Shan; Xu, Hua-Gen; Chen, Ruo-Fu; Wu, He-Yu; Han, Jian-Long; Li, Zhi-Chang; Lu, Xiu-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Liu, Jian-Cheng; Sergey, Yu-Kun

    2004-10-01

    Angular distributions of fragments B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg and Al induced by the collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV have been measured. Angular dispersion parameters are extracted from the experimental data and compared with the theoretical ones. The dynamic dispersions for dissipative products depend strongly on the charge number Z of the fragments.

  11. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  12. A Multi-technique Characterization of Adsorbed Protein Films: Orientation and Structure by ToF-SIMS, NEXAFS, SFG, and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baio, Joseph E.

    There are many techniques that allow surface scientists to study interfaces. However, few are routinely applied to probe biological surfaces. The work presented here demonstrates how detailed information about the conformation, orientation, chemical state, and molecular structure of biological molecules immobilized onto a surface can be assessed by electron spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy techniques. This investigation began with the development of simple model systems (small proteins, and peptides) and evolved into a study of more complex --- real world systems. Initially, two model systems based on the chemical and electrostatic immobilization of a small rigid protein (Protein G B1 domain, 6kDa) were built to develop the capabilities of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToFSIMS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy as tools to probe the structure of surface immobilized proteins. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to measure the amount of immobilized protein and ToF-SIMS sampled the amino acid composition of the exposed surface of the protein film. Within the ToF-SIMS spectra, an enrichment of secondary ions from amino acids located at opposite ends of the proteins were used to describe protein orientation. SFG spectral peaks characteristic of ordered alpha-helix and beta-sheet elements were observed for both systems and the phase of the peaks indicated a predominantly upright orientation for both the covalent and electrostatic configurations. Polarization dependence of the NEXAFS signal from the N 1s to pi* transition of the peptide bonds that make up the beta-sheets also indicated protein ordering at the surface. Building upon the Protein G B1 studies, the orientation and structure of a surface immobilized antibody (HuLys Fv: variant of humanized anti-lysozyme variable fragment, 26kDa) was characterized across two

  13. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  14. Toward Quantifying the Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Individual Submicron Atmospheric Aerosol Particles with STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey Piens, D.; Kelly, S. T.; OBrien, R. E.; Wang, B.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols influences their optical and cloud-nucleation properties, and therefore affects climate. Although changes in particle size as a function of relative humidity have often been used to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles, it has been noted that calculations of hygroscopicity based on size contain error due to particle porosity, non-ideal volume additivity and changes in surface tension. We will present a method to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles based on changes in mass, rather than size, as a function of relative humidity. This method results from a novel experimental approach combining scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near-edge x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), as well as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) on the same individual particles. First, using STXM/NEXAFS, our methods are applied to aerosol particles of known composition ‒ for instance ammonium sulfate, sodium bromide and levoglucosan ‒ and validated by theory. Then, using STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX, these methods are extended to mixed atmospheric aerosol particles collected in the field at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Planes sampling site in Oklahoma, USA. We have observed and quantified a range of hygroscopic behaviors which are correlated to the composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles. These methods will have implications for parameterizing aerosol mixing state and cloud-nucleation activity in atmospheric models.

  15. C 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) of substituted benzoic acids: a theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Baldea,I.; Schimmelpfennig, B.; Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J.; Schirmer, J.; Trofimov, A.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to explain the discrete transitions in experimental C 1s-NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) spectra of various benzoic acid derivates. Transition energies and oscillator strengths of the contributing C 1s-{pi}* excitations are computed using the ADC(2) (second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction) method. This method is demonstrated to be well suited for the finite electronic systems represented by these simple organic acids. There is good agreement between experiment and theory reproducing all the relevant spectral features. Some transitions can only be assigned based on a theoretical foundation. Remaining discrepancies between experimental and computed spectra are discussed.

  16. Composition and Morphology of Individual Combustion, Biomass Burning, and Secondary Organic Particle Types Obtained Using ATOFMS and STXM-NEXAFS Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Bahadur, R.; Liu, S.; Takahama, S.; Prather, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    Complementary single particle measurements of organic aerosols using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy—Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (STXM-NEXAFS) are compared to examine the relationships between particle morphologies and chemical composition of particles having similar sources. ATOFMS measurements from field campaigns in polluted or urban (Riverside/SOAR 2005; Mexico City/MILAGRO 2006; Port of Long Beach 2007) and clean or marine (Arabian Sea/INDOEX 1999; Sea of Japan/ACE-Asia 2001; Trinidad Head/CIFEX 2004) locations illustrate regional differences in the amount and types of organic particles. The majority (≥ 85%) of the number of submicron particles are carbonaceous (including elemental and organic carbon), but represent less than 10% of the number of supermicron particles. Organic carbon (OC) particles are classified into three meta-classes corresponding to (1) combustion-generated OC/EC internalmixtures, (2) biomass burning generated K/OC mixtures, and (3) OC/High MassOC (HMOC) mixtures containing secondary markers of atmospheric processing. Normalized dot products are used to quantify similarity among fragment spectra and indicate that OC particle types are consistent across (and within) platforms. Single particle carbon STXM-NEXAFS measurements during ACE-Asia 2001 and MILAGRO 2006 yield similar source categories based on relative abundances of aromatic, alkane, and carboxylic acid functional groups. All three organic particle types correspond to a variety of very heterogeneous particle morphologies, although the highly oxygenated OC particles with likely secondary organic contributions frequently are nearly spherical, liquid-like particles. Similar particle types are observed at many other locations, including recent measurements at Bakersfield, Tijuana, and the R/V Atlantis as part of CalNex and CalMex. Size-resolved number fractions of the major ATOFMS organic particle types show

  17. Uniaxial angular accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, A. V.; Shvab, I. A.

    1985-05-01

    The basic mechanical components of an angular accelerometer are the sensor, the damper, and the transducer. Penumatic dampers are simplest in construction, but the viscosity of air is very low and, therefore, dampers with special purpose oils having a high temperature stability (synthetic silicon or organosilicon oils) are most widely used. The most common types of viscous dampers are lamellar with meshed opposed arrays of fixed and movable vanes in the dashpot, piston dampers regulated by an adjustable-length capillary tube, and dampers with paddle wheel in closed tank. Another type of damper is an impact-inertial one with large masses absorbing the rotational energy upon collision with the sensor. Conventional measuring elements are resistive, capacitive, electromagnetic, photoelectric, and penumatic or hydraulic. Novel types of angular accelerometers are based on inertia of gas jets, electron beams, and ion beams, the piezoelectric effect in p-n junctions of diode and transistors, the electrokinetic effect in fluids, and cryogenic suspension of the sensor.

  18. Soft X-ray-induced decomposition of amino acids: An XPS, massspectrometry, and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Zubavichus, Y.; Fuchs, O.; Weinhardt, L.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.; Denlinger, J.D.; Grunze, M.

    2003-02-26

    Decomposition of five amino acids, viz. alanine, serine,cysteine, aspartic acid, and asparagine under soft X-ray irradiation (MgKα X-ray source) in ultra-high vacuum has been studied by meansof XPS and mass-spectrometry. A comparative analysis of changes in XPSline shapes, stoichiometry, and residual gas composition indicates thatthe molecules decompose via severalpathways. Dehydration,decarboxylation, decarbonylation, deamination, and desulfurization ofpristine molecules accompanied by desorption of H2, H2O, CO2, CO, NH3,H2S are observed with rates depending on the specific amino acid. NEXAFSspectra of cysteine at the C, O, N K- and S L2,3-edges complement the XPSand mass-spectrometry data and show that exposure of the sample to anintense soft X-ray synchrotron beam results in a formation of C-C and C-Ndouble and triple bonds. Qualitatively, the studied amino acids can bearranged in the following ascending order for radiation stability: serine

  19. Orbital angular momentum microlaser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-29

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes. PMID:27471299

  20. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  1. Electronic structure of individual hybrid colloid particles studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in the X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Lu, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Schneider, Gerd; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-02-13

    The electronic structure of individual hybrid particles was studied by nanoscale near-edge X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. The colloidal particles consist of a solid polystyrene core and a cross-linked poly-N-(isopropylacrylamide) shell with embedded crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (d = 6 ± 3 nm). The TiO(2) particles are generated in the carrier network by a sol-gel process at room temperature. The hybrid particles were imaged with photon energy steps of 0.1 eV in their hydrated environment with a cryo transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Ti L(2,3)-edge. By analyzing the image stacks, the obtained near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of our individual hybrid particles show clearly that our synthesis generates TiO(2) in the anastase phase. Additionally, our spectromicroscopy method permits the determination of the density distribution of TiO(2) in single carrier particles. Therefore, NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with TXM presents a unique method to get in-depth insight into the electronic structure of hybrid materials. PMID:23360082

  2. Microscopic origin of the charge transfer in single crystals based on thiophene derivatives: A combined NEXAFS and density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernenkaya, A.; Morherr, A.; Backes, S.; Popp, W.; Witt, S.; Kozina, X.; Nepijko, S. A.; Bolte, M.; Medjanik, K.; Öhrwall, G.; Krellner, C.; Baumgarten, M.; Elmers, H. J.; Schönhense, G.; Jeschke, H. O.; Valentí, R.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the charge transfer mechanism in single crystals of DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4TCNQ (where DTBDT is dithieno[2,3-d;2',3'-d'] benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b']dithiophene) using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density functional theory calculations (DFT) including final state effects beyond the sudden state approximation. In particular, we find that a description that considers the partial screening of the electron-hole Coulomb correlation on a static level as well as the rearrangement of electronic density shows excellent agreement with experiment and allows to uncover the details of the charge transfer mechanism in DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4 TCNQ, as well as a reinterpretation of previous NEXAFS data on pure TCNQ. Finally, we further show that almost the same quality of agreement between theoretical results and experiment is obtained by the much faster Z+1/2 approximation, where the core hole effects are simulated by replacing N or F with atomic number Z with the neighboring atom with atomic number Z+1/2.

  3. The influence of oxygen adsorption on the NEXAFS and core-level XPS spectra of the C{sub 60} derivative PCBM

    SciTech Connect

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Ericsson, Leif; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen

    2015-02-07

    Fullerenes have been a main focus of scientific research since their discovery due to the interesting possible applications in various fields like organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, the derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 60}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is currently one of the most popular choices due to its higher solubility in organic solvents compared to unsubstituted C{sub 60}. One of the central issues in the field of OPVs is device stability, since modules undergo deterioration (losses in efficiency, open circuit voltage, and short circuit current) during operation. In the case of fullerenes, several possibilities have been proposed, including dimerization, oxidation, and impurity related deterioration. We have studied by means of density functional theory the possibility of oxygen adsorption on the C{sub 60} molecular moiety of PCBM. The aim is to provide guidelines for near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements which can probe the presence of atomic or molecular oxygen on the fullerene cage. By analysing several configurations of PCBM with one or more adsorbed oxygen atoms, we show that a joint core level XPS and O1s NEXAFS investigation could be effectively used not only to confirm oxygen adsorption but also to pinpoint the bonding configuration and the nature of the adsorbate.

  4. Fundamental aspects of enantioselective heterogeneous catalysis: a NEXAFS study of methyl pyruvate and ( S)-(-)-1-(1-naphthyl) ethylamine on Pt{1 1 1}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonello, J. M.; Sykes, E. C. H.; Lindsay, R.; Williams, F. J.; Santra, A. K.; Lambert, R. M.

    2001-06-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to characterise the adsorption and reactivity of methyl pyruvate and ( S)-(-)-1-(1-napthyl) ethylamine (( S)-NEA) on Pt{1 1 1}. Methyl pyruvate polymerises at room temperature yielding chains that contain CO bonds and no CC bonds; the CO bonds are inclined at 64±5° with respect to the metal surface. Polymerisation probably occurs by an aldol condensation that involves elimination of methanol. This mechanism is in excellent accord with the intramolecular bonding deduced from the NEXAFS results. These findings suggest that irreversible deactivation during start-up or steady state operation of Pt catalysts during enantioselective hydrogenation of alkyl pyruvates can be due to hydrogen starvation, which results in polymerisation of the prochiral reactant. For ( S)-NEA, the naphthalene ring is inclined at 46±5° with respect to the metal surface. It is proposed that ( S)-NEA binds to the surface via contributions from both the aromatic π-system and the lone pair of electrons on the amine nitrogen atom.

  5. Impact of Ferrocene on the Structure of Diesel Exhaust Soot as Probed with Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering and C(1s) NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun,A.; Huggins, F.; Kelly, K.; Mun, B.; Ehrlich, S.; Huffman, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the structure of a set of diesel exhaust samples that were obtained from reference diesel fuel and diesel fuel mixed with ferrocene. Characterization was carried out with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (C(1s) NEXAFS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The reference diesel soot shows a pronounced graphite-like microstructure and molecular structure, with a strong (0 0 2) graphite Bragg reflex and a strong aromatic C{double_bond}C resonance at 285 eV. The mineral matter in the reference soot could be identified as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hematite. The soot specimen from the diesel mixed with ferrocene has an entirely different structure and lacks significantly in graphite-like characteristics. NEXAFS spectra of such soot barely show aromatics but pronounced contributions from aliphatic structures. WAXS patterns show almost no intensity at the Bragg (0 0 2) reflection of graphite, but a strong aliphatic {gamma}-side band. The iron from the ferrocene transforms to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} maghemite.

  6. High-dimensional quantum nature of ghost angular Young's diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; Leach, Jonathan; Jack, Barry; Padgett, Miles J.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; She Weilong

    2010-09-15

    We propose a technique to characterize the dimensionality of entangled sources affected by any environment, including phase and amplitude masks or atmospheric turbulence. We illustrate this technique on the example of angular ghost diffraction using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) spectrum generated by a nonlocal double slit. We realize a nonlocal angular double slit by placing single angular slits in the paths of the signal and idler modes of the entangled light field generated by parametric down-conversion. Based on the observed OAM spectrum and the measured Shannon dimensionality spectrum of the possible quantum channels that contribute to Young's ghost diffraction, we calculate the associated dimensionality D{sub total}. The measured D{sub total} ranges between 1 and 2.74 depending on the opening angle of the angular slits. The ability to quantify the nature of high-dimensional entanglement is vital when considering quantum information protocols.

  7. Resolution analysis of an angular domain imaging system with two dimensional angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter to distinguish between quasi-ballistic and scattered photons based on trajectory. A 2D angular filter array was constructed using 3D printing technology to generate an array of micro-channels 500 μm x 500 μm with a length of 12 cm. The main barrier to 2D imaging with the 2D angular filter array was the shadows cast on the image by the 500 μm walls of the angular filter. The objective of this work was to perform a resolution analysis of the 2D angular filter array. The approach was to position the AFA with a two dimensional positioning stage to obtain images of areas normally obstructed by the walls of the AFA. A digital light processor was also incorporated to generate various light patterns to improve the contrast of the images. A resolution analysis was completed by imaging a knife edge submerged in various uniform scattering media (Intralipid® dilutions with water). The edge response functions obtained were then used to compute the line spread function and the theoretical resolution of the imaging system. The theoretical system resolution was measured to be between 110 μm - 180 μm when the scattering level was at or below 0.7% Intralipid®. The theoretical resolution was in agreement with a previous resolution analysis of a silicon-based angular filter with a similar aspect ratio. The measured resolution was also found to be smaller than the size of an individual channel, suggesting that the resolution of an AFA based ADI system is not dependent on the size of the micro-channel.

  8. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  9. Angular signal radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Panyun; Zhang, Kai; Bao, Yuan; Ren, Yuqi; Ju, Zaiqiang; Wang, Yan; He, Qili; Zhu, Zhongzhu; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi; Zhu, Peiping

    2016-03-21

    Microscopy techniques using visible photons, x-rays, neutrons, and electrons have made remarkable impact in many scientific disciplines. The microscopic data can often be expressed as the convolution of the spatial distribution of certain properties of the specimens and the inherent response function of the imaging system. The x-ray grating interferometer (XGI), which is sensitive to the deviation angle of the incoming x-rays, has attracted significant attention in the past years due to its capability in achieving x-ray phase contrast imaging with low brilliance source. However, the comprehensive and analytical theoretical framework is yet to be presented. Herein, we propose a theoretical framework termed angular signal radiography (ASR) to describe the imaging process of the XGI system in a classical, comprehensive and analytical manner. We demonstrated, by means of theoretical deduction and synchrotron based experiments, that the spatial distribution of specimens' physical properties, including absorption, refraction and scattering, can be extracted by ASR in XGI. Implementation of ASR in XGI offers advantages such as simplified phase retrieval algorithm, reduced overall radiation dose, and improved image acquisition speed. These advantages, as well as the limitations of the proposed method, are systematically investigated in this paper. PMID:27136780

  10. The Angular Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the structural and functional properties of the angular gyrus (AG). Located in the posterior part of the inferior parietal lobule, the AG has been shown in numerous meta-analysis reviews to be consistently activated in a variety of tasks. This review discusses the involvement of the AG in semantic processing, word reading and comprehension, number processing, default mode network, memory retrieval, attention and spatial cognition, reasoning, and social cognition. This large functional neuroimaging literature depicts a major role for the AG in processing concepts rather than percepts when interfacing perception-to-recognition-to-action. More specifically, the AG emerges as a cross-modal hub where converging multisensory information is combined and integrated to comprehend and give sense to events, manipulate mental representations, solve familiar problems, and reorient attention to relevant information. In addition, this review discusses recent findings that point to the existence of multiple subdivisions in the AG. This spatial parcellation can serve as a framework for reporting AG activations with greater definition. This review also acknowledges that the role of the AG cannot comprehensibly be identified in isolation but needs to be understood in parallel with the influence from other regions. Several interesting questions that warrant further investigations are finally emphasized. PMID:22547530

  11. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  12. Angular resolution of air-shower array-telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A fundamental limit on the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes is set by the finite number of shower particles coupled with the finite thickness of the particle swarm. Consequently the angular resolution which can be achieved in practice depends in a determinant manner on the size and number of detectors in an array-telescope, as well as on the detector separation and the timing resolution. It is also necessary to examine the meaning of particle density in whatever type of detector is used. Results are given which can be used to predict the angular resolution of a given instrument for showers of various sizes, and to compare different instruments.

  13. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules. PMID:20707545

  14. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

  15. Two-color ghost imaging with enhanced angular resolving power

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Sanjit; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-03-15

    This article reports an experimental demonstration on nondegenerate, two-color, biphoton ghost imaging which reproduced a ghost image with enhanced angular resolving power by means of a greater field of view compared with that of classical imaging. With the same imaging magnification, the enhanced angular resolving power and field of view compared with those of classical imaging are 1.25:1 and 1.16:1, respectively. The enhancement of angular resolving power depends on the ratio between the idler and the signal photon frequencies, and the enhancement of the field of view depends mainly on the same ratio and also on the distances of the object plane and the imaging lens from the two-photon source. This article also reports the possibility of reproducing a ghost image with the enhancement of the angular resolving power by means of a greater imaging amplification compared with that of classical imaging.

  16. Effect of angular momentum conservation on hydrodynamic simulations of colloids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Theers, Mario; Hu, Jinglei; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G; Ripoll, Marisol

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to most real fluids, angular momentum is not a locally conserved quantity in some mesoscopic simulation methods. Here we quantify the importance of this conservation in the flow fields associated with different colloidal systems. The flow field is analytically calculated with and without angular momentum conservation for the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method, and simulations are performed to verify the predictions. The flow field generated around a colloidal particle moving under an external force with slip boundary conditions depends on the conservation of angular momentum, and the amplitude of the friction force is substantially affected. Interestingly, no dependence on the angular momentum conservation is found for the flow fields generated around colloids under the influence of phoretic forces. Moreover, circular Couette flow between a no-slip and a slip cylinder is investigated, which allows us to validate one of the two existing expressions for the MPC stress tensor. PMID:26274301

  17. Micro- and nano-environments of C sequestration in soil: a multi-elemental STXM-NEXAFS assessment of black C and organomineral associations.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Dawit; Lehmann, Johannes; Wang, Jian; Kinyangi, James; Heymann, Karen; Lu, Yingshen; Wirick, Sue; Jacobsen, Chris

    2012-11-01

    Black C is an essential component of the terrestrial C pool and its formation is often credited as a CO(2) sink by transferring the fast-cycling C from the atmosphere-biosphere system into slower cycling C in the geosphere. This study is the first multi-element K- (C, N, Ca, Fe, Al and Si) soft-X-ray STXM-NEXAFS investigation conducted at a submicron-scale spatial resolution specifically targeting black C and its interaction with the mineral and non-black C organic matter in the organomineral assemblage. The STXM-NEXAFS micrographs and spectra demonstrated that pyrogenic C was dominated by quinoide, aromatic, phenol, ketone, alcohol, carboxylic and hydroxylated- and ether-linked C species. There was also evidence for the presence of pyridinic, pyridonic, pyrrolic, amine and nitril N functionalities. The non-black C organic matter contained amino acids, amino sugars, nucleic acids and polysaccharides known to exhibit negatively charged carboxylic, phenolic, enolic, thiolate and phosphate functionalities highly reactive towards metal ions and black C. The metal-rich mineral matrix was composed of phyllosilicate clay minerals, Fe and Al hydroxypolycations, oxides, hydroxides and oxyhydroxide that can attract and bind organic biopolymers. STXM-NEXAFS provided evidence for interactive association between pyrogenic C, non-black C organic matter and the mineral oxide and oxyhydroxide communities in the organomineral interface. These intimate associations occurred through a "two-way" direct linkage between black C and the mineral or non-black C organic matter or via a "three-way" indirect association where non-black C organic matter could serve as a molecular cross-linking agent binding black C with the mineral matrix or vice versa where inorganic oxides, hydroxides and polycations could act as a bridge to bind black C with non-black C organic matter. The binding and sequestration of black C in the investigated micro- and nano-C repository environments seem to be the

  18. Precompound nucleon angular distributions in the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Scobel, W.; Plechaty, E.

    1985-08-01

    Angular distributions for nucleon induced reactions (incident energies 14 to 90 MeV) leading to precompound nucleon emission in the continuum (emitted particle energies 9-70 MeV) are calculated based on nucleon-nucleon scattering kinematics for an incident nucleon on a Fermi gas. Analytic expressions due to Kikuchi and Kawai are used for the single scattering kernel. The geometry dependent hybrid model is used to generate the differential cross sections for first, second, etc. order scattering, these weightings being used to fold the single scattering kernel. Results are found to reproduce all experimental angular distributions quite well at angles in the 20/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/ range. Ad-hoc modifications to approximate quantal effects and Coulomb deflections are explored, but the results do not seem to offer a consistent means of reproducing back angle yields, and give generally poorer results at very forward angles.

  19. Performance criteria for dosimeter angular response

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R. A.; Cummings, F. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Jones, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides criteria for evaluating the response of personnel dosimeters to radiation at nonperpendicular incidence. The US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) ensures that dosimetry systems at DOE facilities meet acceptable standards for precision and accuracy. In the past, these standards were limited to tests for system variability, energy dependence, and level of detection. The proposed criteria will broaden the scope of DOELAP to include the angular response of personnel dosimeters. Because occupational exposures in the workplace are rarely due to radiation from only one direction, dosimeters must accurately assign individual dose equivalent from irradiation at any forward angle of incidence. Including an angular response criterion in DOELAP would improve the quality of personnel monitoring provided that the criterion is developed from appropriate dose quantities. This report provides guidance for assigning individual dose equivalents for radiation fields at nonperpendicular incidence to the dosimeter. 21 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum and Exclusive Processes at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Ellinghaus, F.

    2006-11-17

    A first attempt for a model-dependent extraction of the orbital angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon has been made, based on HERMES data on exclusive processes and their description in terms of generalized parton distributions. An overview of the HERMES data on hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons (Deeply-Virtual Compton Scattering) and mesons is given, focusing on the measurements relevant to the extraction of quark orbital angular momentum.

  1. Combining in situ NEXAFS spectroscopy and CO₂ methanation kinetics to study Pt and Co nanoparticle catalysts reveals key insights into the role of platinum in promoted cobalt catalysis.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Simon K; Alayoglu, Selim; Specht, Colin; Michalak, William D; Pushkarev, Vladimir V; Guo, Jinghua; Kruse, Norbert; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-07-16

    The mechanistic role of platinum and precious metals in promoting cobalt hydrogenation catalysts of the type used in reactions such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is highly debated. Here we use well-defined monometallic Pt and Co nanoparticles (NPs) and CO2 methanation as a probe reaction to show that Pt NPs deposited near Co NPs can enhance the CO2 methanation rate by up to a factor of 6 per Co surface atom. In situ NEXAFS spectroscopy of these same Pt NP plus Co NP systems in hydrogen shows that the presence of nearby Pt NPs is able to significantly enhance reduction of the Co at temperatures relevant to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and CO2 methanation. The mechanistic role of Pt in these reactions is discussed in light of these findings. PMID:24978060

  2. Electromagnetically induced angular Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian

    2015-12-01

    The discrete angular spectrum (angular Talbot effect) of a periodic grating illuminated by a suitable spherical wave front has been observed recently (Azaña and Chatellus 2104 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 213902). In this paper we study the possibility of such a phenomenon being realized with a medium that has no macroperiodic structure itself. Tunable electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) could be such a kind of medium. We obtain an EIG based on the periodically modulated strong susceptibility due to the third-order nonlinear effect generated in a double Λ-type four-level atomic system, and show the angular Talbot effect of an amplitude EIG, as well as a hybrid EIG, as the condition of the discrete phase-modulation shift of the illumination light front is satisfied. EIG parameters are tunable and the EIG-based angular Talbot effect may have the same potential applications as its periodic grating counterpart has.

  3. Transverse angular momentum of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    We develop the quantum theory of transverse angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order transverse derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.

  4. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy for mapping nano-scale distribution of organic carbon forms in soil: Application to black carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Johannes; Liang, Biqing; Solomon, Dawit; Lerotic, Mirna; LuizãO, Flavio; Kinyangi, James; SchäFer, Thorsten; Wirick, Sue; Jacobsen, Chris

    2005-03-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of organic carbon (C) forms in soils is poorly quantified since appropriate analytical techniques were not available up to now. Specifically, tools for the identification of functional groups on the surface of micrometer-sized black C particles were not available up to now. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) using synchrotron radiation was used in conjunction with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate nano-scale distribution (50-nm resolution) of C forms in black C particles and compared to synchrotron-based FTIR spectroscopy. A new embedding technique was developed that did not build on a C-based embedding medium and did not pose the risk of heat damage to the sample. Elemental sulfur (S) was melted to 220°C until it polymerized and quenched with liquid N2 to obtain a very viscous plastic S in which the black C could be embedded until it hardened to a noncrystalline state and was ultrasectioned. Principal component and cluster analysis followed by singular value decomposition was able to resolve distinct areas in a black carbon particle. The core of the studied biomass-derived black C particles was highly aromatic even after thousands of years of exposure in soil and resembled the spectral characteristics of fresh charcoal. Surrounding this core and on the surface of the black C particle, however, much larger proportions of carboxylic and phenolic C forms were identified that were spatially and structurally distinct from the core of the particle. Cluster analysis provided evidence for both oxidation of the black C particle itself as well as adsorption of non-black C. NEXAFS spectroscopy has great potential to allow new insight into black C properties with important implications for biogeochemical cycles such as mineralization of black C in soils and sediments, and adsorption of C, nutrients, and pollutants as well as transport in the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere.

  5. Electronic structure modification and Fermi level shifting in niobium-doped anatase titanium dioxide thin films: a comparative study of NEXAFS, work function and stiffening of phonons.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Subodh K; Das, Arkaprava; Ojha, S; Shukla, D K; Phase, D M; Singh, Fouran

    2016-02-01

    The electronic structure and tuning of work function (WF) by electronic excitations (EEs) induced by swift heavy ions (SHIs) in anatase niobium-doped titanium dioxide (NTO) thin films is reported. The densities of EEs were varied using 80 MeV O, 130 MeV Ni and 120 MeV Ag ions for irradiation. The EE-induced modifications in electronic structure were studied by O K-edge and Ti L3,2 edge absorption spectra using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The reduction of hybridized O 2p and Ti 3d unoccupied states in the conduction band with a decrease in energy of the crystal field strength of ∼ 480 meV and the correlated effect on the decrease in the WF value of ∼ 520 meV upon increasing the total energy deposition in the lattice are evident from the study of NEXAFS and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM), respectively. The observed stiffening in the low frequency Raman mode (LFRM) of ∼ 9 cm(-1) further validates the electronic structure modification under the influence of EE-induced strain in TiO6 octahedra. The reduction of hybridized valence states, stiffening behavior of LFRM and decrease in WF by nano-crystallization followed by amorphization and defects in NTO lattice are explained in terms of continuous, discontinuous amorphous ion tracks containing intestinally created defects and non-stoichiometry in the lattice. These studies are very appropriate for better insights of electronic structure modification during phase transformation and controlled Fermi level shifting, which plays a crucial role in controlling the charge carrier injection efficiency in opto-electronic applications and also provides a deeper understanding of the involved physical processes. PMID:26752253

  6. Angular Momentum Ejection and Recoil*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohia, O.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation phenomenon observed in axisymmetric magnetically confined plasmas has been explained by the ``accretion theory'' [1] that considers the plasma angular momentum as gained from its interaction with the magnetic field and the surrounding material wall. The ejection of angular momentum to the wall, and the consequent recoil are attributed to modes excited at the edge while the transport of the (recoil) angular momentum from the edge toward the center is attributed to a different kind of mode. The toroidal phase velocity of the edge mode, to which the sign of the ejected angular momentum is related, is considered to change its direction in the transition from the H-regime to the L-regime. For the latter case, edge modes with phase velocity in the direction of vdi are driven by the temperature gradient of a cold ion population at the edge and damped on the ``hot'' ion population. The ``balanced'' double interaction [2] of the mode with the two populations, corresponding to a condition of marginal stability, leads to ejection of hot ions and loss of angular momentum in the direction of vdi while the cold population acquires angular momentum in the opposite direction. In the H-regime resistive ballooning modes with phase velocities in the direction of vde are viewed as the best candidates for the excited edge modes. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE. [1] B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42, 1 (2002) [2] B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)

  7. Uncertainty principle for angular position and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Eric; Leach, Jonathan; Courtial, Johannes; Padgett, Miles

    2004-08-01

    The uncertainty principle places fundamental limits on the accuracy with which we are able to measure the values of different physical quantities (Heisenberg 1949 The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory (New York: Dover); Robertson 1929 Phys. Rev. 34 127). This has profound effects not only on the microscopic but also on the macroscopic level of physical systems. The most familiar form of the uncertainty principle relates the uncertainties in position and linear momentum. Other manifestations include those relating uncertainty in energy to uncertainty in time duration, phase of an electromagnetic field to photon number and angular position to angular momentum (Vaccaro and Pegg 1990 J. Mod. Opt. 37 17; Barnett and Pegg 1990 Phys. Rev. A 41 3427). In this paper, we report the first observation of the last of these uncertainty relations and derive the associated states that satisfy the equality in the uncertainty relation. We confirm the form of these states by detailed measurement of the angular momentum of a light beam after passage through an appropriate angular aperture. The angular uncertainty principle applies to all physical systems and is particularly important for systems with cylindrical symmetry.

  8. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  9. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  10. The Angular Momentum of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Babiker, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    Preface D. L. Andrews and M. Babiker; 1. Light beams carrying orbital angular momentum J. B. Götte and S. M. Barnett; 2. Vortex transformation and vortex dynamics in optical fields G. Molina-Terriza; 3. Vector beams in free space E. J. Galvez; 4. Optical beams with orbital angular momentum in nonlinear media A. S. Desyatnikov and Y. S. Kivshar; 5. Ray optics, wave optics and quantum mechanics G. Nienhuis; 6. Quantum formulation of angle and orbital angular momentum J. B. Götte and S. M. Barnett; 7. Dynamic rotational frequency shift I. Bialynicki-Birula and Z. Bialynicka-Birula; 8. Spin-orbit interactions of light in isotropic media K. Y. Bliokh, A. Aiello and M. A. Alonso; 9. Quantum electrodynamics, angular momentum and chirality D. L. Andrews and M. Babiker; 10. Trapping of charged particles by Bessel beams I. Bialynicki-Birula, Z. Bialynicka-Birula and N. Drozd; 11. Theory of atoms in twisted light M. Babiker, D. L. Andrews and V. E. Lembessis; 12. An experimentalist's introduction to orbital angular momentum for quantum optics J. Romero, D. Giovannini, S. Franke-Arnold and M. J. Padgett; 13. Measurement of light's orbital angular momentum M. P. J. Lavery, J. Courtial and M. J. Padgett; 14. Efficient generation of optical twisters using helico-conical beams V. R. Daria, D. Palima and J. Glückstad; 15. Self similar modes of coherent diffusion with orbital angular momentum O. Firstenberg, M. Shuker, R. Pugatch and N. Davidson; 16. Dimensionality of azimuthal entanglement M. van Exter, E. Eliel and H. Woerdman; Index.

  11. Angular distributions of neutron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Lahiri, Joydev; Basu, D. N.

    2011-06-15

    We derive the total and the differential cross sections with respect to angle for neutron-induced reactions from an analytical model having a simple functional form to demonstrate the quantitative agreement with the measured cross sections. The energy dependence of the neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections are estimated successfully for energies ranging from 5 to 600 MeV. In this work, the effect of the imaginary part of the nuclear potential is treated more appropriately compared to our earlier work. The angular distributions for neutron scattering also agree reasonably well with the experimental data at forward angles.

  12. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  13. Variations in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Twice-daily values of the atmosphere's angular momentum about the polar axis during the five years from 1976 through 1980 are presented in graphs and a table. The compilation is based on a global data set, incorporating 90 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. The relationship between changes in the angular momentum of the atmosphere and changes in the length of day is described, as are the main sources of error in the data. The variability in angular momentum is revealed in a preliminary fashion by means of a spectral decomposition. The data presented should stimulate comparisons with other measures of the length of day and so provide a basis for greater understanding of Earth-atmosphere interactions.

  14. Interferometric measurement of angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10-11 rad/sqrt{textrm {Hz}} from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  15. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  16. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  17. Preliminary optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel detection of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra in the 280-550 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, B.S.; McKinney, W.R.; Hussain, Z.; Padmore, H.

    1996-07-01

    The optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel recording of NEXAFS spectra in a single {open_quotes}snapshot{close_quotes} is proposed. The spectrograph is to be used with a bending magnet source on beamline 7.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Approximately 20 volts of spectra are simultaneously imaged across a small square of material sample at each respective K absorption edge of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Photoelectrons emitted from the material sample will be collected by an electron imaging microscope, the view field of which determines the sampling size. The sample also forms the exit slit of the optical system. This dispersive method of NEXAFS data acquisition is three to four orders of magnitude faster than the conventional method of taking data point-to-point using scanning of the grating. The proposed design is presented along with the design method and supporting SHADOW raytrace analysis.

  18. REVIEW ARTICLE: Angular selective window coatings: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbise, G. W.; LeBellac, D.; Niklasson, G. A.; Granqvist, C. G.

    1997-08-01

    This review is devoted to the angular selectivity that can be obtained in thin films prepared under conditions such that they contain inclined absorbing regions of sizes much smaller than the wavelength of visible light. The films are of considerable interest as window coatings for energy-conscious architecture and, potentially, in the automotive sector. The theoretical basis for modelling the optical properties is presented, comprising rigorous bounds on the dielectric function, effective medium theories pertinent to different microgeometries and equations for treating the optics of anisotropic thin films. Experimental data are reported for films made by oblique-angle evaporation of Cr and for reactive and non-reactive oblique-angle sputtering of Cr, Al, Ti and W. The highest angular selectivity was obtained with evaporated Cr, whereas the highest luminous transmittance, combined with some angular selectivity, was found with reactively sputtered Al. Films made from Ti showed angular selectivity mainly in the infrared, whereas films made from W could display angular selective electrochromism. Samples of several types were subjected to elaborate theoretical analysis using effective-medium theories and it was seen that theory and experiment could be reconciled using plausible parameters to specify the microstructures of the films. Thus it appears that the angular, spectral and polarization dependences of obliquely deposited films can be understood, at least approximately, in terms of conceptually simple theoretical models.

  19. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  20. The lunar angular momentum problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Formation of the Moon by classical Darwin-type fission of a rapidly spinning proto-Earth is discussed. The relationship of angular momentum to accretion disks is examined. The co-accretion scenario and Darwin-type fission are compared and evaluated.

  1. Olympic Wrestling and Angular Momentum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Reported is the use of a wrestling photograph in a noncalculus introductory physics course. The photograph presents a maneuver that could serve as an example for a discussion on equilibrium, forces, torque, and angular motion. Provided are some qualitative thoughts as well as quantitative calculations. (YP)

  2. Probing the Orientation and Conformation of alpha-Helix and beta-Strand Model Peptides on Self-Assembled Monolayers Using Sum Frequency Generation and NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, T.; Apte, J; Gamble, L; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure and orientation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand model peptide films on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been studied with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer, and the {beta}-strand is a 15-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with hydrophobic periodicities of 3.5 and 2, respectively. These periodicities result in the leucine side chains located on one side of the peptides and the lysine side chains on the other side. The SAMs were prepared from the assembly of either carboxylic acid- or methyl-terminated alkyl thiols onto gold surfaces. For SFG studies, the deuterated analog of the methyl SAM was used. SFG vibrational spectra in the C-H region of air-dried peptides films on both SAMs exhibit strong peaks near 2965, 2940, and 2875 cm{sup -1} related to ordered leucine side chains. The orientation of the leucine side chains was determined from the phase of these features relative to the nonresonant gold background. The relative phase for both the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand peptides showed that the leucine side chains were oriented away from the carboxylic acid SAM surface and oriented toward the methyl SAM surface. Amide I peaks observed near 1656 cm{sup -1} for the {alpha}-helix peptide confirm that the secondary structure is preserved on both SAMs. Strong linear dichroism related to the amide {pi}* orbital at 400.8 eV was observed in the nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra for the adsorbed {beta}-strand peptides, suggesting that the peptide backbones are oriented parallel to the SAM surface with the side chains pointing toward or away from the interface. For the {alpha}-helix the dichroism of the amide {pi}* is significantly weaker, probably because of the broad distribution of amide bond orientations in the {alpha}-helix secondary structure.

  3. Asymmetric angular-selective thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Enas; Dhaka, Shailja; Bermel, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Thermal emission from blackbodies and flat metallic surfaces is non-directional, following the Lambert cosine law. However, highly directional thermal emission could be useful for improving the efficiency of a broad range of different applications, including thermophotovoltaics, spectroscopy and infra-red light sources. This is particularly true if strong symmetry breaking could ensure emission only in one particular direction. In this work, we investigate the possibility of tailoring asymmetric thermal emission using structured metasurfaces. These are built from surface grating unit elements that support asymmetric localization of thermal surface plasmon polaritons. The angular dependence of emissivity is studied using a rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) of absorption, plus Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation. It is further validated using a direct thermal simulation of emission originating from the metal. Asymmetric angular selectivity with near-blackbody emissivity is demonstrated for different shallow blazed grating structures. We study the effect of changing the period, depth and shape of the grating unit cell on the direction angle, angular spread, and magnitude of coupled radiation mode. In particular, a periodic sawtooth structure with a period of 1.5λ and angle of 8°was shown to create significant asymmetry of at least a factor of 3. Such structures can be considered arbitrary directional sources that can be carefully patterned on metallic surfaces to yield thermal lenses with designed focal lengths, targeted to particular concentration ratios. The benefit of this approach is that it can enhance the view factor between thermal emitters and receivers, without restricting the area ratio or separation distance.

  4. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites

  5. On Dunkl angular momenta algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Misha; Hakobyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    We consider the quantum angular momentum generators, deformed by means of the Dunkl operators. Together with the reflection operators they generate a subalgebra in the rational Cherednik algebra associated with a finite real reflection group. We find all the defining relations of the algebra, which appear to be quadratic, and we show that the algebra is of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) type. We show that this algebra contains the angular part of the Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian and that together with constants it generates the centre of the algebra. We also consider the gl( N ) version of the subalge-bra of the rational Cherednik algebra and show that it is a non-homogeneous quadratic algebra of PBW type as well. In this case the central generator can be identified with the usual Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian associated with the Coxeter group in the harmonic confinement.

  6. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-01

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  7. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  8. Understanding GRETINA using angular correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Madeline

    2015-10-01

    The ability to trace the path of gamma rays through germanium is not only necessary for taking full advantage of GRETINA but also a promising possibility for homeland security defense against nuclear threats. This research tested the current tracking algorithm using the angular correlation method by comparing results from raw and tracked data to the theoretical model for Co-60. It was found that the current tracking method is unsuccessful in reproducing angular correlation. Variations to the tracking algorithm were made in the FM value, tracking angle, number of angles of separation observed, and window of coincidence in attempt to improve correlation results. From these variations it was observed that having a larger FM improved results, reducing the number of observational angles worsened correlation, and that overall larger tracking angles improved with larger windows of coincidence and vice-verse. Future research would be to refine the angle of measurement for raw data and to explore the possibility of an energy dependence by testing other elements. This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357

  9. NUCLEI AT HIGH ANGULAR MOMENTUM

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    It appears that most nuclei show a compromise between purely collective and purely non-collective behavior at very high spins.non~collective behavior in nuclei has been seen only as high as 36 or 37{bar h}, at which point a more collective structure seems to develop. The concepts underlying the study of high angular momentum states are discussed. The factors that limit angular momentum in nuclei are considered. The currently emerging state of physics of very high spin states is reviewed. The detailed calculations currently made for high spin states are described, focusing not on the calculations themselves, but on the physical input to them and results that come out. Production of high-spin states using heavy-ion reactions is reviewed. Studies of {gamma}-rays de-exciting the evaporation residues from heavy-ion reactions are covered. Two types of {gamma} rays occur: those that cool the nucleus to or toward the yrast line, called "statistical," and those that are more or less parallel to the yrast line and remove the angular momentum, called "yrast~like." Collective rotation, in simplest form the motion of a deformed nucleus around an axis perpendicular to its symmetry axis, is also covered.

  10. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  11. Angular Momentum and Galaxy Formation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j sstarf and mass M sstarf (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j sstarf reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j sstarf in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ~100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j sstarf versus M sstarf. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j sstarf-M sstarf tracks, with log-slopes of ~0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ~3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ~7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j sstarf-M sstarf trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j sstarf

  12. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-15

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j{sub *} and mass M{sub *} (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j{sub *} reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j{sub *} in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of {approx}100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j{sub *} versus M{sub *}. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j{sub *}-M{sub *} tracks, with log-slopes of {approx}0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of {approx}3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and {approx}7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j{sub *}-M{sub *} trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow

  13. Angular Spacing Control for Segmented Data Pages in Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Ando, Toshio; Masaki, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    To improve the recording density of angle-multiplexed holographic memory, it is effective to increase the numerical aperture of the lens and to shorten the wavelength of the laser source as well as to increase the multiplexing number. The angular selectivity of a hologram, which determines the multiplexing number, is dependent on the incident angle of not only the reference beam but also the signal beam to the holographic recording medium. The actual signal beam, which is a convergent or divergent beam, is regarded as the sum of plane waves that have different propagation directions, angular selectivities, and optimal angular spacings. In this paper, focusing on the differences in the optimal angular spacing, we proposed a method to control the angular spacing for each segmented data page. We investigated the angular selectivity of a hologram and crosstalk for segmented data pages using numerical simulation. The experimental results showed a practical bit-error rate on the order of 10-3.

  14. Astrophysical applications of high angular resolution array-telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    The air shower array-telescopes which are currently being used to search for and study point sources of UHE gamma-rays have angular resolution similar to 1 deg, limited by either the small total area of particle detectors or poor timing resolution. As the signal to noise ratio depends sensitively on the angular resolution, it seems certain that this figure will quickly be surpassed when second generation instruments come into operation. Since the trajectories of galactic cosmic rays with E 100,000 GeV are practically straight lines on scales of 1 A.U. or less, these new instruments will be able to observe a shadow cast by the Moon (angular diameter 0.5 deg). Although the angular diameter of the Sun is practically the same, its shadow will be more complex because of its magnetic field. Thus, high angular resolution observations of the Sun afford a means of investigating the solar magnetic field, and also the charge composition of cosmic rays, including the ratio of antiprotons to protons.

  15. Two-dimensional angular filter array for angular domain imaging with 3D printed angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) is a technique that is capable of generating two dimensional shadowgrams of attenuating targets embedded in a scattering medium. In ADI, an angular filter array (AFA) is positioned between the sample and the detector to distinguish between quasi-ballistic photons and scattered photons. An AFA is a series of micro-channels with a high aspect ratio. Previous AFAs from our group were constructed by micro-machining the micro-channels into a silicon wafer, limiting the imaging area to a one dimensional line. Two dimensional images were acquired via scanning. The objective of this work was to extend the AFA design to two dimensions to allow for two dimensional imaging with minimal scanning. The second objective of this work was to perform an initial characterization of the imaging capabilities of the 2D AFA. Our approach was to use rapid 3D prototyping techniques to generate an array of micro-channels. The imaging capabilities were then evaluated by imaging a 0.9 mm graphite rod submerged in a scattering media. Contrast was observed to improve when a second angular filter array was placed in front of the sample to mask the incoming light.

  16. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Angular-momentum distributions sigma/sub L/ for the compound nucleus /sup 164/Yb were deduced from measurements of ..gamma..-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of /sup 64/Ni and /sup 100/Mo at and below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation functions can be reproduced with coupled-channels calculations only if additional coupling beyond the known inelastic strengths is included. Even with this augmented coupling, however, at the lowest bombarding energies the experimental sigma/sub L/ extend to higher L values than the predictions. Single-barrier penetration models for a potential with an energy-dependent depth and shape fitted to the excitation function likewise underestimate the role of high-L partial waves. Somewhat better success is achieved with models in which fission is allowed to occur at distances comparable with or even larger than the Coulomb barrier radius. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Zebra tape identification for the instantaneous angular speed computation and angular resampling of motorbike valve train measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivola, Alessandro; Troncossi, Marco

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign was performed on the valve train of a racing motorbike engine in order to get insight into the dynamic of the system. In particular the valve motion was acquired in cold test conditions by means of a laser vibrometer able to acquire displacement and velocity signals. The valve time-dependent measurements needed to be referred to the camshaft angular position in order to analyse the data in the angular domain, as usually done for rotating machines. To this purpose the camshaft was fitted with a zebra tape whose dark and light stripes were tracked by means of an optical probe. Unfortunately, both manufacturing and mounting imperfections of the employed zebra tape, resulting in stripes with slightly different widths, precluded the possibility to directly obtain the correct relationship between camshaft angular position and time. In order to overcome this problem, the identification of the zebra tape was performed by means of the original and practical procedure that is the focus of the present paper. The method consists of three main steps: namely, an ad-hoc test corresponding to special operating conditions, the computation of the instantaneous angular speed, and the final association of the stripes with the corresponding shaft angular position. The results reported in the paper demonstrate the suitability of the simple procedure for the zebra tape identification performed with the final purpose to implement a computed order tracking technique for the data analysis.

  18. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  19. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  20. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  1. Metal-ion Complexation Effects in C 1s-NEXAFS Spectra of Carboxylic Acids—Evidence by Quantum Chemical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Armbruster, M.; Schimmelpfennig, B; Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Denecke, M; Klenze, R

    2009-01-01

    Previous systematic C 1s-NEXAFS studies carried out for humic acid (HA) loaded with polyvalent metal cations (Mn+) reveal spectral features which were postulated to result from metal ion complexation: a strong decrease of the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition intensity and the appearance of a new absorption feature at slightly lower energy adjacent to the carboxyl resonance. Although spectroscopic results for the Mn+-PAA (polyacrylic acid) system (selected as model for structurally ill-defined HA) reveal the same spectral features, evidence by an independent approach for interpretation of these features is desirable. It is well established that quantum chemical calculations are capable of reproducing transition features in C 1s core excitation spectra of small organic molecules, e.g., acetate, which is chosen here as a fragment containing the complexing group to model the macromolecular HA and PAA systems. In this study, the RI-ADC(2) approach, as implemented in the TURBOMOLE program package, is applied to calculate vertical core excitation spectra of various metal acetates and the acetate anion. An energy shift (?f) between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition of the acetate anion and various metal cation acetates is established. Calculated shifts are very similar to the experimentally observed values for the energy difference between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO peak and the absorption feature appearing after metal ion complexation in Mn+-PAA/PAA. According to our computations, structural changes of the acetate complexes (e.g., the O-CeO bond angle) compared to the free acetate anion are predominantly responsible for the spectral changes observed upon metal ion complexation.

  2. An experimental NEXAFS and computational TDDFT and ΔDFT study of the gas-phase core excitation spectra of nitroxide free radical TEMPO and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Ivan; Kivimäki, Antti; Coreno, Marcello

    2016-04-21

    Core-hole spectroscopy adds to the fundamental understanding of the electronic structure of stable nitroxide free radicals thus paving way for a sensible design of new analogues with desired functionalities. We study the gas-phase C 1s, N 1s and O 1s excitation spectra of three nitroxide free radicals - TEMPO and two of its amide-substituted analogues - using the experimental NEXAFS technique and the theoretical TDDFT and ΔDFT methods in the unrestricted setting. The short-range corrected SRC1-BLYP and SRC2-BLYP exchange-correlation functionals are used with TDDFT, and the standard B3LYP functional with ΔDFT. The TDDFT-based detailed spectral assignment includes the valence, mixed valence-Rydberg and Rydberg portions of the spectra from the onset of absorptions to the vicinity of the core-ionization thresholds. The relative overlaps between the experimental and TDDFT-modelled spectra are reasonably good, in the range of 0.7-0.8, 0.6-0.8, and 0.7-0.8 for the C 1s, N 1s, and O 1s spectra, respectively. The extent of spin contamination within the unrestricted framework and its effect on the accuracy of the calculated excitation energies and dipole intensities are discussed in detail. It is concluded that, despite the sizeable spin contamination, the presently used methods are capable of predicting the core-excitation spectra of comparatively large free radical species fairly reliably over a wide spectral range. PMID:27020039

  3. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies. PMID:26399831

  4. Useful angular selectivity in oblique columnar aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditchburn, R. J.; Smith, G. B.

    1991-03-01

    A useful magnitude of angular selective transmittance of incident unpolarized light is demonstrated in obliquely deposited aluminum. Required deposition procedures and anisotropic optical properties are discussed. Angular selectivity is very strong at visible wavelengths but both experiment and theory indicate that a single oblique layer with well defined columns gives high transmittance at near-infrared wavelengths compared with normal films. There are ways of reducing this to enhance the energy control capability. Both solar and luminous angular selectivity are reported.

  5. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  6. Configuration interaction calculations with infinite angular = expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.P.; Glickman, T.

    1996-05-01

    The Modified Configuration Interaction (MCI) method improves the angular convergence of Configuration Interaction (CI) calculations by several orders of magnitude by mixing a priori a large number of angular basis functions. With MCI one can therefore use basis functions with very large angular momentum quantum numbers, overcoming an important limitation of conventional CI. Although this is desirable given the excellent convergence obtained, the large number of angular integrations and the calculation of n-j symbols with large values of l to high accuracy, make the angular calculations lengthy. In this work a new angular representation for CI calculations is presented that is much more efficient and powerful. Instead of the large number of angular functions of MCI the authors use a basis set containing an infinite linear combination of angular functions. All the necessary integrations involving these infinite expansions are done in closed form and are actually easy and fast to compute. The linear coefficients in the angular expansion are optimized in terms of a few non-linear parameters. Several examples will be presented with applications to two-electron systems.

  7. Semiclassical model for attosecond angular streaking.

    PubMed

    Smolarski, M; Eckle, P; Keller, U; Dörner, R

    2010-08-16

    Attosecond angular streaking is a new technique to achieve unsurpassed time accuracy of only a few attoseconds. Recently this has been successfully used to set an upper limit on the electron tunneling delay time in strong laser field ionization. The measurement technique can be modeled with either the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) or a more simple semiclassical approach that describes the process in two steps in analogy to the three-step model in high harmonic generation (HHG): step one is the tunnel ionization and step two is the classical motion in the strong laser field. Here we describe in detail a semiclassical model which is based on the ADK theory for the tunneling step, with subsequent classical propagation of the electron in the laser field. We take into account different ellipticities of the laser field and a possible wavelength-dependent ellipticity that is typically observed for pulses in the two-optical-cycle regime. This semiclassical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental result. PMID:20721150

  8. Pulse-Echo Technique for Angular Dependent Magnetoacoustic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, A.; Svitelskiy, O.; Palm, E.; Murphy, T.; Shulyatev, D.

    2006-09-01

    The pulse-echo ultrasonic technique is the only method to investigate the tensor of the so-called area coefficient, which describes the strain influence on the Fermi surface of a material. This technique has been used to study the layered superconductor Sr2RuO4 at temperatures down to 45 mK and in fields of up to 33 T. We scanned the orientation of the field in the bc-plane of the crystal and performed field and temperature sweeps at specific angles selected with a precision of about 1 degree. The wave vector of studied c11 mode coincided with the axis of rotation and was always perpendicular to the field direction. The observed quantum oscillations were the strongest at small angles between the field and the c direction of the crystal. The three frequencies of the quantum oscillations Fα = 3.02 kTesla, Fβ = 12.74 kTesla and Fγ = 18.44 kTesla as well as two values of the effective masses mα = 3.2mc and mβ = 5.5me associated with the α, β, and γ sheets of the Fermi surface measured at zero angle, are in good agreement with the known values. As expected for the cylindrical Fermi surfaces, the frequencies followed a 1/cosθ law. These results demonstrate that the technique has good performance.

  9. Angular dependence of current-driven chiral walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Eduardo; Alejos, Oscar; Auxiliadora Hernandez, Maria; Raposo, Victor; Sanchez-Tejerina, Luis; Moretti, Simone

    2016-06-01

    The current-driven dynamics of chiral domain walls is theoretically studied by means of realistic micromagnetic simulations. Trains of current pulses flowing through the heavy metal underneath the ferromagnetic layer are injected with different directions with respect to the ferromagnetic strip axis. The wall displacement is highly sensitive to the wall configuration and to the angle between the current and the longitudinal axis of the strip. These simulations can account for the experimental behavior at large currents, but preliminary results at lower current density point towards incompatibilities between the model and the experiment that need further experimental and theoretical efforts.

  10. Angular dependence of the auger lineshape of graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Houston, J.E.; Rye, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Auger lineshape of graphite is of interest as a model for studying initial-state, core-hole screening and final-state, hole-hole correlation effects in aromatic systems. We have obtained the Auger spectra from POCO (amorphous) and HOPG (highly-oriented pyrolytic) graphite.

  11. Regulation of angular impulse during two forward translating tasks.

    PubMed

    Mathiyakom, Witaya; McNitt-Gray, Jill L; Wilcox, Rand R

    2007-05-01

    Angular impulse generation is dependent on the position of the total body center of mass (CoM) relative to the ground reaction force (GRF) vector during contact with the environment. The purpose of this study was to determine how backward angular impulse was regulated during two forward translating tasks. Control of the relative angle between the CoM and the GRF was hypothesized to be mediated by altering trunk-leg coordination. Eight highly skilled athletes performed a series of standing reverse somersaults and reverse timers. Sagittal plane kinematics, GRF, and electromyograms of lower extremity muscles were acquired during the take-off phase of both tasks. The magnitude of the backward angular impulse generated during the push interval of both tasks was mediated by redirecting the GRF relative to the CoM. During the reverse timer, backward angular impulse generated during the early part of the take-off phase was negated by limiting backward trunk rotation and redirecting the GRF during the push interval. Biarticular muscles crossing the knee and hip coordinated the control of GRF direction and CoM trajectory via modulation of trunk-leg coordination. PMID:17603134

  12. Generation of angular-momentum-dominated electron beams from a photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-E.; Piot, Philippe; Kim, Kwang-Je; Barov, Nikolas; Lidia, Steven; Santucci, James; Tikhoplav, Rodion; Wennerberg, Jason

    2004-11-30

    Various projects under study require an angular-momentum-dominated electron beam generated by a photoinjector. Some of the proposals directly use the angular-momentum-dominated beams (e.g. electron cooling of heavy ions), while others require the beam to be transformed into a flat beam (e.g. possible electron injectors for light sources and linear colliders). In this paper, we report our experimental study of an angular-momentum-dominated beam produced in a photoinjector, addressing the dependencies of angular momentum on initial conditions. We also briefly discuss the removal of angular momentum. The results of the experiment, carried out at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are found to be in good agreement with theoretical and numerical models.

  13. Generation of angular-momentum-dominated electron beams from a photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Kim, K.-J.; Barov, N.; Lidia, S.; Santucci, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; Wennerberg, J.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Various projects under study require an angular-momentum-dominated electron beam generated by a photoinjector. Some of the proposals directly use the angular-momentum-dominated beams (e.g. electron cooling of heavy ions), while others require the beam to be transformed into a flat beam (e.g. possible electron injectors for light sources and linear colliders). In this paper, we report our experimental study of an angular-momentum-dominated beam produced in a photoinjector, addressing the dependencies of angular momentum on initial conditions. We also briefly discuss the removal of angular momentum. The results of the experiment, carried out at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are found to be in good agreement with theoretical and numerical models.

  14. Angular-Rate Estimation using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  15. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quatemion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quatemion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quatemion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  16. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    In most spacecraft (SC) there is a need to know the SC angular rate. Precise angular rate is required for attitude determination, and a coarse rate is needed for attitude control damping. Classically, angular rate information is obtained from gyro measurements. These days, there is a tendency to build smaller, lighter and cheaper SC, therefore the inclination now is to do away with gyros and use other means and methods to determine the angular rate. The latter is also needed even in gyro equipped satellites when performing high rate maneuvers whose angular-rate is out of range of the on board gyros or in case of gyro failure. There are several ways to obtain the angular rate in a gyro-less SC. When the attitude is known, one can differentiate the attitude in whatever parameters it is given and use the kinematics equation that connects the derivative of the attitude with the satellite angular-rate and compute the latter. Since SC usually utilize vector measurements for attitude determination, the differentiation of the attitude introduces a considerable noise component in the computed angular-rate vector.

  17. Mean Angular Momenta of Primary Photofission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Bezshyyko, O.A.; Kadenko, I.M.; Plujko, V.A.; Yermolenko, R.V.; Mazur, V.M.; Strilchuk, N.V.; Vishnevsky, I.M.; Zheltonozhsky, V.A.

    2005-05-24

    Isomer ratios and mean angular momenta for photofission products of 237Np and 238U are obtained. The technique of gamma-ray spectrometry for isomeric ratio determination was used. Fissionable nuclei were irradiated by bremsstrahlung spectrum of microtron M-30 with electron energy 16 MeV. Calculations of mean angular momenta were performed by modified version of the EMPIRE II code.

  18. Orbital angular momentum in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Gerald T.

    2010-05-15

    Analysis of the measured value of the integrated d-bar-u-bar asymmetry (I{sub fas} = 0.147 +- 0.027) in the nucleon show it to arise from nucleon fluctuations into baryon plus pion. Requiring angular momentum conservation in these fluctuations shows the associated orbital angular momentum is equal to the value of the flavor asymmetry.

  19. Power calculation of linear and angular incremental encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofev, Aleksandr V.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.; Mednikov, Sergey V.; Sycheva, Elena A.

    2016-04-01

    Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and transmit the measured values back to the control unit. The capabilities of these systems are undergoing continual development in terms of their resolution, accuracy and reliability, their measuring ranges, and maximum speeds. This article discusses the method of power calculation of linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders, to find the optimum parameters for its components, such as light emitters, photo-detectors, linear and angular scales, optical components etc. It analyzes methods and devices that permit high resolutions in the order of 0.001 mm or 0.001°, as well as large measuring lengths of over 100 mm. In linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders optical beam is usually formulated by a condenser lens passes through the measuring unit changes its value depending on the movement of a scanning head or measuring raster. Past light beam is converting into an electrical signal by the photo-detecter's block for processing in the electrical block. Therefore, for calculating the energy source is a value of the desired value of the optical signal at the input of the photo-detecter's block, which reliably recorded and processed in the electronic unit of linear and angular incremental optoelectronic encoders. Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and

  20. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  1. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  2. Ground-state angular momentum, spectral asymmetry, and topology in chiral superfluids and superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojanen, Teemu

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it was discovered that the ground-state orbital angular momentum in two-dimensional chiral superfluids with pairing symmetry (px+i py) ν depends on the winding number ν in a striking manner. The ground-state value for the ν =1 case is Lz=ℏ N /2 as expected by counting the Cooper pairs, while a dramatic cancellation takes place for ν >1 . The origin of the cancellation is associated with the topological edge states that appear in a finite geometry and give rise to a spectral asymmetry. Here, we study the reduction of orbital angular momentum for different potential profiles and pairing strengths, showing that the result Lz=ℏ N /2 is robust for ν =1 under all studied circumstances. We study how angular momentum depends on the gap size Δ /EF and obtain the result Lz=ℏ/ν 2 N (1 -μ/EF) for ν =2 ,3 . Thus, the gap dependence of Lz for ν <4 enters at most through the chemical potential while ν ≥4 is qualitatively different. In addition, we generalize the spectral asymmetry arguments to total angular momentum in the ground state of triplet superfluids where due to a spin-orbit coupling Lz is not a good quantum number. We find that the ground-state total angular momentum also behaves very differently depending on total angular momentum of the Cooper pairs.

  3. Is photon angular momentum important in molecular collision processes occurring in a laser field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of the rigorous treatment of photon angular momentum in molecular-collision processes occurring in the presence of intense radiation is investigated. An alternate approximate treatment, which essentially neglects the angular momentum coupling between the photon and the molecular degrees of freedom by averaging over the angular dependence of the interaction matrix elements, is presented and applied to a model calculation. The degeneracy-averaged results of this calculation compare remarkably well with the results of a rigorous calculation, from which we conclude (with reservation) that the explicit consideration of photoangular momentum coupling in molecular-collision problems is unnecessary.

  4. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Delayed Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I. Y.; Harman, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements, which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear part of the rotas rotational dynamics equation of a body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This non unique decomposition, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft (SC) dynamics model as a linear one and, thus, the application of a PseudoLinear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to compute recursively the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the rotational dynamics by a simple Markov model is also examined. In this paper special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results are presented.

  5. Resolving enantiomers using the optical angular momentum of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Brullot, Ward; Vanbel, Maarten K; Swusten, Tom; Verbiest, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Circular dichroism and optical rotation are crucial for the characterization of chiral molecules and are of importance to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, proteins, DNA, and many others. These techniques are based on the different interactions of enantiomers with circularly polarized components of plane wave light that carries spin angular momentum (SAM). For light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), for example, twisted or helical light, the consensus is that it cannot engage with the chirality of a molecular system as previous studies failed to demonstrate an interaction between optical OAM and chiral molecules. Using unique nanoparticle aggregates, we prove that optical OAM can engage with materials' chirality and discriminate between enantiomers. Further, theoretical results show that compared to circular dichroism, mainly based on magnetic dipole contributions, the OAM analog helical dichroism (HD) is critically dependent on fundamentally different chiral electric quadrupole contributions. Our work opens new venues to study chirality and can find application in sensing and chiral spectroscopy. PMID:26998517

  6. Resolving enantiomers using the optical angular momentum of twisted light

    PubMed Central

    Brullot, Ward; Vanbel, Maarten K.; Swusten, Tom; Verbiest, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Circular dichroism and optical rotation are crucial for the characterization of chiral molecules and are of importance to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, proteins, DNA, and many others. These techniques are based on the different interactions of enantiomers with circularly polarized components of plane wave light that carries spin angular momentum (SAM). For light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), for example, twisted or helical light, the consensus is that it cannot engage with the chirality of a molecular system as previous studies failed to demonstrate an interaction between optical OAM and chiral molecules. Using unique nanoparticle aggregates, we prove that optical OAM can engage with materials’ chirality and discriminate between enantiomers. Further, theoretical results show that compared to circular dichroism, mainly based on magnetic dipole contributions, the OAM analog helical dichroism (HD) is critically dependent on fundamentally different chiral electric quadrupole contributions. Our work opens new venues to study chirality and can find application in sensing and chiral spectroscopy. PMID:26998517

  7. Inversion of parity splitting in alternating parity bands at high angular momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R.V.; Minkov, N.; Scheid, W.

    2005-12-15

    The angular-momentum dependence of parity splitting in ground-state alternating parity bands and especially the sign inversion of parity splitting are considered. It is shown that the complicated odd-even staggering structure of the alternating parity bands can be interpreted as the result of two simultaneously manifesting effects: (1) penetration of the barrier separating two minima with the opposite signs of the reflection asymmetric deformation and (2) alignment of the angular momentum of the intrinsic excitations.

  8. Nonlinear management of the angular momentum of soliton clusters: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fratalocchi, Andrea; Piccardi, Armando; Peccianti, Marco; Assanto, Gaetano

    2007-06-15

    We demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, how to acquire nonlinear control over the angular momentum of a cluster of solitary waves. Our results, stemming from a universal theoretical model, show that the angular momentum can be adjusted by acting on the global energy input in the system. The phenomenon is experimentally ascertained in nematic liquid crystals by observing a power-dependent rotation of a two-soliton ensemble.

  9. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  10. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  11. Optical Mixing of Rydberg Angular Momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Corless, J.D.; Stroud, C.R., Jr.

    1997-07-01

    When optical frequency fields are used to couple a ground state to a Rydberg state, the resonant dipole coupling is to a low angular momentum state. Higher angular momentum states are typically thought not to play a role in the excitation. The extremely large dipole matrix elements coupling Rydberg states of the same n but differing l , however, allow optical fields of modest strengths to produce Rabi frequencies larger than optical frequencies. We demonstrate that these optical fields can therefore readily excite the higher angular momentum states, and we examine the consequences of this coupling. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Gravitational waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2016-02-01

    Spinorial formalism is used to map every electromagnetic wave into the gravitational wave (within the linearized gravity). In this way we can obtain the gravitational counterparts of Bessel, Laguerre-Gauss, and other light beams carrying orbital angular momentum.

  13. Calculates Angular Quadrature Weights and Cosines.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1988-02-18

    DSNQUAD calculates the angular quadrature weights and cosines for use in CCC-254/ANISN-ORNL. The subroutines in DSNQUAD were lifted from the XSDRN-PM code, which is supplied with the CCC-475/ SCALIAS-77 package.

  14. Spin and orbital angular momentum of a class of nonparaxial light beams having a globally defined polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunfang

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the momentum density of free electromagnetic field splits into two parts. One has no contribution to the net momentum due to the transversality condition. The other yields all the momentum. The angular momentum that originates from the former part is spin, and the angular momentum that originates from the latter part is orbital angular momentum. Expressions for the spin and orbital angular momentum are given in terms of the electric vector in reciprocal space. The spin and orbital angular momentum defined this way are used to investigate the angular momentum of nonparaxial beams that are described in a recently published paper [Phys. Rev. A 78, 063831 (2008)]. It is found that the orbital angular momentum depends, apart from an l-dependent term, on two global quantities, the polarization represented by a generalized Jones vector and another characteristic represented by a unit vector I, though the spin depends only on the polarization. The polarization dependence of orbital angular momentum through the effect of I is obtained and discussed. Some applications of the result obtained here are also made. The fact that the spin originates from the part of momentum density that has no contribution to the net momentum is used to show that there does not exist the paradox on the spin of circularly polarized plane wave. The polarization dependence of both spin and orbital angular momentum is shown to be the origin of conversion from the spin of a paraxial Laguerre-Gaussian beam into the orbital angular momentum of the focused beam through a high numerical aperture.

  15. A new integrated optical angular velocity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Peluso, Francesco; Armenise, Mario N.

    2005-03-01

    Very compact and low-cost rotation sensors are strongly required for any moving systems in several applications. Integrated optical angular velocity sensors seem to be very promising in terms of low cost, compactness, light weight and high-performance. In the paper a new integrated optical angular velocity sensor having a passive resonant configuration is proposed. Preliminary results are really encouraging and demonstrate the possibility of using the sensor in gyro systems for satellite applications.

  16. Angular performance measure for tighter uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Hradil, Z.; Rehacek, J.; Klimov, A. B.; Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.

    2010-01-15

    The uncertainty principle places a fundamental limit on the accuracy with which we can measure conjugate quantities. However, the fluctuations of these variables can be assessed in terms of different estimators. We propose an angular performance that allows for tighter uncertainty relations for angle and angular momentum. The differences with previous bounds can be significant for particular states and indeed may be amenable to experimental measurement with the present technology.

  17. Angular wander measurements of maser clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutel, Robert L.

    Angular wander measurements of the relative positions of closely spaced maser features provides a powerful probe of interstellar turbulence associated with regions of star formation. Differential angular wander is easily measured in a maser complex and can strongly distinguish between shallow and steep power-law turbulence. The best candidates for such measurements appear to be the 6 and 12 GHz type II methanol masers.

  18. A detection system with broad angular acceptance for particle identification and angular distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Arazi, A.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Capurro, O. A.; Cardona, M. A.; de Barbará, E.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martí, G. V.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    A new detection system for time-optimized heavy-ion angular distribution measurements has been designed and constructed. This device is composed by an ionization chamber with a segmented-grid anode and three position-sensitive silicon detectors. This particular arrangement allows identifying reaction products emitted within a 30° wide angular range with better than 1° angular resolution. As a demonstration of its capabilities, angular distributions of the elastic scattering cross-section and the production of alpha particles in the 7Li+27Al system, at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, are presented.

  19. Unexpected angular or rotational deformity after corrective osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Codman’s paradox reveals a misunderstanding of geometry in orthopedic practice. Physicians often encounter situations that cannot be understood intuitively during orthopedic interventions such as corrective osteotomy. Occasionally, unexpected angular or rotational deformity occurs during surgery. This study aimed to draw the attention of orthopedic surgeons toward the concepts of orientation and rotation and demonstrate the potential for unexpected deformity after orthopedic interventions. This study focused on three situations: shoulder arthrodesis, femoral varization derotational osteotomy, and femoral derotation osteotomy. Methods First, a shoulder model was generated to calculate unexpected rotational deformity to demonstrate Codman’s paradox. Second, femoral varization derotational osteotomy was simulated using a cylinder model. Third, a reconstructed femoral model was used to calculate unexpected angular or rotational deformity during femoral derotation osteotomy. Results Unexpected external rotation was found after forward elevation and abduction of the shoulder joint. In the varization and derotation model, closed-wedge osteotomy and additional derotation resulted in an unexpected extension and valgus deformity, namely, under-correction of coxa valga. After femoral derotational osteotomy, varization and extension of the distal fragment occurred, although the extension was negligible. Conclusions Surgeons should be aware of unexpected angular deformity after surgical procedure involving bony areas. The degree of deformity differs depending on the context of the surgical procedure. However, this study reveals that notable deformities can be expected during orthopedic procedures such as femoral varization derotational osteotomy. PMID:24886469

  20. Shocks in the low angular momentum accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suková, Petra; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    We address the variability of low luminous galactic nuclei including the Sgr A* or other transient accreting systems, e.g. the black hole X-ray binaries, such as GX 339-4 or IGR J17091. These sources exhibit bright X-ray flares and quasi-periodical oscillations and are theoretically interpreted as the quasi-spherical accretion flows, formed instead of or around Keplerianaccretion disks. In low angular momentum flows the existence of shocks for some range of leading parameters (energy, angular momentum and adiabatic constant of the gas) was studied semi-analytically. The possible hysteresis effect, caused by the fact that the evolution of the flow and the formation of the shock depends on its own history, was discovered. The presence of the shock in the accreted material is important for the observable properties of the out-coming radiation. In the shocked region the gas is dense and hot, thus much more luminous than in the other case. We study the appearance of standing shocks in low angular momentum gas accreting onto a black hole with numerical hydrodynamicalsimulations, using the ZEUS code with Paczynski-Wiitapseudo-Newtonian potential.

  1. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions with attosecond bichromatic intense XUV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2012-01-01

    Angular distributions of molecular above-threshold ionization (MATI) in bichromatic attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) linear polarization laser pulses have been theoretically investigated. Multiphoton ionization in a prealigned molecular ion H2+ produces clear MATI spectra which show a forward-backward asymmetry in angular and momentum distributions which is critically sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP) φ, the time delay Δτ between the two laser pulses, and the photoelectron kinetic energies Ee. The features of the asymmetry in MATI angular distributions are described well by multiphoton perturbative ionization models. Phase differences of continuum electron wave functions can be extracted from the CEP φ and time delay Δτ dependent ionization asymmetry ratio created by interfering multiphoton ionization pathways. At large internuclear distances MATI angular distributions exhibit more complex features due to laser-induced electron diffraction where continuum electron wavelengths are less than the internuclear distance.

  2. Extracting angular observables without a likelihood and applications to rare decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaujean, Frederik; Chrz&egon; szcz, Marcin; Serra, Nicola; van Dyk, Danny

    2015-06-01

    Our goal is to obtain a complete set of angular observables arising in a generic multibody process. We show how this can be achieved without the need to carry out a likelihood fit of the angular distribution to the measured events. Instead, we apply the method of moments that relies both on the orthogonality of angular functions and the estimation of integrals by Monte Carlo techniques. The big advantage of this method is that the joint distribution of all observables can be easily extracted, even for very few events. The method of moments is shown to be robust against mismodeling of the angular distribution. Our main result is an explicit algorithm that accounts for systematic uncertainties from detector-resolution and acceptance effects. Finally, we present the necessary process-dependent formulas needed for direct application of the method to several rare decays of interest.

  3. Vector correlation analysis for inelastic and reactive collisions between partners possessing spin and orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2009-12-31

    A general reactive collision of the type A + B --> C + D is considered where both the collision partners (A and B) or the products (C and D) may possess internal, i.e., spin, orbital or rotational, angular momenta. Compact expressions are derived using a rigorous quantum mechanical analysis for the angular momentum anisotropy of either of the products (C or D) arising from an initially polarized distribution of the reactant angular momentum. The angular momentum distribution of the product is expressed in terms of canonical spherical tensors multiplied by anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L). These coefficients act as transformation coefficients between the angular momentum anisotropy of the reactants and that of the product. They are independent of scattering angle but depend on the details of the scattering dynamics. The relationship between the coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L) and the body-fixed scattering S matrix is given and the methodology for the quantum mechanical calculation of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients is clearly laid out. The anisotropy-transforming coefficients are amenable to direct experimental measurement in a similar manner to vector correlation and alignment parameters in photodissociation processes. A key aspect of the theory is the use of projections of both reactant and product angular momenta onto the product recoil vector direction. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that if the state multipole for reactant angular momentum distribution has a projection q(k) onto the product recoil vector the state multipoles for the product angular momentum distribution all have this same projection. Expressions are also presented for the distribution of the product angular momentum when its components are evaluated relative to the space-fixed Z-axis. Notes with detailed derivations of all the formulas are available as Supporting Information. PMID:19642631

  4. Magnetic field and angular momentum evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic field in young stellar object is clearly the most important component when one dealing with the angular momentum evolution of solar-like stars. It controls this latter one from the pre-main sequence, during the ``disk locking'' phase where the stars magnetically interact with their surrounding disk, to the main-sequence through powerful stellar winds that remove angular momentum from the stellar surface. We present new models for the rotational evolution of solar-like stars between 1 Myr and 10 Gyr with the aim to reproduce the distributions of rotational periods observed for star forming regions and young open clusters within this age range. Our simulations are produced by a recent model dedicated to the study of the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars. This model include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetized stellar winds and a specific dynamo and mass-loss prescription are used to link the angular momentum loss-rate to angular velocity evolution. The model additionally allows for a core/envelope decoupling with an angular momentum transfer between these two regions. Since this former model didn't include any physical star/disk interaction description, two star/disk interaction processes are eventually added to it in order to reproduce the apparent small angular velocities to which the stellar surface is subject during the disk accretion phase. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow, median and fast rotators including two star/disk interaction scenarios that are the magnetospheric ejection and the accretion powered stellar winds processes. The models appear to fail at reproducing the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars except when a more intense magnetic field is used during the disk accretion phase.

  5. Temperature-dependent templated growth of porphine thin films on the (111) facets of copper and silver

    SciTech Connect

    Diller, Katharina; Klappenberger, Florian; Allegretti, Francesco; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Fischer, Sybille; Duncan, David A.; Lloyd, Julian A.; Oh, Seung Cheol; Barth, Johannes V.; Maurer, Reinhard J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-10-14

    The templated growth of the basic porphyrin unit, free-base porphine (2H-P), is characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements and density functional theory (DFT). The DFT simulations allow the deconvolution of the complex XPS and NEXAFS signatures into contributions originating from five inequivalent carbon atoms, which can be grouped into C–N and C–C bonded species. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS measurements reveal an intriguing organizational behavior: On both Cu(111) and Ag(111), for coverages up to one monolayer, the molecules adsorb undeformed and parallel to the respective metal surface. Upon increasing the coverage, however, the orientation of the molecules in the thin films depends on the growth conditions. Multilayers deposited at low temperatures exhibit a similar average tilting angle (30° relative to the surface plane) on both substrates. Conversely, for multilayers grown at room temperature a markedly different scenario exists. On Cu(111) the film thickness is self-limited to a coverage of approximately two layers, while on Ag(111) multilayers can be grown easily and, in contrast to the bulk 2H-P crystal, the molecules are oriented perpendicular to the surface. This difference in molecular orientation results in a modified line-shape of the C 1s XPS signatures, which depends on the incident photon energy and is explained by comparison with depth-resolved DFT calculations. Simulations of ionization energies for differently stacked molecules show no indication for a packing-induced modification of the multilayer XP spectra, thus indicating that the comparison of single molecule calculations to multilayer data is justified.

  6. Temperature-dependent templated growth of porphine thin films on the (111) facets of copper and silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, Katharina; Klappenberger, Florian; Allegretti, Francesco; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Fischer, Sybille; Duncan, David A.; Maurer, Reinhard J.; Lloyd, Julian A.; Oh, Seung Cheol; Reuter, Karsten; Barth, Johannes V.

    2014-10-01

    The templated growth of the basic porphyrin unit, free-base porphine (2H-P), is characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements and density functional theory (DFT). The DFT simulations allow the deconvolution of the complex XPS and NEXAFS signatures into contributions originating from five inequivalent carbon atoms, which can be grouped into C-N and C-C bonded species. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS measurements reveal an intriguing organizational behavior: On both Cu(111) and Ag(111), for coverages up to one monolayer, the molecules adsorb undeformed and parallel to the respective metal surface. Upon increasing the coverage, however, the orientation of the molecules in the thin films depends on the growth conditions. Multilayers deposited at low temperatures exhibit a similar average tilting angle (30° relative to the surface plane) on both substrates. Conversely, for multilayers grown at room temperature a markedly different scenario exists. On Cu(111) the film thickness is self-limited to a coverage of approximately two layers, while on Ag(111) multilayers can be grown easily and, in contrast to the bulk 2H-P crystal, the molecules are oriented perpendicular to the surface. This difference in molecular orientation results in a modified line-shape of the C 1s XPS signatures, which depends on the incident photon energy and is explained by comparison with depth-resolved DFT calculations. Simulations of ionization energies for differently stacked molecules show no indication for a packing-induced modification of the multilayer XP spectra, thus indicating that the comparison of single molecule calculations to multilayer data is justified.

  7. Relative Effects of Angularity, Grain Size, and Sorting on Auto-Acoustic Compaction in Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    There are thought to be three main rheological regimes exhibited within granular media in the presence of shear stress, each dependent on a dimensionless number, I, representing the relative values of collisional stress between grains and confining stress. At slow shear rates, when I<<1, the granular flow is in the quasi-static regime, and shear stress is supported elastically through multi-grain networks (force-chains). At high shear rates, when I>>1, the flow is in the grain-inertial regime, and shear stress is supported through the transfer of momentum occurring in grain-to-grain collisions. Experiments conducted using a torsional rheometer found that at intermediate shear velocities, where I approaches 1, force-chain collapse in angular sand samples produces sound waves capable of vibrating the shear zone enough to cause compaction (van der Elst et al., 2012; Lu et al., 2007). Whether or not a granular mixture exhibits this auto-acoustic compaction effect during flow has been observed to be dependent on angularity, grain size, sorting, and mineral strength: more angular grains produce more noise and compact more at intermediate shear velocities than spherical grains do, and smaller angular grains produce more noise and compact more than larger angular grains. We use the same experimental set up to explore the relative importance of the effects of angularity and grain size, comparing various grain sizes and sorting in both spherical and angular granular mixtures. Accurate assessment of the effect of angularity and grain size on rheology of granular flow will serve as a helpful predictive tool for modeling granular processes including landslides, rockslides, fault ruptures, and desert dune migrations. Grain size and shape can vary greatly system-to-system but are also often easy to observe in the field. We hope to be able to use these types of small scale grain observations to form predictions about the behavior of the larger scale process of which they are a

  8. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Haberberger, D. Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  9. Teleportation of a controllable orbital angular momentum generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; She Weilong

    2009-12-15

    We report on a teleportation scheme, in which a controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) generator is teleported. Via our scheme, Alice is able to--according to another independent photon's spin state (polarization) sent by Carol--electrically control the remote OAM generation on Bob's photon. To this end, we introduce a local electrically tunable and spin-dependent OAM generator to transfer a preliminary OAM-OAM entanglement to a spin-OAM hybrid entanglement, which then makes a joint Bell-state measurement on Alice and Carol's photons play its role. We show that the quantum state tomography can be introduced to evaluate the performance of the teleportation.

  10. Classical and quantum chaotic angular-momentum pumps.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, T; Dubeibe, F L

    2015-03-01

    We study directed transport of charge and intrinsic angular momentum by periodically driven scattering in the regime of fast and strong driving. A spin-orbit coupling through a kicked magnetic field confined to a compact region in space leads to irregular scattering and triggers spin flips in a spatially asymmetric manner which allows us to generate polarized currents. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the spin separation carry over to the quantum level and give rise to spin pumping. Our theory based on the Floquet formalism is confirmed by numerical solutions of the time-dependent inhomogeneous Schrödinger equation with a continuous source term. PMID:25793818

  11. Ultrafast angular momentum transfer in multisublattice ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; López-Flores, V; Halté, V; Hehn, M; Stamm, C; Pontius, N; Beaurepaire, E; Boeglin, C

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to induce ultrafast changes of the magnetization in magnetic materials. However, one of the unsolved questions is that of conservation of the total angular momentum during the ultrafast demagnetization. Here we report the ultrafast transfer of angular momentum during the first hundred femtoseconds in ferrimagnetic Co0.8Gd0.2 and Co0.74Tb0.26 films. Using time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism allowed for time-resolved determination of spin and orbital momenta for each element. We report an ultrafast quenching of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and show that at early times the demagnetization in ferrimagnetic alloys is driven by the local transfer of angular momenta between the two exchange-coupled sublattices while the total angular momentum stays constant. In Co0.74Tb0.26 we have observed a transfer of the total angular momentum to an external bath, which is delayed by ~150 fs. PMID:24614016

  12. Angular momentum conservation for dynamical black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2006-11-15

    Angular momentum can be defined by rearranging the Komar surface integral in terms of a twist form, encoding the twisting around of space-time due to a rotating mass, and an axial vector. If the axial vector is a coordinate vector and has vanishing transverse divergence, it can be uniquely specified under certain generic conditions. Along a trapping horizon, a conservation law expresses the rate of change of angular momentum of a general black hole in terms of angular momentum densities of matter and gravitational radiation. This identifies the transverse-normal block of an effective gravitational-radiation energy tensor, whose normal-normal block was recently identified in a corresponding energy conservation law. Angular momentum and energy are dual, respectively, to the axial vector and a previously identified vector, the conservation equations taking the same form. Including charge conservation, the three conserved quantities yield definitions of an effective energy, electric potential, angular velocity and surface gravity, satisfying a dynamical version of the so-called first law of black-hole mechanics. A corresponding zeroth law holds for null trapping horizons, resolving an ambiguity in taking the null limit.

  13. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  14. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  15. Inequalities for angular derivatives and boundary interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, Vladimir; Elin, Mark; Shoikhet, David

    2013-03-01

    The classical Julia-Wolff-Carathéodory theorem asserts that the angular derivative of a holomorphic self-mapping of the open unit disk (Schur function) at its boundary fixed point is a positive number. Cowen and Pommerenke (J Lond Math Soc 26:271-289, 1982) proved that if a Schur function has several boundary regular fixed (or mutual contact) points, then the angular derivatives at these points are subject to certain inequalities. We develop a unified approach to establish relations between angular derivatives of Schur functions with a prescribed (possibly, infinite) collection of either mutual contact points or boundary fixed points. This approach yields diverse inequalities improving both classical and more recent results. We apply them to study the Nevanlinna-Pick interpolation problem with boundary data. Our methods lead to fairly explicit formulas describing the set of solutions.

  16. Improved numerical projection of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Kevin; Johnson, Calvin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear many-body states have good angular momenta, but many theoretical building blocks such as deformed Slater determinants do not. Hence one must numerically project out states of good angular momenta, usually through a computationally taxing three-dimensional integral. We took an existing code for angular-momentum projected Hartree-Fock and improved its performance, partly through judicious ordering of the loops, precomputing arrays of important combinatorics, and careful application of parallelization. We also investigated a novel inversion scheme. This work is potentially applicable to multiple approaches in many-body calculations, and should also be generalizable to particle number projection. Supported by SDSU Summer Undergraduate Research Program and by DOE Award Number DE-FG02-96ER40985.

  17. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  18. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions. PMID:22194572

  19. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  20. Angular momentum transport efficiency in post-main sequence low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, F.; Gellert, M.; Arlt, R.; Deheuvels, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Using asteroseismic techniques, it has recently become possible to probe the internal rotation profile of low-mass (≈1.1-1.5 M⊙) subgiant and red giant stars. Under the assumption of local angular momentum conservation, the core contraction and envelope expansion occurring at the end of the main sequence would result in a much larger internal differential rotation than observed. This suggests that angular momentum redistribution must be taking place in the interior of these stars. Aims: We investigate the physical nature of the angular momentum redistribution mechanisms operating in stellar interiors by constraining the efficiency of post-main sequence rotational coupling. Methods: We model the rotational evolution of a 1.25M⊙ star using the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code. Our models take into account the magnetic wind braking occurring at the surface of the star and the angular momentum transport in the interior, with an efficiency dependent on the degree of internal differential rotation. Results: We find that models including a dependence of the angular momentum transport efficiency on the radial rotational shear reproduce very well the observations. The best fit of the data is obtained with an angular momentum transport coefficient scaling with the ratio of the rotation rate of the radiative interior over that of the convective envelope of the star as a power law of exponent ≈3. This scaling is consistent with the predictions of recent numerical simulations of the Azimuthal Magneto-Rotational Instability. Conclusions: We show that an angular momentum transport process whose efficiency varies during the stellar evolution through a dependence on the level of internal differential rotation is required to explain the observed post-main sequence rotational evolution of low-mass stars.

  1. Synthetic aperture methods for angular scatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Drake A.; Ranganathan, Karthik; McAllister, Michael J.; Rigby, K. W.; Walker, William F.

    2004-04-01

    Angular scatter offers a new source of tissue contrast and an opportunity for tissue characterization in ultrasound imaging. We have previously described the application of the translating apertures algorithm (TAA) to coherently acquire angular scatter data over a range of scattering angles. While this approach works well at the focus, it suffers from poor depth of field (DOF) due to a finite aperture size. Furthermore, application of the TAA with large focused apertures entails a tradeoff between spatial resolution and scattering angle resolution. While large multielement apertures improve spatial resolution, they encompass many permutations of transmit/receive element pairs. This results in the simultaneous interrogation of multiple scattering angles, limiting angular resolution. We propose a synthetic aperture imaging scheme that achieves both high spatial resolution and high angular resolution. In backscatter acquisition mode, we transmit successively from single transducer elements, while receiving on the same element. Other scattering angles are interrogated by successively transmitting and receiving on different single elements chosen with the appropriate spatial separation between them. Thus any given image is formed using only transmit/receive element pairs at a single separation. This synthetic aperture approach minimizes averaging across scattering angles, and yields excellent angular resolution. Likewise, synthetic aperture methods allow us to build large effective apertures to maintain a high spatial resolution. Synthetic dynamic focusing and dynamic apodization are applied to further improve spatial resolution and DOF. We present simulation results and experimental results obtained using a GE Logiq 700MR system modified to obtain synthetic aperture TAA data. Images of wire targets exhibit high DOF and spatial resolution. We also present a novel approach for combining angular scatter data to effectively reduce grating lobes. With this approach we have

  2. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  3. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  4. Absolute angular positioning in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Schief, H.; Marsico, V.; Kern, K.

    1996-05-01

    Commercially available angular resolvers, which are routinely used in machine tools and robotics, are modified and adapted to be used under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions. They provide straightforward and reliable measurements of angular positions for any kind of UHV sample manipulators. The corresponding absolute reproducibility is on the order of 0.005{degree}, whereas the relative resolution is better than 0.001{degree}, as demonstrated by high-resolution helium-reflectivity measurements. The mechanical setup and possible applications are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Angular momentum in spin-phonon processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum theory of spin relaxation in the elastic environment is revised with account of the concept of a phonon spin recently introduced by Zhang and Niu [L. Zhang and Q. Niu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 085503 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.085503]. Similar to the case of the electromagnetic field, the division of the angular momentum associated with elastic deformations into the orbital part and the part due to phonon spins proves to be useful for the analysis of the balance of the angular momentum. Such analysis sheds important light on microscopic processes leading to the Einstein-de Haas effect.

  6. On the vector model of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  7. Angular distribution of emission from hyperbolic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Livenere, J. E.; Zhu, G.; Tumkur, T. U.; Hu, H.; Cortes, C. L.; Jacob, Z.; Prokes, S. M.; Noginov, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied angular distribution of emission of dye molecules deposited on lamellar metal/dielectric and Si/Ag nanowire based metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion. In agreement with the theoretical prediction, the emission pattern of dye on top of lamellar metamaterial is similar to that on top of metal. At the same time, the effective medium model predicts the emission patterns of the nanowire array and the dye film deposited on glass to be nearly identical to each other. This is not the case of our experiment. We tentatively explain the nearly Lambertian (∝cosθ) angular distribution of emission of the nanowire based sample by a surface roughness. PMID:25476126

  8. Angular Resolution of Multi-Lisa Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Gong, Xue-Fei

    2010-04-01

    In this article, we present a detailed derivation of the angular resolution of arbitrary sets of LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) constellations with a toy model for gravitational wave signals, and further generalized to more complicated cases with slowly varying gravitational wave signals of well-defined frequency at any time instant. For future space-borne LISA-like gravitational wave detectors, our results may serve as a conservative quick estimate of the detector's angular resolution and hopefully moreover a reference for the configuration designs.

  9. Angular encoding in attosecond recollision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua; Roither, Stefan; Scrinzi, Armin; Baltuska, Andrius

    2008-02-01

    We describe a general concept of using the spatial information encoded in the time-dependent polarization of high harmonic radiation generated by orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. The main properties of recolliding electron wave packets driven by such fields are reviewed. It is shown that in addition to the recollision energy the angle of recollision of such wave packets, which is directly mapped onto the polarization direction of the emitted high harmonic radiation, varies on a sub-laser-cycle time-scale. Thus, a mapping between the polarization angle and the frequency of the emitted radiation is established on an attosecond time scale. While the polarization angle encodes the spatial properties of the recollision process, the frequency is linked to time via the well-known dispersion relations of high harmonic generation. Based on these principles, we show that in combination with polarization selective detection the use of orthogonally polarized drive pulses for high harmonic generation permit one to construct spatially resolved attosecond measurements. Here, we present two examples of possible applications: (i) a method for isolating a single attosecond pulse from an attosecond pulse train which is more efficient than the cut-off selection method, and (ii) a technique for orbital tomography of molecules with attosecond resolution.

  10. Probes of initial-state interactions in dilepton angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ralston, J.P.; Pire, B.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss the angular distribution of dileptons d sigma/d/sup 4/Qd OMEGA, emphasizing phase sensitivity as a probe of initial-state interactions in QCD. The coherent nature of Sudakov effects is discussed, along with the presence of imaginary parts related by analyticity. Angular-distribution structure functions which describe interference between longitudinal and transverse virtual photons, e.g., can be used to probe phase differences that depend on large momenta. These evolve according to exp(ic ln ln(Q/sup 2//lambda/sub QCD/sup 2/)) where Q/sup 2/ is a large scale. We report on a complete calculation at O(..cap alpha../sub s//sup 2/) of the q anti q ..-->.. ..gamma..* + gluons channel which confirms the cancellation of small (cutoff) scales, and describe a complementary experiment involving spin. We discuss the limit x ..-->.. 1 of the distribution d sigma/dQ/sup 2/dxdcos theta, and point out an unusual and interesting effect that a momentum-dependent phase can produce here.

  11. Large angular scale CMB anisotropy from an excited initial mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojasi, A.; Mohsenzadeh, M.; Yusofi, E.

    2016-07-01

    According to inflationary cosmology, the CMB anisotropy gives an opportunity to test predictions of new physics hypotheses. The initial state of quantum fluctuations is one of the important options at high energy scale, as it can affect observables such as the CMB power spectrum. In this study a quasi-de Sitter inflationary background with approximate de Sitter mode function built over the Bunch-Davies mode is applied to investigate the scale-dependency of the CMB anisotropy. The recent Planck constraint on spectral index motivated us to examine the effect of a new excited mode function (instead of pure de Sitter mode) on the CMB anisotropy at large angular scales. In so doing, it is found that the angular scale-invariance in the CMB temperature fluctuations is broken and in the limit ℓ < 200 a tiny deviation appears. Also, it is shown that the power spectrum of CMB anisotropy is dependent on a free parameter with mass dimension H << M * < M p and on the slow-roll parameter ɛ. Supported by the Islamic Azad University, Rasht Branch, Rasht, Iran

  12. Study of the angular distributions of X-rays emitted following L3 ionization of gold atoms by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I.; Sestric, G.; Ferguson, S.; Williams, S.

    2015-03-01

    Theoretical work suggests that when an atomic inner-shell vacancy with total angular momentum j greater than 1/2 is created by interaction with a photon or charged particle the vacancy will be aligned due to the magnetic sublevels of the ion having nonstatistical populations. The experiments we performed, testing this theory, involved measurements of the angular distributions of gold Lα, Lβ, and Ll X-rays at forward angles in the range 0 degrees to 25 degrees emitted after being bombarded with 15-keV electrons. After corrections for absorption of the characteristic X-rays within the gold target, our results suggest that the angular distributions of the Lα and Lβ X-rays are essentially isotropic, as no angular dependence was observed in our data outside of experimental uncertainties. However, the results of our experiments suggest that the angular distribution of the gold Ll X-rays may be weakly anisotropic.

  13. Angular distribution of turbulence in wave space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G.; Ferziger, J. H.; Bertoglio, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative to the one-point closure model for turbulence, the large eddy simulation (LES), together with its more exact relative, direct numerical simulation (DNS) are discussed. These methods are beginning to serve as partial substitutes for turbulence experiments. The eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) theory is reviewed. Angular distribution of the converted data was examined in relationship to EDQNM.

  14. Inclusion of angular momentum in FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    2015-05-18

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  15. Spacecraft Angular State Estimation After Sensor Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor); BarItzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes two algorithms for computing the angular rate and attitude in case of a gyro failure in a spacecraft (SC) with a special mission profile. The source of the problem is presented, two algorithms are suggested, an observability study is carried out, and the efficiency of the algorithms is demonstrated.

  16. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  17. Inclusion of Angular Momentum in FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  18. The Role of Angularity in Route Choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Alasdair

    The paths of 2425 individual motorcycle trips made in London were analyzed in order to uncover the route choice decisions made by drivers. The paths were derived from global positioning system (GPS) data collected by a courier company for each of their drivers, using algorithms developed for the purpose of this paper. Motorcycle couriers were chosen due to the fact that they both know streets very well and that they do not rely on the GPS to guide their navigation. Each trace was mapped to the underlying road network, and two competing hypotheses for route choice decisions were compared: (a) that riders attempt to minimize the Manhattan distance between locations and (b) that they attempt to minimize the angular distance. In each case, the distance actually traveled was compared to the minimum possible either block or angular distance through the road network. It is usually believed that drivers who know streets well will navigate trips that reduce Manhattan distance; however, here it is shown that angularity appears to play an important role in route choice. 63% of trips made took the minimum possible angular distance between origin and destination, while 51% of trips followed the minimum possible block distance. This implies that impact of turns on cognitive distance plays an important role in decision making, even when a driver has good knowledge of the spatial network.

  19. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael F.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Cook, Philip A.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:23333416

  20. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s(-2)). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  1. Angular momentum evolution of Algol binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanoǧlu, C.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Dervişoǧlu, A.

    2006-11-01

    We have compiled the well-determined absolute parameters of Algol-type binaries. The lists contain the parameters of 74 detached and 61 semidetached close binaries. The double-lined eclipsing binaries provide not only the most accurate determinations of stellar mass, radius and temperatures but also distance-independent luminosity for each of their individual components. The distributions of the primary and secondary masses of detached binaries (DBs) are similar, whilst the secondary masses of the semidetached binaries (SDBs) are mostly smaller than 2 Msolar with a peak in the M2-bin (0.21-1.0). The components of the DBs are almost all located in the main-sequence band. On the contrary, the secondary components of the SDBs have larger radii and luminosity with respect to the same mass and the same effective temperature of main-sequence counterparts. They occupy a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram between terminal-age main sequence and giants. Moreover, the total angular momenta and specific angular momenta are larger for the SDBs of orbital periods with P > 5 d than those of the shorter period ones. The specific angular momenta of SDBs with periods longer than 5 d are 65 per cent greater than that of the short period group with the same mass. The DBs and the SDBs with orbital periods longer and shorter than 5 d are separated into three groups in the J/M5/3 - q diagram. The SDBs with mass ratios greater than 0.3 and P > 5 d have almost the same angular momentum to those of DBs. However, the SDBs with short periods have the smallest angular momentum even though they have the same mass ratios. This result reveals that angular momentum loss (AML) considerably affects the evolution of close binary systems. Recently, Chen, Li & Qian suggested that, in addition to magnetic braking, a circumbinary disc may play an important role in AML from Algol-type binaries. Their calculations indicated that the evolution of Algol-type binaries can be significantly affected by

  2. Optical elements with extended depth of focus and arbitrary distribution of intensity along the focal segment obtained by angular modulation of the optical power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakarenko, K.; Ducin, I.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Kołodziejczyk, A.; Petelczyc, K.; Stompor, A.; Sypek, M.

    2015-04-01

    Light Sword Lens (LSL), i.e., an optical element with extended depth of focus (EDOF) characterized by angular modulation of the optical power in its conventional form is characterized by a linear relationship between the optical power and the angular coordinate of the corresponding angular lens sector. This dependence may be manipulated in function of the required design needs. In the present communicate this additional degree of freedom of design is used for elimination of the LSL shape discontinuity.

  3. Miniaturized photoelectric angular sensor with simplified design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Schiaua, Silviu

    1999-09-01

    In building the movable elements of robots, peripheral devices and measuring apparata, increasing the resolution of the angular sensor systems, based on incremental rotary encoders, is essential, together with decreasing the complexity, dimensions and weight. Especially when the angular sensor is integrated in a measuring system, belonging to a programmed light airplane for surveillance, the key issue is to reduce both dimensions and weight. This can be done using a simplified design, which consists in the following solutions: replacement of the fragile Cr on glass substrate, 1.5 mm thick (normally used for the fabrication of incremental disks), with light Cr on polycarbonate substrate, with only 0.15 mm thick; the absence of collimating optics (based on microlenses, used in IR emitter-photocell receiver assembly), as a result of the good coupling efficiency (due to the possible approaching of these elements at minimum 0.45 mm); the shrinkage of the disk's diameters to only 14 mm; the use of surface mounting devices and the related surface mounting technology, enabling to reduce dimensions and weight. The maximum number of slits on a 14 mm diameter dividing disk, usually obtained in a Cr on polycarbonate version, being approx. 1000, no problem occurs in our case, for 360 slits. The requested angular resolution (only 0.5 degrees for the light airplane), using the whole classical '4x digital multiplication' is not necessary, but a lower one of only 2x, resulting in a simplified electronics. The proposed design permitted, that an original arrangement, for building a small size, lightweight, heavy-duty incremental transducer based angular sensor system, to be obtained, useful not only in avionics, but also in robotics, or other special applications. Besides, extending the number of fixed gratings (masks) allows, that many primary signals to be derived, and a further increase in resolution of even 6 angular minutes to be obtained from the initial 360 slits.

  4. Optical spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in ultra-thin metasurfaces with arbitrary topological charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; De Leon, Israel; Schulz, Sebastian A.; Upham, Jeremy; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-09-01

    Orbital angular momentum associated with the helical phase-front of optical beams provides an unbounded "space" for both classical and quantum communications. Among the different approaches to generate and manipulate orbital angular momentum states of light, coupling between spin and orbital angular momentum allows a faster manipulation of orbital angular momentum states because it depends on manipulating the polarisation state of light, which is simpler and generally faster than manipulating conventional orbital angular momentum generators. In this work, we design and fabricate an ultra-thin spin-to-orbital angular momentum converter, based on plasmonic nano-antennas and operating in the visible wavelength range that is capable of converting spin to an arbitrary value of orbital angular momentum ℓ. The nano-antennas are arranged in an array with a well-defined geometry in the transverse plane of the beam, possessing a specific integer or half-integer topological charge q. When a circularly polarised light beam traverses this metasurface, the output beam polarisation switches handedness and the orbital angular momentum changes in value by ℓ = ± 2 q ℏ per photon. We experimentally demonstrate ℓ values ranging from ±1 to ±25 with conversion efficiencies of 8.6% ± 0.4%. Our ultra-thin devices are integratable and thus suitable for applications in quantum communications, quantum computations, and nano-scale sensing.

  5. Optical spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in ultra-thin metasurfaces with arbitrary topological charges

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Frédéric; De Leon, Israel; Schulz, Sebastian A.; Upham, Jeremy; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-09-08

    Orbital angular momentum associated with the helical phase-front of optical beams provides an unbounded “space” for both classical and quantum communications. Among the different approaches to generate and manipulate orbital angular momentum states of light, coupling between spin and orbital angular momentum allows a faster manipulation of orbital angular momentum states because it depends on manipulating the polarisation state of light, which is simpler and generally faster than manipulating conventional orbital angular momentum generators. In this work, we design and fabricate an ultra-thin spin-to-orbital angular momentum converter, based on plasmonic nano-antennas and operating in the visible wavelength range that is capable of converting spin to an arbitrary value of orbital angular momentum ℓ. The nano-antennas are arranged in an array with a well-defined geometry in the transverse plane of the beam, possessing a specific integer or half-integer topological charge q. When a circularly polarised light beam traverses this metasurface, the output beam polarisation switches handedness and the orbital angular momentum changes in value by ℓ=±2qℏ per photon. We experimentally demonstrate ℓ values ranging from ±1 to ±25 with conversion efficiencies of 8.6% ± 0.4%. Our ultra-thin devices are integratable and thus suitable for applications in quantum communications, quantum computations, and nano-scale sensing.

  6. Effects of angular correlations on particle-particle propagation in infinite nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, J.; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of angular correlations on self-consistent solutions for single-particle (sp) potentials in infinite nuclear matter is investigated. To this end we treat explicitly the angular dependence of the particle-particle (pp) propagator in Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) equation for the g matrix. It is observed that the exact angular dependence of the pp propagator yields highly fluctuating structures, posing stringent difficulties in the actual search of self-consistent solutions for the sp energy. A perturbative approach is presented to evaluate the effect of the angular correlations in the self-consistent solutions. Solutions at Fermi momenta kF in the range 1.20 - 1.75 fm-1 are reported using Argonne v 18 nucleon- nucleon potential. Although the sp potentials are sensitive to the treatment of the angular behaviour of the propagator, such sensitivity appears at momenta well above the Fermi surface. As a result, the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter differ marginally from those calculated using angle-averaged energy denominators in pp propagators.

  7. Combined calculi for photon orbital and spin angular momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, N. M.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Wavelength, photon spin angular momentum (PSAM), and photon orbital angular momentum (POAM), completely describe the state of a photon or an electric field (an ensemble of photons). Wavelength relates directly to energy and linear momentum, the corresponding kinetic quantities. PSAM and POAM, themselves kinetic quantities, are colloquially known as polarization and optical vortices, respectively. Astrophysical sources emit photons that carry this information. Aims: PSAM characteristics of an electric field (intensity) are compactly described by the Jones (Stokes/Mueller) calculus. Similarly, I created calculi to represent POAM characteristics of electric fields and intensities in an astrophysical context. Adding wavelength dependence to all of these calculi is trivial. The next logical steps are to 1) form photon total angular momentum (PTAM = POAM + PSAM) calculi; 2) prove their validity using operators and expectation values; and 3) show that instrumental PSAM can affect measured POAM values for certain types of electric fields. Methods: I derive the PTAM calculi of electric fields and intensities by combining the POAM and PSAM calculi. I show how these quantities propagate from celestial sphere to image plane. I also form the PTAM operator (the sum of the POAM and PSAM operators), with and without instrumental PSAM, and calculate the corresponding expectation values. Results: Apart from the vector, matrix, dot product, and direct product symbols, the PTAM and POAM calculi appear superficially identical. I provide tables with all possible forms of PTAM calculi. I prove that PTAM expectation values are correct for instruments with and without instrumental PSAM. I also show that POAM measurements of "unfactored" PTAM electric fields passing through non-zero instrumental circular PSAM can be biased. Conclusions: The combined PTAM calculi provide insight into mathematically modeling PTAM sources and calibrating POAM- and PSAM-induced measurement errors.

  8. Angular magnetic field beam improves efficiency in klystrons and traveling wave tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, W.

    1973-01-01

    Special lens shaping allows variation of focusing strength with radius. Lens can be either converging or diverging depending on charge of particles and direction of angular magnetic field. There is potential use for lens in particle analyzers, electron beam welding systems, microwave tube refocusing systems, and possible display type devices.

  9. Quark orbital angular momentum: can we learn about it from GPDs and TMDs?

    SciTech Connect

    H.Avakian, A.V.Efremov, P.Schweitzer, O.V.Teryaev, P.Zavada

    2011-05-01

    It is known how to access information on quark orbital angular momentum from generalized parton distribution functions, in a certain specified framework. It is intuitively expected, that such information can be accessed also through transverse momentum dependent distribution functions, but not known how. Now quark models provide promising hints. Recent results are reviewed.

  10. On a relation of the angular frequency to the Aharonov-Casher geometric phase in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, P. M. T.; Bakke, K.

    2016-09-01

    By analysing the behaviour of a neutral particle with permanent magnetic dipole moment confined to a quantum dot in the presence of a radial electric field, Coulomb-type and linear confining potentials, then, an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect for bound states and a dependence of the angular frequency of the system on the Aharonov-Casher geometric phase and the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes, the angular momentum and the spin are obtained. In particular, the possible values of the angular frequency and the persistent spin currents associated with the ground state are investigated in two different cases.

  11. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss. PMID:27519107

  12. Angular description for 3D scattering centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Raynal, Ann Marie; Ling, Hao; Moore, John; Velten, Vincent J.

    2006-05-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field from an electrically large target can often be well modeled as if it is emanating from a discrete set of scattering centers (see Fig. 1). In the scattering center extraction tool we developed previously based on the shooting and bouncing ray technique, no correspondence is maintained amongst the 3D scattering center extracted at adjacent angles. In this paper we present a multi-dimensional clustering algorithm to track the angular and spatial behaviors of 3D scattering centers and group them into features. The extracted features for the Slicy and backhoe targets are presented. We also describe two metrics for measuring the angular persistence and spatial mobility of the 3D scattering centers that make up these features in order to gather insights into target physics and feature stability. We find that features that are most persistent are also the most mobile and discuss implications for optimal SAR imaging.

  13. Phenomenological Determination of the Orbital Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Gordon P.

    2009-08-04

    Measurements involving the gluon spin, {delta}G(x, t) and the corresponding asymmetry, A(x,t) = {delta}G(x,t)/G(x,t) play an important role in quantitative understanding of proton structure. We have modeled the asymmetry perturbatively and calculated model corrections to obtain information about non-perturbative spin-orbit effects. These models are consistent with existing COMPASS and HERMES data on the gluon asymmetry. The J{sub z} = (1/2) sum rule is used to generate values of orbital angular momentum at LO and NLO. For models consistent with data, the orbital angular momentum is small. Our studies specify accuracy that future measurements should achieve to constrain theoretical models for nucleon structure.

  14. From transverse angular momentum to photonic wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter; Neugebauer, Martin; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Scientists have known for more than a century that light possesses both linear and angular momenta along the direction of propagation. However, only recent advances in optics have led to the notion of spinning electromagnetic fields capable of carrying angular momenta transverse to the direction of motion. Such fields enable numerous applications in nano-optics, biosensing and near-field microscopy, including three-dimensional control over atoms, molecules and nanostructures, and allowing for the realization of chiral nanophotonic interfaces and plasmonic devices. Here, we report on recent developments of optics with light carrying transverse spin. We present both the underlying principles and the latest achievements, and also highlight new capabilities and future applications emerging from this young yet already advanced field of research.

  15. Satellite Angular Rate Estimation From Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the angular rate vector of a satellite which is based on the time derivatives of vector measurements expressed in a reference and body coordinate. The computed derivatives are fed into a spacial Kalman filter which yields an estimate of the spacecraft angular velocity. The filter, named Extended Interlaced Kalman Filter (EIKF), is an extension of the Kalman filter which, although being linear, estimates the state of a nonlinear dynamic system. It consists of two or three parallel Kalman filters whose individual estimates are fed to one another and are considered as known inputs by the other parallel filter(s). The nonlinear dynamics stem from the nonlinear differential equation that describes the rotation of a three dimensional body. Initial results, using simulated data, and real Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data indicate that the algorithm is efficient and robust.

  16. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriage, Tobias; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Araujo, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Boone, F.; Chan, M.; Cho, H.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F.; Crowe, E.; Denis, K.; Dünner, R.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Huang, C.; Irwin, K.; Jones, G.; Karakla, J.; Kogut, A. J.; Larson, D.; Limon, M.; Lowry, L.; Mehrle, N.; Miller, A. D.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Novak, G.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; Stevenson, T.; Towner, D.; U-Yen, K.; Wagner, E.; Watts, D.; Wollack, E.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most compelling inflation models predict a background of primordial gravitational waves (PGW) detectable by their imprint of a curl-like "B-mode" pattern in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a novel array of telescopes to measure the B-mode signature of the PGW. By targeting the largest angular scales (>2°) with a multifrequency array, novel polarization modulation and detectors optimized for both control of systematics and sensitivity, CLASS sets itself apart in the field of CMB polarization surveys and opens an exciting new discovery space for the PGW and inflation. This poster presents an overview of the CLASS project.

  17. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures. PMID:27045994

  18. Synchronization of colloidal rotors through angular optical binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, S. H.; Chvátal, L.; Zemánek, P.

    2016-02-01

    A mechanism for the synchronization of driven colloidal rotors via optical coupling torques is presented and analyzed. Following our recent experiments [Brzobohatý et al., Opt. Express 23, 7273 (2015)], 10.1364/OE.23.007273, we consider a counterpropagating optical beam trap that carries spin angular momentum, but no net linear momentum, operating in an aqueous solvent. The angular momentum carried by the beams causes the continuous low-Reynolds-number rotation of spheroidal colloids. Due to multiple scattering, the optical torques experienced by these particles depend on their relative orientations, while the effect of hydrodynamic interaction is negligible. This results in frequency pulling, which causes weakly dissimilar spheroids to synchronize their rotation rates and lock their relative phases. The effect is qualitatively captured by a coupled dipole model and quantitatively reproduced by T -matrix calculations. For pairs of rotors, the relative torque Δ τ is shown to vary with relative phase Δ ϕ according to Δ τ ≈A sin(2 Δ ϕ +δ )+B for constants A ,B ,δ , so the resulting motion is governed by the well-known Adler equation. We show that this behavior can be preserved for larger numbers of particles. The application of these phenomena to the inertial motion of particles in vacuum could provide a route to the sympathetic cooling of mesoscopic particles.

  19. Angular-dispersion-induced spatiotemporal aberrations in noncollinear optical parametric amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bromage, Jake; Dorrer, Christophe; Zuegel, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    We characterize spatiotemporal aberrations induced in noncollinear optical parametric amplifiers (NOPAs), for the first time (to our knowledge), using spatially resolved spectral interferometry. Measurements show that when the submillimeter pump and signal beams are not correctly aligned, several degrees of pulse-front tilt caused by angular dispersion are introduced by the NOPA angular-dependent gain, without significant loss of bandwidth. After eliminating the pulse-front tilt, analysis of the residual higher-order aberrations shows that far-field intensities reaching 80% of the theoretical limit can be achieved without complex spatiospectral phase optimization.

  20. Angular resolution studies of the CYGNUS array using the shadows of the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, A.L.; The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Using the cosmic ray shadows of the sun and moon, we have estimated the angular resolution of the CYGNUS extensive air shower array. With the event sample now available we estimate the angular resolution of the array to be 0.70{sub {minus}0.06}{sup {plus}0.07} degrees. The resolution depends on the total number of detected shower particles. A new parameterization of the measured shower-front timing structure and the use of counters with small pulse areas lead to a {approximately}25% improvement in the resolution. The systematic pointing error of the array is less than 0.4{degree}.

  1. Angular resolution studies of the CYGNUS array using the shadows of the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Using the cosmic ray shadows of the sun and moon, we have estimated the angular resolution of the CYGNUS extensive air shower array. With the event sample now available we estimate the angular resolution of the array to be 0.70[sub [minus]0.06][sup [plus]0.07] degrees. The resolution depends on the total number of detected shower particles. A new parameterization of the measured shower-front timing structure and the use of counters with small pulse areas lead to a [approximately]25% improvement in the resolution. The systematic pointing error of the array is less than 0.4[degree].

  2. Rotor Displacement of the Ultrasonic Motor Having an Angular Displacement Self-Correction Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoduo; Kusakabe, Chiharu; Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Takano, Takehiro

    1993-09-01

    This paper deals with the experimental investigation for confirmation of rotor displacement of the ultrasonic stepping motor having an angular displacement self-correction function. The experiment focused on the relationship between the rotor’s vibration displacement and its staying position for the self-correction. The result proved that the rotor always stays at the position where the displacement is smallest by cutting a slit into the rotor. Moreover, it has also been found that the stable self-correction of rotor angular displacement depends upon both the rotor driving frequency and rotor clamping force.

  3. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions with intense circularly polarized attosecond XUV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2012-05-01

    Photoionization of aligned and fixed nuclei three-dimensional H2+ and two-dimensional H2 by intense circularly polarized attosecond extreme ultraviolet laser pulses is investigated from numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions are found to be rotated with respect to the two laser perpendicular polarizations or, equivalently the symmetry axes of the molecule. The angle of rotation is critically sensitive to laser wavelength λ, photoelectron energy Een, and molecular internuclear distance R. The correlated interaction of the two electrons in H2 is shown to also influence such angular distribution rotations in different electronic states.

  4. Creating optical near-field orbital angular momentum in a gold metasurface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Fu; Ku, Chen-Ta; Tai, Yi-Hsin; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Lin, Heh-Nan; Huang, Chen-Bin

    2015-04-01

    Nanocavities inscribed in a gold thin film are optimized and designed to form a metasurface. We demonstrate both numerically and experimentally the creation of surface plasmon (SP) vortex carrying orbital angular momentum in the metasurface under linearly polarized optical excitation that carries no optical angular momentum. Moreover, depending on the orientation of the exciting linearly polarized light, we show that the metasurface is capable of providing dynamic switching between SP vortex formation or SP subwavelength focusing. The resulting SP intensities are experimentally measured using a near-field scanning optical microscope and are found in excellent quantitative agreements as compared to the numerical results. PMID:25798810

  5. Angular distribution of light emission from compound-eye cornea with conformal fluorescent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-09-01

    The complex morphology of the apposition compound eyes of insects of many species provides them a wide angular field of view. This characteristic makes these eyes attractive for bioreplication as artificial sources of light. The cornea of a blowfly eye was conformally coated with a fluorescent thin film with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. On illumination by shortwave-ultraviolet light, the conformally coated eye emitted visible light whose intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  6. Angular momentum of an electric charge and magnetically charged black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkle, D. . Dept. of Physics); Rey, Soo-Jong . Inst. for Fundamental Theory)

    1990-01-01

    We find the angular momentum L of a point particle with electric charge e held at a fixed position in the presence of a black hole with magnetic charge g. (For a point charge in the presence of an of ordinary magnetic monopole, it is known that L = eg). The angular momentum does depend on the separation distance between the particle and the black hole; however, L {yields} eg for a large separation. Implications for the cosmic censorship hypothesis, the quantum hairs and other physical situations are discussed.

  7. Behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1982-07-01

    The present report begins with a brief overview of nuclear shapes and level structures at high-spin values. The new spectroscopy associated with angular-momentum alignments is described, and some of the exciting possibilities of this spectroscopy are explored. Nuclear moments of inertia are discussed and a somewhat different one is defined, together with a method for measuring it and some early results. Finally a few comments on the future prospects for high-spin physics are offered.

  8. Diaphyseal angular deformities in three foals.

    PubMed

    White, K K

    1983-02-01

    Angular limb deformities in 3 foals were found to originate in the diaphyseal region of the 3rd metacarpal (2) and metatarsal (1) bones. In each case, treatment consisted of wedge ostectomy followed by compression plating. Two foals survived for useful performance; the 3rd was euthanatized because of ischemia of the operated limb. The condition appeared to resemble a similar syndrome in man involving tibial curvature. PMID:6826451

  9. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  10. Angular Fock coefficients: Refinement and further development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2015-10-01

    The angular coefficients ψk ,p(α ,θ ) of the Fock expansion characterizing the S -state wave function of the two-electron atomic system are calculated in hyperspherical angular coordinates α and θ . To solve the problem the Fock recurrence relations separated into the independent individual equations associated with definite power j of the nucleus charge Z are applied. The "pure" j components of the angular Fock coefficients, orthogonal to the hyperspherical harmonics Yk l, are found for even values of k . To this end, the specific coupling equation is proposed and applied. Effective techniques for solving the individual equations with the simplest nonseparable and separable right-hand sides are proposed. Some mistakes or misprints made earlier in representations of ψ2 ,0, are noted and corrected. All j components of ψ4 ,1 and the majority of components and subcomponents of ψ3 ,0 are calculated and presented. All calculations are carried out with the help of Wolfram Mathematica.

  11. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  12. Nuclear structure at high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    This review paper begins by discussing the limits faced in the attempts to get nuclei to hold very high angular momentum. The method presently used to produce nuclei with the maximum angular momentum is described. Then the physics of high-spin states is taken up; some properties of a purely collective, classical rotor are described, and the effects of coupling single-particle motion to this are considered. Next, backbending, its causes, and a new spectroscopy of bands and backbends at high spin values are discussed. Noncollective states occur when the nuclear angular momentum is carried by a few high-j particles and is aligned along a symmetry axis. There results an irregular yrast line, along which there are no collective transitions. Noncollective behavior in the lead region, the hafnium region, and the N = 82 region is examined. Then the discussion moves on to collective behavior and recent studies on continuum spectra. Evidence for rotation is given, and effective moments of inertia for this rotation are evaluated. Finally, current ..gamma..-ray energy correlation studies are described. 68 references, 36 figures. (RWR)

  13. A Neural Circuit for Angular Velocity Computation

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Samuel B.; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob. PMID:21228902

  14. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob. PMID:21228902

  15. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect. PMID:24978243

  16. Similarities in STXM-NEXAFS Spectra of Atmospheric Particles and Secondary Organic Aerosol Generated from Glyoxal, α-Pinene, Isoprene, 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene, and d-Limonene

    SciTech Connect

    Shakya, Kabindra M.; Liu, Shang; Takahama, Satoshi; Russell, Lynn M.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Galloway, Melissa M.; Shilling, John E.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Song, Chen; Kim, Hwajin; Paulson, Suazanne E.; Pfaffenberger, Lisa; Barmet, Peter; Slowik, J. G.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2013-02-06

    Functional group composition of particles produced in smog chambers are examined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in order to identify characteristic spectral signatures for secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Glyoxal uptake studies showed absorption for mainly alkyl, carbon-nitrogen (C-N), and carboxylic carbonyl groups. The SOA formed from the photooxidation of α-pinene (with and without isoprene) showed stronger absorptions for alkyl and carbonyl groups than the glyoxal studies. The mass ratio of carbonyl to acid group was larger in α-pinene-only experiments relative to the mixed α-pinene-isoprene experiments. The chamber particle spectra were compared with the ambient particle spectra from multiple field campaigns to understand the potential SOA sources. One hundred nineteen particles from six field campaigns had spectral features that were considered similar to the chamber-SOA particles: MILAGRO-2006 (9 particles), VOCALS-2008 (42 particles), Whistler-2008 (22 particles), Scripps Pier-2009 (9 particles), Bakersfield-2010 (25 particles), and Whistler-2010 (12 particles). These similarities with SOA formed from glyoxal, α-pinene (with and without isoprene), 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and limonene provide spectroscopic evidence of SOA products from these precursors in ambient particles.

  17. Development of a High Accuracy Angular Measurement System for Langley Research Center Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett; Yu, Si-bok; Rhew, Ray D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern experimental and test activities demand innovative and adaptable procedures to maximize data content and quality while working within severely constrained budgetary and facility resource environments. This report describes development of a high accuracy angular measurement capability for NASA Langley Research Center hypersonic wind tunnel facilities to overcome these deficiencies. Specifically, utilization of micro-electro-mechanical sensors including accelerometers and gyros, coupled with software driven data acquisition hardware, integrated within a prototype measurement system, is considered. Development methodology addresses basic design requirements formulated from wind tunnel facility constraints and current operating procedures, as well as engineering and scientific test objectives. Description of the analytical framework governing relationships between time dependent multi-axis acceleration and angular rate sensor data and the desired three dimensional Eulerian angular state of the test model is given. Calibration procedures for identifying and estimating critical parameters in the sensor hardware is also addressed.

  18. ISOTROPY IN THE TWO-POINT ANGULAR CORRELATION FUNCTION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sophie

    2012-04-01

    We study the directional dependence of the angular two-point correlation function in maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose two new statistics: one which measures the correlation of each point in the sky with a ring of points separated an angle {theta} away, and a second one that measures the missing angular correlation above 60 deg as a function of direction. Using these statistics, we find that most of the low power in cut-sky maps measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment comes from unusually low contributions from the directions of the lobes of the quadrupole and the octupole. These findings may aid a future explanation of why the CMB exhibits low power at large angular scales.

  19. Angular Momentum Role in the Hypercritical Accretion of Binary-driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L.; Cipolletta, F.; Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-10-01

    The induced gravitational collapse paradigm explains a class of energetic, {E}{{iso}}≳ {10}52 erg, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with Ic supernovae, recently named binary-driven hypernovae. The progenitor is a tight binary system formed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta of the exploding CO core trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS, which reaches the critical mass in a few seconds, and gravitationally collapses to a black hole, emitting a GRB. In our previous simulations of this process, we adopted a spherically symmetric approximation to compute the features of the hypercritical accretion process. We here present the first estimates of the angular momentum transported by the supernova ejecta, {L}{{acc}}, and perform numerical simulations of the angular momentum transfer to the NS during the hyperaccretion process in full general relativity. We show that the NS (1) reaches either the mass-shedding limit or the secular axisymmetric instability in a few seconds depending on its initial mass, (2) reaches a maximum dimensionless angular momentum value, {[{cJ}/({{GM}}2)]}{{max}}≈ 0.7, and (3) can support less angular momentum than the one transported by supernova ejecta, {L}{{acc}}\\gt {J}{{NS,max}}, hence there is an angular momentum excess that necessarily leads to jetted emission.

  20. Angular momentum flux of nonparaxial acoustic vortex beams and torques on axisymmetric objects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    An acoustic vortex in an inviscid fluid and its radiation torque on an axisymmetric absorbing object are analyzed beyond the paraxial approximation to clarify an analogy with an optical vortex. The angular momentum flux density tensor from the conservation of angular momentum is used as an efficient description of the transport of angular momentum. Analysis of a monochromatic nonparaxial acoustic vortex beam indicates that the local ratio of the axial (or radial) flux density of axial angular momentum to the axial (or radial) flux density of energy is exactly equal to the ratio of the beam's topological charge l to the acoustic frequency ω. The axial radiation torque exerted by the beam on an axisymmetric object centered on the beam's axis due to the transfer of angular momentum is proportional to the power absorbed by the object with a factor l/ω, which can be understood as a result of phonon absorption from the beam. Depending on the vortex's helicity, the torque is parallel or antiparallel to the beam's axis. PMID:22304145

  1. Angular rate optimal design for the rotary strapdown inertial navigation system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Sun, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the characteristics of high precision for a long duration, the rotary strapdown inertial navigation system (RSINS) has been widely used in submarines and surface ships. Nowadays, the core technology, the rotating scheme, has been studied by numerous researchers. It is well known that as one of the key technologies, the rotating angular rate seriously influences the effectiveness of the error modulating. In order to design the optimal rotating angular rate of the RSINS, the relationship between the rotating angular rate and the velocity error of the RSINS was analyzed in detail based on the Laplace transform and the inverse Laplace transform in this paper. The analysis results showed that the velocity error of the RSINS depends on not only the sensor error, but also the rotating angular rate. In order to minimize the velocity error, the rotating angular rate of the RSINS should match the sensor error. One optimal design method for the rotating rate of the RSINS was also proposed in this paper. Simulation and experimental results verified the validity and superiority of this optimal design method for the rotating rate of the RSINS. PMID:24759115

  2. Angular Rate Optimal Design for the Rotary Strapdown Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Sun, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the characteristics of high precision for a long duration, the rotary strapdown inertial navigation system (RSINS) has been widely used in submarines and surface ships. Nowadays, the core technology, the rotating scheme, has been studied by numerous researchers. It is well known that as one of the key technologies, the rotating angular rate seriously influences the effectiveness of the error modulating. In order to design the optimal rotating angular rate of the RSINS, the relationship between the rotating angular rate and the velocity error of the RSINS was analyzed in detail based on the Laplace transform and the inverse Laplace transform in this paper. The analysis results showed that the velocity error of the RSINS depends on not only the sensor error, but also the rotating angular rate. In order to minimize the velocity error, the rotating angular rate of the RSINS should match the sensor error. One optimal design method for the rotating rate of the RSINS was also proposed in this paper. Simulation and experimental results verified the validity and superiority of this optimal design method for the rotating rate of the RSINS. PMID:24759115

  3. Photoelectron Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in Multiply Charged Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2009-02-12

    Photoelectrons emitted from multiply charged anions (MCAs) carry information of the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion (ICR), which is dependent on molecular structures. Using photoelectron imaging, we observed the effects of ICR on photoelectron angular distributions (PAD) of the three isomers of benzene dicarboxylate dianions C6H4(CO2)22– (o-, m- and p-BDC2–). Photoelectrons were observed to peak along the laser polarization due to the ICR, but the anisotropy was the largest for p-BDC2–, followed by the m- and o-isomer. The observed anisotropy is related to the direction of the ICR or the detailed molecular structures, suggesting that photoelectron imaging may allow structural information to be obtained for complex multiply charged anions.

  4. Teleportation of a controllable orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lixiang; She, Weilong

    2009-12-01

    We report on a teleportation scheme, in which a controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) generator is teleported. Via our scheme, Alice is able to—according to another independent photon’s spin state (polarization) sent by Carol—electrically control the remote OAM generation on Bob’s photon. To this end, we introduce a local electrically tunable and spin-dependent OAM generator to transfer a preliminary OAM-OAM entanglement to a spin-OAM hybrid entanglement, which then makes a joint Bell-state measurement on Alice and Carol’s photons play its role. We show that the quantum state tomography can be introduced to evaluate the performance of the teleportation.

  5. Creating High-Harmonic Beams with Controlled Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    A beam of light with an angle-dependent phase Φ = lϕ , where ϕ is the azimuthal coordinate, about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum (OAM) of lℏ per photon. Such beams have been exploited to provide superresolution in visible-light microscopy. The ability to create extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable OAM would be a critical step towards extending superresolution methods to extremely small feature size. Here we show that OAM is conserved during the process of high-harmonic generation (HHG). Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with l = 1 and interferometrically determine that the q-th harmonic has an OAM quantum number l equal to its harmonic order q. We also show theoretically how to couple an arbitrary low value of the OAM quantum number l to any harmonic order q in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  6. Proposal for Angular Momentum Multiplexing in Microholographic Recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryuichi

    2013-09-01

    A novel multiplexing technology in microholographic recording using beams that have an orbital angular momentum has been proposed. The multiplexing is carried out by changing the order of the phase singularity (m) of beams for recording and readout in multiple states. In the recording operation, multiple microholograms are formed at the same position of the recording medium by changing the value of m. In the readout operation, each of the multiple microholograms is selectively reproduced by changing the value of m. Microholograms with m≠0 have a spiral shape, and the handednesses, multiplicities, and pitches of the spiral differ from each other depending on the value of m. A readout signal simulation has demonstrated that the multiplexing of at least five bits is feasible. It is expected that a terabyte-order recording capacity will be achieved in microholographic recording by combining this technology with three-dimensional recording technology.

  7. Angular momentum and orientation effects in excitation-ionization collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. L.; Esposito, T. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present theoretical fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for electron-impact excitation-ionization of helium in which the final state He+ ion is oriented in a particular direction. Specifically, we study the process for He+ ions in the 2p0 state. Using our 4-body distorted wave model, we show a strong dependence of the FDCS on the ion’s orientation and trace some unexpected structures in the FDCS to the L = 2 term in the partial wave expansion for the ionized electron. A comparison is drawn to the ionization of oriented Mg (3p0) atoms, and unlike that process, we find that for excitation-ionization angular momentum must be transferred from either the projectile or the target atom.

  8. The Evershed Effect with 0.2 arcsec Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, I.; Bonet, J. A.; Sánchez Almeida, J.; Domínguez Cerdeña, I.

    2006-12-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of penumbral spectra observed with unprecedented angular resolution (0.2 arcsec) using the new Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. The use of a non-magnetic line allows us to measure Doppler shifts without magnetic contamination. The observed Doppler shifts depend on the part of the line used for measuring, indicating that the velocity structure of penumbrae remains unresolved even with our resolution. We find a correlation between upflows and bright filaments. This association is not specific of the outer penumbra but it also occurs in the inner penumbra. The existence of such correlation was originally reported by tet{m1 BS69}, and it is suggestive of energy transport by convection in penumbrae.

  9. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  10. Linear and angular retroreflecting interferometric alignment target

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L. Curtis

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for measuring both the linear displacement and angular displacement of an object using a linear interferometer system and an optical target comprising a lens, a reflective surface and a retroreflector. The lens, reflecting surface and retroreflector are specifically aligned and fixed in optical connection with one another, creating a single optical target which moves as a unit that provides multi-axis displacement information for the object with which it is associated. This displacement information is useful in many applications including machine tool control systems and laser tracker systems, among others.

  11. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  12. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-01

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM.

  13. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-15

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM. PMID:27472113

  14. Angular momentum exchange in white dwarf binaries accreting through direct impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sepinsky, J. F.; Kalogera, V. E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu

    2014-04-20

    We examine the exchange of angular momentum between the component spins and the orbit in semi-detached double white dwarf binaries undergoing mass transfer through direct impact of the transfer stream. We approximate the stream as a series of discrete massive particles ejected in the ballistic limit at the inner Lagrangian point of the donor toward the accretor. This work improves upon similar earlier studies in a number of ways. First, we self-consistently calculate the total angular momentum of the orbit at all times. This includes changes in the orbital angular momentum during the ballistic trajectory of the ejected mass, as well as changes during the ejection/accretion due to the radial component of the particle's velocity. Second, we calculate the particle's ballistic trajectory for each system, which allows us to determine the precise position and velocity of the particle upon accretion. We can then include specific information about the radius of the accretor as well as the angle of impact. Finally, we ensure that the total angular momentum is conserved, which requires the donor star spin to vary self-consistently. With these improvements, we calculate the angular momentum change of the orbit and each binary component across the entire parameter space of direct impact double white dwarf binary systems. We find a significant decrease in the amount of angular momentum removed from the orbit during mass transfer, as well as cases where this process increases the angular momentum of the orbit at the expense of the spin angular momentum of the donor. We conclude that, unlike earlier claims in the literature, mass transfer through direct impact need not destabilize the binary and that the quantity and sign of the orbital angular momentum transfer depends on the binary properties, particularly the masses of the double white dwarf binary component stars. This stabilization may significantly impact the population synthesis calculations of the expected numbers of

  15. The analytical Scheme calculator for angular momentum coupling and recoupling coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveikis, A.; Kuznecovas, A.

    2005-10-01

    -Gordan coefficients, Wigner 6 j and 9 j symbols, and general recoupling coefficients with small angular momenta are computed almost instantaneously. The running time for large-scale calculations depends strongly on the number and magnitude of arguments' values (i.e., of the angular momenta).

  16. Form features provide a cue to the angular velocity of rotating objects

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Christopher David; Goold, Jessica; Killebrew, Kyle; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2013-01-01

    As an object rotates, each location on the object moves with an instantaneous linear velocity dependent upon its distance from the center of rotation, while the object as a whole rotates with a fixed angular velocity. Does the perceived rotational speed of an object correspond to its angular velocity, linear velocities, or some combination of the two? We had observers perform relative speed judgments of different sized objects, as changing the size of an object changes the linear velocity of each location on the object’s surface, while maintaining the object’s angular velocity. We found that the larger a given object is, the faster it is perceived to rotate. However, the observed relationships between size and perceived speed cannot be accounted for simply by size-related changes in linear velocity. Further, the degree to which size influences perceived rotational speed depends on the shape of the object. Specifically, perceived rotational speeds of objects with corners or regions of high contour curvature were less affected by size. The results suggest distinct contour features, such as corners or regions of high or discontinuous contour curvature, provide cues to the angular velocity of a rotating object. PMID:23750970

  17. Form features provide a cue to the angular velocity of rotating objects.

    PubMed

    Blair, Christopher David; Goold, Jessica; Killebrew, Kyle; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2014-02-01

    As an object rotates, each location on the object moves with an instantaneous linear velocity, dependent upon its distance from the center of rotation, whereas the object as a whole rotates with a fixed angular velocity. Does the perceived rotational speed of an object correspond to its angular velocity, linear velocities, or some combination of the two? We had observers perform relative speed judgments of different-sized objects, as changing the size of an object changes the linear velocity of each location on the object's surface, while maintaining the object's angular velocity. We found that the larger a given object is, the faster it is perceived to rotate. However, the observed relationships between size and perceived speed cannot be accounted for simply by size-related changes in linear velocity. Further, the degree to which size influences perceived rotational speed depends on the shape of the object. Specifically, perceived rotational speeds of objects with corners or regions of high-contour curvature were less affected by size. The results suggest distinct contour features, such as corners or regions of high or discontinuous contour curvature, provide cues to the angular velocity of a rotating object. PMID:23750970

  18. THE ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} RESONANT PHOTONS EMERGING FROM AN OPTICALLY THICK MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang; Roy, Ishani; Fang Lizhi

    2013-07-20

    We investigate the angular distribution of Ly{alpha} photons scattering or emerging from an optically thick medium. Since the evolution of specific intensity I in frequency space and angular space are coupled with each other, we first develop the WENO numerical solver to find the time-dependent solutions of the integro-differential equation of I in frequency and angular space simultaneously. We first show that the solutions with the Eddington approximation, which assume that I is linearly dependent on the angular variable {mu}, yield similar frequency profiles of the photon flux as those without the Eddington approximation. However, the solutions of the {mu} distribution evolution are significantly different from those given by the Eddington approximation. First, the angular distribution of I is found to be substantially dependent on the frequency of the photons. For photons with the resonant frequency {nu}{sub 0}, I contains only a linear term of {mu}. For photons with frequencies at the double peaks of the flux, the {mu}-distribution is highly anisotropic; most photons are emitted radially forward. Moreover, either at {nu}{sub 0} or at the double peaks, the {mu} distributions actually are independent of the initial {mu} distribution of photons of the source. This is because the photons with frequencies either at {nu}{sub 0} or the double peaks undergo the process of forgetting their initial conditions due to resonant scattering. We also show that the optically thick medium is a collimator of photons at the double peaks. Photons from the double peaks form a forward beam with a very small opening angle.

  19. The Angular Distribution of Lyα Resonant Photons Emerging from an Optically Thick Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Roy, Ishani; Shu, Chi-Wang; Fang, Li-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the angular distribution of Lyα photons scattering or emerging from an optically thick medium. Since the evolution of specific intensity I in frequency space and angular space are coupled with each other, we first develop the WENO numerical solver to find the time-dependent solutions of the integro-differential equation of I in frequency and angular space simultaneously. We first show that the solutions with the Eddington approximation, which assume that I is linearly dependent on the angular variable μ, yield similar frequency profiles of the photon flux as those without the Eddington approximation. However, the solutions of the μ distribution evolution are significantly different from those given by the Eddington approximation. First, the angular distribution of I is found to be substantially dependent on the frequency of the photons. For photons with the resonant frequency ν0, I contains only a linear term of μ. For photons with frequencies at the double peaks of the flux, the μ-distribution is highly anisotropic; most photons are emitted radially forward. Moreover, either at ν0 or at the double peaks, the μ distributions actually are independent of the initial μ distribution of photons of the source. This is because the photons with frequencies either at ν0 or the double peaks undergo the process of forgetting their initial conditions due to resonant scattering. We also show that the optically thick medium is a collimator of photons at the double peaks. Photons from the double peaks form a forward beam with a very small opening angle.

  20. Molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions Molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchese, Robert R.; Stolow, Albert

    2012-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron measurements in molecular ionization continue to grow in importance due to their sensitivity to molecular dynamics combined with their avoidance of deleterious averaging over molecular orientation. This special issue contains only regularly refereed articles and provides an account of current experimental and theoretical studies of such molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs). Recent experimental activity in this field has been stimulated by advances in light sources such as x-ray free electron lasers, attosecond XUV laser pulses and phase-stable ultrashort strong laser fields. This effort is further amplified by recent developments in coincidence detection and molecular-frame alignment/orientation techniques. Beyond perturbative light-matter interactions, strong field processes such as tunnel ionization, above threshold ionization and rescattering phenomena such as high harmonic generation and laser-induced electron diffraction are beginning to probe molecular-frame photoelectron-molecule scattering dynamics. Theoretical developments are playing an equally important role in furthering molecular-frame photoelectron science. This issue contains several purely theoretical papers that aim to provide insight into possible schemes for using MFPADs in the study of molecular dynamics. Because the details of the electron-molecule scattering dynamics are important to the interpretation of experimental data, significant progress is made by a close collaboration between theory and experiment. There are a number of such contributions in this issue that combine theory and experiment to obtain a detailed understanding of the observed processes. One recurring theme is the use of measured MFPADs as probes of the molecular state and to uncover information about the dynamics of molecular systems. Contributions in this issue consider using MFPADs to investigate molecular geometry or the rotational, vibrational or electronic state of a

  1. Axions and the galactic angular momentum distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, N.; Sikivie, P.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the behavior of axion dark matter before it falls into a galactic gravitational potential well. The axions thermalize sufficiently fast by gravitational self-interactions that almost all go to their lowest-energy state consistent with the total angular momentum acquired from tidal torquing. That state is a state of rigid rotation on the turnaround sphere. It predicts the occurrence and detailed properties of the caustic rings of dark matter for which observational evidence had been found earlier. We show that the vortices in the axion Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are attractive, unlike those in superfluid He4 and dilute gases. We expect that a large fraction of the vortices in the axion BEC join into a single big vortex along the rotation axis of the galaxy. The resulting enhancement of caustic rings explains the typical size of the rises in the Milky Way rotation curve attributed to caustic rings. We show that baryons and ordinary cold dark matter particles are entrained by the axion BEC and acquire the same velocity distribution. The resulting baryonic angular momentum distribution gives a good qualitative fit to the distributions observed in dwarf galaxies. We give estimates of the minimum fraction of dark matter that is composed of axions.

  2. Practical scaling law for photoelectron angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Dongsheng; Zhang Jingtao; Xu Zhizhan; Li Xiaofeng; Fu Panming; Freeman, R.R.

    2003-10-01

    A practical scaling law that predicts photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) is derived using angular distribution formulas which explicitly contain spontaneous emission. The scaling law is used to analyze recent PAD measurements in above-threshold ionization, and to predict results of future experiments. Our theoretical and numerical studies show that, in the non-relativistic regime and long-wavelength approximation, the shapes of PADs are determined by only three dimensionless numbers: (1) u{sub p}{identical_to}U{sub p}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}, the ponderomotive number (ponderomotive energy in units of laser photon energy); (2) {epsilon}{sub b}{identical_to}E{sub b}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}, the binding number (atomic binding energy in units of the laser photon energy); (3) j, the absorbed-photon number. The scaling law is shown to be useful in predictions of results from strong-field Kapitza-Dirac effect measurements; specifically, the application of this scaling law to recently reported Kapitza-Dirac diffraction is discussed. Possible experimental tests to verify the scaling law are suggested.

  3. Axial-conductances angular filter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, P. W.; Pedersen, J. F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes the concept, analysis, design, construction, and tests of an angular filter using an axial-conductance medium. The filter provides rejection that increases with incidence angle in the E plane. It is essentially invisible at broadside incidence, does not have critical tolerances on dimensions or materials, and operates over a wide frequency band. Analysis of an ideal homogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that the optimum value for the axial loss tangent is unity. With this value, the homogeneous medium provides approximately 8 dB of absorptive rejection per wavelength of filter thickness at a 45 E-plane incidence angle. Analysis of a practical inhomogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that some loss is introduced at broadside incidence, and that two types of waves can exist in the medium when only one wave is incident at an oblique angle. When the practical medium has dimensions that are properly chosen, its broadside loss can be negligible, and its rejection versus incidence angle can approximate that of the ideal medium. Tests of inhomogeneous samples in simulator wave guide confirm these analytical results. A screen printing method for depositing thick-film resistive ink on thin dielectric sheets has been investigated. With this method a 5x5 foot angular filter, designed for operation at 10 GHz, has been constructed containing over 70,000 axial-conductance elements.

  4. Freehand spatial-angular compounding of photoacoustic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Jae; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality that relies on the absorption of optical energy and the subsequent emission of acoustic waves that are detected with a conventional ultrasound probe. PA images are susceptible to background noise artifacts that reduce the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). We investigated spatial-angular compounding of PA images to enhance these image qualities. Spatial-angular compounding was implemented by averaging multiple PA images acquired as an ultrasound probe was rotated about the elevational axis with the laser beam and PA target fixed in the same location. An external tracking system was used to provide the position and orientation (i.e. pose) information of each PA image. Based on this pose information, frames in similar elevational planes were filtered from the acquired image data and compounded using one of two methods. One method registered overlapping signals between frames prior to compounding (using the pose information), while the second method omitted this spatial registration step. These two methods were applied to pre-beamformed RF, beamformed RF, and envelope-detected data, resulting in six different compounding pipelines. Compounded PA images with similar lateral resolution to a single reference image had factors of 1.1 - 1.6, 2.0 - 11.1, and 2.0 - 11.1 improvements in contrast, CNR, and SNR, respectively, when compared to the reference image. These improvements depended on the amount of relative motion between the reference image and the images that were compounded. The inclusion of spatial registration prior to compounding preserved lateral resolution and signal location when the relative rotations about the elevation axis were 3.5° or less for images that were within an elevational distance of 2.5 mm from the reference image, particularly when the method was applied to the enveloped-detected data. Results indicate that spatial-angular compounding has the

  5. A spectral analysis of the earth's angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.; Callahan, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The exchange of angular momentum between the solid earth and the atmosphere from January 1976 through March 1982 is investigated using estimates of the earth's rotation from optical astrometry and lunar laser ranging and meteorological estimates of the atmospheric angular momentum M(atm). The physics of the earth's angular momentum budget is described, and earth rotation measurements are related to changes in the angular momentum of the fluid parts of the earth. The availability and reliability of earth rotation and M(atm) data are reported, and the possibility of estimating the exchange of angular momentum with the oceans and with the core is examined. Estimates of the power spectrum, cospectral coherence, and linear transfer functions and an analysis of the unmodeled part of the angular momentum budget are presented and discussed. The amplitude and phase of the semiannual, monthly, and fortnightly tidal variations in the length of day are estimated after removing observed atmospheric excitation.

  6. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus. PMID:20371254

  7. Angular momenta creation in relativistic electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, T; Berezhiani, V I; Pekker, M; Mahajan, S M

    2003-07-01

    Creation of angular momentum in a relativistic electron-positron plasma is explored. It is shown that a chain of angular momentum carrying vortices is a robust asymptotic state sustained by the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation characteristic to the system. The results may suggest a possible electromagnetic origin of angular momenta when it is applied to the MeV epoch of the early Universe. PMID:12935260

  8. Peculiarities of Angular Distribution of Electrons at Si <100> Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Pivovarov, Yu L.; Takabayashi, Y.; Tukhfatullin, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    The properties of both angular and spatial distribution of 255 MeV electrons at <100> channeling in silicon crystal has been investigated experimentally at the linac injector of SAGA light source and by computer simulations. The simulation of trajectories, angular and spatial distributions of electrons on the screen monitor has been performed taking into account initial spatial as well as angular beam divergence of electron beam. Both experimental data and simulations show the brilliant effect of so-called "doughnut scattering".

  9. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  10. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  11. Angular Clustering of Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Garcet, O.; Disseau, L.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Gueguen, A.; Alloin, D.; Chiappetti, L.; Gosset, E.; Maccagni, D.; Surdej, J.; Valtchanov, I.

    2006-09-01

    We describe the properties of X-ray point-like sources detected over 4.2 sq. degs. of the largest contiguous survey with XMM-Newton to date (the XMM-LSS survey) to fluxes of F2-10 keV 8x10-15 erg/s/cm2 and F0.5-2 keV 2x10-15 erg/s/cm2 respectively. For 1200 sources in the soft band, we find a two-point angular correlation function (ACF) signal similar to previous work, but no correlation for 400 sources in the hard band. A sample of 200 faint sources with hard X-ray spectra does show a 2-3 sigma positive signal with a power-law normalization theta0>40 arcsec. We discuss implications, including the fact that a large correlation length for obscured AGN is inconsistent with simple AGN Unification based on orientation only.

  12. Colliding particles carrying nonzero orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Igor P.

    2011-05-01

    Photons carrying nonzero orbital angular momentum (twisted photons) are well-known in optics. Recently, using Compton backscattering to boost optical twisted photons to high energies was suggested. Twisted electrons in the intermediate energy range have also been produced recently. Thus, collisions involving energetic twisted particles seem to be feasible and represent a new tool in high-energy physics. Here we discuss some generic features of scattering processes involving twisted particles in the initial and/or final state. In order to avoid additional complications arising from nontrivial polarization states, we focus here on scalar fields only. We show that processes involving twisted particles allow one to perform a Fourier analysis of the plane-wave cross section with respect to the azimuthal angles of the initial particles. In addition, using twisted states, one can probe the autocorrelation function of the amplitude, which is inaccessible in the plane-wave collisions. Finally, we discuss prospects for experimental study of these effects.

  13. Internal reflection sensors with high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavirin, I.; Strelkov, O.; Vetskous, A.; Norton-Wayne, L.; Harwood, R.

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the use of total internal reflection for the production of sensors with high angular resolution. These sensors are intended for measurement of the angle between a sensor's axis and the direction to a source of radiation or reflecting object. Sensors of this type are used in controlling the position of machine parts in robotics and industry, orienting space vehicles and astronomic devices in relation to the Sun, and as autocollimators for checking angles of deviation. This kind of sensor was used in the Apollo space vehicle some 20 years ago. Using photodetectors with linear and area CCD arrays has opened up new application possibilities for appropriately designed sensors. A generalized methodology is presented applicable to a wide range of tasks. Some modifications that can improve the performance of the basic design are described.

  14. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, C.; Rheault, F.; Boulay, R.; Tremblay, R.

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-Summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  15. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  16. Angular relation of axes in perceptual space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, Urs

    1992-01-01

    The geometry of perceptual space needs to be known to model spatial orientation constancy or to create virtual environments. To examine one main aspect of this geometry, the angular relation between the three spatial axes was measured. Experiments were performed consisting of a perceptual task in which subjects were asked to set independently their apparent vertical and horizontal plane. The visual background provided no other stimuli to serve as optical direction cues. The task was performed in a number of different body tilt positions with pitches and rolls varied in steps of 30 degs. The results clearly show the distortion of orthogonality of the perceptual space for nonupright body positions. Large interindividual differences were found. Deviations from orthogonality up to 25 deg were detected in the pitch as well as in the roll direction. Implications of this nonorthogonality on further studies of spatial perception and on the construction of virtual environments for human interaction is also discussed.

  17. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  18. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  19. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  20. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  1. Chiral symmetries associated with angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Kleinert, M.

    2014-03-01

    In quantum mechanics courses, symmetries of a physical system are usually introduced as operators which commute with the Hamiltonian. In this paper we will consider chiral symmetries which anticommute with the Hamiltonian. Typically, introductory courses at the (under)graduate level do not discuss these simple, useful and beautiful symmetries at all. The first time a student encounters them is when the Dirac equation is discussed in a course on relativistic quantum mechanics, or when particle-hole symmetry is studied in the context of superconductivity. In this paper, we will show how chiral symmetries can be simply elucidated using the theory of angular momentum, which is taught in virtually all introductory quantum mechanics courses.

  2. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  3. Angular biasing in implicit Monte-Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1994-10-20

    Calculations of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion target experiments require an integrated approach in which laser irradiation and radiation transport in the hohlraum are solved simultaneously with the symmetry, implosion and burn of the fuel capsule. The Implicit Monte Carlo method has proved to be a valuable tool for the two dimensional radiation transport within the hohlraum, but the impact of statistical noise on the symmetric implosion of the small fuel capsule is difficult to overcome. We present an angular biasing technique in which an increased number of low weight photons are directed at the imploding capsule. For typical parameters this reduces the required computer time for an integrated calculation by a factor of 10. An additional factor of 5 can also be achieved by directing even smaller weight photons at the polar regions of the capsule where small mass zones are most sensitive to statistical noise.

  4. Angular Approach Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Andrew; Tokar, Sergiy; Gopal, Sahana; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Tarasov, Andrei I; Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Chiappini, Ciro; Rorsman, Patrik; Stevens, Molly M; Gorelik, Julia; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2016-05-24

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a super-resolution live imaging technique that uses a glass nanopipette as an imaging probe to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of cell surface. SICM can be used to analyze cell morphology at nanoscale, follow membrane dynamics, precisely position an imaging nanopipette close to a structure of interest, and use it to obtain ion channel recordings or locally apply stimuli or drugs. Practical implementations of these SICM advantages, however, are often complicated due to the limitations of currently available SICM systems that inherited their design from other scanning probe microscopes in which the scan assembly is placed right above the specimen. Such arrangement makes the setting of optimal illumination necessary for phase contrast or the use of high magnification upright optics difficult. Here, we describe the designs that allow mounting SICM scan head on a standard patch-clamp micromanipulator and imaging the sample at an adjustable approach angle. This angle could be as shallow as the approach angle of a patch-clamp pipette between a water immersion objective and the specimen. Using this angular approach SICM, we obtained topographical images of cells grown on nontransparent nanoneedle arrays, of islets of Langerhans, and of hippocampal neurons under upright optical microscope. We also imaged previously inaccessible areas of cells such as the side surfaces of the hair cell stereocilia and the intercalated disks of isolated cardiac myocytes, and performed targeted patch-clamp recordings from the latter. Thus, our new, to our knowledge, angular approach SICM allows imaging of living cells on nontransparent substrates and a seamless integration with most patch-clamp setups on either inverted or upright microscopes, which would facilitate research in cell biophysics and physiology. PMID:27224490

  5. Delocalized correlations in twin light beams with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Marino, A M; Boyer, V; Pooser, R C; Lett, P D; Lemons, K; Jones, K M

    2008-08-29

    We generate intensity-difference-squeezed Laguerre-Gauss twin beams of light carrying orbital angular momentum by using four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. The conservation of orbital angular momentum in the four-wave mixing process is studied as well as the spatial distribution of the quantum correlations obtained with different configurations of orbital angular momentum. Intensity-difference squeezing of up to -6.7 dB is demonstrated with beams carrying orbital angular momentum. Delocalized spatial correlations between the twin beams are observed. PMID:18851611

  6. The angular momentum transport by unstable toroidal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Gellert, M.; Spada, F.; Tereshin, I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate with a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code that angular momentum can be transported because of the magnetic instability of toroidal fields under the influence of differential rotation, and that the resulting effective viscosity may be high enough to explain the almost rigid-body rotation observed in radiative stellar cores. We only consider stationary, current-free fields, and only those combinations of rotation rates and magnetic field amplitudes which provide maximal numerical values of the viscosity. We find that the dimensionless ratio of the effective over molecular viscosity, νT/ν, linearly grows with the Reynolds number of the rotating fluid multiplied by the square-root of the magnetic Prandtl number, which is approximately unity for the considered red subgiant star KIC 7341231. For the interval of magnetic Reynolds numbers considered - which is restricted by numerical constraints of the nonlinear MHD code - the magnetic Prandtl number has a remarkable influence on the relative importance of the contributions of the Reynolds stress and the Maxwell stress to the total viscosity, which is magnetically dominated only for Pm ≳ 0.5. We also find that the magnetized plasma behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid, i.e., the resulting effective viscosity depends on the shear in the rotation law. The decay time of the differential rotation thus depends on its shear and becomes longer and longer during the spin-down of a stellar core.

  7. Transient optical angular momentum effects in light-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, A. R.; Babiker, M.; Al-Amri, M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2005-10-01

    The time evolution of the radiation pressure forces due to the action of laser light on matter in the form of neutral molecules, atoms, and ions is considered when the frequency of the light is comparable to a dipole-allowed transition frequency. We find that the transient regime, applicable from the instant the laser is switched on, is important for the gross motion, provided that the upper-state lifetime Γ-1 is relatively long, while the steady-state regime, formally such that t≫ Γ-1 , is appropriate for the evaluation of the forces and the dynamics for large Γ . With a focus on the orbital-angular-momentum-endowed laser light, the light-induced time-dependent forces and torques are determined and their full time dependence utilized to determine trajectories. Marked differences are found in both translational and rotational features in comparison with the results emerging when the steady-state forces are assumed from the outset. Intricate and detailed atom trajectories are plotted for Laguerre-Gaussian light at near resonance for a transition of Eu3+ that has a particularly small Γ . The implications of the results for trapping and manipulating atoms and ions using laser light are pointed out and discussed.

  8. Soft gluon resummations in dijet azimuthal angular correlations in hadronic collisions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Yuan, C-P; Yuan, Feng

    2014-12-01

    We derive all order soft gluon resummation in dijet azimuthal angular correlation in hadronic collisions at the next-to-leading logarithmic level. The relevant coefficients for the Sudakov resummation factor, the soft and hard factors, are calculated. The theory predictions agree well with the experimental data from D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron. This provides a benchmark calculation for the transverse momentum dependent QCD resummation for jet productions in hadron collisions. PMID:25526118

  9. Numerical investigation of the self-focusing of broad-bandwidth laser light with applied angular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenty, P. W.; Skupsky, S.; Kelly, J. H.; Cotton, C. T.

    1994-08-01

    The self-focusing of phase-modulated broad-bandwidth (BBW) laser light, in which the spectral components are angularly dispersed to produce smoothing of laser nonuniformities, is analyzed. A multifrequency, multidimensional computer code has been developed to simulate the propagation of angularly dispersed BBW light within a nonlinear medium. Earlier work has shown that the self-focusing behavior of phase-modulated BBW light without angular dispersion is insignificantly different from that of monochromatic beams. With the addition of angular dispersion, pure phase modulation cannot be maintained during propagation, and the beam becomes subject to the development of spatial amplitude modulation which moves across the beam in time. Instantaneously, this amplitude modulation will begin to self-focus in a nonlinear medium. However, when examined over one period of the phase modulation, the time-integrated intensity (TII) due to the angularly dispersed BBW beam is consistently smooth, regardless of the amount of propagation modulation or self-focusing growth present in the instantaneous profile. Similarly, the angular dispersion will produce a time-dependent deflection of any amplitude modulation on the beam produced by laser defects. Because the focus of the modulation is enlarged due to the deflection, the TII of this amplitude structure is found to be less than that for a monochromatic beam.

  10. Numerical investigation of the self-focusing of broad-bandwidth laser light with applied angular dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    McKenty, P.W.; Skupsky, S.; Kelly, J.H.; Cotton, C.T. )

    1994-08-15

    The self-focusing of phase-modulated broad-bandwidth (BBW) laser light, in which the spectral components are angularly dispersed to produce smoothing of laser nonuniformities, is analyzed. A multifrequency, multidimensional computer code has been developed to simulate the propagation of angularly dispersed BBW light within a nonlinear medium. Earlier work has shown that the self-focusing behavior of phase-modulated BBW light without angular dispersion is insignificantly different from that of monochromatic beams. With the addition of angular dispersion, pure phase modulation cannot be maintained during propagation, and the beam becomes subject to the development of spatial amplitude modulation which moves across the beam in time. Instantaneously, this amplitude modulation will begin to self-focus in a nonlinear medium. However, when examined over one period of the phase modulation, the time-integrated intensity (TII) due to the angularly dispersed BBW beam is consistently smooth, regardless of the amount of propagation modulation or self-focusing growth present in the instantaneous profile. Similarly, the angular dispersion will produce a time-dependent deflection of any amplitude modulation on the beam produced by laser defects. Because the focus of the modulation is enlarged due to the deflection, the TII of this amplitude structure is found to be less than that for a monochromatic beam.

  11. Effects of Variations of Parallel Angular Velocity and Vorticity on the Oscillations of Compressible Homogeneous Rotating Ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, T. T.; Pung, S. Y.

    1995-07-01

    Earlier work on the oscillations of an ellipsoid is extended to investigate the behaviour of a nonequilibrium compressible homogeneous rotating gaseous ellipsoid, with the components of the velocity field as linear functions of the coordinates, and with parallel angular velocity and uniform vorticity. The dynamical behaviour of the ellipsoid is obtained by numerically integrating the relevant differential equations for different values of the initial angular velocity and vorticity. This behaviour is displayed by the (a 1,a 2) and (a 1,a 3) phase plots, where thea i's (i = 1, 2, 3) are the semi-diameters, and by the graphs ofa 1,a 2,a 3, the volume, and the angular velocity as functions of time. The dynamical behaviour of the nonequilibrium ellipsoid depends on the deviation of the angular momentum from its equilibrium value; for larger deviations, the oscillations are more nonperiodic with larger amplitudes. An initially ellipsoidal configuration always remains ellipsoidal, but it cannot become spheroidal about its rotation axis, though it may become spheroidal instantaneously about either one of the other two principal axes. For an ellipsoid approaching axisymmetry about its axis of rotation, the angular velocity can suddenly increase by a large amount. Thus if an astrophysical object can be modelled by a nonequilibrium ellipsoid, it may occasionally undergo sudden large increases of angular velocity.

  12. Relativistic calculations of angle-dependent photoemission time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, Anatoli; Mandal, Ankur; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Dolmatov, Valeriy K.; Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.

    2016-07-01

    Angular dependence of photoemission time delay for the valence n p3 /2 and n p1 /2 subshells of Ar, Kr, and Xe is studied in the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. Strong angular anisotropy of the time delay is reproduced near respective Cooper minima while the spin-orbit splitting affects the time delay near threshold.

  13. Polarization of molecular angular momentum in the chemical reactions Li + HF and F + HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B.; Popov, Ruslan S.; Roncero, Octavio; De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2013-06-01

    The quantum mechanical approach to vector correlation of angular momentum orientation and alignment in chemical reactions [G. Balint-Kurti and O. S. Vasyutinskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 14281 (2009)], 10.1021/jp902796v is applied to the molecular reagents and products of the Li + HF [L. Gonzalez-Sanchez, O. S. Vasyutinskii, A. Zanchet, C. Sanz-Sanz, and O. Roncero, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13656 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02452j and F + HD [D. De Fazio, J. Lucas, V. Aquilanti, and S. Cavalli, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 8571 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02738c reactions for which accurate scattering information has become recently available through time-dependent and time-independent approaches. Application of the theory to two important particular cases of the reactive collisions has been considered: (i) the influence of the angular momentum polarization of reactants in the entrance channel on the spatial distribution of the products in the exit channel and (ii) angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction between unpolarized reactants. In the former case, the role of the angular momentum alignment of the reactants is shown to be large, particularly when the angular momentum is perpendicular to the reaction scattering plane. In the latter case, the orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum was found to be significant and strongly dependent on the scattering angle. The calculation also reveals significant differences between the vector correlation properties of the two reactions under study which are due to difference in the reaction mechanisms. In the case of F + HD reaction, the branching ratio between HF and DF production points out interest in the insight gained into the detailed dynamics, when information is available either from exact quantum mechanical calculations or from especially designed experiments. Also, the geometrical arrangement for the experimental determination of the product angular momentum orientation and alignment based

  14. Bayesian Deconvolution for Angular Super-Resolution in Forward-Looking Scanning Radar

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yuebo; Huang, Yulin; Sun, Zhichao; Wang, Yue; Yang, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Scanning radar is of notable importance for ground surveillance, terrain mapping and disaster rescue. However, the angular resolution of a scanning radar image is poor compared to the achievable range resolution. This paper presents a deconvolution algorithm for angular super-resolution in scanning radar based on Bayesian theory, which states that the angular super-resolution can be realized by solving the corresponding deconvolution problem with the maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion. The algorithm considers that the noise is composed of two mutually independent parts, i.e., a Gaussian signal-independent component and a Poisson signal-dependent component. In addition, the Laplace distribution is used to represent the prior information about the targets under the assumption that the radar image of interest can be represented by the dominant scatters in the scene. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed deconvolution algorithm has higher precision for angular super-resolution compared with the conventional algorithms, such as the Tikhonov regularization algorithm, the Wiener filter and the Richardson–Lucy algorithm. PMID:25806871

  15. The massive Dirac field on a rotating black hole spacetime: angular solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Sam R.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2009-09-01

    The massive Dirac equation on a Kerr-Newman background may be solved by the method of separation of variables. The radial and angular equations are coupled via an angular eigenvalue, which is determined from the Chandrasekhar-Page (CP) equation. Obtaining accurate angular eigenvalues is a key step in studying scattering, absorption and emission of the fermionic field. Here we introduce a new method for finding solutions of the CP equation. First, we introduce a novel representation for the spin-half spherical harmonics. Next, we decompose the angular solutions of the CP equation (the mass-dependent spin-half spheroidal harmonics) in the spherical basis. The method yields a three-term recurrence relation which may be solved numerically via continued-fraction methods, or perturbatively to obtain a series expansion for the eigenvalues. In the case μ = ±ω (where ω and μ are the frequency and mass of the fermion) we obtain eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in a closed form. We study the eigenvalue spectrum and the zeros of the maximally co-rotating mode. We compare our results with previous studies, and uncover and correct some errors in the literature. We provide series expansions, tables of eigenvalues and numerical fits across a wide parameter range and present plots of a selection of eigenfunctions. It is hoped that this study will be a useful resource for all researchers interested in the Dirac equation on a rotating black hole background.

  16. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms. PMID:26393606

  17. Integrated accretion disk angular momentum removal and astrophysical jet acceleration mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A model has been developed for how accretion disks discard angular momentum while powering astrophysical jets. The model depends on the extremely weak ionization of disks. This causes disk ions to be collisionally locked to adjacent disk neutrals so a clump of disk ions and neutrals has an effective cyclotron frequency αωci where α is the fractional ionization. When αωci is approximately twice the Kepler orbital frequency, conservation of canonical momentum shows that the clump spirals radially inwards producing a radially inward disk electric current as electrons cannot move radially in the disk. Upon reaching the jet radius, this current then flows axially away from the disk plane along the jet, producing a toroidal magnetic field that drives the jet. Electrons remain frozen to poloidal flux surfaces everywhere and electron motion on flux surfaces in the ideal MHD region outside the disk completes the current path. Angular momentum absorbed from accreting material in the disk by magnetic counter-torque -JrBz is transported by the electric circuit and ejected at near infinite radius in the disk plane. This is like an electric generator absorbing angular momentum and wired to a distant electric motor that emits angular momentum. Supported by USDOE/NSF Partnership in Plasma Science.

  18. Angular Distributions of Drell-Yan Dimuons at Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramson, Bryan; Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions (PDF), fragmentation functions, and their necessary theoretical framework provide a rich foundation from which to build a more descriptive, quantitative understanding of QCD and hadron structure. Fortuitously, TMD sensitive analyses of leptonic angular distributions have been a fixture in Drell-Yan experiments since the π+W CERN NA-10 of the 1980's, with particular focus on the violation of the Lam-Tung relation through a non-zero cos (2 ϕ) modulation in the angular distributions of the final-state leptons. The cos (2 ϕ) modulation is sensitive to the correlation between the motion and spin of transversely polarized (anti)quarks within their encompassing unpolarized hadron, described by the Boer-Mulders TMD PDF. In the mid-1990's, Fermilab E-866/NuSea investigated angular distributions of p+p and p+d Drell-Yan and found that the relative strength of the cos (2 ϕ) modulation, as compared to pion-induced Drell-Yan, is reduced. Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest provides an ideal laboratory in which to measure the cos (2 ϕ) modulation at a higher target xBj than possible with E-866. Recent progress in the analysis of the angular distributions from SeaQuest Drell-Yan dimuons will be shown.

  19. Analytical model for CMB temperature angular power spectrum from cosmic (super-)strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Yoo, Chul-Moon; Sasaki, Misao; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sendouda, Yuuiti

    2010-09-15

    We present a new analytical method to calculate the small angle cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature angular power spectrum due to cosmic (super-)string segments. In particular, using our method, we clarify the dependence on the intercommuting probability P. We find that the power spectrum is dominated by Poisson-distributed string segments. The power spectrum for a general value of P has a plateau on large angular scales and shows a power-law decrease on small angular scales. The resulting spectrum in the case of conventional cosmic strings is in very good agreement with the numerical result obtained by Fraisse et al.. Then we estimate the upper bound on the dimensionless tension of the string for various values of P by assuming that the fraction of the CMB power spectrum due to cosmic (super-)strings is less than ten percent at various angular scales up to l=2000. We find that the amplitude of the spectrum increases as the intercommuting probability. As a consequence, strings with smaller intercommuting probabilities are found to be more tightly constrained.

  20. Angular momentum conservation in heavy ion collisions at very high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.; Piccinini, F.; Rizzo, J.

    2008-02-15

    The effects of angular momentum conservation in peripheral heavy ion collisions at very high energy are investigated. It is shown that the initial angular momentum of the quark-gluon plasma should enhance the azimuthal anisotropy of particle spectra (elliptic flow) with respect to the usual picture where only the initial geometrical eccentricity of the nuclear overlap region is responsible for the anisotropy. In hydrodynamical terms, the initial angular momentum entails a nontrivial dependence of the initial longitudinal flow velocity on the transverse coordinates. This gives rise to a nonvanishing vorticity in the equations of motion, which enhances the expansion rate of the supposedly created fluid compensating for the possible quenching effect of viscosity. A distinctive signature of the vorticity in the plasma is the generation of an average polarization of the emitted hadrons, for which we provide analytical expressions. These phenomena might be better observed at LHC, where the initial angular momentum density will be larger and where we envisage an increase of the elliptic flow coefficient v{sub 2} with respect to RHIC energies.