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Sample records for angular dependent nexafs

  1. Structural vs electronic origin of renormalized band widths in TTF-TCNQ: An angular dependent NEXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, M.; Meyer, J.; Hoinkis, M.; Glawion, S.; Blaha, P.; Gavrila, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.; Claessen, R.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed angle-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the Auger electron yield mode on the correlated quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) in order to determine the orientation of the molecules in the topmost surface layer. We find that the tilt angles of the molecules with respect to the one-dimensional axis are essentially the same as in the bulk. Thus, we can rule out surface relaxation as the origin of the renormalized band widths which were inferred from the analysis of photoemission data within the one-dimensional Hubbard model. Thereby, recent theoretical results are corroborated which invoke long-range Coulomb repulsion as alternative explanation to understand the spectral dispersions of TTF-TCNQ quantitatively within an extended Hubbard model.

  2. Structural vs electronic origin of renormalized band widths in TTF-TCNQ: An angular dependent NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Sing, M.; Meyer, J.; Glawion, S.; Claessen, R.; Hoinkis, M.; Blaha, P.; Gavrila, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2007-12-15

    We have performed angle-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the Auger electron yield mode on the correlated quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) in order to determine the orientation of the molecules in the topmost surface layer. We find that the tilt angles of the molecules with respect to the one-dimensional axis are essentially the same as in the bulk. Thus, we can rule out surface relaxation as the origin of the renormalized band widths which were inferred from the analysis of photoemission data within the one-dimensional Hubbard model. Thereby, recent theoretical results are corroborated which invoke long-range Coulomb repulsion as alternative explanation to understand the spectral dispersions of TTF-TCNQ quantitatively within an extended Hubbard model.

  3. Nature of the empty states and signature of the charge density wave instability and upper Peierls transition of TTF-TCNQ by temperature-dependent NEXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernenkaya, Alisa; Medjanik, Katerina; Nagel, Peter; Merz, Michael; Schuppler, Stefan; Canadell, Enric; Pouget, Jean-Paul; Schönhense, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of TTF-TCNQ was studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in order to detect a spectroscopic signature of the phase transitions, especially that occurring at 54 K, which is related to a Peierls gap opening on the TCNQ stacks. All unoccupied TCNQ orbitals predicted by first-principles calculations and, in particular the pair σ ∗( π( a g , b 3 u )), located in the cyano groups, are clearly resolved in our experimental data. The latter orbital was observed for the first time in our NEXAFS spectra. The temperature dependence of NEXAFS peak intensities gives evidence of a subtle modification of the electronic structure when the charge density wave (CDW) fluctuations develop as the Peierls transition of the TCNQ stacks is approached from higher temperatures. These changes are explained on the basis of the charge transfer, the shape of the lower empty TCNQ molecular orbitals and the deformation of TCNQ during the pre-transitional CDW fluctuations. Finally the data suggest that the internal stack deformation consisting in a substantial out of plane displacement of the central ring with respect to the cyano-groups allows to gain C α -C α bonding energy which helps the stabilization of the Peierls transition on the TCNQ stack.

  4. Angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.; Dines, E.L.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Lisle, J.C.; Schmitt, R.P.; Majka, Z.; Nebbia, G.

    1987-12-01

    The angular momentum dependence of large fragment production in long-lived reactions is studied by measurements of fragment cross sections from reactions with substantially different angular momentum distributions and the coincident ..gamma..-ray multiplicity distributions. The results indicate that the primary l-wave distributions move to larger mean values and decrease in width and skewness with increasing mass symmetry in the decay channel. The results also confirm that the partition of angular momentum kinetic energy relaxed heavy-ion reactions is that expected for a rigidly rotating intermediate.

  5. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  6. Angular dependent light emission from planar waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Jaison; Prabhu, Radhakrishna; Radhakrishnan, P.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-01-07

    We have investigated the angular dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and laser emission from an asymmetric and free-standing polymer thin films doped with rhodamine 6G, which is transversely pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A semi-leaky waveguide or quasi-waveguide structure has been developed by spin coating technique. In these waveguides, the light was confined by the film/air-film/glass substrate interfaces. At the film/substrate interface, a portion of light will reflect back into the film (guided mode) and the remaining refracted to the substrate resulting in cutoff modes. A blue-shift in ASE has been observed when the pump power was increased from 8 to 20 mW allowing a limited range of tuning of emission wavelength. To study the directionality of the ASE from the waveguide, we have measured the output intensity and FWHM of emission spectra as a function of viewing angle (θ) from the plane parallel to film. From the detailed examination of the output emission spectra, as +θ increases from 0° there has been an initial decrease in output intensity, but at a particular angle ≈10° an increase in output intensity was observed. This additional peak in output intensity as +θ is a clear indication of coexistence of the cutoff mode. We also present a compact solid-state laser based on leaky mode propagation from the dye-doped polymer free-standing film (∼50 μm thickness) waveguide. The partial reflections from the broad lateral surfaces of the free-standing films provided the optical feedback for the laser emission with high directionality. For a pump power of 22 mW, an intense line with FWHM <0.2 nm was observed at 578 nm.

  7. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Steven S.-L. Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-07

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  8. The angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sobtka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.; Dines, E.L.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Schmitt, R.P.; Majka, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Griffin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Large fragment (A > 4) production at high angular momentum is studied via the reaction, 200 MeV /sup 45/Sc + /sup 65/Cu. Comparisons of the fragment yields from this reaction (high angular momentum) to those from /sup 93/Nb + Be (low angular momentum) are used to verify the strong angular momentum dependence of large fragment production predicted by equilibrium models. Details of the coincident ..gamma..-ray distributions not only confirm a rigidly rotating intermediate but also indicate that the widths of the primary L-wave distributions decrease with increasing symmetry in the decay channel. These data are used to test the asymmetry and L-wave dependence of emission barriers calculated from a rotating, finite range corrected, liquid drop model. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Modeling of the angular dependence of plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wei; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2009-11-15

    An understanding of the angular dependence of etching yield is essential to investigate the origins of sidewall roughness during plasma etching. In this article the angular dependence of polysilicon etching in Cl{sub 2} plasma was modeled as a combination of individual angular-dependent etching yields for ion-initiated processes including physical sputtering, ion-induced etching, vacancy generation, and removal. The modeled etching yield exhibited a maximum at {approx}60 degree sign off-normal ion angle at low flux ratio, indicative of physical sputtering. It transformed to the angular dependence of ion-induced etching with the increase in the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiments was achieved for various flux ratios and ion energies. The variation of etching yield in response to the ion angle was incorporated in the three-dimensional profile simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained. The surface composition was calculated and compared to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The modeling indicated a Cl areal density of 3x10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} on the surface that is close to the value determined by the XPS analysis. The response of Cl fraction to ion energy and flux ratio was modeled and correlated with the etching yields. The complete mixing-layer kinetics model with the angular dependence effect will be used for quantitative surface roughening analysis using a profile simulator in future work.

  10. Angular dose dependence of Matrixx TM and its calibration.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberger, Luciant D; Wagar, Matthew; Nitsch, Paige; Bhagwat, Mandar S; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    One of the applications of MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry) is experimental verification of dose for IMRT, VMAT, and tomotherapy. For cumulative plan verification, dose is delivered for all the treatment gantry angles to a stationary detector. Experimental calibration of MatriXX detector recommended by the manufacturer involves only AP calibration fields and does not address angular dependency of MatriXX. Angular dependency may introduce dose bias in cumulative plan verification if not corrected. For this reason, we characterized angular dependency of MatriXX and developed a method for its calibration. We found relatively large discrepancies in responses to posterior vs. anterior fields for four MatriXX (Evolution series) detectors (up to 11%), and relatively large variability of responses as a function of gantry angle in the gantry angle ranges of 91 degrees-110 degrees and 269 degrees-260 degrees. With our calibration method, the bias due to angular dependency is effectively removed in experimental verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. PMID:20160692

  11. Pump/Probe Angular Dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Richard; Campbell, Kaleb; Crescimanno, Michael; Bali, Samir

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) on angular separation between pump and probe field propagation directions in room-temperature Rb vapor. We observe the FWHM of the probe transmission spectrum and the amplitude of the EIT signal while varying the angular separation from 0 to 1 milliradian. Following the work of Ref., we examine potential applications in information storage and retrieval. We are grateful to Miami University for their generous financial support, and to the Miami University Instrumentation lab for their invaluable contributions.

  12. Angular-dependent magnetization reversal processes in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, D. M.; Chadha, M.; Branford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetization reversal in interconnected kagome artificial spin ice structures has been studied through experimental MOKE measurements and micromagnetic simulations. This reversal is mediated by the propagation of magnetic domain walls along the interconnecting bars, which either nucleate at the vertex or arrive following an interaction in a neighboring vertex. The physical differences in these processes show a distinct angular dependence allowing the different contributions to be identified. The configuration of the initial magnetization state, either locally or on a full sublattice of the system, controls the reversal characteristics of the array within a certain field window. This shows how the available magnetization reversal routes can be manipulated and the system can be trained.

  13. Time and 'angular' dependent backgrounds from stationary axisymmetric solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Obregon, Octavio; Quevedo, Hernando; Ryan, Michael P.

    2004-09-15

    Backgrounds depending on time and on angular variable, namely, polarized and unpolarized S{sup 1}xS{sup 2} Gowdy models, are generated as the sector inside the horizons of the manifold corresponding to axisymmetric solutions. As is known, an analytical continuation of ordinary D-branes, iD-branes allow one to find S-brane solutions. Simple models have been constructed by means of analytic continuation of the Schwarzschild and the Kerr metrics. The possibility of studying the i-Gowdy models obtained here is outlined with an eye toward seeing if they could represent some kind of generalized S-branes depending not only on time but also on an angular variable.

  14. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  15. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  16. Angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Lena R.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-04-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that combines tomography with conventional digital mammography. In developing DBT dosimetry, a direct application of mammographic dosimetry has appeal. However, DBT introduces rotation of the x-ray tube relative to the dosimeter, thus raising questions about the angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters. To measure this dependence, two ionization chambers, two solid-stated detectors, and one photodiode were rotated relative to an incident Mo/Mo x-ray beam. In this isocentric DBT simulation, the signal of each dosimeter was studied over an angular range of 180° for tube voltages of 26 to 34 kV. One ionization chamber was then modeled numerically to study the response to various monoenergetic beams. The results show that all dosimeters underestimate dose to varying degrees; solid-state detectors show the greatest angular dependence while ionization chambers show the least. Correction factors were computed from the data for isocentric DBT images using projection angles up to +/-25° these factors ranged from 1.0014 to 1.1380. The magnitude of the angular dependence generally decreased with increasing energy, as shown with both the measured and modeled data. As a result, the error arising in measuring DBT dose with a mammographic dosimeter varies significantly; it cannot always be disregarded. The use of correction factors may be possible but is largely impractical, as they are specific to the dosimeter, x-ray beam, and DBT geometry. Instead, an angle-independent dosimeter may be more suitable for DBT.

  17. Angular dependence of the nanoDot OSL dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Kry, Stephen F.; Sahoo, Narayan; Followill, David S.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs) are quickly gaining popularity as passive dosimeters, with applications in medicine for linac output calibration verification, brachytherapy source verification, treatment plan quality assurance, and clinical dose measurements. With such wide applications, these dosimeters must be characterized for numerous factors affecting their response. The most abundant commercial OSLD is the InLight∕OSL system from Landauer, Inc. The purpose of this study was to examine the angular dependence of the nanoDot dosimeter, which is part of the InLight system.Methods: Relative dosimeter response data were taken at several angles in 6 and 18 MV photon beams, as well as a clinical proton beam. These measurements were done within a phantom at a depth beyond the build-up region. To verify the observed angular dependence, additional measurements were conducted as well as Monte Carlo simulations in MCNPX.Results: When irradiated with the incident photon beams parallel to the plane of the dosimeter, the nanoDot response was 4% lower at 6 MV and 3% lower at 18 MV than the response when irradiated with the incident beam normal to the plane of the dosimeter. Monte Carlo simulations at 6 MV showed similar results to the experimental values. Examination of the results in Monte Carlo suggests the cause as partial volume irradiation. In a clinical proton beam, no angular dependence was found.Conclusions: A nontrivial angular response of this OSLD was observed in photon beams. This factor may need to be accounted for when evaluating doses from photon beams incident from a variety of directions. PMID:21858992

  18. Volume Dependence of Bound States with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Sebastian; Hammer, H.-W.; Lee, Dean

    2011-09-09

    We derive general results for the mass shift of bound states with angular momentum l{>=}1 in a finite periodic volume. Our results have direct applications to lattice simulations of hadronic molecules as well as atomic nuclei. While the binding of S-wave bound states increases at finite volume, we show that the binding of P-wave bound states decreases. The mass shift for D-wave bound states as well as higher partial waves depends on the representation of the cubic rotation group. Nevertheless, the multiplet-averaged mass shift for any angular momentum l can be expressed in a simple form, and the sign of the shift alternates for even and odd l. We verify our analytical results with explicit numerical calculations. We also show numerically that similar volume corrections appear in three-body bound states.

  19. Angular Dependence of Superconductivity in Superconductor / Spin Valve Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Alejandro; Safranski, Christopher; Krivorotov, Ilya; Wu, Chien-Te; Valls, Oriol

    2014-03-01

    The superconducting condensate in superconductor / ferromagnet (S/F) multilayers consists of singlet and triplet components. For a non-collinear state of magnetization of the multilayer, all three spin components Sz =(0 , +/- 1) of the triplet condensate are generally non-zero, which can result in a long range proximity effect in S/F multilayers. Indeed, the Sz = +/- 1 triplet components of the condensate are immune to pair breaking by the exchange field and, unlike the singlet and the Sz = 0 triplet components, they can penetrate deep into the ferromagnetic layers. Here we report measurements demonstrating magnetic control of the triplet component amplitude in Nb/Co/Cu/Co/CoOx superconducting spin valves. We find that for all values of the layer thicknesses employed in the experiment, Tc shows non-monotonic angular dependence with a minimum near perpendicular orientation of the Co layers. This drop in Tc is evidence of the enhanced long-range triplet amplitude in the maximally non-collinear configuration of the spin valve. We will present detailed measurements of the magnitude of this effect as a function of thicknesses of both Co and Cu layers of the spin valve. We will also compare our data to theoretical predictions of the angular dependence of Tc for this system.

  20. Engineering of angular dependence of high-contrast grating mirror for transverse mode control of VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    We present our recent activity on highly angular-dependent high contrast grating (HCG) for the transverse mode control of VCSELs. The modeling and the experiment show the design flexibility of HCG to manage the angular dependence of HCG. The optimized angular dependent HCG functions as a spatial frequency filter. We are able to use the engineered angular dependence of HCG for the transverse-mode control of VCSELs by filtering out high-order transverse-modes. We fabricated and characterized amorphous Si HCG mirrors, which clearly show the large angular dependence. We demonstrated single-mode 980nm VCSELs with a HCG mirror functioning as a spatial frequency filter.

  1. Angular Dependence of Quantum Oscillations in SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartstein, M.; Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y.-T.; Zeng, B.; Ciomaga Hatnean, M.; Harrison, N.; Zhu, Z.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J.-H.; Balicas, L.; Shitsevalova, N.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, S. E.

    Recent proposals of low-dimensional electronic states in the Kondo insulator, SmB6 have lead to renewed interest in the material. In this study we present quantum oscillation measurements of high quality single-crystals of SmB6. Magnetic torque was measured in magnetic fields up to 40 T, allowing the observation of quantum oscillation frequencies ranging from 50 T to 15,000 T in multiple samples prepared by different groups. The size and the angular dependence of the oscillations indicate the striking concurrence of an electronically insulating bulk and a large, bulk Fermi surface. Comparison of the measured oscillations with similar measurements of metallic rare-earth hexaborides supports such a Fermi surface. Our model, previously employed for the metallic hexaborides, describes large ellipsoidally distorted spheres centred at X-points of the Brillouin zone, and smaller ellipsoids positioned at neck points, and gives a good account of the observed frequencies.

  2. Nanoscale spectroscopy with polarized X-rays by NEXAFS-TXM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Peter; Bittencourt, Carla; Rehbein, Stefan; Umek, Polona; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris P.; Schneider, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is an essential analytical tool in material science. Combining NEXAFS with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) adds spatial resolution and the possibility to study individual nanostructures. Here, we describe a full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) that generates high-resolution, large-area NEXAFS data with a collection rate two orders of magnitude faster than is possible with STXM. The TXM optical design combines a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 1 × 104 with a spatial resolution of 25 nm in a field of view of 15-20 µm and a data acquisition time of ~1 s. As an example, we present image stacks and polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectra from individual anisotropic sodium and protonated titanate nanoribbons. Our NEXAFS-TXM technique has the advantage that one image stack visualizes a large number of nanostructures and therefore already contains statistical information. This new high-resolution NEXAFS-TXM technique opens the way to advanced nanoscale science studies.

  3. Angular distribution anisotropy of fragments ejected from methyl iodide clusters: Dependence on fs laser intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Kosmidis, C.

    2010-10-01

    The angular distribution of the fragment ions ejected from the interaction of methyl iodide clusters with 20 fs strong laser pulses is studied by means of a mass spectrometer. Three types of angular distributions, one isotropic and two anisotropic, have been observed and their dependence on the laser intensity has been studied. There is strong evidence that the ions exhibiting anisotropic angular distribution with a maximum in the direction parallel to the laser polarization vector are produced via an electron impact ionization process.

  4. Angular dependent transport of auroral electrons in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.; Anderson, H. R.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of auroral electrons through the upper atmosphere is analyzed. The transport equation is solved using a discrete-ordinate method, including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons (resulting in changes of pitch angle) and degradation in energy as the electrons penetrate into the atmosphere. The transport equation is solved numerically for the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle, and energy. In situ measurements of the pitch angle and energy distribution of precipitating electrons over an auroral arc provide boundary conditions for the calculation. Model calculations were carried out with various different phase functions for elastic and inelastic collisions to attempt changing the angular scattering, but the observed pitch angle distributions remain unexplained. It is suggested that mechanisms other than collisional scattering influence the angular distribution of auroral electrons at or below 300 km altitude in the low-energy domain.

  5. Depth and latitude dependence of the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1990-01-01

    One of the design goals for the dedicated helioseismology observing state located at Mount Wilson Observatory was the measurement of the internal solar rotation using solar p-mode oscillations. In this paper, the first p-mode splittings obtained from Mount Wilson are reported and compared with those from several previously published studies. It is demonstrated that the present splittings agree quite well with composite frequency splittings obtained from the comparisons. The splittings suggest that the angular velocity in the solar equatorial plane is a function of depth below the photosphere. The latitudinal differential rotation pattern visible at the surface appears to persist at least throughout the solar convection zone.

  6. Sensitivity in frequency dependent angular rotation of optical vortices.

    PubMed

    Rumala, Yisa S

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity (and resolution) of a coherent superposition of optical vortices emerging from a single spiral phase plate (SPP) device when light's optical frequency (or wavelength) going into the SPP device is varied. The paper discusses the generation and measurement of ultrasmall rotation. Factors that affect the ability to perform precision rotation measurements include the linewidth and stability of the input light source, the number of photon counts making position rotation measurements on the CCD detector, SPP reflectivity, the length of SPP device, and the angular modulation frequency of the intensity pattern due to a coherent superposition of optical vortices in a single SPP device. This paper also discusses parameters to obtain a high-sensitivity single shot measurement and multiple measurements. Furthermore, it presents what I believe is a new scaling showing the enhancement in sensitivity (and resolution) in the standard quantum limit and Heisenberg limit. With experimentally realizable parameters, there is an enhancement of rotation sensitivity by at least one order of magnitude compared to previous rotation measurements with optical vortices. Understanding robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity in an SPP device is important to metrology in general and for building compact SPP sensors such as gyroscopes, molecular sensors, and thermal sensors. PMID:26974798

  7. Density functional theory study of NEXAFS spectra of 4-methylbenzenethiol molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiuneng; Wang, Guangwei; Ma, Yong; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Xu, Shicai; Wang, Chuankui

    2016-02-01

    We have employed density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectroscopy of 4-methylbenzenethiol (4-MBT) on gold surface. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectra of 4-MBT at different orientation angles are systematically analyzed. The π* resonance at 285 eV, which is the result of the transitions from 1s orbitals of carbon atoms in benzene ring to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), is selected to study the orientation of 4-MBT molecule on the gold surface. In comparison with the experimental results, it is found that the benzene ring of 4-MBT is tilted by 33° with respect to the gold surface.

  8. Angular dependence of surfactant-mediated forces between carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Müter, Dirk; Angelikopoulos, Panagiotis; Bock, Henry

    2012-12-27

    We employ dissipative particle dynamics to examine surfactant-mediated forces between two carbon nanotubes. Calculations are performed varying both the distance and the angle between the nanotubes. For small distances, a repulsive region is observed, followed by an overall attractive interval with strong oscillations in the force. Decreasing the angle between the tubes leads to a steady increase in the force, but the relative dependence on the separation distance is preserved. We find that the force scales linearly with the size of the overlap area between the tubes. This allows us to express the angle dependence by a simple equation, whereas the distance dependence is represented by a master curve. For the parallel case, the behavior is significantly different. PMID:23116052

  9. Higher order treatment on temporal derivative of angular flux for time-dependent MOC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Kamiyama, Y.; Kirimura, K.

    2013-07-01

    A new kinetic analysis method, whose angular dependence of temporal derivative for angular flux is accurately treated within practical memory requirement, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, the computational resources, i.e., the memory capacity, can be still a crucial problem for rigorous kinetic calculations using MOC. In the straightforward approach for kinetic calculation using MOC, the segment-averaged angular fluxes should be stored on the memory in order to explicitly calculate the temporal derivative of the angular flux, which would require huge memory. Thus, in the conventional kinetic calculation code using MOC, the temporal derivative of the angular flux has been approximated as angularly isotropic in order to reduce the memory requirement (isotropic assumption). However, the approximation error caused by the conventional isotropic assumption has not been thoroughly and quantitatively investigated so far and an accurate kinetic calculation method, which can quantitatively estimate the above approximation error within practical memory storage, has not been developed. The present study tries to address this issue with a newly developed approach. Effect of the approximate treatment for the temporal derivative of angular flux is evaluated through benchmark calculations. (authors)

  10. Generalization of Equivalent Crystal Theory to Include Angular Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-01-01

    In the original Equivalent Crystal Theory, each atomic site in the real crystal is assigned an equivalent lattice constant, in general different from the ground state one. This parameter corresponds to a local compression or expansion of the lattice. The basic method considers these volumetric transformations and, in addition, introduces the possibility that the reference lattice is anisotropically distorted. These distortions however, were introduced ad-hoc. In this work, we generalize the original Equivalent Crystal Theory by systematically introducing site-dependent directional distortions of the lattice, whose corresponding distortions account for the dependence of the energy on anisotropic local density variations. This is done in the spirit of the original framework, but including a gradient term in the density. This approach is introduced to correct a deficiency in the original Equivalent Crystal Theory and other semiempirical methods in quantitatively obtaining the correct ratios of the surface energies of low index planes of cubic metals (100), (110), and (111). We develop here the basic framework, and apply it to the calculation of Fe (110) and Fe (111) surface energy formation. The results, compared with first principles calculations, show an improvement over previous semiempirical approaches.

  11. A study of angular dependence in the ablation rate of polymers by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedder, James E. A.; Holmes, Andrew S.

    2006-02-01

    Measurements of ablation rate have traditionally been carried out only at normal incidence. However, in real-world applications ablation is often carried out at oblique angles, and it is useful to have prior knowledge of the ablation rate in this case. Detailed information about the angular dependence is also important for the development of ablation simulation tools, and can provide additional insight into the ablation mechanism. Previously we have reported on the angular dependence of direct-write ablation at 266 nm wavelength in solgel and polymer materials. In this paper we present a systematic study of angular dependence for excimer laser ablation of two polymer materials of interest for microfabrication: polycarbonate and SU8 photoresist. The results are used to improve simulation models to aid in mask design.

  12. An angular frequency dependence on the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, P.M.T.; Bakke, K.

    2015-10-15

    A quantum effect characterized by a dependence of the angular frequency associated with the confinement of a neutral particle to a quantum ring on the quantum numbers of the system and the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase is discussed. Then, it is shown that persistent spin currents can arise in a two-dimensional quantum ring in the presence of a Coulomb-type potential. A particular contribution to the persistent spin currents arises from the dependence of the angular frequency on the geometric quantum phase.

  13. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  14. Fit formulas for the angular dependence of the sticking coefficient of energetic hydrocarbon molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichmann, K.; von Toussaint, U.; Jacob, W.

    2011-08-01

    The angular dependence of the sticking coefficient of CHx projectiles on a prototypical amorphous hydrocarbon surface was studied using molecular dynamics. The resulting datasets are fitted to appropriate fit formulas to allow interpolation and lookup of sticking coefficients at arbitrary parameter values.

  15. Effects of angular dependence of surface diffuseness in deformed nuclei on Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Malov, L. A.; Scamps, G.; Lacroix, D.

    2014-09-01

    The angular dependence of surface diffuseness is further discussed. The results of self-consistent calculations are compared with those obtained with the phenomenological mean-field potential. The rather simple parametrizations are suggested. The effects of surface polarization and hexadecapole deformation on the height of the Coulomb barrier are revealed.

  16. Helicity-dependent angular distributions in double-charged-pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen Strauch

    2003-05-01

    Two-pion photoproduction in the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} has been studied at Jefferson Lab Hall B using a circularly-polarized tagged photon beam in the energy range between 0.6 GeV and 2.3 GeV. Owing to the large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector, complete beam-helicity-dependent angular distributions of the final-state particles were measured. The large cross-section asymmetries exhibit strong sensitivity to the kinematics of the reaction and provide valuable information on the reaction dynamics. Preliminary results are presented.

  17. Angular dependence of coercivity with temperature in Co-based nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran, C.; Espejo, A. P.; Palmero, E. M.; Escrig, J.; Vázquez, M.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic behavior of arrays of Co and CoFe nanowire arrays has been measured in the temperature range between 100 and 300 K. We have paid particular attention to the angular dependence of magnetic properties on the applied magnetic field orientation. The experimental angular dependence of coercivity has been modeled according to micromagnetic analytical calculations, and we found that the propagation of a transversal domain wall mode gives the best fitting with experimental observations. That reversal mode holds in the whole measuring temperature range, for nanowires with different diameters and crystalline structure. Moreover, the quantitative strength of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetization easy axis are determined to depend on the crystalline structure and nanowires diameter. The evolution of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with temperature for nanowires with different composition gives rise to an opposite evolution of coercivity with increasing temperature: it decreases for CoFe while it increases for Co nanowire arrays.

  18. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    SciTech Connect

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M. Arvanitidis, J.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ves, S.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.

    2015-02-21

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane (11{sup ¯}20) and semipolar s-plane (101{sup ¯}1) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup h} on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 2}{sup h} Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  19. Instability in the dense supernova neutrino gas with flavor-dependent angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2012-06-01

    The usual description of self-induced flavor conversions for neutrinos (ν's) in supernovae is based on the simplified assumption that all the ν's of the different species are emitted "half-isotropically" by a common neutrinosphere, in analogy to a blackbody emission. However, realistic supernova simulations show that ν angular distributions at decoupling are far from being half-isotropic and, above all, are flavor dependent. We show that flavor-dependent angular distributions may lead to crossing points in the angular spectra of different ν species (where F(ν(e))=F(ν(x)) and F(ν(e))=F(ν(x))) around which a new multiangle instability can develop. To characterize this effect, we carry out a linearized flavor stability analysis for different supernova neutrino angular distributions. We find that this instability can shift the onset of the flavor conversions toward low radii and produce a smearing of the splitting features found with trivial ν emission models. As a result the spectral differences among ν's of different flavors could be strongly reduced. PMID:23003940

  20. Angular dependence of hysteresis shift in oblique deposited ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupled bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. B.; Rodriguez-Suarez, R. L.; Michea, S.; Vega, H.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.; Aliaga, C.; Denardin, J.

    2014-07-01

    The angular dependence of the hysteresis shift has been investigated in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (NiFe/IrMn) bilayers grown by oblique deposition under the influence of a static magnetic field applied perpendicular to the uniaxial anisotropy direction induced during the growth process. It was found that at low oblique deposition angles, the unidirectional anisotropy field is much greater than the uniaxial anisotropy field and the corresponding anisotropies directions are noncollinear. In these conditions, the angular dependence of the hysteresis loop shift exhibits the well know cosine like shape but demanding a phase shift. Contrary to this, at high oblique deposition angle (70°), the uniaxial anisotropy plays the fundamental role and the anisotropies directions are collinear. In this case, the exchange bias displays a jump phenomenon. The numerical calculations are consistent with the experimental data obtained from magneto-optical Kerr effect and ferromagnetic resonance.

  1. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D.W. Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; C.W. de Jager; M.K. Jones; L.J. Kaufman; E.R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K.D. Paschke; C.F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I.A. Qattan; R.D. Ransome; P.E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E.C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G.M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Zhu

    2007-02-26

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  2. Dependence of electric potentials at trench surfaces on ion angular distribution in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palov, A. P.; Mankelevich, Yu A.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Baklanov, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    Ion-stimulated etching of dielectrics in radio frequency plasma results in positive charging of a trench bottom because of the significant difference in the angular distribution functions of ions and electrons. They are anisotropic for ions and quasi-isotropic for electrons. The charging leads to a decrease in the energy of the ions bombarding the trench bottom and to undesirable sputtering of the walls near the trench bottom because of the curving of the ion trajectories. This process is normally investigated by Monte Carlo methods in the absence of experimental data. In this paper the analytical dependence of the ion flux bombarding the trench bottom on a trench aspect ratio and ion angular distribution function is obtained. Numerical calculations of the electric potential on the trench bottom for a set of trench aspect ratios and angles of the ion angular distribution function were performed based on a Monte Carlo method to demonstrate the ion flux and electric potential correlated well with each other. The proposed formula for an ion flux is suggested to be helpful for analyzing charging the trenches with different aspect ratios in plasma with an arbitrary angular ion distribution function.

  3. Angular dependence of electromagnetic torque in a bulk high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postrekhin, Y. V.; Ma, Ki; Ye, Hong; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2002-05-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetic torque has been measured in cubic shaped YBaCuO samples. The bulk sample was prepared by a seeded-melt growth process in which a small NdBaCuO seed was used to induce domain growth of YBaCuO. The sample had cubic shape so that its edges coincided with basic crystallographic directions. The measurements were conducted in static and dynamic modes. Under static mode, the angular dependencies of the torque have been obtained in a series of zero field cooled magnetic hysteresis measurements. Between each measurement at a specific angle, the sample was warmed up above critical temperature. Under dynamic mode, the magnetic field was increased up to a certain point and then the sample was turned around its axis continuously. It was found that the static torque was a sinusoidal function of the double angle between the external field and one of basic directions of the crystal structure. It also exhibited prominent anisotropy in relation to the crystal structure of the high-temperature superconductor. The dynamic torque-angle relation is not only a result of the anisotropic structure of the superconductor but also a result of the strong intrinsic pinning of this material. Based on Kogan's theory for the anisotropic superconductors and the Bean model approach, a physical model has been developed to describe the angular dependence of the magnetic torque.

  4. Multiple-scattering distributions and angular dependence of the energy loss of slow protons in copper and silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, E. D.; Lantschner, G. H.; Eckardt, J. C.; Lovey, F. C.; Arista, N. R.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of angular distributions and of the angular dependence of the energy loss of 4-, 6-, and 9-keV protons transmitted through thin Cu and Ag polycrystalline foils are presented. By means of standard multiple-scattering model calculations it is found that a V(r)∝r-2.8 potential leads to significantly better fits of the angular distributions than the standard Thomas Fermi, Lenz-Jensen, or Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potentials. A theoretical model for the angular dependence of the energy loss based on considering geometric effects on a frictional inelastic energy loss plus an angular-dependent elastic contribution and the effects of foil roughness reproduces the experimental data. This agrees with previous results in Au and Al, therefore extending the applicability of the model to other metallic elements.

  5. Multiple-scattering distributions and angular dependence of the energy loss of slow protons in copper and silver

    SciTech Connect

    Cantero, E. D.; Lantschner, G. H.; Eckardt, J. C.; Lovey, F. C.; Arista, N. R.

    2010-04-15

    Measurements of angular distributions and of the angular dependence of the energy loss of 4-, 6-, and 9-keV protons transmitted through thin Cu and Ag polycrystalline foils are presented. By means of standard multiple-scattering model calculations it is found that a V(r){proportional_to}r{sup -2.8} potential leads to significantly better fits of the angular distributions than the standard Thomas Fermi, Lenz-Jensen, or Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potentials. A theoretical model for the angular dependence of the energy loss based on considering geometric effects on a frictional inelastic energy loss plus an angular-dependent elastic contribution and the effects of foil roughness reproduces the experimental data. This agrees with previous results in Au and Al, therefore extending the applicability of the model to other metallic elements.

  6. Energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions for 19F, 24Mg and 28Si induced reactions on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, M. B.; Utsunomiya, H.; Gelbke, C. K.; Lynch, W. G.; Back, B. B.; Saini, S.; Baisden, P. A.; McMahan, M. A.

    1983-09-01

    The energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions was measured for reaction induced by 19F, 24Mg, and 28Si on 208Pb over the range of incident energies of {E}/{A} = 5.6-10 MeV. For all three systems the angular distributions are inconsistent with the saddle point deformations of the rotating liquid drop model.

  7. Influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in API5L steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ortiz, P.; Pérez-Benítez, J. A.; Espina-Hernández, J. H.; Caleyo, F.; Mehboob, N.; Grössinger, R.; Hallen, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    This work studies the influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of the energy of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal in three different API5L pipeline steels. The results show that the shape of the angular dependence of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise energy changes with the increase of the amplitude of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon is a consequence of the presence of unlike magnetization processes at different magnitudes of the applied magnetic field. The outcomes reveal the importance of controlling the value of the maximum applied field as parameter for the improvement of the MBN angular dependence measurements.

  8. Highly angular dependent high-contrast grating mirror and its application for transverse-mode control of VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shunya; Kashino, Junichi; Matsutani, Akihiro; Ohtsuki, Hideo; Miyashita, Takahiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-09-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a highly angular dependent high contrast grating (HCG) mirror. The modeling and experiment on amorphous-Si/SiO2 HCG clearly show the large angular dependence of reflectivity, which enables single transverse-mode operations of large-area VCSELs. We fabricate 980 nm VCSELs with the angular dependent HCG functioning as a spatial frequency filter. We obtained the single transverse mode operation of the fabricated device in contrast to conventional VCSELs with semiconductor multilayer mirrors.

  9. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  10. Angular dependence of the spin textures in two-dimensional chiral magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Dan; Qi, Yang

    2015-05-28

    The angular dependence of spin textures in thin helimagnetic films is investigated by a Monte Carlo simulation. When an external field is applied at an angle relative to the film normal, we find that the skyrmion states with broken axis-symmetric structure are able to persist over a wide range of angles by changing the spin orientation. In addition, the uniaxial anisotropy is able to stabilize the distorted skyrmions. This behavior reflects the robust topological stability of skyrmion states in helimagnets and favors their application in spintronic devices.

  11. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  12. Angular-dependent interatomic potential for the aluminum-hydrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, F.; Mishin, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the development of an angular-dependent interatomic potential for hydrogen and the aluminum-hydrogen system. The potential reproduces properties of diatomic hydrogen gas, accurate solution energies of hydrogen atoms in crystalline Al, the energetic preference of the tetrahedral interstitial site occupation over octahedral, the hydrogen diffusion barrier in Al, and a number of other properties. Some of the results predicted by the potential have been tested by molecular dynamics simulations. It is suggested that the new potential can be used in atomistic simulations of the effect of dissolved hydrogen on deformation and fracture of Al, a problem which is relevant to hydrogen-induced degradation of Al alloys.

  13. Effect of angular velocity on sensors based on morphology dependent resonances.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amir R; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2014-01-01

    We carried out an analysis to investigate the morphology dependent optical resonances shift (MDR) of a rotating spherical resonator. The spinning resonator experiences an elastic deformation due to the centrifugal force acting on it, leading to a shift in its MDR. Experiments are also carried out to demonstrate the MDR shifts of a spinning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microsphere. The experimental results agree well with the analytical prediction. These studies demonstrated that spinning sensor based on MDR may experience sufficient shift in the optical resonances, therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Also the results show that angular velocity sensors could be designed using this principle. PMID:24759108

  14. Effect of Angular Velocity on Sensors Based on Morphology Dependent Resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amir R.; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2014-01-01

    We carried out an analysis to investigate the morphology dependent optical resonances shift (MDR) of a rotating spherical resonator. The spinning resonator experiences an elastic deformation due to the centrifugal force acting on it, leading to a shift in its MDR. Experiments are also carried out to demonstrate the MDR shifts of a spinning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microsphere. The experimental results agree well with the analytical prediction. These studies demonstrated that spinning sensor based on MDR may experience sufficient shift in the optical resonances, therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Also the results show that angular velocity sensors could be designed using this principle. PMID:24759108

  15. Improved angular momentum evolution model for solar-like stars. II. Exploring the mass dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.; Bouvier, J.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Understanding the physical processes that dictate the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars from birth to maturity remains a challenge for stellar physics. Aims: We aim to account for the observed rotational evolution of low-mass stars over the age range from 1 Myr to 10 Gyr. Methods: We developed angular momentum evolution models for 0.5 and 0.8 M⊙ stars. The parametric models include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetised stellar winds, specific dynamo and mass-loss rate prescriptions, as well as core-envelope decoupling. We compare model predictions to the distributions of rotational periods measured for low-mass stars belonging to star-forming regions and young open clusters. Furthermore, we explore the mass dependence of model parameters by comparing these new models to the solar-mass models we developed earlier. Results: Rotational evolution models are computed for slow, median, and fast rotators at each stellar mass. The models reproduce reasonably well the rotational behaviour of low-mass stars between 1 Myr and 8-10 Gyr, including pre-main sequence to zero-age main sequence spin up, prompt zero-age main sequence spin down, and early-main sequence convergence of the surface rotation rates. Fast rotators are found to have systematically shorter disk lifetimes than moderate and slow rotators, thus enabling dramatic pre-main sequence spin up. They also have shorter core-envelope coupling timescales, i.e., more uniform internal rotation. As for the mass dependence, lower mass stars require significantly longer core-envelope coupling timescales than solar-type stars, which results in strong differential rotation developing in the stellar interior on the early main sequence. Lower mass stars also require a weaker braking torque to account for their longer spin-down timescale on the early main sequence, while they ultimately converge towards lower rotational velocities than solar-type stars in the longer term

  16. Daily and seasonal performance of angularly dependent fixed mount dual aperture holographic planar concentrator photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Juan M.; Castillo, Jose E.; Aspnes, Eric D.; Kostuk, Raymond K.; Rosenberg, Glenn

    2010-08-01

    Dual aperture holographic planar concentrator (DA-HPC) technology consists of bifacial cells separated by strips of holographic film that diffract the light from the spacing into the cells for direct incident, diffuse, roof-reflected and albedo irradiance. The holographic film is angularly dependent of the seasonal sun angle. DA-HPC modules are compared to single aperture conventional modules for clear and cloudy days as well as for a seasonal period of eight months. Direct-current IV and alternating-current power curves are used to compare modules with comparable silicon active area and cell efficiency.

  17. Angular dependence of the attosecond time delay in the H 2 + ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, Anatoli; Serov, Vladislav

    2016-05-01

    Angular dependence of attosecond time delay relative to polarization of light can now be measured using combination of RABBITT and COLTRIMS techniques. This dependence brings particularly useful information in molecules where it is sensitive to the orientation of the molecular axis. Here we extend the theoretical studies of and consider a molecular ion H2+in combination of an attosecond pulse train and a dressing IR field which is a characteristic set up of a RABBIT measurement. We solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a fast spherical Bessel transformation (SBT) for the radial variable, a discrete variable representation for the angular variables and a split-step technique for the time evolution. The use of SBT ensures correct phase of the wave function for a long time evolution which is especially important in time delay calculations. To speed up computations, we implement an expanding coordinate (EC) system which allows us to reach space sizes and time periods unavailable by other techniques. Australian Research Council DP120101805.

  18. Angular dependence of the FMR linewidth and the anisotropy of the relaxation time in iron garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, A. V.; Shvachko, Yu. N.; Ustinov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the problem of extracting the contribution of the anisotropy of relaxation to the angular dependence of the FMR linewidth and to the opportunity of determining the values of the parameters of relaxation. The results of the FMR study of films based on the yttrium iron garnet prepared by the method of liquid-phase epitaxy are given. The orientational dependence of the linewidth has been calculated using the traditional method of measuring an FMR spectrum and a method based on scanning at an angle to the resonance field for obtaining the minimum linewidth. A model for calculating the linewidth has been proposed that takes into account the anisotropy of the relaxation term in the equation of motion of the magnetic moment. The model leads to a dependence that agrees well with the experimental data, which makes it possible to state that the anisotropy of relaxation most likely takes place in the samples under consideration at the temperatures employed.

  19. Relation between the alignment dependence of coercive force decrease ratio and the angular dependence of coercive force of ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yutaka; Kitai, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Seiichi; Hoshijima, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The relation of the coercive force decrease ratio (CFDR) and the angular dependence of the coercive force (ADCF) of ferrite magnets and their temperature properties were investigated. When we compared that against the angle of the magnetization reverse area obtained from these calculation results, which was obtained from the Gaussian distribution of the grain alignment and the postulation that every grain follows the Kondorskii law or the 1/cos θ law, and against the angle of the reverse magnetization area calculated from the experiment CFDR data of these magnets, it was found that this latter expanded at room temperature, to 36° from the calculated angle, for magnet with α=0.96. It was also found that, as temperature increased from room temperature to 413 K, the angle of the reverse magnetization area of ferrite magnets obtained from the experiment data expanded from 36° to 41°. When we apply these results to the temperature properties of ADCF, it seems that the calculated ADCF could qualitatively and reasonably explain these temperature properties, even though the difference between the calculated angular dependence and the experimental data still exists in the high angle range. These results strongly suggest that the coercive force of these magnets is determined by the magnetic domain wall motion. The magnetic domain walls are strongly pinned at tilted grains, and when the domain walls are de-pinned from their pinning sites, the coercive force is determined.

  20. NEXAFS and XPS studies of nitrosyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Schio, Luca; Li, Cui; Monti, Susanna; Salén, Peter; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Feifel, Raimund; Alagia, Michele; Richter, Robert; Falcinelli, Stefano; Stranges, Stefano; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2015-04-14

    The electronic structure of nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) has been investigated in the gas phase by X-ray Photoelectron (XPS) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Cl 2p, Cl 2s, N 1s and O 1s edges in a combined experimental and theoretical study. The theoretical calculations at different levels of approximation predict ionization potential values in good agreement with the experimental data and allow us to assign the main features of the absorption spectra. An unexpected failure of the density functional model is, however, observed in the calculation of the Cl 2s binding energy, which is related to a large self-interaction error. Largely different photoabsorption cross-section patterns are experimentally observed in core excitations from the investigated quantum shells (n = 1, 2). This finding is confirmed by the oscillator strength distributions calculated at different absorption edges; in the case of the n = 2 shell the bands below the threshold are extremely weak and most of the absorption intensity is due to excitations in the continuum. PMID:25754872

  1. Inference of stress and texture from angular dependence of ultrasonic plate mode velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Smith, J. F.; Lee, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory for the angular dependence of the ultrasonic wave velocity in a symmetry plane of an orthorhombic, stressed material is presented. The two waves having polarizations in this plane are shown to have velocities which can be estimated from measurements of the SH sub 0 and S sub 0 guided modes of a thin plate: the relationship being exact for the SH sub 0 mode and requiring a 10% correction for the S sub 0 mode at long wavelength. It is then shown how stress and texture can be independently inferred from various features of the angular dependence of these two velocities. From the SH sub 0 data, the ability to determine the directions and differences in magnitudes of principal stresses is described and supported by experimental data on several materials. From a combination of the SH sub 0 and S sub 0 data, a procedure is proposed for determining the coefficients W sub 400, W sub 420 and W sub 440 of an expansion of the crystallite orientation distribution function in terms of generalized Legendre functions. Possible applications in process control are indicated.

  2. Tailoring Rydberg interactions via Förster resonances: state combinations, hopping and angular dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Gorniaczyk, Hannes; Tresp, Christoph; Mirgorodskiy, Ivan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Förster resonances provide a highly flexible tool to tune both the strength and the angular shape of interactions between two Rydberg atoms. We give a detailed explanation about how Förster resonances can be found by searching through a large range of possible quantum number combinations. We apply our search method to SS, SD and DD pair states of 87Rb with principal quantum numbers from 30 to 100, taking into account the fine structure splitting of the Rydberg states. We find various strong resonances between atoms with a large difference in principal quantum numbers. We quantify the strength of these resonances by introducing a figure of merit {\\tilde{C}}3 which is independent of the magnetic quantum numbers and geometry to classify the resonances by interaction strength. We further predict to what extent excitation exchange is possible on different resonances and point out limitations of the coherent hopping process. Finally, we discuss the angular dependence of the dipole–dipole interaction and its tunability near resonances.

  3. Angular-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations in Na0.48CoO2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F.; Liu, G. T.; Luo, J. L.; Wu, D.; Wang, N. L.; Xiang, T.

    2006-06-01

    We have measured the c -axis angular-dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) of a Na0.48CoO2 single crystal, with a magnetic field of 10T rotating within Co-O planes. Below the metal-insulator transition temperature at 40K , the AMR is dominated by a twofold oscillation due to the charge ordering. The fourfold and sixfold oscillations in AMR become pronounced below 25K . The presence of this fourfold oscillation is consistent with the picture proposed by Choy (cond-mat/0502164) that the Co lattice will split into two orthogonal sublattices with one occupied by Co3+ ions and the other by Co4+ ions in low temperatures. Embedded in these orthogonal sublattices, a hexagonal lattice, formed by Co4+ spins, leads to the sixfold oscillation in AMR.

  4. On the angular dependence and scattering model of polar mesospheric summer echoes at VHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Svenja; Stober, Gunter; Chau, Jorge L.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular dependence of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). Our results are based on multireceiver and multibeam observations using beam pointing directions with off-zenith angles up to 25° as well as on spatial correlation analysis (SCA) from vertical beam observations. We consider a beam filling effect at the upper and lower boundaries of PMSE in tilted beams, which determines the effective mean angle of arrival. Comparing the average power of the vertical beam to the oblique beams suggests that PMSE are mainly not as aspect sensitive as in contrast to previous studies. However, from SCA, times of enhanced correlation are found, indicating aspect sensitivity or a localized scattering mechanism. Our results suggest that PMSE consist of nonhomogeneous isotropic scattering and previously reported aspect sensitivity values might have been influenced by the inhomogeneous nature of PMSE.

  5. Versatile, high sensitivity, and automatized angular dependent vectorial Kerr magnetometer for the analysis of nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, J. M.; Lusche, R.; Ventura, J.; Fermento, R.; Carpinteiro, F.; Araujo, J. P.; Sousa, J. B.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2011-04-01

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometry is an indispensable, reliable, and one of the most widely used techniques for the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. Information, such as the magnitude of coercive fields or anisotropy strengths, can be readily obtained from MOKE measurements. We present a description of our state-of-the-art vectorial MOKE magnetometer, being an extremely versatile, accurate, and sensitivity unit with a low cost and comparatively simple setup. The unit includes focusing lenses and an automatized stepper motor stage for angular dependent measurements. The performance of the magnetometer is demonstrated by hysteresis loops of Co thin films displaying uniaxial anisotropy induced on growth, MnIr/CoFe structures exhibiting the so called exchange bias effect, spin valves, and microfabricated flux guides produced by optical lithography.

  6. Angular dependent potential for α-boron and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokatashkin, P.; Kuksin, A.; Yanilkin, A.

    2015-06-01

    Both quantum mechanical and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of α-boron are done at this work. Angular dependent interatomic potential (ADP) for boron is obtained using force-matching technique. Fitting data are based on ab initio results within  -20..100 GPa pressure range and temperatures up to 2000 K. Characteristics of α-boron, obtained using ADP potential such as bond lengths at equilibrium condition, bulk modulus, pressure-volume relations, Gruneisen coefficient, thermal expansion coefficient are in good agreement with both ab initio data, obtained in this work and known experimental data. As an example of application, the propagation of shock waves through a single crystal of α-boron is also explored by large-scale MD simulations.

  7. Unusual angular dependent magnetoresistance in single-crystalline Co/Pt bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Liang, J. H.; Sun, L.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of the single-crystalline Co/Pt(111) bilayers was studied systematically as a function of Co or Pt thickness at room temperature. For Co thickness dCo < 6 nm, the resistances with in-plane magnetization M parallel ( R∥ ) and transverse ( R⊥ ) to current and with a perpendicular M normal ( RP ) to film show the unconventional behavior of RP>R∥>R⊥ . This MR behavior can be attributed to the combination effect of spin Hall MR with RP≈R∥>R⊥ and the geometrical size effect. In addition, the angular dependent magnetoresistance behavior of the (111)-oriented Co/Pt bilayer shows striking difference with that of the (001)-oriented Co/Pt bilayer.

  8. Angular dependence of metamagnetic transitions in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, P.C.; Budko, S.L.; Cho, B.K.; Lacerda, A.; Farrell, D.; Johnston-Halperin, E.; Kalatsky, V.A.; Pokrovsky, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed measurements of M(2 K, H, {theta}) of HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, where {theta} is the angle that the applied field H makes with the [110] axis while remaining perpendicular to the crystallographic c axis, reveal three metamagnetic transitions with angular dependences H{sub c1}=(4.1{plus_minus}0.1 kG)/cos({theta}), H{sub c2}=8.4{plus_minus}0.2 kG/cos({phi}), and H{sub c3}=(6.6{plus_minus}0.2 kG)/sin({phi}), where {phi}={theta}{minus}45 is the angle from the [100] axis. The high-field saturated moment, M{sub sat}{approx}10{mu}{sub B}cos{theta} is consistent with the local moments being confined to the [110] direction. The locally saturated moments for fields between H{sub ci} (i=1,2,3) also manifest angular dependences that are consistent with combinations of local moments along [110] axes. Analysis of these data lead us to infer that the net distribution of moments is ({up_arrow}{down_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}) for H{lt}H{sub c1}, ({up_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{down_arrow}) for H{sub c1}{lt}H{lt}H{sub c2}, ({up_arrow}{up_arrow}{r_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{r_arrow}) for H{sub c2}{lt}H{lt}H{sub c3}, and ({up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}{up_arrow}) for H{gt}H{sub c3}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Angular radiation temperature simulation for time-dependent capsule drive prediction in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Longfei; Yang, Dong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Zhiwei; Li, Liling; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2015-02-15

    The x-ray drive on a capsule in an inertial confinement fusion setup is crucial for ignition. Unfortunately, a direct measurement has not been possible so far. We propose an angular radiation temperature simulation to predict the time-dependent drive on the capsule. A simple model, based on the view-factor method for the simulation of the radiation temperature, is presented and compared with the experimental data obtained using the OMEGA laser facility and the simulation results acquired with VISRAD code. We found a good agreement between the time-dependent measurements and the simulation results obtained using this model. The validated model was then used to analyze the experimental results from the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. More specifically, the variations of the peak radiation temperatures at different view angles with the albedo of the hohlraum, the motion of the laser spots, the closure of the laser entrance holes, and the deviation of the laser power were investigated. Furthermore, the time-dependent radiation temperature at different orientations and the drive history on the capsule were calculated. The results indicate that the radiation temperature from “U20W112” (named according to the diagnostic hole ID on the target chamber) can be used to approximately predict the drive temperature on the capsule. In addition, the influence of the capsule on the peak radiation temperature is also presented.

  10. NEXAFS Study of Air Oxidation for Mg Nanoparticle Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, S.; Murakami, S.; Shirai, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Ohta, T.; Yagi, S.

    2013-03-01

    The air oxidation reaction of Mg nanoparticle thin film has been investigated by Mg K-edge NEXAFS technique. It is revealed that MgO is formed on the Mg nanoparticle surfaces at the early stage of the air oxidation for Mg nanoparticle thin film. The simulation of NEXAFS spectrum using standard spectra indicates the existence of complex magnesium carbonates (x(MgCO3).yMg(OH2).z(H2O)) in addition to MgO at the early stage of the air oxidation.

  11. A study of the angular dependence problem in effective dose equivalent assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.G.; Reece, W.D.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1995-02-01

    The newly revised American National Standard N13.11 (1993) includes measurements of angular response as part of personnel dosimeter performance testing. However, data on effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), the principle limiting quantity defined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 26 and later adopted by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for radiation incident on the body from off-normal angles are little seen in the literature. The absence of scientific data has led to unnecessarily conservative approaches in radiation protection practices. This paper presents a new set of fluence-to-H{sub E} conversion factors as a function of radiation angles and sex for monoenergetic photon beams of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV. A Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP) and sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms were used in this study. Results indicate that Anterior-posterior (AP) exposure produces the highest H{sub E} per unit photon fluence in all cases. Posterior-anterior (PA) exposure produces the highest H{sub E} among beams incident from the rear half-plane of the body. H{sub E} decreases dramatically as one departs from the AP and PA orientations. Results also indicate that overestimations caused by using isotropic dosimeters in assessing effective dose equivalent from near-overhead and near-underfoot exposures are 550%, 390%, and 254% for 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV, respectively. Comparisons of the angular dependence of H{sub E} with those based on the secondary quantities defined in International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Reports 39, 43, and 47 show significant differences. This paper discusses why more accurate assessments of H{sub E} are necessary and possible. An empirical equation is proposed which can be used as the optimum dosimeter angular response function for radiation angles ranging from 0{degrees} to 90{degrees} for dosimeter calibration, performance testing, and design. 27 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (δFC) and zero-field-cooled (δZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher δ-ratio (δ = δFC/δZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower δ-ratio, larger δFC and δZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  13. Modeling angular-dependent spectral emissivity of snow and ice in the thermal infrared atmospheric window.

    PubMed

    Hori, Masahiro; Aoki, Teruo; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sugiura, Konosuke; Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Niwano, Masashi

    2013-10-20

    A model of angular-dependent emissivity spectra of snow and ice in the 8-14 μm atmospheric window is constructed. Past field research revealed that snow emissivity varies depending on snow grain size and the exitance angle. Thermography images acquired in this study further revealed that not only welded snow particles such as sun crust, but also disaggregated particles such as granular snow and dendrite crystals exhibit high reflectivity on their crystal facets, even when the bulk snow surface exhibits blackbody-like behavior as a whole. The observed thermal emissive behaviors of snow particles suggest that emissivity of the bulk snow surface can be expressed by a weighted sum of two emissivity components: those of the specular and blackbody surfaces. Based on this assumption, a semi-empirical emissivity model was constructed; it is expressed by a linear combination of specular and blackbody surfaces' emissivities with a weighting parameter characterizing the specularity of the bulk surface. Emissivity spectra calculated using the model succeeded in reproducing the past in situ measured directional spectra of various snow types by employing a specific weighting parameter for each snow type. PMID:24216578

  14. A filter for reducing the angular dependence of LiF; Ti, Mg for beta radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports on an improvement in the angular dependence of LiF:Ti,Mg (TAD-100) for beta radiation which was achieved by using a special filter design which produced a constant dosimeter response over a range of +70{degrees} and {minus}70{degrees}. The filter material used was acetate. The filter design was tested with three different beta sources, Sr/Y-90, Tl-204 and Pm-147 with average energies of 0.8, 0.24 and 0.06 MeV, respectively. The average response at 180 degrees of the new filtered dosimeter differed by less than 5% when compared to the response at zero degrees. An average decrease in sensitivity of 53% for Sr-90, 70% for Tl-204 and 67% for Pm-147 was obtained due to filter use. All doses were calculated for a depth dose in tissue of 0.07 mm equivalent to 7 mg/cm{sup 2} as is recommended in ICRP Publication 26. A comparison of the energy dependence for a bare TAD-100 at 0.0 mm and 0.07 mm depth in tissue was obtained.

  15. An Analysis of the NEXAFS Spectra of a molecular crystal: alpha-Glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2010-06-18

    The nitrogen K-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectrum of alpha-crystalline glycine has been calculated for temperatures ranging from 0 K to 450 K. Significant temperature dependent spectral changes are predicted. The calculated room temperature spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. At high temperatures, molecular motions strongly influence the spectrum, as any unique spectrum from an individual instantaneous configuration does not resemble the experimental result or the average calculated spectrum; complex coupled motions in this prototypical molecular crystal underlie the observed spectral changes.

  16. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. Methods: The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. Results: No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433–0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42–2.58 g/cm{sup 3} and relative sensitivity of 0.92–1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. Conclusions: When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92–1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm{sup 3}. The angular dependence is not related to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  17. Tomographic imaging of the angular-dependent coherent-scatter cross section.

    PubMed

    Westmore, M S; Fenster, A; Cunningham, I A

    1997-01-01

    A new special-purpose computed tomographic (CT) imaging system is described which produces images based on measurements of the low-angle (0-10 degrees) x-ray diffraction properties of an object. Low-angle scatter in the diagnostic x-ray energy range is dominated by coherent scatter, and the system uses first-generation CT geometry to acquire a diffraction pattern for each pencil beam. The patterns are used to reconstruct a series of images which represent the coherent-scatter intensity at a series of scatter angles. To demonstrate the potential of coherent-scatter CT (CSCT), the scanner has been built and used to image a phantom consisting of a water-filled Lucite cylinder containing rods of polyethylene, Lucite, polycarbonate, and nylon. In this paper, the system is described and a sequence of CSCT images of this phantom is shown. Coherent-scatter cross sections of these materials are generated for each pixel from this sequence of images and compared with cross sections measured separately. The resulting excellent agreement shows that the angular-dependent coherent-scatter cross section can be accurately imaged in a tomographic slice through an object. These cross sections give material-specific information about the object. The long-term goal of this research is to make measurements of bone-mineral content for every pixel in a tomographic slice. PMID:9029536

  18. Angular Dependence of the Sharply Directed Emission in Organic Light Emitting Diodes with a Microcavity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Laih, Li-Hong; Lin, Chia-Ju; Hsu, Yu-Jen

    2002-04-01

    An optical microcavity structure was used in organic light emitting diodes. We succeeded in fabricating a device with sharply directed emission vertical to an emission surface. The device shows green emission (bright green) at normal position which turns red (bright red) at the 30° position. The angular dependences of the electroluminescence and the emission patterns versus viewing angle in the microcavity OLED were studied. The resonance wavelength λ decreases with viewing angle. The emission peak at 490 nm is directed vertically to the device surface more sharply than that at 632 nm. The microcavity structure shows non-Lambertian emission. The spectra appear more blue off-axis and the intensity of the green-like emission decreases rapidly with increasing viewing angle. A significantly narrow linewidth of 7.4 nm in the 0° direction for the 490 nm peak was observed. The full-widths at half maximum (FWHM) of the green-like spectra are much smaller than those of the red-like ones, indicating better cavity quality.

  19. Angular Dependence of the Facular-Sunspot Coverage Relation as Derived by MDI Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscuoli, S.

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the variation over the solar magnetic activity cycle of the area of facular/network features identified from broad-band and narrow-band imagery is positively correlated with the sunspot area and number, the relation being described as either linear or quadratic. On the other hand, the temporal variation of the spatial distributions of faculae, network and sunspots follows patterns that are less obviously correlated, so that we expect the relation that describes variation of the area coverage of different types of magnetic features to vary with the position over the disk. In this work we employ Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI) full-disk magnetograms acquired during solar cycle 23 and at the beginning of cycle 24 to investigate the relation between the coverage of magnetic elements characterized by different amounts of magnetic flux and located at different angular distances from disk center with the sunspot number. In agreement with some previous studies we find that daily data are best described by a quadratic function while data averaged over six months are best described by a linear function. In both cases the coefficients of the fits show large dependence on the position over the disk and the magnetic flux. We also find that toward disk center six-month averaged data show asymmetries between the ascending and the descending phases. The implications for solar irradiance modeling are discussed.

  20. Angular Dependence of the Facular-Sunspot Coverage Relation as Derived by MDI Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscuoli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the variation over the solar magnetic activity cycle of the area of facular/network features identified from broad-band and narrow-band imagery is positively correlated with the sunspot area and number, the relation being described as either linear or quadratic. On the other hand, the temporal variation of the spatial distributions of faculae, network and sunspots follows patterns that are less obviously correlated, so that we expect the relation that describes variation of the area coverage of different types of magnetic features to vary with the position over the disk. In this work we employ Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI) full-disk magnetograms acquired during solar cycle 23 and at the beginning of cycle 24 to investigate the relation between the coverage of magnetic elements characterized by different amounts of magnetic flux and located at different angular distances from disk center with the sunspot number. In agreement with some previous studies we find that daily data are best described by a quadratic function while data averaged over six months are best described by a linear function. In both cases the coefficients of the fits show large dependence on the position over the disk and the magnetic flux. We also find that toward disk center six-month averaged data show asymmetries between the ascending and the descending phases. The implications for solar irradiance modeling are discussed.

  1. Light Scattering by Fractal Dust Aggregates. I. Angular Dependence of Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Ryo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Kataoka, Akimasa; Nomura, Hideko

    2016-06-01

    In protoplanetary disks, micron-sized dust grains coagulate to form highly porous dust aggregates. Because the optical properties of these aggregates are not completely understood, it is important to investigate how porous dust aggregates scatter light. In this study, the light scattering properties of porous dust aggregates were calculated using a rigorous method, the T-matrix method, and the results were then compared with those obtained using the Rayleigh–Gans–Debye (RGD) theory and Mie theory with the effective medium approximation (EMT). The RGD theory is applicable to moderately large aggregates made of nearly transparent monomers. This study considered two types of porous dust aggregates—ballistic cluster–cluster agglomerates (BCCAs) and ballistic particle–cluster agglomerates. First, the angular dependence of the scattered intensity was shown to reflect the hierarchical structure of dust aggregates; the large-scale structure of the aggregates is responsible for the intensity at small scattering angles, and their small-scale structure determines the intensity at large scattering angles. Second, it was determined that the EMT underestimates the backward scattering intensity by multiple orders of magnitude, especially in BCCAs, because the EMT averages the structure within the size of the aggregates. It was concluded that the RGD theory is a very useful method for calculating the optical properties of BCCAs.

  2. A comparison of the angular dependence of effective dose and effective dose equivalent

    SciTech Connect

    Sitek, M.A.; Gierga, D.P.; Xu, X.G.

    1996-06-01

    In ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) Publication 60, the set of critical organs and their weighing factors were changed, defining the quantity effective dose, E. This quantity replaced the effective dose equivalent, H{sub E}, as defined by ICRP 26. Most notably, the esophagus was added to the list of critical organs. The Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code MCNP was used to determine the effective dose to sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms, developed in previous research, were modified to include the esophagus. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for monoenergetic photon beams of energies 0.08 MeV, 0.3 MeV, and 1.0 MeV for various azimuthal and polar angles. Separate organ equivalent doses were determined for male and female phantoms. The resulting organ equivalent doses were calculated from arithmetic mean averages. The angular dependence of effective dose was compared with that of effective dose equivalent reported in previous research. The differences between the two definitions and possible implications to regulatory agencies were summarized.

  3. Angular dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter and its impact on in vivo surface dose measurement in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Qin, S; Chen, T; Wang, L; Tu, Y; Yue, N; Zhou, J

    2014-08-01

    The focus of this study is the angular dependence of two types of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters (MOSFET20 and OneDose/OneDosePlus) when used for surface dose measurements. External beam radiationat different gantry angles were delivered to a cubic solid water phantom with a MOSFET placed on the top surface at CAX. The long axis of the MOSFET was oriented along the gantry axis of rotation, with the dosimeter (bubble side) facing the radiation source. MOSFET-measured surface doses were compared against calibrated radiochromic film readings. It was found that both types of MOSFET dosimeters exhibited larger than previously reported angular dependence when measuring surface dose in beams at large oblique angles. For the MOSFET20 dosimeter the measured surface dose deviation against film readings was as high as 17% when the incident angle was 72 degrees to the norm of the phantom surface. It is concluded that some MOSFET dosimeters may have a strong angular dependence when placed on the surface of water-equivalent material, even though they may have an isotropic angular response when surrounded by uniform medium. Extra on-surface calibration maybe necessary before using MOSFET dosimeters for skin dose measurement in tangential fields. PMID:24206205

  4. Measurement of Neutron-Induced, Angular-Momentum-Dependent Fission Probabilities Direct Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Jovanovic, Igor; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The surrogate method has previously been used to successfully measure (n , f) cross sections of a variety of difficult to produce actinide isotopes. These measurements are inaccurate at excitation energies below 1.5 MeV where the distribution of angular momentum states populated in the compound nucleus created by neutron absorption significantly differs from that arising from direct reactions. A method to measure the fission probability of individual angular momentum states arising from 239 Pu(d , pf) and 239 Pu(α ,α' f) reactions has been developed. This method consists on charged particle detectors with 40 keV FWHM resolution at 13 angles up and downstream of the beam. An array of photovoltaic (solar) cells is used to measure the angular distribution of fission fragments with high angular resolution. This distribution uniquely identifies the populated angular momentum states. These are fit to expected distributions to determine the contribution of each state. The charged particle and fission matrix obtained from these measurements determines fission probabilities of specific angular momentum states in the transition nucleus. Development of this scheme and first results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number 2012-DN-130-NF0001.

  5. Tunable angular-dependent magnetoresistance correlations in magnetic films and their implications for spin Hall magnetoresistance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. K.; Zhang, Y.; Gu, L.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, L.

    2016-02-01

    Angular-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) is considered to be intrinsic to spintronic materials, represented by the classical anisotropic MR (AMR) phenomenon and the recently emerged spin Hall MR (SMR). So far, isotropic AMR, AMR with geometric size effect and interfacial effect, and SMR have been treated separately to explain distinct MR correlations observed in various systems. Current study shows all four types of MR correlations can be reproduced in Fe thin films depending on the film thickness, texture, interface, and morphology. Results suggest previous explanations of the thin-film MR correlations are incomplete and it is inappropriate to use a specific MR angular-dependent correlation as the sole criterion in determining the origin of AMR or ascertaining the exclusive existence of SMR.

  6. Surrogate Reaction Measurement of Angular Dependent 239Pu (n , f) Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Burke, Jason; Casperson, Robert; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    The surrogate method has previously been used to measure (n , f) cross sections of difficult to produce actinide isotopes. These measurements have inaccuracies at excitation energies below 1.5 MeV where the distribution of angular momentum states populated in the compound nucleus created by neutron absorption significantly differs from that arising from direct reactions. A method to measure the fission probability of individual angular momentum states arising from 239Pu (d , pf) and 239Pu (α ,α' f) reactions has been developed. This experimental apparatus consists of charged particle detectors with 40 keV FWHM resolution at 13 angles up and downstream of the particle beam. A segmented array of photovoltaic (solar) cells is used to measure the angular distribution of fission fragments. This distribution uniquely identifies the populated angular momentum states. These are fit to expected distributions to determine the contribution of each state. The charged particle and fission rates matrix obtained from this analysis determines fission probabilities of specific angular momentum states in the transition nucleus. Development of this scheme and first results will be discussed.

  7. TXM-NEXAFS of TiO2-Based Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, P.; Bittencourt, C.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Umek, P.; Arcon, D.; Ewels, C. P.; Rehbein, S.; Heim, S.; Schneider, G.

    2011-09-01

    In this work, electronic properties of individual TiOx-pristine nanoribbons (NR) prepared by hydrothermal treatment of anatase TiO2 micro-particles were studied using the HZB transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) at the BESSY II undulator beamline U41-FSGM. NEXAFS is ideally suited to study TiO2-based materials because both the O K-edge and Ti L-edge features are very sensitive to the local bonding environment, providing diagnostic information about the crystal structures and oxidation states of various forms of titanium oxides and sub-oxides. TXM-NEXAFS combines full-field x-ray microscopy with spectroscopy, allowing the study of the electronic structure of individual nanostructures with spatial resolution better than 25 nm and a spectral resolution of up to E/ΔE = 10000. The typical image field in TXM-NEXAFS measurements is about 10 μm×10 μm, which is large compared to the individual nanoparticle. Therefore, one image stack already contains statistically significant data. In addition, the directional electric field vector (Ē) of the x-rays can be used as a "search tool" for the direction of chemical bonds of the atom selected by its absorption edge.

  8. Probing the anisotropic behaviors of black phosphorus by transmission electron microscopy, angular-dependent Raman spectra, and electronic transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wanglin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Fei, Zhen; Zhou, Jianguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Ze

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we correlated the angular dependence of the Raman response of black phosphorus to its crystallographic orientation by using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the intensity of the Ag 2 mode reached a maximum when the polarization direction of the incident light was parallel to the zigzag crystallographic orientation. Notably, it was further confirmed that the zigzag crystallographic direction exhibited superior conductance and carrier mobility. Because of the lattice extension along the armchair direction, an intensification of the anisotropic Raman response was observed. This work provides direct evidence of the correlation between anisotropic properties and crystallographic direction and represents a turning point in the discussion of the angular-dependent electronic properties of black phosphorus.

  9. Di-Hadron Angular Correlation Dependence on Leading Hadron Identity in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauder, Kolja

    A unique state of matter is created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). It displays the properties of a near-perfect liquid of quarks and gluons (partons) interacting collectively via the strong force. Properties of this medium can be explored using high-energy probes created in the form of back-to-back pairs (jets) in hard scatterings. A distinct feature of the QGP is jet quenching, which describes the large energy loss of such probes observed in measurements of hadron distributions in head-on heavy ion collisions. A more differential measurement of jet quenching is achieved using di-hadron correlations, where relative angular distributions are studied with respect to a leading (high energy) "trigger" hadron. Two striking features found in di-hadron correlations are the emergence of a long-range plateau on the near-side (at small relative azimuth), the so-called "ridge", and a broadening and deformation of the away-side, back to back with the trigger. Using 200 GeV central gold-gold and minimum bias deuteron-gold collision data collected by the STAR detector at RHIC, a systematic study of the dependence of di-hadron correlation structures on the identity of the trigger particle is carried out in this work by statistically separating pion from non-pion (i.e. proton and kaon) triggers, offering new insights into the hadronization mechanisms in the QGP. The jet-like yield at small relative angles is found enhanced for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference, while leading non-pions (protons and kaons) do not elicit such an enhancement. These findings are discussed within the context of quark recombination. At large angles, the correlated yield is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. Parameters extracted from two-dimensional model fits are used to test consistency with the constituent quark scaling assumptions

  10. Angular Dependence of Transport AC Losses in Superconducting Wire with Position-Dependent Critical Current Density in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xing-liang; Xiong, Li-ting; Gao, Yuan-wen; Zhou, You-he

    2013-07-01

    Transport AC losses play a very important role in high temperature superconductors (HTSs), which usually carry AC transport current under applied magnetic field in typical application-like conditions. In this paper, we propose the analytical formula for transport AC losses in HTS wire by considering critical current density of both inhomogeneous and anisotropic field dependent. The angular dependence of critical current density is described by effective mass theory, and the HTS wire has inhomogeneous distribution cross-section of critical current density. We calculate the angular dependence of normalized AC losses under different DC applied magnetic fields. The numerical results of this formula agree well with the experiment data and are better than the results of Norris formula. This analytical formula can explain the deviation of experimental transport current losses from the Norris formula and apply to calculate transport AC losses in realistic practical condition.

  11. Irreversible evolution of angular-dependent coercivity in Fe80Ni20 nanowire arrays: Detection of a single vortex state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhani, M.; Ramazani, A.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Samanifar, S.; Montazer, A. H.

    2016-09-01

    The irreversible evolution of magnetic coercivity in arrays of 75 nm diameter Fe80Ni20 nanowires (NWs) has been explored by means of first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis as a function of the angle between the magnetic field and the NW axis (0°≤θ≤90°). The Fe80Ni20 NWs with lengths up to 60 μm were fabricated using a pulsed electrodeposition method into hard-anodic aluminum oxide templates with an interpore distance of 275 nm. Investigating the interwire and intrawire magnetostatic interactions, the angular FORC (AFORC) diagrams indicated enhanced intrawire interactions with increasing length and θ (<90°), induced by a magnetization reversal through vortex domain wall (VDW) propagation. Intriguingly, in addition to the VDW mode, a single vortex state with broad irreversible switching of nucleation and annihilation fields was detected at θ=83° for 60 μm long NWs. At θ=90°, the NWs reversed magnetization through transverse domain wall, involving a reversible component by a fraction of 95%. Furthermore, the transition angle between the reversal modes was found to decrease with increasing aspect ratio from 200 to 800. The irreversible angular-dependent coercivity (HcIrrev(θ)) of Fe80Ni20 NWs was extracted from the AFORC measurements and compared with the major angular dependence of coercivity (HcMajor(θ)) obtained from the conventional hysteresis loop measurements. While HcMajor(θ) showed a non-monotonic behavior, HcIrrev(θ) constantly increased with increasing θ (<90°). On the other hand, using analytical models, a 93% agreement was obtained between the theoretical angular-dependent nucleation field and experimental HcIrrev(θ) for irreversible switching of VDW when 0°≤θ≤86°.

  12. Angular dependence of pump-induced bottomside and topside ionospheric plasma turbulence at EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, M. J.; MjøLhus, E.; Ashrafi, M.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T.; Nozawa, S.

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally observe the location and angular size of the high-frequency (HF) radio window in the bottomside ionosphere, which permits radio wave propagation to the topside ionosphere, with high angular resolution at the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) facility. HF pump-induced ion line enhancements were observed by the EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar on the ionospheric bottomside and topside. The radar zenith angle was scanned in small steps in the magnetic meridian. The HF pump duty cycle was deliberately kept low enough to minimize the growth of artificial field-aligned irregularities. The locations of the bottomside radio window and topside enhanced radar echoes are consistent with the expected position determined by ray tracing performed using the observed plasma densities.

  13. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T{sub c}-films

    SciTech Connect

    Geerkens, A.; Frenck, H.J.; Ewert, S.

    1994-12-31

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T{sub c}-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle {Theta} between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the {Theta}-rotation plane is discussed.

  14. Angular dependence of optical scattering in mixed nematic-cholesteric liquid crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oron, N.; Yu, J. L.; Labes, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The basic ternary cholesteric mixture used in the investigations reported contained by weight 1.1 parts of cholesteryl chloride, 0.9 parts of cholesteryl nonanoate, and 2.0 parts cholesteryl oleyl carbonate. Samples were prepared by adding a nematic dopant to the cholesteric mixture. Measurements of the wavelength of maximum scattering at different angles for the doped samples show that the angular color distortion is reduced with increasing concentrations of nematic dopant.

  15. RADIUS-DEPENDENT ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN LOW-MASS STARS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, Ansgar; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2012-02-10

    Angular momentum evolution in low-mass stars is determined by initial conditions during star formation, stellar structure evolution, and the behavior of stellar magnetic fields. Here we show that the empirical picture of angular momentum evolution arises naturally if rotation is related to magnetic field strength instead of to magnetic flux and formulate a corrected braking law based on this. Angular momentum evolution then becomes a strong function of stellar radius, explaining the main trends observed in open clusters and field stars at a few Gyr: the steep transition in rotation at the boundary to full convection arises primarily from the large change in radius across this boundary and does not require changes in dynamo mode or field topology. Additionally, the data suggest transient core-envelope decoupling among solar-type stars and field saturation at longer periods in very low mass stars. For solar-type stars, our model is also in good agreement with the empirical Skumanich law. Finally, in further support of the theory, we show that the predicted age at which low-mass stars spin down from the saturated to unsaturated field regimes in our model corresponds remarkably well to the observed lifetime of magnetic activity in these stars.

  16. Monte Carlo study of the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Klein, David; Beddar, A. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: By using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors investigated the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in photon beams. Methods: Three PSDs were modeled in this study: A plastic scintillator (BC-400) and a scintillating fiber (BCF-12), both attached by a plastic-core optical fiber stem, and a plastic scintillator (BC-400) attached by an air-core optical fiber stem with a silica tube coated with silver. The authors then calculated, with low statistical uncertainty, the energy and angular dependences of the PSDs’ responses in a water phantom. For energy dependence, the response of the detectors is calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose. The perturbation caused by the optical fiber stem connected to the PSD to guide the optical light to a photodetector was studied in simulations using different optical fiber materials. Results: For the energy dependence of the PSDs in photon beams, the PSDs with plastic-core fiber have excellent energy independence within about 0.5% at photon energies ranging from 300 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD with an air-core optical fiber with a silica tube also has good energy independence within 1% in the same photon energy range. For the angular dependence, the relative response of all the three modeled PSDs is within 2% for all the angles in a 6 MV photon beam. This is also true in a 300 keV monoenergetic photon beam for PSDs with plastic-core fiber. For the PSD with an air-core fiber with a silica tube in the 300 keV beam, the relative response varies within 1% for most of the angles, except in the case when the fiber stem is pointing right to the radiation source in which case the PSD may over-response by more than 10%. Conclusions: At ±1% level, no beam energy correction is necessary for the response of all three PSDs modeled in this study in the photon energy ranges from 200 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD would be even closer

  17. Angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment topolyatomic molecules: application to the 2B1 metastable state of the H2Oand H2S anions

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2006-01-12

    The angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to polyatomic targets is formulated in the local complex potential model, under the assumption that the axial recoil approximation describes the dissociation dynamics. An additional approximation, which is found to be valid in the case of H2O but not in the case of H2S, makes it possible to describe the angular dependence of DEA solely from an analysis of the fixed-nuclei entrance amplitude, without carrying out nuclear dynamics calculations. For H2S, the final-vibrational-state-specific angular dependence of DEA is obtained by incorporating the variation of the angular dependence of the entrance amplitude with nuclear geometry into the nuclear dynamics. Scattering calculations using the complex Kohn method and, for H2S, full quantum calculations of the nuclear dynamics using the Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree method, are performed.

  18. Investigation on the angular dependent reflectance of coupled high-contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroker, Stefanie; Käsebier, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    In this contribution we discuss configurations of stacked silicon high contrast gratings (HCGs) which are separated by a thin silicon dioxide grating such that they are coupled via their near-fields. For a given configuration altering incidence angle allows to either benefit from the optical performance of two separated HCGs or one single grating with enhanced thickness. This effect can serve to realize filters with tailored optical properties and for diffractive cavity couplers. We experimentally demonstrate the coupling effect on a stack of two HCGs for a wavelength of 1550nm and transverse-magnetic polarization. The investigated structure provides a nearly angular independent high reflectance.

  19. Aging induced changes on NEXAFS fingerprints in individual combustion particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, V.; Mooser, R.; Tritscher, T.; Křepelová, A.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Huthwelker, T.; Ammann, M.

    2011-11-01

    Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political) importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing of the combustion exhaust gases is still a subject of discussion. In this work, individual soot particles emitted from two different vehicles, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger car, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of NEXAFS spectra from the unprocessed particles and those resulting from exhaust photooxidation in the chamber revealed changes in the carbon functional group content. For the wood stove emissions, these changes were minor, related to the relatively mild oxidation conditions. For the EURO 2 transporter emissions, the most apparent change was that of carboxylic carbon from oxidized organic compounds condensing on the primary soot particles. For the EURO 3 car emissions oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging has likely contributed as well. Overall, the changes in the NEXAFS fingerprints were in qualitative agreement with data from an aerosol mass spectrometer. Furthermore, by taking full advantage of our in situ microreactor concept, we show that the soot particles from all three combustion sources changed their ability to take up water under humid conditions upon photochemical aging of the exhaust. Due to the selectivity and sensitivity of the NEXAFS technique for the water mass, also small amounts of water taken up into the internal voids of agglomerated particles could be

  20. Response of semicircular canal dependent units in vestibular nuclei to rotation of a linear acceleration vector without angular acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Benson, A. J.; Guedry, F. E.; Jones, G. Melvill

    1970-01-01

    1. Recent experiments have shown that rotation of a linear acceleration vector round the head can generate involuntary ocular nystagmus in the absence of angular acceleration. The present experiments examine the suggestion that adequate stimulation of the semicircular canals may contribute to this response. 2. Decerebrate cats were located in a stereotaxic device on a platform, slung from four parallel cables, which could be driven smoothly round a circular orbit without inducing significant angular movement of the platform. This Parallel Swing Rotation (PSR) generated a centripetal acceleration of 4·4 m/sec2 which rotated round the head at 0·52 rev/sec. 3. The discharge frequency of specifically lateral canal-dependent neural units in the vestibular nuclei of cats was recorded during PSR to right and left, and in the absence of motion. The dynamic responses to purely angular motion were also examined on a servo-driven turntable. 4. Without exception all proven canal-dependent cells examined (twenty-nine cells in nine cats) were more active during PSR in the direction of endolymph circulation assessed to be excitatory to the unit, than during PSR in the opposite direction. 5. The observed changes in discharge frequency are assessed to have been of a magnitude appropriate for the generation of the involuntary oculomotor response induced by the same stimulus in the intact animal. 6. The findings suggest that a linear acceleration vector which rotates in the plane of the lateral semicircular canals can be an adequate stimulus to ampullary receptors, though an explanation which invokes the modulation of canal cells by a signal dependent upon the sequential activation of macular receptors cannot be positively excluded. PMID:5501270

  1. Angular dependent torque measurements on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Gao, B.; Ma, Y. H.; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    2016-08-01

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF (Ca1 1 1 1) single crystals. In the normal state, the torque data shows \\sin 2θ angular dependence and H 2 magnetic field dependence, as a result of paramagnetism. In the mixed state, the torque signal is a combination of the vortex torque and paramagnetic torque, and the former allows the determination of the anisotropy parameter γ. At T   =  11.5 K, γ (11.5 K ≃ 0.5 T c)  =  19.1, which is similar to the result of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2, γ ≃ 23 at T≃ 0.4{{T}\\text{c}} . So the 11 1 1 is more anisotropic compared to 11 and 122 families of iron-based superconductors. This may suggest that the electronic coupling between layers in 1 1 1 1 is less effective than in 11 and 122 families.

  2. Angular dependent torque measurements on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Gao, B; Ma, Y H; Li, X J; Mu, G; Hu, T

    2016-08-17

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF (Ca1 1 1 1) single crystals. In the normal state, the torque data shows [Formula: see text] angular dependence and H (2) magnetic field dependence, as a result of paramagnetism. In the mixed state, the torque signal is a combination of the vortex torque and paramagnetic torque, and the former allows the determination of the anisotropy parameter γ. At T   =  11.5 K, γ (11.5 K ≃ 0.5 T c)  =  19.1, which is similar to the result of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2, [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. So the 11 1 1 is more anisotropic compared to 11 and 122 families of iron-based superconductors. This may suggest that the electronic coupling between layers in 1 1 1 1 is less effective than in 11 and 122 families. PMID:27346165

  3. Angular dependence in proton-proton correlation functions in central 40Ca + 40Ca and 48Ca + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, V.; Kilburn, M. A.; Chajęcki, Z.; Henzlova, D.; Lynch, W. G.; Brown, D.; Chbihi, A.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Danielewicz, P.; Desouza, R. T.; Famiano, M.; Herlitzius, C.; Hudan, S.; Lee, Jenny; Lukyanov, S.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sobotka, L. G.; Sun, Z. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Vander Molen, A.; Verde, G.; Wallace, M. S.; Youngs, M.

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of proton-proton correlation functions is studied in central 40Ca+40Ca and 48Ca+48Ca nuclear reactions at E/A=80 MeV. Measurements were performed with the High Resolution Array (HiRA) complemented by the 4π Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. A striking angular dependence in the laboratory frame is found within proton-proton correlation functions for both systems that greatly exceeds the measured and expected isospin dependent difference between the neutron-rich and neutron-deficient systems. Sources measured at backward angles reflect the participant zone of the reaction, while much larger sources observed at forward angles reflect the expanding, fragmenting, and evaporating projectile remnants. The decrease of the size of the source with increasing momentum is observed at backward angles while a weaker trend in the opposite direction is observed at forward angles. The results are compared to the theoretical calculations using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model.

  4. Angular dependences of the motion of the anisotropic flux line lattice and the peak effect in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.-J.; Lee, H.-S.; Kang, B.; Lee, H.-G.; Cho, M.-H.; Lee, S.-I.

    2008-12-01

    We have studied the angle-dependent motion of the anisotropic flux line lattice (FLL) and the peak effect (PE) in MgB2 single crystals. For arbitrary angles (θ), we measured the resistance (R(H)) and critical current (Ic(H)) with AC and DC currents, respectively. At low fields below the PE, R(H) and Ic(H) showed a weak angular dependence, regardless of the type of excitation current, because of the stable vortex state. At intermediate fields near the PE, R(H) and Ic(H) at the onset of the PE varied with θ, depending on the type of external current, due to the metastability of the disordered vortex lattice near the PE. At high fields above the PE and near the upper critical field Hc2, the R(H) curves showed a simple scaling behavior with θ.

  5. Angular dependence of electron emission induced by grazing-ion surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.; Otero, G. G.; Sánchez, E. A.; Grizzi, O.

    2004-04-01

    In this work, electron emission spectra produced by impact of fast protons on Al(111) surfaces are theoretically and experimentally studied. Contributions coming from the different electronic sources of the metal—atomic inner shells and valence band—are analyzed as a function of the angle of electron emission. In the forward direction, the inner-shell ionization process is the dominant mechanism. The valence emission, instead, becomes important when the ejection angle is separated from the specular-reflection direction. In both angular regions, theoretical and experimental values are in reasonable agreement. The energy shift and broadening of the convoy electron peak at glancing observation angles are well described by the present model, which takes into account the influence of the induced surface field on the ionized electron.

  6. Toward the measurement of angular dependence of in-plane ultrasonic properties of unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Boghosian, Jeffrey S.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2000-05-01

    Modern textile-based composite materials have complex fiber architectures, which present new challenges for ultrasonic characterization. As a step toward developing a measurement scheme for examining in detail the ultrasonic properties of textile composites, the present work addresses measurement of the angular dependence of the angular dependence of ultrasonic properties in unidirectional composite specimens. Cylindrical composite specimens of diameter 19 mm were fabricated, some with the fibers parallel to the cylinder axis and others with the fibers perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Additional specimens of varying diameters were made from acrylic. Small-diameter holes were drilled along the center axis of some specimens to serve as fiducial markers for the geometrical center of the cylinder. The measurement apparatus consisted of a ring of 100 matched transducers, spaced by 3.6°, facing the center of the ring. Each specimen was placed in turn at the center of the ring. Transmission measurements of attenuation and sound speed were performed by transmitting and receiving using pairs of transducers opposite each other on the ring. Backscattered waves were measured by transmitting and receiving with each transducer alone. The ultrasonic backscatter, attenuation and speed measured along a diameter of the cylinders were found to qualitatively and quantitatively match values measured in flat specimens. Angular "scattering" measurements were made by transmitting with one transducer and receiving with all 100 transducers. Substantial ultrasonic signals were generated in the "scattered" waves by phenomena related to the geometry of the cylindrical water/composite or water/acrylic interfaces, and at several angles these overlapped the desired scattered waves arising from the center of the cylinder.

  7. Asymmetric angular dependence of spin-transfer torques in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ling; Xu, Zhi-Jun; Zuo, Xian-Jun; Yang, Ze-Jin; Gao, Qing-He; Linghu, Rong-Feng; Guo, Yun-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Using a first-principles noncollinear wave-function-matching method, we studied the spin-transfer torques (STTs) in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe(001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), where three different types of B-doped MgO in the spacer are considered, including B atoms replacing Mg atoms (Mg3BO4), B atoms replacing O atoms (Mg4BO3), and B atoms occupying interstitial positions (Mg4BO4) in MgO. A strong asymmetric angular dependence of STT can be obtained both in ballistic CoFe/Mg3BO4 and CoFe/Mg4BO4 based MTJs, whereas a nearly symmetric STT curve is observed in the junctions based on CoFe/Mg4BO3. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the angular dependence of STT can be suppressed significantly by the disorder of B distribution. Such skewness of STTs in the CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe MTJs could be attributed to the interfacial resonance states induced by the B diffusion into MgO spacer.

  8. NEXAFS spectroscopy and site-specific fragmentation of N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, and N,N-dimethylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salén, Peter; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Schio, Luca; Feifel, Raimund; Richter, Robert; Alagia, Michele; Stranges, Stefano; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-06-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra measured at the C, N, and O K-edges for three molecules containing the amide moiety, N-methylformamide (HCONHCH3), N,N-dimethylformamide (HCON(CH3)2), and N,N-dimethylacetamide (CH3CON(CH3)2) are presented. These molecules have similar structures and differ by the number of methyl groups located at the molecular ends. The fragmentation of these molecules after resonant excitation at different K-edge resonances is also investigated, using a 3D-ion imaging time-of-flight spectrometer. A comparison between the molecules with respect to the relative contributions of the fragments created upon excitation at distinct resonances reveals site-specific fragmentation. Further information about the character of the core-excitation and dissociation process is obtained from the angular distributions of the ion fragments.

  9. Primary and Secondary Contributions to the Organic Aerosol Over the Amazon Determined by STXM-NEXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Sinha, B.; Artaxo, P.; Kilcoyne, D.; Smith, M. L.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the morphology and chemical composition of aerosol samples from a pristine tropical environment, the Amazon Basin, using Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy - Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (STXMNEXAFS) analysis. The NEXAFS spectra were used to estimate the elemental ratios of C, N and O, as well as the chemical bonding state of these elements. The aim of this study was to investigate the microphysical and chemical properties of a tropical background aerosol and its internal mixing state. The samples were collected in the Amazonian rainforest during the rainy season and can be regarded as a nearly pristine background aerosol. Lab-generated SOA-samples (produced by the (photo)oxidation of isoprene, alpha-pinene and beta-caryophyllene), microtome slices of fungal spores, and aerosolized authentic organic compounds were measured as reference samples. The STXM-NEXAFS results of the lab-generated SOA have been analyzed and compared to SOA from the Amazonian region. In the lab samples, SOA occurred as droplets of different sizes, sometimes exhibiting internal structures ('raisin-like' structure). The spectral characteristics of the lab samples depend on the precursors applied for their generation. The Amazonian aerosol was found to be dominated by drop-like organic particles in the fine mode (often in internal mixture with solid particles), and Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAP) in the coarse mode. Liquid organic aerosol coatings were also frequently observed on the PBAPs. Unexpectedly, many ambient SOA samples show a high content of N (around 20% or even more) as well as the frequent occurrence of potassium. Furthermore, the spectra exhibit characteristic signal patterns for different functional groups. In most cases, the spectrum near the C-edge is dominated by either the hydroxyl or the carboxylate signal, but prominent peaks for ketone carbonyls, alkanes and alkenes have also been observed. Based on these results, a new

  10. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  11. Comparison of the Angular Dependence of Monte Carlo Particle Transport Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Jeff; Guetersloh, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    Modeling nuclear interactions is relevant to cancer radiotherapy, space mission dosimetry and the use of heavy ion research beams. In heavy ion radiotherapy, fragmentation of the primary ions has the unwanted effect of reducing dose localization, contributing to a non-negligible dose outside the volume of tissue being treated. Fragmentation in spaceship walls, hardware and human tissue can lead to large uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk inside the crew habitat. Radiation protection mandates very conservative dose estimations, and reduction of uncertainties is critical to avoid limitations on allowed mission duration and maximize shielding design. Though fragment production as a function of scattering angle has not been well characterized, experimental simulation with Monte Carlo particle transport models have shown good agreement with data obtained from on-axis detectors with large acceptance angles. However, agreement worsens with decreasing acceptance angle, attributable in part to incorrect transverse momentum assumptions in the models. We will show there is an unacceptable angular discrepancy in modeling off-axis fragments produced by inelastic nuclear interaction of the primary ion. The results will be compared to published measurements of 400 MeV/nucleon carbon beams interacting in C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets.

  12. High-Throughput Analysis of Molecular Orientation on Surfaces by NEXAFS Imaging of Curved Sample Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy provides detailed information about the orientation and alignment of thin films. NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique—the availability of beam-time per user is typically limited to no more than a few weeks per year. The limited availability is currently a true barrier for using NEXAFS in combinatorial studies of molecular alignment. We have recently demonstrated how large area full field NEXAFS imaging allows users to pursue combinatorial studies of surface chemistry. Now we report an extension of this approach which allows the acquisition of orientation information from a single NEXAFS image. An array with 80 elements (samples), containing eight series of different surface modifications, was mounted on a curved substrate allowing the collection of NEXAFS spectra with a range of orientations with respect to the X-ray beam. Images collected from this array show how hyperspectral NEXAFS data collected from curved surfaces can be used for high-throughput molecular orientation analysis. PMID:25046426

  13. Angular dependence of the response of the nanoDot OSLD system for measurements at depth in clinical megavoltage beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; Dunn, Leon; Lye, Jessica E.; Kenny, John W.; Alves, Andrew D. C.; Cole, Andrew; Asena, Andre; Kron, Tomas; Williams, Ivan M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to assess the angular dependence of a commercial optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) dosimetry system in MV x-ray beams at depths beyondd{sub max} and to find ways to mitigate this dependence for measurements in phantoms. Methods: Two special holders were designed which allow a dosimeter to be rotated around the center of its sensitive volume. The dosimeter's sensitive volume is a disk, 5 mm in diameter and 0.2 mm thick. The first holder rotates the disk in the traditional way. It positions the disk perpendicular to the beam (gantry pointing to the floor) in the initial position (0°). When the holder is rotated the angle of the disk towards the beam increases until the disk is parallel with the beam (“edge on,” 90°). This is referred to as Setup 1. The second holder offers a new, alternative measurement position. It positions the disk parallel to the beam for all angles while rotating around its center (Setup 2). Measurements with five to ten dosimeters per point were carried out for 6 MV at 3 and 10 cm depth. Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 were performed to simulate the response of the active detector material for several angles. Detector and housing were simulated in detail based on microCT data and communications with the manufacturer. Various material compositions and an all-water geometry were considered. Results: For the traditional Setup 1 the response of the OSLD dropped on average by 1.4% ± 0.7% (measurement) and 2.1% ± 0.3% (Monte Carlo simulation) for the 90° orientation compared to 0°. Monte Carlo simulations also showed a strong dependence of the effect on the composition of the sensitive layer. Assuming the layer to completely consist of the active material (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) results in a 7% drop in response for 90° compared to 0°. Assuming the layer to be completely water, results in a flat response within the simulation uncertainty of about 1%. For the new Setup 2

  14. Mixed optical Cherenkov-Bremsstrahlung radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone from relativistic heavy ions: Unusual dependence of the angular distribution width on the radiator thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkova, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov radiation (ChR) angular distribution is usually described by the Tamm-Frank (TF) theory, which assumes that relativistic charged particle moves uniformly and rectilinearly in the optically transparent radiator. According to the TF theory, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the ChR angular distribution inversely depends on the radiator thickness. In the case of relativistic heavy ions (RHI) a slowing-down in the radiator may sufficiently change the angular distribution of optical radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone, since there appears a mixed ChR-Bremsstrahlung radiation. As a result, there occurs a drastic transformation of the FWHM of optical radiation angular distribution in dependence on the radiator thickness: from inversely proportional (TF theory) to the linearly proportional one. In our paper we present the first analysis of this transformation taking account of the gradual velocity decrease of RHI penetrating through a radiator.

  15. Angular dependent study on spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanian, S. M.; Shokri, A. A.; Mikaili Agah, K.; Elahi, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) on the spin-dependent current and shot noise through II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor/nonmagnetic semiconductor (DMS/NMS) barrier structures. The calculation of transmission probability is based on an effective mass quantum-mechanical approach in the presence of an external magnetic field applied along the growth direction of the junction and also applied voltage. We also study the dependence of spin-dependent properties on external magnetic field and relative angle between the magnetizations of two DMS layers in CdTe/CdMnTe heterostructures by including the DSOC effect. The results show that the DSOC has great different influence on transport properties of electrons with spin up and spin down in the considered system and this aspect may be utilized in designing new spintronics devices.

  16. Angular dependence of novel magnetic quantum oscillations in a quasi-two-dimensional multiband Fermi liquid with impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovsky, A. M.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2002-03-01

    The semiclassical Lifshitz-Kosevich-type description is given for the angular dependence of quantum oscillations with combination frequencies in a multiband quasi-two-dimensional Fermi liquid with a constant number of electrons. The analytical expressions are found for the Dingle, thermal, spin, and amplitude (Yamaji) reduction factors of the novel combination harmonics, where the latter two strongly oscillate with the direction of the field [1]. At the magic angles those factors reduce to the purely two-dimensional expressions given earlier. The combination harmonics are suppressed in the presence of the nonquantized background states, and they decay exponentially faster with temperature and/or disorder compared to the standard harmonics, providing an additional tool for electronic structure determination. The theory is applied to Sr2RuO4. [1] A.M. Bratkovsky and A.S. Alexandrov, Phys. Rev. B 65, xxxx (2002); cond-mat/0104520.

  17. Skyshine analysis using energy and angular dependent dose-contribution fluxes obtained from air-over-ground adjoint calculation.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Mikio; Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    A generalised and convenient skyshine dose analysis method has been developed based on forward-adjoint folding technique. In the method, the air penetration data were prepared by performing an adjoint DOT3.5 calculation with cylindrical air-over-ground geometry having an adjoint point source (importance of unit flux to dose rate at detection point) in the centre. The accuracy of the present method was certified by comparing with DOT3.5 forward calculation. The adjoint flux data can be used as generalised radiation skyshine data for all sorts of nuclear facilities. Moreover, the present method supplies plenty of energy-angular dependent contribution flux data, which will be useful for detailed shielding design of facilities. PMID:16604693

  18. Angular dependence of L X-rays emission for Ag by 10 keV electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Chengwei

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic X-ray intensities of Ag-Lα, Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 are measured in electron-impact ionization at energy of 10 keV. The emission angle in this work ranges from 0° to 20° at interval of 5°. The angular dependence of L X-ray intensity ratios has been investigated for Lα / Lβ1, Lβ2 / Lβ1 and Lγ1 / Lβ1. It is found from the experimental results that the emissions of Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 X-rays are spatially isotropic, while the Lα X-rays exhibit anisotropic emission. Consequently, the alignment behavior of vacancy states is discussed with thorough analysis of vacancy transfer process.

  19. Improved model for the angular dependence of excimer laser ablation rates in polymer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pedder, J. E. A.; Holmes, A. S.; Dyer, P. E.

    2009-10-26

    Measurements of the angle-dependent ablation rates of polymers that have applications in microdevice fabrication are reported. A simple model based on Beer's law, including plume absorption, is shown to give good agreement with the experimental findings for polycarbonate and SU8, ablated using the 193 and 248 nm excimer lasers, respectively. The modeling forms a useful tool for designing masks needed to fabricate complex surface relief by ablation.

  20. Angular confinement and direction-dependent transmission in graphene nanostructures with magnetic barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masir, M. Ramezani; Vasilopoulos, P.; Matulis, A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the transmission through magnetic barriers in graphene-based nanostructures. Several particular cases are considered: a magnetic step, single and double barriers, δ -function barriers as well as barrier structures with inhomogeneous magnetic field profiles but with average magnetic field equal to zero. The transmission exhibits a strong dependence on the direction of the incident wave vector. In general the resonant structure of the transmission is significantly more pronounced for (Dirac) electrons with linear spectrum compared to that for electrons with a parabolic one.

  1. Study of Iron Dimers Reveals Angular Dependence of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a developing technique that probes the occupied molecular orbitals of a metal complex. As an element-specific probe of metal centers, Kβ XES is finding increasing applications in catalytic and, in particular, bioinorganic systems. For the continued development of XES as a probe of these complex systems, however, the full range of factors which contribute to XES spectral modulations must be explored. In this report, an investigation of a series of oxo-bridged iron dimers reveals that the intensity of valence-to-core features is sensitive to the Fe–O–Fe bond angle. The intensity of these features has a well-known dependence on metal–ligand bond distance, but a dependence upon bond angle has not previously been documented. Herein, we explore the angular dependence of valence-to-core XES features both experimentally and computationally. Taken together, these results show that, as the Fe–O–Fe angle decreases, the intensity of the Kβ″ feature increases and that this effect is modulated by increasing amounts of Fe np mixing into the O 2s orbital at smaller bond angles. The relevance of these findings to the identification of oxygenated intermediates in bioinorganic systems is highlighted, with special emphasis given to the case of soluble methane monooxygenase. PMID:25211540

  2. Angular dependence of coercivity and remanence of Ni nanowire arrays and its relevance to magnetoviscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.; Monz, S.; Tschöpe, A.; Birringer, R.; Michels, A.

    Ni nanowire arrays with varying wire dimensions (diameter d, length l) and center-to-center distances dCC were synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition of Ni in porous Al templates. The magnetization-reversal behavior of the arrays was investigated by means of magnetometry for different angles θ between the wire axes and the applied magnetic field. The functional dependences of the characteristic parameters coercivity HC( θ) and reduced remanence mR/mS( θ) exhibit a strong dependence on the wire dimensions and the center-to-center distance. For instance, for nanowire arrays with d=40 nm, dCC=100 nm, and for θ=0°, the coercivity takes on a rather large value of μ0HC=85 mT and mR/mS≅94%; reducing dCC to 30 nm and d to 17 nm results in μ0HC=49 mT and mR/mS≅57%, an observation which suggests an increasing magnetostatic interwire interaction at increased ( d/ dCC)-ratio. The potential application of nanowires as the constituents of ferrofluids is discussed.

  3. THE MASS-DEPENDENCE OF ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN SUN-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Matt, Sean P.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Chabrier, Gilles; Brun, A. Sacha

    2015-02-01

    To better understand the observed distributions of the rotation rate and magnetic activity of Sun-like and low-mass stars, we derive a physically motivated scaling for the dependence of the stellar wind torque on the Rossby number. The torque also contains an empirically derived scaling with stellar mass (and radius), which provides new insight into the mass-dependence of stellar magnetic and wind properties. We demonstrate that this new formulation explains why the lowest mass stars are observed to maintain rapid rotation for much longer than solar-mass stars, and simultaneously why older populations exhibit a sequence of slowly rotating stars, in which the low-mass stars rotate more slowly than solar-mass stars. The model also reproduces some previously unexplained features in the period-mass diagram for the Kepler field, notably: the particular shape of the ''upper envelope'' of the distribution, suggesting that ∼95% of Kepler field stars with measured rotation periods are younger than ∼4 Gyr; and the shape of the ''lower envelope'', corresponding to the location where stars transition between magnetically saturated and unsaturated regimes.

  4. Simulations of the angular dependence of the dipole-dipole interaction among Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Jacob L.; Hollingsworth, Jacob; Paul, Jacob T.; Peleg, Matan; Sanford, Veronica L.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction between two Rydberg atoms depends on the relative orientation of the atoms and on the change in the magnetic quantum number. We simulate the effect of this anisotropy on the energy transport in an amorphous many atom system of ultracold Rydberg atoms subject to a homogeneous applied electric field. We consider two experimentally feasible geometries and find that the effects should be measurable in current generation imaging experiments. We also examine evidence for Anderson localization. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897 and used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number OCI-1053575.

  5. Angular emission and polarization dependence of harmonics from laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easter, J. H.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B. X.; Mordovanakis, A.; Mourou, G.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2013-02-01

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been performed to characterize high order harmonic emission up to the 18th order using high rep rate mJ level laser pulses at relativistic intensities. The experiments were compared to two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The harmonic divergence was found to be less than 4° (full-width at half-maximum) at highest intensity and increased as the laser was defocused (i.e. as the intensity was reduced). The polarization dependence on the harmonic generation efficiency and divergence was also measured. Circular polarization was found to cause a deflection in the angle of emission of the harmonics—an effect which may be beneficial in the use of such harmonics for efficient isolated attosecond pulse production.

  6. Simulations of the angular dependence of the dipole–dipole interaction among Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Jacob L.; Paul, Jacob T.; Peleg, Matan; Sanford, Veronica L.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-08-01

    The dipole–dipole interaction between two Rydberg atoms depends on the relative orientation of the atoms and on the change in the magnetic quantum number. We simulate the effect of this anisotropy on the energy transport in an amorphous many atom system subject to a homogeneous applied electric field. We consider two experimentally feasible geometries and find that the effects should be measurable in current generation imaging experiments. In both geometries atoms of p character are localized to a small region of space which is immersed in a larger region that is filled with atoms of s character. Energy transfer due to the dipole–dipole interaction can lead to a spread of p character into the region initially occupied by s atoms. Over long timescales the energy transport is confined to the volume near the border of the p region which suggests Anderson localization. We calculate a correlation length of 6.3 μm for one particular geometry.

  7. Angular and Frequency-Dependent Wave Velocity and Attenuation in Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Gurevich, Boris; Santos, Juan E.; Picotti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow generates a dominant attenuation mechanism in porous media. It consists of energy loss due to P-wave conversion to Biot (diffusive) modes at mesoscopic-scale inhomogeneities. Fractured poroelastic media show significant attenuation and velocity dispersion due to this mechanism. The theory has first been developed for the symmetry axis of the equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium corresponding to a poroelastic medium containing planar fractures. In this work, we consider the theory for all propagation angles by obtaining the five complex and frequency-dependent stiffnesses of the equivalent TI medium as a function of frequency. We assume that the flow direction is perpendicular to the layering plane and is independent of the loading direction. As a consequence, the behaviour of the medium can be described by a single relaxation function. We first consider the limiting case of an open (highly permeable) fracture of negligible thickness. We then compute the associated wave velocities and quality factors as a function of the propagation direction (phase and ray angles) and frequency. The location of the relaxation peak depends on the distance between fractures (the mesoscopic distance), viscosity, permeability and fractures compliances. The flow induced by wave propagation affects the quasi-shear (qS) wave with levels of attenuation similar to those of the quasi-compressional (qP) wave. On the other hand, a general fracture can be modeled as a sequence of poroelastic layers, where one of the layers is very thin. Modeling fractures of different thickness filled with CO2 embedded in a background medium saturated with a stiffer fluid also shows considerable attenuation and velocity dispersion. If the fracture and background frames are the same, the equivalent medium is isotropic, but strong wave anisotropy occurs in the case of a frameless and highly permeable fracture material, for instance a suspension of solid particles in the fluid.

  8. Angular dependence of optical modes in metal-insulator-metal coupled quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, YouLiang; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Qian; Chen, PingPing; Zhou, XiaoHao; Wang, Han; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We report the dependence of the near-field optical modes in metal-insulator-metal quantum well infrared photodetector (MIM-QWIP) on the incident angles. Three optical modes are observed and attributed to the 2nd- and the 3rd-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes and the localized surface polariton (LSP) mode. In addition to the observation of a responsivity enhancement of 14 times by the LSP mode, the varying pattern of the three modes against the incident angle are revealed, in which the LSP mode is fixed while the 2nd SPP mode splits into two branches and the 3rd SPP mode red-shifts. The detailed mechanisms are analyzed and numerically simulated. The results fit the experiments very well, demonstrating the wavevector coupling effect between the incident light and the metal gratings on the SPP modes. Our work will pave the way to fully understanding the influence of incident angles on a detector's response for applying the MIM-QWIP to focal plane arrays.

  9. Angular Dependence of Jet Quenching Indicates Its Strong Enhancement Near the QCD Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shuryak, Edward

    2008-10-22

    We study dependence of jet quenching on matter density, using 'tomography' of the fireball provided by RHIC data on azimuthal anisotropy v{sub 2} of high p{sub t} hadron yield at different centralities. Slicing the fireball into shells with constant (entropy) density, we derive a 'layer-wise geometrical limit' v{sub 2}{sup max} which is indeed above the data v{sub 2} < v{sub x}{sup max}. Interestingly, the limit is reached only if quenching is dominated by shells with the entropy density exactly in the near-T{sub c} region. We show two models that simultaneously describe the high p{sub t} v{sub 2} and R{sub AA} data and conclude that such a description can be achieved only if the jet quenching is few times stronger in the near-T{sub c} region relative to QGP at T > T{sub c}. One possible reason for that may be recent indications that the near-T{sub c} region is a magnetic plasma of relatively light color-magnetic monopoles.

  10. GEANT4 simulation of the angular dependence of TLD-based monitor response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, C. C.; Moralles, M.; Okuno, E.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, the response of thermoluminescent (TL) monitors to X-ray beams impinging on them at different angles was investigated and compared with results of simulations performed with the GEANT4 radiation transport toolkit. Each monitor used contains four TL detectors (TLD): two CaF 2 pellets and two TLD-100 (one of each type within lead filter and the other without filter). Monitors were irradiated free-in-air with X-ray beams of the narrow and wide spectrum with effective energy of 61 and 130 keV and angles of incidence of 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°. Curves of TL response relative to air kerma as a function of photon effective energy for each detector, with and without filter, are used to correct the energetic dependence of TL response. Such curves were also obtained from the data of radiation energy stored in the TLDs provided by the simulations. The attenuation increases with the increase of the incidence angle, since the thickness of lead filter traversed by the beam also enlarges. As the monitor calibration is usually performed with the beams impinging the monitor at 0°, changes in the attenuation become a source of error in the energy determination and consequently in the value of dose equivalent obtained with this monitor. The changes in attenuation observed in experiments were corroborated by the Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Self-association of organic solutes in solution: a NEXAFS study of aqueous imidazole.

    PubMed

    Thomason, M J; Seabourne, C R; Sattelle, B M; Hembury, G A; Stevens, J S; Scott, A J; Aziz, E F; Schroeder, S L M

    2015-01-01

    N K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra of imidazole in concentrated aqueous solutions have been acquired. The NEXAFS spectra of the solution species differ significantly from those of imidazole monomers in the gas phase and in the solid state of imidazole, demonstrating the strong sensitivity of NEXAFS to the local chemical and structural environment. In a concentration range from 0.5 to 8.2 mol L(-1) the NEXAFS spectrum of aqueous imidazole does not change strongly, confirming previous suggestions that imidazole self-associates are already present at concentrations more dilute than the range investigated here. We show that various types of electronic structure calculations (Gaussian, StoBe, CASTEP) provide a consistent and complete interpretation of all features in the gas phase and solid state spectra based on ground state electronic structure. This suggests that such computational modelling of experimental NEXAFS will permit an incisive analysis of the molecular interactions of organic solutes in solutions. It is confirmed that microhydrated clusters with a single imidazole molecule are poor models of imidazole in aqueous solution. Our analysis indicates that models including both a hydrogen-bonded network of hydrate molecules, and imidazole-imidazole interactions, are necessary to explain the electronic structure evident in the NEXAFS spectra. PMID:25873522

  12. Development of a standard method for nanoparticle sizing by using the angular dependence of dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kayori; Kato, Haruhisa; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    A standard method for nanoparticle sizing based on the angular dependence of dynamic light scattering was developed. The dependences of the diffusion coefficients for aqueous suspensions of polystyrene latex on the concentration and scattering angle were accurately measured by using a high-resolution dynamic light-scattering instrument. Precise measurements of the short-time correlation function at seven scattering angles and five concentrations were made for suspensions of polystyrene latex particles with diameters from 30 to 100 nm. The apparent diffusion coefficients obtained at various angles and concentrations showed properties characteristic of polystyrene latex particles with electrostatic interactions. A simulation was used to calculate a dynamic structure factor representing the long-range interactions between particles. Extrapolations to infinite dilution and to low angles gave accurate particle sizes by eliminating the effects of long-range interactions. The resulting particle sizes were consistent with those measured by using a differential mobility analyzer and those obtained by pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. PMID:21747185

  13. Effects of anisotropic fluences and angular depended spectra of beta-particles in the use of large area reference sources.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahiro; Kawada, Yasushi; Ishizu, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Shinich; Yunoki, Akira; Sato, Yasushi; Unno, Yasuhiro; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    Calibrations of instrument efficiency of surface contamination meters are usually made with extended reference sources which are standardized in terms of 2π surface β-particle emission rates from the source surface including backscattered particles. Extended sources supplied from various metrology institutes or calibration laboratories, but the source-types such as structure, preparation method, backing and covering materials vary between manufacturers. In this work first we show how the calibration results are dependent on the source type. Second, in order to clarify the possible reason of such discrepancy, we examined the isotropy of β-particle fluences by the use of a proportional counter and also observed the angular dependence of β-particle spectra by the use of small plastic scintillation spectrometer, where the source mount can rotate relative to the detector window at various obliquities. The discrepancy in the instrument-calibration of surface contamination meters, which are mainly used under the conditions of large source-to-detector geometry, can be explained. PMID:22424745

  14. Shubnikov-de Haas Effect and Angular-Dependent Magnetoresistance in Layered Organic Conductor β''-(ET)(TCNQ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuzuka, Syuma; Uji, Shinya; Konoike, Takako; Terashima, Taichi; Graf, David; Choi, Eun Sang; Brooks, James S.; Yamamoto, Hiroshi M.; Kato, Reizo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect and angular-dependent magnetoresistance oscillation (AMRO) for the organic conductor β''-(ET)(TCNQ). We observed several two dimensional (2D) SdH frequencies, whose cross-sectional areas of the Fermi surfaces (FSs) correspond to only a few percent of the first Brillouin zone. Such small 2D FSs are not predicted by band-structure calculations, suggesting that these FS pockets are created by an imperfect nesting of FSs at low temperatures. It is found that the AMRO consists of a long-period oscillation and a short-period one. The long-period oscillation is associated with the Yamaji oscillation corresponding to the α orbit, whose shape and area are consistent with previous magneto-optical measurement. The short-period oscillation is not caused by peaks instead but dips. The dip structure is discussed in terms of the AMRO of a quasi-2D electron system with a periodic potential caused by the possible density-wave related to the ET layers or the 4kF charge-density-wave associated with the TCNQ layers.

  15. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  16. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  17. The impact of surface-polish on the angular and wavelength dependence of fiber focal ratio degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenbrot, Arthur D.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wood, Corey M.

    2012-09-01

    We present measurements of how multimode fiber focal-ratio degradation (FRD) and throughput vary with levels of fiber surface polish from 60 to 0.5 micron grit. Measurements used full-beam and laser injection methods at wavelengths between 0.4 and 0.8 microns on 17 meter lengths of Polymicro FBP 300 and 400 μm core fiber. Full-beam injection probed input focal-ratios between f/3 and f/13.5, while laser injection allowed us to isolate FRD at discrete injection angles up to 17 degrees (f/1.6 marginal ray). We find (1) FRD effects decrease as grit size decreases, with the largest gains in beam quality occurring at grit sizes above 5 μm (2) total throughput increases as grit size decreases, reaching 90% at 790 nm with the finest polishing levels; (3) total throughput is higher at redder wavelengths for coarser polishing grit, indicating surface-scattering as the primary source of loss. We also quantify the angular dependence of FRD as a function of polishing level. Our results indicate that a commonly adopted micro-bending model for FRD is a poor descriptor of the observed phenomenon.

  18. Observation of a Change in Twist of an RNA Kissing Complex Using the Angular Dependence of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Milas, Peker; Parrot, Louis; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of a change in the bend angle of an RNA kissing complex upon Rop binding using single-molecular-pair FRET. The angular relationship between the dyes, rather than the distance between them, is shown to be responsible for the observed change in energy transfer. It has long been thought that Rop increases the bend angle of the R1inv-R2inv complex upon binding, but this has never been directly observed. In contrast, we find an increase in FRET upon the addition of Rop that is shown via modeling to be consistent with a decrease in the bend angle of the complex of $-15^{\\circ}\\pm7^{\\circ}$. The model predicts FRET from dye trajectories generated using molecular dynamics simulations of Cy3 and Cy5 attached to $5'$ terminal cytosine or guanosine on RNA. While FRET is commonly used to observe global changes in molecular structure attributed to changes in the distance between dyes, it is rarely, if ever, used to elucidate angular changes. Subtle global changes in molecular structure upon binding are generally difficult to discern using NMR or crystallography, but FRET is well suited to observe these changes because of its sensitivity at interdye distance around the F\\"orster radius, $R_F\\approx5$ nm. While FRET is often referred to and used as a ``molecular ruler" for distances around $R_F$, for dye pairs that have minimal rotational freedom, FRET can also be used to observe changes in structure for which there is no significant change in distance between the dyes. This is the case for the R1inv-R2inv kissing complex studied here. This complex is derived from the RNA I - RNA II complex in E. coli. RNA II is a primer for replication of the ColE1 plasmid; its function is modulated by interaction with RNA II. Rop is known to stabilize the complex, and it is also known to bind kissing complexes in a structure, but not sequence, dependent fashion.

  19. Temperature dependence of electric field gradient in LaCoO3 perovskite investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, Astrogildo C.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Saxena, Rajendra N.; Mestnik-Filho, José; Dogra, Rakesh

    2005-11-01

    The time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique was used to study the temperature dependence of electric field gradient (EFG) in LaCoO3 perovskite using {}^{111}\\mathrm {In}\\rightarrow {}^{111}\\mathrm {Cd} and {}^{181}\\mathrm {Hf} \\rightarrow {}^{181}\\mathrm {Ta} nuclear probes. The radioactive parent nuclei 111In and 181Hf were introduced into the oxide lattice through a chemical process during sample preparation and were found to occupy only the Co sites in LaCoO3. The PAC measurements with 111Cd and 181Ta probes were made in the temperature range of 4.2-1146 K and 4.2-1004 K, respectively. No long-range magnetic order was observed up to 4.2 K. The EFGs at 111Cd and 181Ta show very similar temperature dependences. They increase slowly between 4.2 and about 77 K and then decrease almost linearly with increasing temperature until about 500-600 K, where a broad peak-like structure is observed, followed by linear decrease at still higher temperatures. These discontinuities at about 77 K and 500-600 K have been interpreted as thermally activated spin state transitions from the low-spin (t2g6eg0) ground state configuration to the intermediate-spin (t2g5eg1) state and from the intermediate-spin to the high-spin (t2g4eg2) state of the Co3+ ion, confirming previous observation in other recent studies. An indication of a Jahn-Teller distortion, which stabilizes the intermediate-spin state with orbital ordering, is also pointed out.

  20. Time-Dependent and Time-Integrated Angular Analysis of B -> phi Ks pi0 and B -> phi K+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V

    2008-08-04

    We perform a time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of the B{sup 0} {yields} {psi}K*(892){sup 0}, {psi}K*{sub 2}(1430{sup 0}), and {psi}(K{pi}){sub S-wave}{sup 0} decays with the final sample of about 465 million B{bar B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay, nine parameters for the vector-tensor decay, and three parameters for the vector-scalar decay, including the branching fractions, CP-violation parameters, and parameters sensitive to final state interaction. We use the dependence on the K{pi} invariant mass of the interference between the scalar and vector or tensor components to resolve discrete ambiguities of the strong and weak phases. We use the time-evolution of the B {yields} {psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel to extract the CP-violation phase difference {Delta}{phi}{sub 00} = 0.28 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.04 between the B and {bar B} decay amplitudes. When the B {yields} {psi}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} channel is included, the fractions of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} of the vector-vector and vector-tensor decay modes are measured to be 0.494 {+-} 0.034 {+-} 0.013 and 0.901{sub -0.058}{sup +0.046} {+-} 0.037, respectively. This polarization pattern requires the presence of a helicity-plus amplitude in the vector-vector decay from a presently unknown source.

  1. Energy and angular dependences of common types of personal dosemeters in the mirror of the First national intercomparison of individual dosimetric monitoring laboratories in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Deniachenko, N; Volosky, V

    2015-12-01

    In depth analysis of the results of the First National Intercomparison of individual dosimetry laboratories in Ukraine has revealed energy and angular responses of the most common types of personal dosemeters and dosi metric systems. Participating laboratories use 9 different types of dosimetric systems - automatic, semi automat ic and manual. If was found that energy dependences of the most common dosemeter types in Ukraine generally correspond to the literature data on respective TLD materials (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, LiF:Mg,TiandAl2O3:С), however, due to peculiarities of holders (filters) and dose algorithms, for some dosimetry systems the energy dependences can be improved (compensated). Angular dependences proved to be more pronounced: only two systems revealed weak dependence of response on the incident angle, for other systems at large angles (α=60°) dosemeters overestimate true dose values. PMID:26695907

  2. Nuclear quantum effects in the structure and lineshapes of the N2 NEXAFS spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fatehi, Shervin; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-12-04

    We study the relative ability of several models of the X-ray absorption spectrum to capture the Franck-Condon structure apparent from an experiment on gaseous nitrogen. In doing so, we adopt the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a constrained density functional theory method for computing the energies of the X-ray-excited molecule. Starting from an otherwise classical model for the spectrum, we systematically introduce more realistic physics, first by substituting the quantum mechanical nuclear radial density in the bond separation R for the classical radial density, then by adding the effect of zero-point energy and other level shifts, and finally by including explicit rovibrational quantization of both the ground and excited states. The quantization is determined exactly, using a discrete variable representation. We show that the NEXAFS spectrum can be predicted semiquantiatively within this framework. We also address the possibility of non-trivial temperature dependence in the spectrum. Finally, we show that it is possible to improve the predicted spectrum by using constrained DFT in combination with more accurate potentials.

  3. Development of a Detector to Measure the Angular Dependence of the Cosmic Ray Induced Neutron Background Flux at Ground Level

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J F; Gosnell, T B; Luke, S J; Archer, D E; Lochner, R T; Frank, I M; Prussin, S G; Quiter, B J; Chivers, D H

    2002-01-28

    The detection of low intensity sources of radiation in containers is of particular interest for arms control, non-proliferation and nuclear smuggling activities. Attempts to procure and smuggle nuclear materials that could be used in terrorist activities have been well documented in recent years. These incidents have included fissile materials such, as plutonium and uranium, as well as medical and industrial isotopes that could be used in a Radiation Dispersal Device. The vast majority of these incidents have been discovered through human intelligence work due to the difficulty of using radiation monitoring. The detection of radiation sources in well-shielded containers presents a difficult technological challenge. Few neutrons and gamma rays may escape from the container and these may be obscured by the naturally occurring background. The world in general is a radioactive environment. Many elements in the earth's crust, as well as in common plants and building materials, emit a constant stream of radiation. In fact the ultimate limit on the detection of hidden sources is often the background level at the location of interest. It has long been understood that knowledge of the directionality of this background can be used to improve the signal/noise ratio in detectors used for these measurements. Imaging detectors are one method of reducing the effect of the background, but this reduction comes at the expensive of a huge increase in detector complexity. Hence these systems, while important in some specific applications, are probably not suited for the deployment of many detectors over a large area. There may be another way of reducing the effect of backgrounds on monitoring measurements. This method consists of using knowledge of the directional dependence of the background flux to help reduce its effect on the detectors in question. An accurate knowledge of this angular distribution allows one to develop better shielding designs for the detectors.

  4. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Byoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1-10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  5. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in

  6. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-01-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. PMID:23520268

  7. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-09-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. PMID:23520268

  8. A detailed assignment of NEXAFS resonances of imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Christopher; Holzweber, Markus; Lippitz, Andreas; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Saalfrank, Peter

    2016-03-16

    In Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy X-Ray photons are used to excite tightly bound core electrons to low-lying unoccupied orbitals of the system. This technique offers insight into the electronic structure of the system as well as useful structural information. In this work, we apply NEXAFS to two kinds of imidazolium based ionic liquids ([CnC1im](+)[NTf2](-) and [C4C1im](+)[I](-)). A combination of measurements and quantum chemical calculations of C K and N K NEXAFS resonances is presented. The simulations, based on the transition potential density functional theory method (TP-DFT), reproduce all characteristic features observed by the experiment. Furthermore, a detailed assignment of resonance features to excitation centers (carbon or nitrogen atoms) leads to a consistent interpretation of the spectra. PMID:26948544

  9. Role of muscle pulleys in producing eye position-dependence in the angular vestibuloocular reflex: a model-based study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurtell, M. J.; Kunin, M.; Raphan, T.; Wall, C. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    the roll gain of the angular vestibuloocular reflex was modified during the initial period of the response, while pulley coefficient was maintained at 0.5. Hence a roll gain modification allows stabilization of the retinal image without requiring a change in the pulley effect. Our results therefore indicate that the eye position-dependent velocity axis tilts could arise due to the effects of the pulleys and that a roll gain modification in the central vestibular structures may be responsible for countering the pulley effect.

  10. Insight into the photoelectron angular dependent energy distribution of negative-electron-affinity InP photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhanghui; Jiang, Xiangwei; Dong, Shan; Li, Jingbo Li, Shushen; Wang, Linwang

    2014-01-13

    Energy distribution and angular distribution of the photoelectrons from InP photocathodes are investigated using a precise Monte Carlo model. It is found that Γ-valley electrons contribute to the first peak of the energy distribution curve, but the second peak is contributed by both Γ-valley and L-valley electrons rather than only L-valley electrons. L valley electrons are shown to have a smaller angular spread than Γ-valley electrons, which is attributed to the much higher potential energy of L-valley minimum. The further simulation indicates that the performance of InP photocathodes can be improved by increasing the hole concentration or decreasing the temperature, but the activation layer thickness variation only has very slight influence on either energy or angular distribution.

  11. Angular and temperature dependence of current induced spin-orbit effective fields in Ta/CoFeB/MgO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuepeng; Deorani, Praveen; Narayanapillai, Kulothungasagaran; Lee, Ki-Seung; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-01-01

    Current induced spin-orbit effective magnetic fields in metal/ferromagnet/oxide trilayers provide a new way to manipulate the magnetization, which is an alternative to the conventional current induced spin transfer torque arising from noncollinear magnetization. Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures are expected to be useful for non-volatile memories and logic devices due to its perpendicular anisotropy and large current induced spin-orbit effective fields. However many aspects such as the angular and temperature dependent phenomena of the effective fields are little understood. Here, we evaluate the angular and temperature dependence of the current-induced spin-orbit effective fields considering contributions from both the anomalous and planar Hall effects. The longitudinal and transverse components of effective fields are found to have strong angular dependence on the magnetization direction at 300 K. The transverse field decreases significantly with decreasing temperature, whereas the longitudinal field shows weaker temperature dependence. Our results reveal important features and provide an opportunity for a more comprehensive understanding of current induced spin-orbit effective fields. PMID:24670317

  12. Angular and local spectroscopic analysis to probe the vertical alignment of N-doped well-separated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Minea, T M; Bouchet-Fabre, B; Lazar, S; Point, S; Zandbergen, H W

    2006-08-17

    Vertically aligned well-separated N-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on a silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Angular near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) was used to investigate the vertical alignment of as-grown CNTs. In addition, both individual tubes and tube bundles were characterized by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Simultaneous analysis of both spectroscopic techniques provides information on chemical environment, orbital orientation between carbon and heteroatoms, and local curvature effects. We demonstrate the utility of NEXAFS as an in situ probe of CNTs. PMID:16898707

  13. Impact of scale dependent bias and nonlinear structure growth on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect: Angular power spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert E.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Seljak, Uros

    2009-09-15

    We investigate the impact of nonlinear evolution of the gravitational potentials in the {lambda}CDM model on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum, and on the cross-power spectrum of the CMB and a set of biased tracers of the mass. We use an ensemble of N-body simulations to directly follow the potentials and compare the results to analytic PT methods. The predictions from the PT match the results to high precision for k<0.2h Mpc{sup -1}. We compute the nonlinear corrections to the angular power spectrum and find them to be <10% of linear theory for l<100. These corrections are swamped by the cosmic variance. On scales l>100 the departures are more significant; however, the CMB signal is more than a factor 10{sup 3} larger at this scale. Nonlinear ISW effects therefore play no role in shaping the CMB power spectrum for l<1500. We analyze the CMB-density tracer cross spectrum using simulations and renormalized bias PT, and find good agreement. The usual assumption is that nonlinear evolution enhances the growth of structure and counteracts the linear ISW on small scales, leading to a change in sign of the CMB large-scale structure cross spectrum at small scales. However, PT analysis suggests that this trend reverses at late times when the logarithmic growth rate f=dlnD/dlna<0.5 or {omega}{sub m}(z)<0.3. Numerical results confirm these expectations and we find no sign change in ISW large-scale structure cross power for low redshifts. Corrections due to nonlinearity and scale dependence of the bias are found to be <10% for l<100, and are therefore below the signal to noise of the current and future measurements. Finally, we estimate the cross-correlation coefficient between the CMB and halos and show that it can be made to match that for the dark matter and CMB to within 5% for thin redshift shells, thus mitigating the need to model bias evolution.

  14. Processing of atmospheric particles caught in the act via STXM/NEXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimer, S.; Lampimäki, M.; Grzinic, G.; Coz, E.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Ammann, M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are an important focus of environmental research due to their effect on climate and human health. Among their main constituents are mineral dust and organic particles. Both types of particles directly and indirectly affect our climate through scattering and absorption of radiation and through acting as cloud condensation nuclei respectively. Organic particles are also of significant concern with respect to their health effects. Mineral dust particles in addition serve as a primary external iron source to the open ocean and the bioavailability of iron from these particles is highly dependent on the oxidation state of the metal. The environmental impact of atmospheric particles depends on their physical and chemical properties, which might change upon chemical ageing. In this study we therefore investigated the changes in chemical composition and morphology of mineral dust and organic particle proxies (Arizona test dust and shikimic acid, respectively) upon in situ exposure to ozone or nitrogen oxides in presence of humidity. This was achieved by monitoring changes at the C and O K-edges as well as the metal L-edges via scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Measurements were conducted at the PolLux beamline at Swiss Light Source. All experiments were conducted in an environmental micro reactor, designed specifically for the end station, to enable the investigation in situ. We observed oxidation of shikimic acid particles in situ during exposure to ozone at different humidities, whereby humidity was found to be a critical factor controlling the rate of the reaction. We also obtained well resolved iron distribution maps from the individual submicrometer size mineral dust particles before and after exposure to nitrogen oxides.

  15. Overview of nanoscale NEXAFS performed with soft X-ray microscopes.

    PubMed

    Guttmann, Peter; Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Today, in material science nanoscale structures are becoming more and more important. Not only for the further miniaturization of semiconductor devices like carbon nanotube based transistors, but also for newly developed efficient energy storage devices, gas sensors or catalytic systems nanoscale and functionalized materials have to be analysed. Therefore, analytical tools like near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has to be applied on single nanostructures. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM) as well as full-field transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM) allow the required spatial resolution to study individual nanostructures. In the soft X-ray energy range only STXM was used so far for NEXAFS studies. Due to its unique setup, the TXM operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II is the first one in the soft X-ray range which can be used for NEXAFS spectroscopy studies which will be shown in this review. Here we will give an overview of the different microscopes used for NEXAFS studies and describe their advantages and disadvantages for different samples. PMID:25821700

  16. Overview of nanoscale NEXAFS performed with soft X-ray microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Summary Today, in material science nanoscale structures are becoming more and more important. Not only for the further miniaturization of semiconductor devices like carbon nanotube based transistors, but also for newly developed efficient energy storage devices, gas sensors or catalytic systems nanoscale and functionalized materials have to be analysed. Therefore, analytical tools like near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has to be applied on single nanostructures. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM) as well as full-field transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM) allow the required spatial resolution to study individual nanostructures. In the soft X-ray energy range only STXM was used so far for NEXAFS studies. Due to its unique setup, the TXM operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II is the first one in the soft X-ray range which can be used for NEXAFS spectroscopy studies which will be shown in this review. Here we will give an overview of the different microscopes used for NEXAFS studies and describe their advantages and disadvantages for different samples. PMID:25821700

  17. Spectral and angular dependence of mid-infrared diffuse scattering from explosives residues for standoff detection using external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of scattered mid-infrared light from surfaces coated with explosives residues (TNT, RDX, and tetryl) detected at a 2 m standoff distance. An external cavity quantum cascade laser provided tunable illumination between 7 and 8 μm. Important differences were identified in the spectral features between specular reflection and diffuse scattering which will impact most practical testing scenarios and complicate material identification. We discuss some of the factors influencing the dependence of observed spectra on the experimental geometry.

  18. Spectral and angular dependence of mid-infrared diffuse scattering from explosives residues for standoff detection using external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-09-01

    We present a study of the spectral and angular dependence of scattered mid-infrared light from surfaces coated with explosives residues (TNT, RDX, and tetryl) detected at a 2 meter standoff distance. An external cavity quantum cascade laser provided tunable illumination between 7 and 8 µm. Important differences were identified in the spectral features between specular reflection and diffuse scattering which will impact most practical testing scenarios and complicate material identification. We discuss some of the factors influencing the dependence of observed spectra on the experimental geometry.

  19. Angular Dependence of the Photoelectron Energy Distribution of InP(100) and GaAs(100) Negative Electron Affinity Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Ick; Sun, Yun; Lu, Zhi; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-15

    Energy distribution of the photoelectrons from InP(100) photocathodes are investigated with a photon energy range from 0.62eV to 2.76eV. When the photon energy is less than 1.8eV, only electrons emitted from the Gamma valley are observed in the energy distribution curves (EDC). At higher photon energies, electrons from the L valley are observed. The angular dependence of the electron energy distributions of InP and GaAs photocathodes are studied and compared. The electrons emitted from the L valley have a larger angular spread than the ones from the Gamma valley due to the larger effective mass of the L valley minimum.

  20. A velocity map ion-imaging study on ketene photodissociation at 208 and 213 nm: Rotational dependence of product angular anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Fengyan; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Bo; Yang, Xueming

    2005-03-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of ketene following excitation at 208.59 and 213.24 nm have been investigated using the velocity map ion-imaging method. Both the angular distribution and translational energy distribution of the CO products at different rotational and vibrational states have been obtained. No significant difference in the translational energy distributions for different CO rotational state products has been observed at both excitation wavelengths. The anisotropy parameter beta is, however, noticeably different for different CO rotational state products at both excitation wavelengths. For lower rotational states of the CO product, beta is smaller than zero, while beta is larger than zero for CO at higher rotational states. The observed rotational dependence of angular anisotropy is interpreted as the dynamical influence of a peculiar conical intersection between the (1)B(1) excited state and (1)A(2) state along the C(S)-I coordinate. PMID:15836317

  1. Multielectron effects on the orientation dependence and photoelectron angular distribution of multiphoton ionization of CO{sub 2} in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chu, S.-I

    2009-07-15

    We perform an ab initio study of multiphoton ionization (MPI) of carbon dioxide in intense linearly polarized laser pulses with arbitrary molecular orientation by means of a time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) with proper long-range potential. We develop a time-dependent Voronoi-cell finite difference method with highly adaptive molecular grids for accurate solution of the TDDFT equations. Our results demonstrate that the orientation dependence of MPI is determined by multiple orbital contributions and that the electron correlation effects are significant. The maximum peak of MPI is predicted to be at 40 deg. in good agreement with recent experimental data. Photoelectron angular distribution reveals the delicate relation between the orientation dependence and the molecular orbital symmetry.

  2. Experimental results and theoretical model to describe angular dependence of light scattering by monolayer of nematic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, V. A.; Krakhalev, M. N.; Konkolovich, A. V.; Prishchepa, O. O.; Miskevich, A. A.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    Light scattering by a monolayer of bipolar nematic droplets encapsulated in polymer film is examined both experimentally and theoretically. A method for the simulation of the angular distribution of scattered light is based on the anomalous diffraction and interference approximations taking into account the director configuration within liquid crystal droplets and their bipolar axes orientation. The director configuration in nematic droplets is calculated using the relaxation method of the free energy minimization. The characteristics of the sample, including distribution of droplet sizes and shape anisometry, are measured in details. The experimental results and theoretical data agree closely with each other.

  3. Ion fluence dependence of the total sputtering yield and differential angular sputtering yield of bismuth due to 50 keV argon ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoli, Naresh T.; Phinney, Lucas C.; Weathers, Duncan L.

    2014-08-01

    The dependences of the total sputtering yield of Bi and the differential angular distribution of these sputtered Bi atoms on the fluence of 50 keV Ar+ ions at normal incidence have been experimentally measured. Polycrystalline Bi targets were used for these purposes. The collector technique and accurate current integration methods were adopted for the determination of angular distributions of sputtered Bi atoms. The ion fluence was varied from 1.9 × 1019 to 3.1 × 1020 ions/cm2. The sputtered atoms were collected on high purity aluminum foils under ultra-high vacuum (∼5 × 10-9 Torr). The collector foils were subsequently analyzed using heavy ion Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The shape of the angular distribution of sputtered atoms was found not to change significantly with the fluence, but the sputtering yield increased significantly from 2.2 ± 0.2 to 9.6 ± 0.6 atoms/ion over the fluence range studied.

  4. Determination of the texture of arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes from the angular dependence of the X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Okotrub, A. V. Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Gusel'nikov, A. V.; Kudashov, A. G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    The properties of materials containing carbon nanotubes depend on the degree of alignment and the internal structure of nanotubes. It is shown that the degree of misorientation of carbon nanotubes in samples can be evaluated from the measurements of the angular dependences of the carbon X-ray emission and carbon X-ray absorption spectra. The CK{sub {alpha}} emission and CK X-ray absorption spectra of the array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic thermolysis of a mixture of fullerene and ferrocene are measured. A comparison of the calculated model dependences of the relative intensities of the {pi} and {sigma} bands in the spectra with the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate the degree of misorientation of nanotubes in the sample and their internal texture.

  5. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  6. NEXAFS and XPS of p-Aminobenzoic Acid Polymorphs: The Influence of Local Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Jaye, C.; Fischer, D. A.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen K-edge XPS and NEXAFS of the two polymorphic forms of para- aminobenzoic acid (PABA) are significantly different reflecting variation in hydrogen bonding. Alteration in hydrogen bonding at the amino group leads to a shift to high energy for both the XPS N 1s core level and the 3π* NEXAFS resonance with β-PABA. Participation of the amine group in the aromatic system causes the 1π* resonance to be sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular bonding at the para-carboxylic acid group, and a shift to low energy for α- PABA is observed due to hydrogen-bonded carboxylic acid dimer formation. FEFF calculations also successfully reproduce both the energy and intensity variations observed for the σ* shape resonance associated with the C-N bond, with the majority of the decrease in energy observed for b-PABA arising from the longer C-N bond.

  7. Oxidation of a potassium monolayer on Ru(001) studied with photoemission, NEXAFS and vibrational EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Weisel, M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fu, Zugen

    1990-08-01

    The interaction of oxygen with a monolayer of potassium on a Ru(001) surface has been investigated with photoemission and NEXAFS. O 1s core-level data exhibit for low exposures of oxygen a single peak at 531.8 eV. This indicates together with the earlier observation of KO bond formation by EELS that a single K xO y species with equivalent oxygen atoms is formed. NEXAFS data indicate a partially filled O π* orbital and a strongly shifted σ-resonance. Photoemission, vibrational and Auger data suggest an ionic species which is close to potassium Superoxide with the OO bond oriented parallel to the surface.

  8. Dopamine adsorption on anatase TiO2(101): a photoemission and NEXAFS spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Syres, K; Thomas, A; Bondino, F; Malvestuto, M; Grätzel, M

    2010-09-21

    The adsorption of dopamine onto an anatase TiO(2)(101) single crystal has been studied using photoemission and NEXAFS techniques. Photoemission results suggest that the dopamine molecule adsorbs on the surface in a bidentate geometry, resulting in the removal of band gap states in the TiO(2) valence band. Using the searchlight effect, carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectra indicate that the phenyl rings in the dopamine molecules are orientated normal to the surface. A combination of experimental and computational results indicates the appearance of new unoccupied states arising following adsorption. The possible role of these states in the charge-transfer mechanism of the dopamine-TiO(2) system is discussed. PMID:20735026

  9. Newly Designed Apparatus for Measuring the Angular Dependent Surface Emittance in a Wide Wavelength Range and at Elevated Temperatures up to 1400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydzek, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini-Schuster, M.; Manara, J.

    2012-11-01

    An optimized apparatus for measuring the angular dependent surface emittance up to elevated temperatures has been designed. This emittance measurement apparatus (EMMA) is coupled to a Bruker Vertex 70v FTIR-spectrometer, so that a wavelength range from about 2 μm up to 25 μm is accessible. The central part of the new apparatus is a double walled, stainless steel vessel which can be evacuated or filled with various gases or with air. Inside the vessel a cylindrical tube furnace is pivot-mounted on a system of discs, for automatically rotating up to an angle of 180°. This allows both, the measurement at different detection angles (0° to 85°) and a consecutive measurement of sample and black-body reference without ventilating and opening the pot. The aim of this work is to present the newly designed emittance measurement apparatus which enables the determination of the angular dependent spectral emittance of opaque samples at temperatures up to 1400 °C. Next to the setup of the apparatus, the measurement results of various materials are presented at different detection angles.

  10. Angular dependant micro-ESR characterization of a locally doped Gd3+:Al2O3 hybrid system for quantum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisby, I. S.; de Graaf, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Meeson, P. J.; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Lindstrom, T.

    Rare-earth doped crystals interfaced with superconducting quantum circuitry are an attractive platform for quantum memory and transducer applications. Here we present a detailed characterization of a locally implanted Gd3+ in Al2O3 system coupled to a superconducting micro-resonator, by performing angular dependent micro-electron-spin-resonance (micro-ESR) measurements at mK temperatures. The device is fabricated using a hard Si3N4 mask to facilitate a local ion-implantation technique for precision control of the dopant location. The technique is found not to degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remains above 105 (1). We find the measured angular dependence of the micro-ESR spectra to be in excellent agreement with the modelled Hamiltonian, supporting the conclusion that the dopant ions are successfully integrated into their relevant lattice sites whilst maintaining crystalline symmetries. Furthermore, we observe clear contributions from individual microwave field components of our micro-resonator, emphasising the need for controllable local implantation. 1 Wisby et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 102601 (2014)

  11. Bonding and charge transfer in nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes: insights from NEXAFS spectra.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, C D; Copping, Roy; Wang, Shuao; Janousch, Markus; Teat, Simon J; Tyliszcak, Tolek; Canning, Andrew; Shuh, David K; Prendergast, David

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of three newly synthesized nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes [(UO2)(H2bbp)Cl2], [(UO)2(Hbbp)(Py)Cl], and [(UO2)(bbp)(Py)2] using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments and simulations. The complexes studied feature derivatives of the tunable tridentate N-donor ligand 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazyl)pyridine (bbp) and exhibit discrete chemical differences in uranyl coordination. The sensitivity of the N K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum to local bonding and charge transfer is exploited to systematically investigate the evolution of structural as well as electronic properties across the three complexes. A thorough interpretation of the measured experimental spectra is achieved via ab initio NEXAFS simulations based on the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach and enables the assignment of spectral features to electronic transitions on specific absorbing sites. We find that ligand-uranyl bonding leads to a signature blue shift in the N K-edge absorption onset, resulting from charge displacement toward the uranyl, while changes in the equatorial coordination shell of the uranyl lead to more subtle modulations in the spectral features. Theoretical simulations show that the flexible local chemistry at the nonbinding imidazole-N sites of the bbp ligand is also reflected in the NEXAFS spectra and highlights potential synthesis strategies to improve selectivity. In particular, we find that interactions of the bbp ligand with solvent molecules can lead to changes in ligand-uranyl binding geometry while also modulating the K-edge absorption. Our results suggest that NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with first-principles interpretation can offer insights into the coordination chemistry of analogous functionalized conjugated ligands. PMID:25330350

  12. NEXAFS Sensitivity to Bond Lengths in Complex Molecular Materials: A Study of Crystalline Saccharides.

    PubMed

    Gainar, Adrian; Stevens, Joanna S; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2015-11-12

    Detailed analysis of the C K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of a series of saccharides (fructose, xylose, glucose, galactose, maltose monohydrate, α-lactose monohydrate, anhydrous β-lactose, cellulose) indicates that the precise determination of IPs and σ* shape resonance energies is sensitive enough to distinguish different crystalline saccharides through the variations in their average C-OH bond lengths. Experimental data as well as FEFF8 calculations confirm that bond length variations in the organic solid state of 10(-2) Å can be experimentally detected, opening up the possibility to use NEXAFS for obtaining incisive structural information for molecular materials, including noncrystalline systems without long-range order such as dissolved species in solutions, colloids, melts, and similar amorphous phases. The observed bond length sensitivity is as good as that originally reported for gas-phase and adsorbed molecular species. NEXAFS-derived molecular structure data for the condensed phase may therefore be used to guide molecular modeling as well as to validate computationally derived structure models for such systems. Some results indicate further analytical value in that the σ* shape resonance analysis may distinguish hemiketals from hemiacetals (i.e., derived from ketoses and aldoses) as well as α from β forms of otherwise identical saccharides. PMID:26459024

  13. TXM-NEXAFS of TiO{sub 2}-Based Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, P.; Rehbein, S.; Heim, S.; Schneider, G.; Bittencourt, C.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Umek, P.; Arcon, D.; Ewels, C. P.

    2011-09-09

    In this work, electronic properties of individual TiO{sub x}-pristine nanoribbons (NR) prepared by hydrothermal treatment of anatase TiO{sub 2} micro-particles were studied using the HZB transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) at the BESSY II undulator beamline U41-FSGM. NEXAFS is ideally suited to study TiO{sub 2}-based materials because both the O K-edge and Ti L-edge features are very sensitive to the local bonding environment, providing diagnostic information about the crystal structures and oxidation states of various forms of titanium oxides and sub-oxides. TXM-NEXAFS combines full-field x-ray microscopy with spectroscopy, allowing the study of the electronic structure of individual nanostructures with spatial resolution better than 25 nm and a spectral resolution of up to E/{Delta}E = 10000. The typical image field in TXM-NEXAFS measurements is about 10 {mu}mx10 {mu}m, which is large compared to the individual nanoparticle. Therefore, one image stack already contains statistically significant data. In addition, the directional electric field vector (E-bar) of the x-rays can be used as a 'search tool' for the direction of chemical bonds of the atom selected by its absorption edge.

  14. Angular dependent study of spatial order-disorder transitions in the vortex matter of superconducting Yb3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Ravi P.; Thamizhavel, A.; Tomy, C. V.; Grover, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present here the results of angular-dependent magnetization measurements (both ac and dc) carried out in a weakly-pinned single crystal of a low Tc superconductor, Yb3Rh4Sn13. Both dc magnetization data (M-H) as well as the ac magnetic susceptibility plots (χ´(H)) have revealed the fingerprints of an order-disorder transition in the vortex matter for various orientations of the crystal with respect to the external magnetic field. Our findings show that the quality of the ordered Bragg glass (BG) phase in this isotropic compound depends significantly on the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the crystallographic axes; a better spatially ordered vortex configuration is obtained when the magnetic field is applied along the [110] direction than that when the magnetic field is applied along the [100] axis. The present findings in Yb3Rh4Sn13 bear resemblance with similar results reported earlier for borocarbide superconductors.

  15. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; de Simone, Monica; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach.

  16. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; de Simone, Monica; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-28

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach. PMID:26627945

  17. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; Simone, Monica de; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-28

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach.

  18. Adsorption of acetic acid on ice studied by ambient-pressure XPS and partial-electron-yield NEXAFS spectroscopy at 230-240 K.

    PubMed

    Křepelová, Adéla; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Brown, Matthew A; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ammann, Markus

    2013-01-17

    Ice plays a key role in the environment, and the ice-air interface influences heterogeneous chemical reactions between snowpack or cirrus clouds and the surrounding air. Soluble gases have been suspected to affect the topmost, disordered layer on ice (often referred to as a quasiliquid layer, QLL). Changes are especially expected in the hydrogen-bonding structure of water in the presence of solutes at the ice surface. Here, we used ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to detect acetic acid at the ice surface at 230-240 K under atmospheric conditions for the first time. Electron-kinetic-energy-dependent C 1s spectra indicate that acetic acid remains confined to the topmost ice surface layers. Spectral analysis provides information about the protonation state of acetate at the ice surface. Surface-sensitive Auger-electron-yield C-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra were recorded to probe the molecular state of the adsorbed species. The O-edge NEXAFS spectra show only minor differences between clean ice and ice with adsorbed acetic acid and thus indicate that acetic acid does not lead to an extended disordered layer on the ice surface between 230 and 240 K. PMID:23252403

  19. Electron-beam transmission through a micrometer-sized tapered-glass capillary: Dependence on incident energy and angular tilt angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Ikeda, T.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental study of 500- and 1000-eV incident electrons transmitted through a micrometer-sized funnel-shaped (tapered) glass capillary with inlet diameter 0.80 mm, outlet diameter 0.10 mm, and a length of 35 mm is reported. The properties of the electron beam transmitted were measured as a function of the emerging angle and the incident energy dependence. The angular profiles were found to be comprised of up to three peaks for both 500 and 1000 eV showing evidence for transmission going straight through the capillary without interacting with the walls (direct), as well as transmission resulting from Coulomb deflection of the electrons from a negative charge patch or by scattering from nuclei close to the surface of the capillary (indirect). The energy spectra show that elastically transmitted electrons dominate at 500 eV for increasing sample tilt angles up to ˜5.0°, while inelastic processes dominate for 1000 eV already at tilt angles of ˜1.0°. The angular width of the emitted electrons was found to constitute a narrow beam for direct (˜0.4°) and indirect (<0.6° for 500 eV and <1.0° for 1000 eV) transmission for both energies with the widths decreasing for the largest tilt angles measured and approaching the inherent resolution (˜0.3°) of the electron analyzer.

  20. SU-E-T-644: Evaluation of Angular Dependence Correction for 2D Array Detector Using for Quality Assurance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Karthikeyan, N; Ganesh, K M; Vikraman, S; Shariff, MH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector in quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT). Methods: Total ten patients comprising of different sites were planned for VMAT and taken for the study. Each plan was exposed on Matrix Evolution 2D array detector with Omnipro IMRT software based on the following three different methods using 6MV photon beams from Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. First method, VMAT plan was delivered on Matrix Evolution detector as it gantry mounted with dedicated holder with build-up of 2.3cm. Second, the VMAT plan was delivered with the static gantry angle on to the table mounted setup. Third, the VMAT plan was delivered with actual gantry angle on Matrix Evolution detector fixed in Multicube phantom with gantry angle sensor and angular dependence correction were applied to quantify the plan quality. For all these methods, the corresponding QA plans were generated in TPS and the dose verification was done for both point and 2D fluence analysis with pass criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. Results: The measured point dose variation for the first method was observed as 1.58±0.6% of mean and SD with TPS calculated. For second and third method, the mean and standard deviation(SD) was observed as 1.67±0.7% and 1.85±0.8% respectively. The 2D fluence analysis of measured and TPS calculated has the mean and SD of 97.9±1.1%, 97.88±1.2% and 97.55±1.3% for first, second and third methods respectively. The calculated two-tailed Pvalue for point dose and 2D fluence analysis shows the insignificance with values of 0.9316 and 0.9015 respectively, among the different methods of QA. Conclusion: The qualitative evaluation of angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector shows its competency in accuracy of quality assurance measurement of composite dose distribution of volumetric modulated arc therapy.

  1. SU-E-J-206: A Comparison of Different Hardware Design Approaches for Feature-Supported Optical Head-Tracking with Respect to Angular Dependencies

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, P; Wissel, T; Wagner, B; Bruder, R; Schweikard, A; Ernst, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that optical features significantly improve marker-less optical head-tracking for cranial radiotherapy. Simulations, however, showed that these optical features, which are used to derive tissue thickness, depend on the incident angle of the IR scanning laser beam and the perspective of the camera analyzing the reflective patterns. We present an experimental analysis determining which is the most robust optical setup concerning angular influences. Methods: In three consecutive experiments, the incident angle of the laser (1), the perspective of the camera (2) or both simultaneously (3, ‘inBeam’-perspective) were changed with respect to the target. We analyzed how this affects feature intensity. These intensities were determined from seven concentric regions of interest (ROIs) around the laser spot. Two targets were used: a tissue-like silicone phantom and a human's forehead. Results: For each experiment, the feature intensity generally decreases with increasing angle. We found that the optical properties of the silicone phantom do not fit the properties of human skin. Furthermore, the angular influence of the laser on the features is significantly higher than the perspective of the camera. With the ‘inBeam’- perspective, the smoothest decays of feature intensity were found. We suppose that this is because of a fixed relationship between both devices. This smoothness, suggesting a predictable functional relationship, may simplify angle compensation for machine learning algorithms. This is particularly prominent for the medial ROIs. The inner ROIs highly depend on the angle and power of the laser. The outer ROIs show less angular dependency but the signal strength is critically low and prone to artifacts. Therefore and because of the smooth decays, medial ROIs are a suitable tradeoff between susceptibility, signal-noise-ratio and distance to the center of the laser spot. Conclusion: For tissue thickness correlated feature

  2. Surface chemistry of alanine on Cu{111}: Adsorption geometry and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Cornish, Alix; Nicklin, Richard E. J.; Zheleva, Zhasmina V.; Held, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption of L-alanine on the Cu{111} single crystal surface was investigated as a model system for interactions between small chiral modifier molecules and close-packed metal surfaces. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy are used to determine the chemical state, bond coordination and out-of-plane orientation of the molecule on the surface. Alanine adsorbs in its anionic form at room temperature, whilst at low temperature the overlayer consists of anionic and zwitterionic molecules. NEXAFS spectra exhibit a strong angular dependence of the π* resonance associated with the carboxylate group, which allows determining the tilt angle of this group with respect to the surface plane (48° ± 2°) at room temperature. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) shows a p(2√{ 13} × 2√{ 13}) R 13 ° superstructure with only one domain, which breaks the mirror symmetry of the substrate and, thus, induces global chirality to the surface. Temperature-programmed XPS (TP-XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments indicate that the zwitterionic form converts into the anionic species (alaninate) at 293 K. The latter desorbs/decomposes between 435 K and 445 K.

  3. Topological dependence of Kepler's third law for collisionless periodic three-body orbits with vanishing angular momentum and equal masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrašinović, V.; Šuvakov, Milovan

    2015-09-01

    We present results of numerical calculations showing a three-body orbit's period's T dependence on its topology. This dependence is a simple linear one, when expressed in terms of appropriate variables, suggesting an exact mathematical law. This is the first known relation between topological and kinematical properties of three-body systems. We have used these results to predict the periods of several sets of as yet undiscovered orbits, but the relation also indicates that the number of periodic three-body orbits with periods shorter than any finite number is countable.

  4. Angular Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mouth. Overview Angular cheilitis (perlèche) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the corners of the mouth. Usually associated with a fungal ( Candidal ) or bacterial ( Staphylococcal ) infection, those ... people of all ages. Chronic pooling of saliva encourages fungal and bacterial growth, ...

  5. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  6. Large anisotropic Fe orbital moments in perpendicularly magnetized Co2FeAl Heusler alloy thin films revealed by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, Jun; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wen, Zhenchao; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2013-09-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in Heusler alloy Co2FeAl thin films sharing an interface with a MgO layer is investigated by angular-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Orbital and spin magnetic moments are deduced separately for Fe and Co 3d electrons. In addition, the PMA energies are estimated using the orbital magnetic moments parallel and perpendicular to the film surfaces. We found that PMA in Co2FeAl is determined mainly by the contribution of Fe atoms with large orbital magnetic moments, which are enhanced at the interface between Co2FeAl and MgO. Furthermore, element specific magnetization curves of Fe and Co are found to be similar, suggesting the existence of ferromagnetic coupling between Fe and Co PMA directions.

  7. Electrically Addressable Optical Devices Using A System Of Composite Layered Flakes Suspended In A Fluid Host To Obtain Angularly Depende

    DOEpatents

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-12-07

    Composite or layered flakes having a plurality of layers of different materials, which may be dielectric materials, conductive materials, or liquid crystalline materials suspended in a fluid host and subjected to an electric field, provide optical effects dependent upon the angle or orientation of the flakes in the applied electric field. The optical effects depend upon the composition and thickness of the layers, producing reflectance, interference, additive and/or subtractive color effects. The composition of layered flakes may also be selected to enhance and/or alter the dielectric properties of flakes, whereby flake motion in an electric field is also enhanced and/or altered. The devices are useful as active electro-optical displays, polarizers, filters, light modulators, and wherever controllable polarizing, reflecting and transmissive optical properties are desired.

  8. On the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. P.; Tavares, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Students of mechanics usually have difficulties when they learn about the rotation of a rigid body. These difficulties are rooted in the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity, because these vectors are not parallel, and we need in general to utilize a rotating frame of reference or a time dependent inertia tensor. We discuss a series of problems that introduce both difficulties.

  9. SU-E-T-44: Angular Dependence of Surface Dose Enhancement Measured On Several Inhomogeneities Using Radiochromic EBT3 Films

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, A; Schoenfeld, A; Poppinga, D; Chofor, N; Poppe, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quantification of the relative surface dose enhancement in dependence on the angle of incidence and the atomic number Z of the surface material. Methods: Experiments were performed with slabs made of aluminum, titanium, copper, silver, dental gold and lead. The metal slabs with equal sizes of 1.0×8.0×8.8mm{sup 3} were embedded in an Octavius 4D phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany). Radiochromic EBT3 films were used to measure the surface dose for angles of incidence ranging from 0° to 90°. The setup with the metals slabs at the isocenter was irradiated with acceleration voltages of 6MV and 10MV. Water reference measurements were taken under equal conditions. Results: The surface dose enhancement is highest for angles of incidence below 30° and drops significantly for higher. The surface dose enhancement produced by lead and dental gold at 6MV showed a peak of 65%. At 90°, the surface dose enhancement dropped to 15% for both materials. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 32%, 22% and 12% at 0°, respectively. At an angle of incidence of 80°, the values dropped to 22%, 18%, 12% und 6%. The values for 10MV were very similar. Lead and dental gold showed peaks of 65% und 60%. Their values dropped to 18% at an angle of 90°. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 30%, 20% and 8% at 0°. At 80° the values dropped to 30%, 20%, 12% and 5%. A dependence of the magnitude of the surface dose enhancement on the atomic number of the surface material can be seen, which is in consistence with literature. Conclusion: The results show that the surface dose enhancements near implant materials with high Z-values should be taken into consideration in radio therapy, even when the angle of incidence is flat.

  10. Angular-Dependent Phase Factor of Shubnikov-de Haas Oscillations in the Dirac Semimetal Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Z. J.; Zhao, D.; Jin, Z.; Shang, C.; Ma, L. K.; Ye, G. J.; Lei, B.; Wu, T.; Xia, Z. C.; Chen, X. H.

    2015-11-01

    We measure the magnetotransport properties of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 single crystal under magnetic fields up to 36 T. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations are clearly resolved and the n =1 Landau level is reached. A detailed analysis on the intercept of the Landau index plot reveals a significant dependence of the SdH phase factor on the orientation of the applied magnetic field. When the magnetic field is applied in the [001] direction, i.e., along the fourfold screw axis of the tetragonal crystal structure, a nontrivial π Berry phase, as predicted for the Dirac fermions, is observed. However, in a magnetic field tilted away from the [001] direction, the π Berry phase is evidently reduced, and a considerable enhancement of the effective mass is also revealed. Our observations demonstrate that the Dirac dispersion in Cd3As2 is effectively modified in a tilted magnetic field, whereas the preserved π Berry phase in a magnetic field along the [001] direction can be related to the realization of the Weyl fermions. The sudden change of the SdH phase also indicates a possible topological phase transition induced by the symmetry-breaking effect.

  11. Time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of B→φKS0π0 and φK±π∓

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Schott, G.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2008-11-01

    We perform a time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of the decays B0→φK*(892)0, φK2*(1430)0, and φ(Kπ)0*0 with the final sample of about 465×106 B Bmacr pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Twenty-four parameters are investigated, including the branching fractions, CP-violation parameters, and parameters sensitive to final-state interactions. We use the dependence on the Kπ invariant mass of the interference between the scalar and vector or tensor components to resolve discrete ambiguities of the strong and weak phases. We use the time evolution of the B→φKS0π0 channel to extract the CP-violation phase difference Δϕ00=0.28±0.42±0.04 between the B and Bmacr decay amplitudes. When the B→φK±π∓ channel is included, the fractions of longitudinal polarization fL of the vector-vector and vector-tensor decay modes are measured to be 0.494±0.034±0.013 and 0.901-0.058+0.046±0.037, respectively. This polarization pattern requires the presence of a positive-helicity amplitude in the vector-vector decay from a currently unknown source.

  12. Probing the Orientation of Surface-Immobilized Protein G B1 Using ToF-SIMS Sum Frequency Generation and NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    L Baugh; T Weidner; J Baio; P Nguyen; L Gamble; P Stayton; D Castner

    2011-12-31

    The ability to orient active proteins on surfaces is a critical aspect of many medical technologies. An important related challenge is characterizing protein orientation in these surface films. This study uses a combination of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to characterize the orientation of surface-immobilized Protein G B1, a rigid 6 kDa domain that binds the Fc fragment of IgG. Two Protein G B1 variants with a single cysteine introduced at either end were immobilized via the cysteine thiol onto maleimide-oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized gold and bare gold substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to measure the amount of immobilized protein, and ToF-SIMS was used to measure the amino acid composition of the exposed surface of the protein films and to confirm covalent attachment of protein thiol to the substrate maleimide groups. SFG and NEXAFS were used to characterize the ordering and orientation of peptide or side chain bonds. On both substrates and for both cysteine positions, ToF-SIMS data showed enrichment of mass peaks from amino acids located at the end of the protein opposite to the cysteine surface position as compared with nonspecifically immobilized protein, indicating end-on protein orientations. Orientation on the maleimide substrate was enhanced by increasing pH (7.0-9.5) and salt concentration (0-1.5 M NaCl). SFG spectral peaks characteristic of ordered {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet elements were observed for both variants but not for cysteine-free wild type protein on the maleimide surface. The phase of the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet peaks indicated a predominantly upright orientation for both variants, consistent with an end-on protein binding configuration. Polarization dependence of the NEXAFS signal from the N 1s to {pi}* transition of {beta}-sheet peptide bonds also

  13. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-12-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in the physics laboratory. Many traditional physics experiments can now be performed very conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment while simultaneously reducing the laboratory budget substantially by using student-owned smartphones.

  14. Study of CP Symmetry Violation in the Charmonium-K*(892) Channel By a Complete Time Dependent Angular Analysis (BaBar Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    T'Jampens, Stephane; /Orsay

    2006-09-18

    This thesis presents the full-angular time-dependent analysis of the vector-vector channel B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0}. After a review of the CP violation in the B meson system, the phenomenology of the charmonium-K*(892) channels is exposed. The method for the measurement of the transversity amplitudes of the B {yields} J/{psi}K*(892), based on a pseudo-likelihood method, is then exposed. The results from a 81.9 fb{sup -1} of collected data by the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance peak are |A{sub 0}|{sup 2} = 0.565 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.004, |A{sub {parallel}}|{sup 2} = 0.206 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, |A{sub {perpendicular}}|{sup 2} = 0.228 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, {delta}{sub {parallel}} = -2.766 {+-} 0.105 {+-} 0.040 and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.935 {+-} 0.067 {+-} 0.040. Note that ({delta}{sub {parallel}}, {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) {yields} (-{delta}{sub {parallel}}, {pi} - {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) is also a solution. The strong phases {delta}{sub {parallel}} and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} are at {approx}> 3{sigma} from {+-}{pi}, signing the presence of final state interactions and the breakdown of the factorization hypothesis. The forward-backward analysis of the K{pi} mass spectrum revealed the presence of a coherent S-wave interfering with the K*(892). It is the first evidence of this wave in the K{pi} system coming from a B meson. The particularity of the B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0} channel is to have a time-dependent but also an angular distribution which allows to measure sin 2{beta} but also cos2{beta}. The results from an unbinned maximum likelihood fit are sin 2{beta} = -0.10 {+-} 0.57 {+-} 0.14 and cos 2{beta} = 3.32{sub -0.96}{sup +0.76} {+-} 0.27 with the transversity amplitudes fixed to the values given above. The other solution for the strong phases flips the sign of cos 2{beta}. Theoretical considerations based on the s-quark helicity

  15. The nature of nitrate at the ice surface studied by XPS and NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Krepelová, Adéla; Newberg, John; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ammann, Markus

    2010-08-21

    Trace contaminants such as strong acids have been suggested to affect the thickness of the quasi-liquid layer at the ice/air interface, which is at the heart of heterogeneous chemical reactions between snowpacks or cirrus clouds and the surrounding air. We used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron yield near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to probe the ice surface in the presence of HNO(3) formed from the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO(2) at 230 K. We studied the nature of the adsorbed species at the ice/vapor interfaces as well as the effect of HNO(3) on the hydrogen bonding environment at the ice surface. The NEXAFS spectrum of ice with adsorbed HNO(3) can be represented as linear combination of the clean ice and nitrate solution spectrum, thus indicating that in the presence of HNO(3) the ice surface consists of a mixture of clean ice and nitrate ions that are coordinated as in a concentrated solution at the same temperature but higher HNO(3) pressures. PMID:20532376

  16. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  17. NEXAFS and XMCD studies of single-phase Co doped ZnO thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav Pratap; Kumar, Ravi; Thakur, P; Brookes, N B; Chae, K H; Choi, W K

    2009-05-01

    A study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Co doped ZnO thin films synthesized by ion implantation followed by swift heavy ion irradiation is presented using near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements. The spectral features of NEXAFS at the Co L(3,2)-edge show entirely different features than that of metallic Co clusters and other Co oxide phases. The atomic multiplet calculations are performed to determine the valence state, symmetry and the crystal field splitting, which show that in the present system Co is in the 2+ state and substituted at the Zn site in tetrahedral symmetry with 10Dq = -0.6 eV. The ferromagnetic character of these materials is confirmed through XMCD spectra. To rule out the possibilities of defect induced magnetism, the results are compared with Ar annealed and Ar-ion implanted pure ZnO thin films. The presented results confirm the substitution of Co at the Zn site in the ZnO matrix, which is responsible for room temperature ferromagnetism. PMID:21825451

  18. Vibrationally resolved high-resolution NEXAFS and XPS spectra of phenanthrene and coronene

    SciTech Connect

    Fronzoni, Giovanna; Baseggio, Oscar; Stener, Mauro; Hua, Weijie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi; Apicella, Barbara; Alfé, Michela; Simone, Monica de; Kivimäki, Antti; Coreno, Marcello

    2014-07-28

    We performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the C1s Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy in the gas phase of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and coronene), typically formed in combustion reactions. In the NEXAFS of both molecules, a double-peak structure appears in the C1s → LUMO region, which differ by less than 1 eV in transition energies. The vibronic coupling is found to play an important role in such systems. It leads to weakening of the lower-energy peak and strengthening of the higher-energy one because the 0 − n (n > 0) vibrational progressions of the lower-energy peak appear in nearly the same region of the higher-energy peak. Vibrationally resolved theoretical spectra computed within the Frank-Condon (FC) approximation and linear coupling model agree well with the high-resolution experimental results. We find that FC-active normal modes all correspond to in-plane vibrations.

  19. Direct measurement of the angular dependence of the single-photon ionization of aligned N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, I.; Lock, R.; Sharma, V.; Gagnon, E.; Pratt, S. T.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Murnane, M. M.; Li, W.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Colorado; NIST

    2008-01-01

    By combining a state-of-the-art high-harmonic ultrafast soft X-ray source with field-free dynamic alignment, we map the angular dependence of molecular photoionization yields for the first time for a nondissociative molecule. The observed modulation in ion yield as a function of molecular alignment is attributed to the molecular frame transition dipole moment of single-photon ionization to the X, A and B states of N{sub 2}{sup +} and CO{sub 2}{sup +}. Our data show that the transition dipoles for single-photon ionization of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at 43 eV have larger perpendicular components than parallel ones. A direct comparison with published theoretical partial wave ionization cross-sections confirms these experimental observations, which are the first results to allow such comparison with theory for bound cation states. The results provide the first step toward a novel method for measuring molecular frame transition dipole matrix elements.

  20. C K-edge NEXAFS spectra of graphene with physical and chemical defects: a study based on density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Christopher; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Saalfrank, Peter

    2014-07-21

    Recently, C K-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of graphite (HOPG) surfaces have been measured for the pristine material, and for HOPG treated with either bromine or krypton plasmas (Lippitz et al., Surf. Sci., 2013, 611, L1). Changes of the NEXAFS spectra characteristic for physical (krypton) and/or chemical/physical modifications of the surface (bromine) upon plasma treatment were observed. Their molecular origin, however, remained elusive. In this work we study by density functional theory, the effects of selected point and line defects as well as chemical modifications on NEXAFS carbon K-edge spectra of single graphene layers. For Br-treated surfaces, also Br 3d X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) are simulated by a cluster approach, to identify possible chemical modifications. We observe that some of the defects related to plasma treatment lead to characteristic changes of NEXAFS spectra, similar to those in experiment. Theory provides possible microscopic origins for these changes. PMID:24901898

  1. Angular dependence of the flux pinning for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}/PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Horng, H.E.; Wu, J.M.; Yang, H.C.

    1997-06-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetic relaxation for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}/PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (YBCO/PBCO) superlattice was measured under magnetic field to investigate the flux pinning. The applied magnetic field was 0.1 Tesla. The direction of the applied magnetic field makes an angle of 10{degrees}, 20{degrees}, 30{degrees}, 45{degrees}... with the c-axis of YBCO/PBCO superlattice. Based on the Anderson-Kim model the authors derive the pinning energy of this film. The pinning energy is angular independent. The results are discussed.

  2. Measurements of the angular dependence of the nonlinear transverse magnetic moment of YBCO as a probe of the pairing-state symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anand

    The symmetry of the superconducting order parameter reflects the symmetries in the underlying mechanism of electron pairing, such as 's-wave ' symmetry for conventional BCS superconductors with a phonon mediated pairing mechanism. The High-Tc superconductors are widely believed to be unconventional, inasmuch the conventional BCS theory fails to describe their physical properties. Amongst the proposed theories for describing these novel superconductors, the leading candidate for the pairing state symmetry is dx2-y2 or 'd-wave'. This state has a lower symmetry than the underlying Fermi surface, has nodes where the order parameter changes sign and the gap goes to zero on the Fermi surface, with a finite density of states for the lowest lying excitations. In order to study the pairing symmetry, we have developed a technique that uses the nonlinear Meissner effect in the transverse magnetic moment (NLTM) as a probe of the low energy excitations, below 1 meV. The predictions for this effect are known from exact numerical calculations based on the ideas of Yip and Sauls. In this thesis, our experiment is motivated with a brief overview of the pairing state problem. Techniques for sample preparation as also the development of various instrumentation techniques to study the angular dependence of the NLTM are described, and the results of our experiments are presented. Our data on high quality single crystals of YBa2Cu3O6.95 support a minimum gap of 0.5--0.75 meV in the quasiparticle excitation spectrum at all points on the Fermi surface. This is contrary to pure ' d-wave' symmetry, but does not rule out gap functions with deep minima or 'quasinode'.

  3. NEXAFS Depth Profiling of Surface Segregation in Block Copolymer Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Paik, M; Ober, C; Martinelli, E; Galli, G; Sohn, K; Kramer, E; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    NEXAFS spectroscopy was used to probe the surface composition and under-water surface reconstruction of thin films of comb-like diblock copolymers with cylindrical and spherical microphases. The polymers consisted of a polystyrene block, and a second block prepared from a styrenic monomer grafted with fluoroalkyl-tagged poly(ethylene glycol) side chains. Compositional depth profiling of the microphase separated block copolymer films, in the top 1-3 nm of the film, was performed to understand the role of block copolymer microstructure and self-assembly on surface composition. Using experimentally determined concentration profiles, the surface concentration of phenyl ring carbon atoms was quantified and compared with those of homopolymer and random copolymer controls. The carbon atoms from the relatively high surface energy phenyl groups were depleted or excluded from the surface, in favor of the low surface-energy fluoroalkyl groups. While it is expected that block copolymer surfaces will be completely covered by a wetting lamellar layer of the lower surface energy block, a significant amount of the higher surface energy polystyrene block was found to be present in the surface region of the cylinder-forming block copolymer. Evidently, the spontaneous formation of the cylindrical polystyrene microdomains in the near-surface region compensated for the lowering of the free energy that could have been achieved by completely covering the surfaces with a lamellar layer of the lower surface energy fluorinated block. All surfaces underwent molecular reconstruction after immersion in water. The experimental concentration depth profiles indicated an increased surface depletion of phenyl ring carbon atoms in the water-immersed thin films, due to the tendency of hydrophilic PEG side groups to be present at the polymer-water interface. Such a detailed characterization of the outermost layers of the block copolymer surfaces was possible because of the exceptional depth resolution

  4. Angular dependences in auger electron emission from the Ni(001) face. II. Angular distribution of auger electron emission from the Ni(001) face for different temperatures and different electron energies in M 2,3VV transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mróz, S.; Mróz, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Fritzsche, V.

    1989-12-01

    Angular-resolved Auger electron spectroscopy (ARAES) was applied for the investigation of the Ni(001) face of both a clean surface and a surface covered with a c(2 × 2) sulphur layer at different sample temperatures. Polar ARAES profiles measured for the NiM 2,3VV transition are presented for the [100] and [110] azimuths, for the full Auger current and for particular Auger energies as well. These latter profiles are theoretically calculated and compared with experiment. An increase of the temperature up to 980 K does not influence appreciably the polar ARAES profiles for the c(2 × 2) {S}/{Ni}(001) sample. It indicates that the atomic structure of the surface investigated is not changed in this temperature region.

  5. The Dependence of Stellar Mass and Angular Momentum Losses on Latitude and the Interaction of Active Region and Dipolar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2015-11-01

    Rotation evolution of late-type stars is dominated by magnetic braking and the underlying factors that control this angular momentum loss are important for the study of stellar spin-down. In this work, we study angular momentum loss as a function of two different aspects of magnetic activity using a calibrated Alfvén wave-driven magnetohydrodynamic wind model: the strengths of magnetic spots and their distribution in latitude. By driving the model using solar and modified solar surface magnetograms, we show that the topology of the field arising from the net interaction of both small-scale and large-scale field is important for spin-down rates and that angular momentum loss is not a simple function of large scale magnetic field strength. We find that changing the latitude of magnetic spots can modify mass and angular momentum loss rates by a factor of two. The general effect that causes these differences is the closing down of large-scale open field at mid- and high-latitudes by the addition of the small-scale field. These effects might give rise to modulation of mass and angular momentum loss through stellar cycles, and present a problem for ab initio attempts to predict stellar spin-down based on wind models. For all the magnetogram cases considered here, from dipoles to various spotted distributions, we find that angular momentum loss is dominated by the mass loss at mid-latitudes. The spin-down torque applied by magnetized winds therefore acts at specific latitudes and is not evenly distributed over the stellar surface, though this aspect is unlikely to be important for understanding spin-down and surface flows on stars.

  6. Angular momentum projected semiclassics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasse, Rainer W.

    1987-06-01

    By using angular momentum projected plane waves as wave functions, we derive semiclassical expressions for the single-particle propagator, the partition function, the nonlocal density matrix, the single-particle density and the one particle-one hole level density for fixed angular momentum and fixed z-component or summed over the z-components. Other quantities can be deduced from the propagator. In coordinate space ( r, r') the relevant quantities depend on |r-r'| instead of | r- r'| and in Wigner space ( R, P) they become proportional to the angular momentum constraints δ(| R × P|/ h̵-l) and δ( R × P) z/ h̵-m) . As applications we calculate the single-particle and one-particle-one hole level densities for harmonic oscillator and Hill-Wheeler box potentials and the imaginary part of the optical potential and its volume integral with an underlying harmonic oscillator potential and a zero range two-body interaction.

  7. On the importance of nuclear quantum motions in near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-02-26

    We report the effects of sampling nuclear quantum motion with path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) on calculations of the nitrogen K-edge spectra of two isolated organic molecules. S-triazine, a prototypical aromatic molecule occupying primarily its vibrational ground state at room temperature, exhibits substantially improved spectral agreement when nuclear quantum effects are included via PIMD, as compared to the spectra obtained from either a single fixed-nuclei based calculation or from a series of configurations extracted from a classical molecular dynamics trajectory. Nuclear quantum dynamics can accurately explain the intrinsic broadening of certain features. Glycine, the simplest amino acid, is problematic due to large spectral variations associated with multiple energetically accessible conformations at the experimental temperature. This work highlights the sensitivity of NEXAFS to quantum nuclear motions in molecules, and the necessity of accurately sampling such quantum motion when simulating their NEXAFS spectra.

  8. Vulcanization reaction of squalene and S8 powder studied by Sulfur K-edge NEXAFS under liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, S.; Menjo, Y.; Tsukada, C.; Ogawa, S.; Kutluk, G.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Vulcanized rubber materials are useful in our surroundings. However, detail structure and reaction are not revealed even in present. Since squalene molecule possesses some same properties compared with natural rubber, we have prepared the samples of vulcanized squalene at 140 °C for several hours. To understand the vulcanization reaction,sulfur K-edge NEXAFS measurements have been carried out for the vulcanized squalene under liquid phase with He-path system and fluorescence detection mode. Moreover, we have tried curve fitting analysis of NEXAFS spectra. The results indicate that the squalene has been vulcanized by the S8 molecule at 140 °C and the S8 molecule length is shortened from 8 to 5-6 after the vulcanization reaction.

  9. The Structure of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Water: Studies Combining UV-Vis, NEXAFS and RIXS Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainar, A.; Stevens, J. S.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    NEXAFS-RIXS and home laboratory-based UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy are combined to examine the speciation and electronic structure of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) in aqueous solution as a function of pH. DFT and TD-DFT electronic structure calculations reproduce the experimental trends and provide a correlation between the experimental HOMO↔LUMO gap as well as the electronic transitions between molecular orbitals in the non-ionic, anionic and cationic forms of PABA.

  10. Characterization of microscale wear in a ploysilicon-based MEMS device using AFM and PEEM-NEXAFS spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, D. S.; Konicek, A. R.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Sumant, A. V.; de Boer, M. P.; Corwin, A. D.; Carpick, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms of microscale wear in silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are elucidated by studying a polysilicon nanotractor, a device specifically designed to conduct friction and wear tests under controlled conditions. Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) was combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantitatively probe chemical changes and structural modification, respectively, in the wear track of the nanotractor. The ability of PEEM-NEXAFS to spatially map chemical variations in the near-surface region of samples at high lateral spatial resolution is unparalleled and therefore ideally suited for this study. The results show that it is possible to detect microscopic chemical changes using PEEM-NEXAFS, specifically, oxidation at the sliding interface of a MEMS device. We observe that wear induces oxidation of the polysilicon at the immediate contact interface, and the spectra are consistent with those from amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The oxidation is correlated with gouging and debris build-up in the wear track, as measured by AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  11. Plasma bromination of HOPG surfaces: A NEXAFS and synchrotron XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippitz, Andreas; Friedrich, Jörg F.; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Br bonding on plasma brominated graphite surfaces has been studied by using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Br2 and bromoform were used as plasma gases in an r.f. cw low pressure plasma process. Kr plasma had been used to study separately the physical and chemical plasma etching effects. At early steps of plasma bromination which lead to only small XPS Br surface concentration values a quick decay of aromaticity has been observed. At low Br surface concentration radical or even electrophilic addition of bromine onto sp2 carbon atoms is discussed as the dominating reaction pathway. At higher Br surface concentrations the inherent formation of sp3 defects in the graphene network by chemical etching processes promotes nucleophilic substitution of bromine at sp3 carbons as a competing reaction pathway. Both reaction pathways lead to C-Br species characterized by the same Br 3d XPS binding energy. However more than one Br 3d component in XP spectra has been found at lower Br2 plasma induced Br surface concentrations and complexation of bromine at HOPG is assumed as a third way of interaction with Br2 plasma.

  12. Phenomenology of preequilibrium angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbach, C.; Mann, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    The systematics of continuum angular distributions from a wide variety of light ion nuclear reactions have been studied. To first order, the shape of the angular distributions have been found to depend only on the energy of the outgoing particle and on the division of the cross section into multi-step direct and multi-step compound parts. The angular distributions can be described in terms of Legendre polynomials with the reduced polynomial coefficients exhibiting a simple dependence on the outgoing particle energy. Two integer and four continuous parameters with universal values are needed to describe the coefficients for outgoing energies of 2 to 60 MeV in all the reaction types studied. This parameterization combined with a modified Griffin model computer code permits the calculation of double differential cross sections for light ion continuum reactions where no data is available.

  13. Optical devices having flakes suspended in a host fluid to provide a flake/fluid system providing flakes with angularly dependent optical properties in response to an alternating current electric field due to the dielectric properties of the system

    DOEpatents

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2006-05-09

    Optical devices utilizing flakes (also called platelets) suspended in a host fluid have optical characteristics, such as reflective properties, which are angular dependent in response to an AC field. The reflectivity may be Bragg-like, and the characteristics are obtained through the use of flakes of liquid crystal material, such as polymer liquid crystal (PLC) materials including polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) and polymer nematic liquid crystal (PNLC) material or birefringent polymers (BP). The host fluid may be propylene carbonate, poly(ethylene glycol) or other fluids or fluid mixtures having fluid conductivity to support conductivity in the flake/host system. AC field dependent rotation of 90.degree. can be obtained at rates and field intensities dependent upon the frequency and magnitude of the AC field. The devices are useful in providing displays, polarizers, filters, spatial light modulators and wherever switchable polarizing, reflecting, and transmission properties are desired.

  14. Angular Momentum and Topological Dependence of Kepler's Third Law in the Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon Family of Periodic Three-Body Orbits.

    PubMed

    Janković, Marija R; Dmitrašinović, V

    2016-02-12

    We use 57 recently found topological satellites of Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon's periodic orbits with values of the topological exponent k ranging from k=3 to k=58 to plot the angular momentum L as a function of the period T, with both L and T rescaled to energy E=-0.5. Upon plotting L(T/k) we find that all our solutions fall on a curve that is virtually indiscernible by the naked eye from the L(T) curve for nonsatellite solutions. The standard deviation of the satellite data from the sixth-order polynomial fit to the progenitor data is σ=0.13. This regularity supports Hénon's 1976 conjecture that the linearly stable Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon orbits are also perpetually, or Kol'mogorov-Arnol'd-Moser, stable. PMID:26918993

  15. Angular Momentum and Topological Dependence of Kepler's Third Law in the Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon Family of Periodic Three-Body Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Marija R.; Dmitrašinović, V.

    2016-02-01

    We use 57 recently found topological satellites of Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon's periodic orbits with values of the topological exponent k ranging from k =3 to k =58 to plot the angular momentum L as a function of the period T , with both L and T rescaled to energy E =-0.5 . Upon plotting L (T /k ) we find that all our solutions fall on a curve that is virtually indiscernible by the naked eye from the L (T ) curve for nonsatellite solutions. The standard deviation of the satellite data from the sixth-order polynomial fit to the progenitor data is σ =0.13 . This regularity supports Hénon's 1976 conjecture that the linearly stable Broucke-Hadjidemetriou-Hénon orbits are also perpetually, or Kol'mogorov-Arnol'd-Moser, stable.

  16. Model-Dependent Constraint on Quark Total Angular Momentum Based on the Transverse Target-spin Asymmetry Measured in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Wolf-Dieter

    2007-06-13

    Results are reported on the transverse target-spin asymmetry (TTSA) associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. The data have been accumulated in the years 2002-2004 by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV e+ beam scattered on a transversely polarized hydrogen target. Two azimuthal amplitudes of the TTSA appearing to LO in 1/Q and {alpha}s, A{sub UT}{sup sin({phi}-{phi}{sub S})cos{phi}} and A{sub UT}{sup cos({phi} -{phi}{sub S})sin{phi}}, are given as a function of -t,xB,Q2 in the kinematic range |t| < 0.7 GeV2, 0.03 < xB < 0.35 and 1 < Q2 < 10 GeV2. The first amplitude is found to be sensitive to the generalized parton distribution (GPD) E of the proton, which can be parameterized in a GPD model through quark total angular momentum Jq(q = u, d). Within the context of this model, a constraint in the (Ju,Jd) plane is obtained from HERMES TTSA data.

  17. Partonic orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh; Shahveh, Abolfazl

    2013-04-01

    Ji's decomposition of nucleon spin is used and the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluon are calculated. We have utilized the so called valon model description of the nucleon in the next to leading order. It is found that the average orbital angular momentum of quarks is positive, but small, whereas that of gluon is negative and large. Individual quark flavor contributions are also calculated. Some regularities on the total angular momentum of the quarks and gluon are observed.

  18. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  19. Charge-multiplicity dependence of single-particle transverse-rapidity yt and pseudorapidity η densities and 2D angular correlations from 200 GeV p -p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Prindle, Duncan J.

    2016-01-01

    An established phenomenology and theoretical interpretation of p -p collision data at lower collision energies should provide a reference for p -p and other collision systems at higher energies, against which claims of novel physics may be tested. The description of p -p collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider has remained incomplete even as claims for collectivity and other novelties in data from smaller systems at the large hadron collider have emerged recently. In this study we report the charge-multiplicity dependence of two-dimensional angular correlations and of single-particle (SP) densities on transverse rapidity yt and pseudorapidity η from 200 GeV p -p collisions. We define a comprehensive and self-consistent two-component (soft+hard ) model for hadron production and report a significant p -p nonjet quadrupole component as a third (angular-correlation) component. Our results have implications for p -p centrality, the underlying event, collectivity in small systems and the existence of flows in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  20. Angular Acceleration Without Torque?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.2

  1. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  2. Determination of g-tensors of low-symmetry Nd{sup 3+} centers in LiNbO{sub 3} by rectification of angular dependence of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, V. Malovichko, G.; Munro, M.; Kokanyan, E.

    2015-07-28

    Two procedures for facilitation of line tracing and deciphering of complicated spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were developed: a correction of microwave frequencies for every orientation of external magnetic field on the base of known values of g-tensor components for a reference paramagnetic center and followed rectification of measured angular dependences using plots of effective deviation of g{sup 2}-factors of observed lines from effective g{sup 2}-factors of the reference center versus angles or squared cosines of angles describing magnetic field orientations. Their application to EPR spectra of nearly stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals doped with neodymium allowed identifying two axial and six different low-symmetry Nd{sup 3+} centers, to determine all components of their g-tensors, and to propose common divacancy models for a whole family of Nd{sup 3+} centers.

  3. Influence of the FFLO-like state on the upper critical field of a superconductor/ferromagnet bilayer: Angular and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenk, D.; Hemmida, M.; Morari, R.; Zdravkov, V. I.; Ullrich, A.; Müller, C.; Sidorenko, A. S.; Horn, S.; Tagirov, L. R.; Loidl, A.; von Nidda, H.-A. Krug; Tidecks, R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the upper critical magnetic field Hc of a superconductor-ferromagnet (S/F) bilayer of Nb/Cu41Ni59 and a Nb film (as reference). We obtained the dependence of Hc ⊥ and Hc ∥ (perpendicular and parallel to the film plane, respectively) on the temperature T by measurements of the resistive transitions and the dependence on the inclination angle θ of the applied field to the film plane, by nonresonant microwave absorption. Over a wide range, Hc ⊥ and Hc ∥ show the temperature dependence predicted by the Ginzburg-Landau theory. At low temperatures and close to the critical temperature, deviations are observed. While Hc(θ ) of the Nb film follows the Tinkham prediction for thin superconducting films, the Nb/Cu41Ni59 -bilayer data exhibit deviations when θ approaches zero. We attribute this finding to the additional anisotropy induced by the quasi-one-dimensional Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO)-like state and propose a new vortex structure in S/F bilayers, adopting the segmentation approach from high-temperature superconductors.

  4. Stellar Angular Diameter Relations for Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Arthur; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2016-01-01

    Determining the physical properties of microlensing events depends on having accurate angular radii of the source star. Using long-baseline optical interferometry we are able to determine the angular sizes of nearby stars with uncertainties less than 2 percent. We present empirical estimates of angular diameters for both dwarfs/subgiants and giant stars as functions of five color indices which are relevant to planned microlensing surveys. We find in all considered colors that metallicity does not play a statistically significant role in predicting stellar size for the samples of stars considered.

  5. Improve angular dependence of emission intensity in top-emitting organic light-emitting devices by using curved surfaces as substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifan; Yang, Tong; Ou, Xiali; Gao, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have demonstrated an effective way to suppress the viewing angle dependence of the emission intensity of top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (TOLEDs) by fabricating devices on curved surfaces. From this approach, curved light emission surface has been obtained and TOLEDs with curved surface exhibit a relatively dispersed light emission pattern. As a result, the variation of emission intensity with viewing angles can be relieved. In addition, we can almost observe the same luminance and efficiency in OLEDs with and without curved surface light emission.

  6. Electronic quenching of O({sup 1}D) by Xe: Oscillations in the product angular distribution and their dependence on collision energy

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Lauren A.; Smith, Mica C.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.; Boering, Kristie A.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-08-07

    The dynamics of the O({sup 1}D) + Xe electronic quenching reaction was investigated in a crossed beam experiment at four collision energies. Marked large-scale oscillations in the differential cross sections were observed for the inelastic scattering products, O({sup 3}P) and Xe. The shape and relative phases of the oscillatory structure depend strongly on collision energy. Comparison of the experimental results with time-independent scattering calculations shows qualitatively that this behavior is caused by Stueckelberg interferences, for which the quantum phases of the multiple reaction pathways accessible during electronic quenching constructively and destructively interfere.

  7. Neoclassical Angular Momentum Flux Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2004-11-01

    The toroidal angular momentum flux in neoclassical transport theory of small rotations depends on the second order (in ion poloidal gyroradius over plasma scale length) ion distribution function. Owing to the complexity of the calculation, the result obtained a long time ago for circular cross-section tokamak plasmas in the banana regime [M.N. Rosenbluth, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, Vienna, 1971), Vol. 1, p. 495] has never been reproduced. Using a representation of the angular momentum flux based on the solution of an adjoint equation to the usual linearized drift kinetic equation, and performing systematically a large-aspect-ratio expansion, we have obtained the flux for flux surfaces of arbitrary shape. We have found the same analytic form for the temperature gradient driven part of the flux, but the overall numerical multiplier is different and has the opposite sign. Implications for rotations in discharges with no apparent momentum input will be discussed.

  8. Study of angular dependence of exchange bias and misalignment in uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropy in NiFe(111)/FeMn(111)/CoFeB(amorphous) stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Braj Bhusan; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2015-07-01

    We report the investigation of the in-plane azimuthal angular dependence of the magnetization reversal in the ion beam sputtered exchanged biased NiFe(111)/FeMn(111)/CoFeB(amorphous) stack. Compared to the as-deposited case, the magnetic annealing resulted in 3 fold enhancement in exchange bias but decrease in coercivity. The observed cosine dependence of exchange biased CoFeB layer on the in-plane azimuthal angle of applied field is corroborated with Meiklejohn and Bean model. The training effect associated with the exchange bias showed unconventional increase in coercivity after first cycle of hysteresis loop, while the exchange bias decreases sharply, and for subsequent cycles the exchange bias follows the empirical relation based on the energy dissipation in the AF layer. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements also exhibited the in-plane azimuthal angle dependence of the magnetic resonance field indicating that the uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropies are not collinear, although they lie in the same plane. However, no misalignment between the unidirectional anisotropy and the exchange bias direction is observed. The misalignment angle between the uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropy, as measured by FMR, is found to be 10° and 14° for CoFeB and NiFe, respectively. This misalignment is attributed to the interface roughness as revealed by x-ray reflectance measurements.

  9. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  10. Nanoscale Biogeocomplexity of the Organomineral Assemblage in Soil: Application of STXM Microscopy and C 1s-NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyangi,J.; Solomon, D.; Liang, B.; Lerotic, M.; Wirick, S.; Lehmann, J.

    2006-01-01

    Methodological constraints limit the extent to which existing soil aggregation models explain carbon (C) stabilization in soil. We hypothesize that the physical infrastructure of microaggregates plays a major role in determining the chemistry of the occluded C and intimate associations between particulate C, chemically stabilized C and the soil mineral matrix. We employed synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (C 1s-NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate the nanoscale physical assemblage and C chemistry of 150-{micro}m microaggregates from a Kenyan Oxisol. Ultra-thin sections were obtained after embedding microaggregates in a sulfur block and sectioning on a cryo-microtome at -55 degrees C. Principal component and cluster analyses revealed four spatially distinct features: pore surfaces, mineral matter, organic matter, and their mixtures. The occurrence of these features did not vary between exterior and interior locations; however, the degree of oxidation decreased while the complexity and occurrence of aliphatic C forms increased from exterior to interior regions of the microaggregate. At both locations, compositional mapping rendered a nanoscale distribution of oxidized C clogging pores and coating pore cavities on mineral surface. Hydrophobic organic matter of aromatic and aliphatic nature, representing particulate C forms appeared physically occluded in 2- to 5-{micro}m pore spaces. Our findings demonstrate that organic matter in microaggregates may be found as either oxidized C associated with mineral surfaces or aromatic and aliphatic C in particulate form. Using STXM and C 1s-NEXAFS we are for the first time able to resolve the nanoscale biogeocomplexity of unaltered soil microaggregates.

  11. Conformations of polyaniline molecules adsorbed on Au(111) probed by in situ STM and ex situ XPS and NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Lee, YiHui; Chang, ChinZen; Yau, ShuehLin; Fan, LiangJen; Yang, YawWen; Yang, LiangYueh Ou; Itaya, Kingo

    2009-05-13

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) have been used to examine the conformation of a monolayer of polyaniline (PAN) molecules produced on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode by anodization at 1.0 V [vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)] in 0.10 M H(2)SO(4) containing 0.030 M aniline. The as-produced PAN molecules took on a well-defined linear conformation stretching for 500 A or more, as shown by in situ and ex situ STM. The XPS and NEXAFS results indicated that the linear PAN seen at 1.0 V assumed the form of an emeraldine salt made of PAN chains and (bi)sulfate anions. Shifting the potential from 1.0 to 0.7 V altered the shape of the PAN molecules from straight to crooked, which was ascribed to restructuring of the Au(111) electrified interface on the basis of voltammetric and XPS results. In situ STM showed that further decreasing the potential to 0.5 V transformed the crooked PAN threads into a mostly linear form again, with preferential alignment and formation of some locally ordered structures. PAN molecules could be reduced from emeraldine to leucoemeraldine as the potential was decreased to 0.2 V or less. In situ STM showed that the fully reduced PAN molecules were straight but mysteriously shortened to approximately 50 A in length. The conformation of PAN did not recuperate when the potential was shifted positively to 1.0 V. PMID:19361217

  12. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  13. One-dimensional photonic crystals with a planar oriented nematic layer: Temperature and angular dependence of the spectra of defect modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, V. G.; Gunyakov, V. A.; Myslivets, S. A.; Gerasimov, V. P.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Vetrov, S. Ya.; Shabanov, V. F.

    2008-02-01

    Transmission spectra of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) formed by two multilayer dielectric mirrors and a planar oriented layer of 5CB nematic liquid crystal (LC) that is sandwiched between these mirrors and serves as a structure defect are investigated experimentally. Specific features of the behavior of the spectrum of defect modes as a function of the angle of incidence of light on the crystal are studied for two polarizations: parallel and perpendicular to the director of the LC; the director either lies in the plane of incidence or is perpendicular to it. It is shown that, for the configurations considered, the maxima of the defect modes shift toward the short-wavelength region as the tilt angle of incidence radiation increases; this tendency is more manifest for the parallel-polarized component, when the director lies in the plane of incidence. In the latter case, the width of the photonic band gap (PBG) appreciably decreases. The temperature dependence of the polarization components of the transmission spectra of a PC is investigated in the case of normal incidence of light. The spectral shift of defect modes due to the variation of the refractive index of the LC at the nematic-isotropic liquid phase transition point is measured. It is shown that, in real PCs, the amplitude of defect modes decreases when approaching the center of the band gap, as well as when the number of layers in the dielectric mirrors increases. Theoretical transmission spectra of the PCs calculated by the method of recurrence relations with regard to the decay of defect modes are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. One-dimensional photonic crystals with a planar oriented nematic layer: Temperature and angular dependence of the spectra of defect modes

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipkin, V. G. Gunyakov, V. A.; Myslivets, S. A.; Gerasimov, V. P.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Vetrov, S. Ya.; Shabanov, V. F.

    2008-02-15

    Transmission spectra of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) formed by two multilayer dielectric mirrors and a planar oriented layer of 5CB nematic liquid crystal (LC) that is sandwiched between these mirrors and serves as a structure defect are investigated experimentally. Specific features of the behavior of the spectrum of defect modes as a function of the angle of incidence of light on the crystal are studied for two polarizations: parallel and perpendicular to the director of the LC; the director either lies in the plane of incidence or is perpendicular to it. It is shown that, for the configurations considered, the maxima of the defect modes shift toward the short-wavelength region as the tilt angle of incidence radiation increases; this tendency is more manifest for the parallel-polarized component, when the director lies in the plane of incidence. In the latter case, the width of the photonic band gap (PBG) appreciably decreases. The temperature dependence of the polarization components of the transmission spectra of a PC is investigated in the case of normal incidence of light. The spectral shift of defect modes due to the variation of the refractive index of the LC at the nematic-isotropic liquid phase transition point is measured. It is shown that, in real PCs, the amplitude of defect modes decreases when approaching the center of the band gap, as well as when the number of layers in the dielectric mirrors increases. Theoretical transmission spectra of the PCs calculated by the method of recurrence relations with regard to the decay of defect modes are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Angular momentum radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thidé, B.; Tamburini, F.; Then, H.; Someda, C. G.; Mari, Elletra; Parisi, G.; Spinello, F.; Romanato, Fra

    2014-02-01

    Wireless communication amounts to encoding information onto physical observables carried by electromagnetic (EM) fields, radiating them into surrounding space, and detecting them remotely by an appropriate sensor connected to an informationdecoding receiver. Each observable is second order in the fields and fulfills a conservation law. In present-day radio only the EM linear momentum observable is fully exploited. A fundamental physical limitation of this observable, which represents the translational degrees of freedom of the charges (typically an oscillating current along a linear antenna) and the fields, is that it is single-mode. This means that a linear-momentum radio communication link comprising one transmitting and one receiving antenna, known as a single-input-single-output (SISO) link, can provide only one transmission channel per frequency (and polarization). In contrast, angular momentum, which represents the rotational degrees of freedom, is multi-mode, allowing an angular-momentum SISO link to accommodate an arbitrary number of independent transmission channels on one and the same frequency (and polarization). We describe the physical properties of EM angular momentum and how they can be exploited, discuss real-world experiments, and outline how the capacity of angular momentum links may be further enhanced by employing multi-port techniques, i.e., the angular momentum counterpart of linear-momentum multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO).

  16. Metamaterial broadband angular selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yichen; Ye, Dexin; Wang, Li; Celanovic, Ivan; Ran, Lixin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate how broadband angular selectivity can be achieved with stacks of one-dimensionally periodic photonic crystals, each consisting of alternating isotropic layers and effective anisotropic layers, where each effective anisotropic layer is constructed from a multilayered metamaterial. We show that by simply changing the structure of the metamaterials, the selective angle can be tuned to a broad range of angles; and, by increasing the number of stacks, the angular transmission window can be made as narrow as desired. As a proof of principle, we realize the idea experimentally in the microwave regime. The angular selectivity and tunability we report here can have various applications such as in directional control of electromagnetic emitters and detectors.

  17. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  18. Dirac Green function for angular projection potentials.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Rudolf

    2015-11-25

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, it is shown that the angular dependence of the Dirac Green function can be described analytically for potentials with non-local dependence on the angular variables if they are chosen as projection potentials in angular momentum space. Because the local dependence on the radial variable can be treated to any precision with present computing capabilities, this means that the Green function can be calculated practically exactly. Second, it is shown that a result of this kind not only holds for a single angular projection potential but also more generally, for instance if space is divided into non-overlapping cells and a separate angular projection potential is used in each cell. This opens the way for relativistic density-functional calculations within a different perspective than the conventional one. Instead of trying to obtain the density for a given potential approximately as well as possible, the density is determined exactly for non-local potentials which can approximate arbitrary local potentials as well as desired. PMID:26523824

  19. Dirac Green function for angular projection potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Rudolf

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, it is shown that the angular dependence of the Dirac Green function can be described analytically for potentials with non-local dependence on the angular variables if they are chosen as projection potentials in angular momentum space. Because the local dependence on the radial variable can be treated to any precision with present computing capabilities, this means that the Green function can be calculated practically exactly. Second, it is shown that a result of this kind not only holds for a single angular projection potential but also more generally, for instance if space is divided into non-overlapping cells and a separate angular projection potential is used in each cell. This opens the way for relativistic density-functional calculations within a different perspective than the conventional one. Instead of trying to obtain the density for a given potential approximately as well as possible, the density is determined exactly for non-local potentials which can approximate arbitrary local potentials as well as desired.

  20. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  1. Nano-scale spatial assessment of calcium distribution in coccolithophores using synchrotron-based nano-CT and STXM-NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Yao, Yanchen; Zou, Xiang; Fan, Shenglan; Zhou, Qing; Dai, Qunwei; Dong, Faqin; Liu, Mingxue; Nie, Xiaoqin; Tan, Daoyong; Li, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Calcified coccolithophores generate calcium carbonate scales around their cell surface. In light of predicted climate change and the global carbon cycle, the biomineralization ability of coccoliths has received growing interest. However, the underlying biomineralization mechanism is not yet well understood; the lack of non-invasive characterizing tools to obtain molecular level information involving biogenic processes and biomineral components remain significant challenges. In the present study, synchrotron-based Nano-computed Tomography (Nano-CT) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy-Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectromicroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) techniques were employed to identify Ca spatial distribution and investigate the compositional chemistry and distinctive features of the association between biomacromolecules and mineral components of calcite present in coccoliths. The Nano-CT results show that the coccolith scale vesicle is similar as a continuous single channel. The mature coccoliths were intracellularly distributed and immediately ejected and located at the exterior surface to form a coccoshpere. The NEXAFS spectromicroscopy results of the Ca L edge clearly demonstrate the existence of two levels of gradients spatially, indicating two distinctive forms of Ca in coccoliths: a crystalline-poor layer surrounded by a relatively crystalline-rich layer. The results show that Sr is absorbed by the coccoliths and that Sr/Ca substitution is rather homogeneous within the coccoliths. Our findings indicate that synchrotron-based STXM-NEXAFS and Nano-CT are excellent tools for the study of biominerals and provide information to clarify biomineralization mechanism. PMID:25530614

  2. Nano-Scale Spatial Assessment of Calcium Distribution in Coccolithophores Using Synchrotron-Based Nano-CT and STXM-NEXAFS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyong; Yao, Yanchen; Zou, Xiang; Fan, Shenglan; Zhou, Qing; Dai, Qunwei; Dong, Faqin; Liu, Mingxue; Nie, Xiaoqin; Tan, Daoyong; Li, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Calcified coccolithophores generate calcium carbonate scales around their cell surface. In light of predicted climate change and the global carbon cycle, the biomineralization ability of coccoliths has received growing interest. However, the underlying biomineralization mechanism is not yet well understood; the lack of non-invasive characterizing tools to obtain molecular level information involving biogenic processes and biomineral components remain significant challenges. In the present study, synchrotron-based Nano-computed Tomography (Nano-CT) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy-Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectromicroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) techniques were employed to identify Ca spatial distribution and investigate the compositional chemistry and distinctive features of the association between biomacromolecules and mineral components of calcite present in coccoliths. The Nano-CT results show that the coccolith scale vesicle is similar as a continuous single channel. The mature coccoliths were intracellularly distributed and immediately ejected and located at the exterior surface to form a coccoshpere. The NEXAFS spectromicroscopy results of the Ca L edge clearly demonstrate the existence of two levels of gradients spatially, indicating two distinctive forms of Ca in coccoliths: a crystalline-poor layer surrounded by a relatively crystalline-rich layer. The results show that Sr is absorbed by the coccoliths and that Sr/Ca substitution is rather homogeneous within the coccoliths. Our findings indicate that synchrotron-based STXM-NEXAFS and Nano-CT are excellent tools for the study of biominerals and provide information to clarify biomineralization mechanism. PMID:25530614

  3. Geometric absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konz, C.; Benford, Gregory

    2003-10-01

    Circularly polarized electromagnetic fields carry both energy and angular momentum. We investigate the conditions under which a circularly polarized wave field transfers angular momentum to a perfectly conducting macroscopic object, using exact electromagnetic wave theory in a steady-state calculation. We find that axisymmetric perfect conductors cannot absorb or radiate angular momentum when illuminated. However, any asymmetry allows absorption. A rigorous, steady-state solution of the boundary value problem for the reflection from a perfectly conducting infinite wedge shows that waves convey angular momentum at the edges of asymmetries. Conductors can also radiate angular momentum, so their geometric absorption coefficient for angular momentum can be negative. Such absorption or radiation depends solely on the specific geometry of the conductor. The geometric absorption coefficient can be as high as 0.8, and the coefficient for radiation can be -0.4, larger than typical material absorption coefficients. We apply the results to recent experiments which spun roof-shaped aluminum sheets with polarized microwave beams. Applications of geometric, instead of material, absorption can be quite varied. Though experiments testing these ideas will be simpler at microwavelengths, the ideas work for optical ones as well.

  4. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure. PMID:24656273

  5. Investigation of reactions between trace gases and functional CuO nanospheres and octahedrons using NEXAFS-TXM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Henzler, Katja; Heilemann, Axel; Kneer, Janosch; Guttmann, Peter; Jia, He; Bartsch, Eckhard; Lu, Yan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In order to take full advantage of novel functional materials in the next generation of sensorial devices scalable processes for their fabrication and utilization are of great importance. Also understanding the processes lending the properties to those materials is essential. Among the most sought-after sensor applications are low-cost, highly sensitive and selective metal oxide based gas sensors. Yet, the surface reactions responsible for provoking a change in the electrical behavior of gas sensitive layers are insufficiently comprehended. Here, we have used near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with x-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) for ex-situ measurements, in order to reveal the hydrogen sulfide induced processes at the surface of copper oxide nanoparticles, which are ultimately responsible for triggering a percolation phase transition. For the first time these measurements allow the imaging of trace gas induced reactions and the effect they have on the chemical composition of the metal oxide surface and bulk. This makes the new technique suitable for elucidating adsorption processes in-situ and under real operating conditions. PMID:26631608

  6. Investigation of reactions between trace gases and functional CuO nanospheres and octahedrons using NEXAFS-TXM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzler, Katja; Heilemann, Axel; Kneer, Janosch; Guttmann, Peter; Jia, He; Bartsch, Eckhard; Lu, Yan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In order to take full advantage of novel functional materials in the next generation of sensorial devices scalable processes for their fabrication and utilization are of great importance. Also understanding the processes lending the properties to those materials is essential. Among the most sought-after sensor applications are low-cost, highly sensitive and selective metal oxide based gas sensors. Yet, the surface reactions responsible for provoking a change in the electrical behavior of gas sensitive layers are insufficiently comprehended. Here, we have used near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with x-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) for ex-situ measurements, in order to reveal the hydrogen sulfide induced processes at the surface of copper oxide nanoparticles, which are ultimately responsible for triggering a percolation phase transition. For the first time these measurements allow the imaging of trace gas induced reactions and the effect they have on the chemical composition of the metal oxide surface and bulk. This makes the new technique suitable for elucidating adsorption processes in-situ and under real operating conditions.

  7. Investigation of reactions between trace gases and functional CuO nanospheres and octahedrons using NEXAFS-TXM imaging.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Heilemann, Axel; Kneer, Janosch; Guttmann, Peter; Jia, He; Bartsch, Eckhard; Lu, Yan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In order to take full advantage of novel functional materials in the next generation of sensorial devices scalable processes for their fabrication and utilization are of great importance. Also understanding the processes lending the properties to those materials is essential. Among the most sought-after sensor applications are low-cost, highly sensitive and selective metal oxide based gas sensors. Yet, the surface reactions responsible for provoking a change in the electrical behavior of gas sensitive layers are insufficiently comprehended. Here, we have used near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with x-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) for ex-situ measurements, in order to reveal the hydrogen sulfide induced processes at the surface of copper oxide nanoparticles, which are ultimately responsible for triggering a percolation phase transition. For the first time these measurements allow the imaging of trace gas induced reactions and the effect they have on the chemical composition of the metal oxide surface and bulk. This makes the new technique suitable for elucidating adsorption processes in-situ and under real operating conditions. PMID:26631608

  8. Uncertainty relations for angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammeier, Lars; Schwonnek, René; Werner, Reinhard F.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we study various notions of uncertainty for angular momentum in the spin-s representation of SU(2). We characterize the ‘uncertainty regions’ given by all vectors, whose components are specified by the variances of the three angular momentum components. A basic feature of this set is a lower bound for the sum of the three variances. We give a method for obtaining optimal lower bounds for uncertainty regions for general operator triples, and evaluate these for small s. Further lower bounds are derived by generalizing the technique by which Robertson obtained his state-dependent lower bound. These are optimal for large s, since they are saturated by states taken from the Holstein-Primakoff approximation. We show that, for all s, all variances are consistent with the so-called vector model, i.e., they can also be realized by a classical probability measure on a sphere of radius \\sqrt{s(s+1)}. Entropic uncertainty relations can be discussed similarly, but are minimized by different states than those minimizing the variances for small s. For large s the Maassen-Uffink bound becomes sharp and we explicitly describe the extremalizing states. Measurement uncertainty, as recently discussed by Busch, Lahti and Werner for position and momentum, is introduced and a generalized observable (POVM) which minimizes the worst case measurement uncertainty of all angular momentum components is explicitly determined, along with the minimal uncertainty. The output vectors for the optimal measurement all have the same length r(s), where r(s)/s\\to 1 as s\\to ∞ .

  9. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  10. Angular Distribution and Angular Dispersion in Collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Dong, Yu-Chuan; Li, Song-Lin; Duan, Li-Min; Xu, Hu-Shan; Xu, Hua-Gen; Chen, Ruo-Fu; Wu, He-Yu; Han, Jian-Long; Li, Zhi-Chang; Lu, Xiu-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Liu, Jian-Cheng; Sergey, Yu-Kun

    2004-10-01

    Angular distributions of fragments B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg and Al induced by the collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV have been measured. Angular dispersion parameters are extracted from the experimental data and compared with the theoretical ones. The dynamic dispersions for dissipative products depend strongly on the charge number Z of the fragments.