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Sample records for angularly adaptive p1

  1. Angular distributions and polarization fractions of helium resonance radiation (n 1P - 1 1S) in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Misakian, M.; Jackson, W. M.; Faris, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Angular intensity distributions of helium (n 1P - 1 1S) resonance photons with respect to the exciting electron beam are presented. The angular intensity distributions were measured at selected electron impact energies from 25 eV (near threshold) to 150 eV. Polarization fractions (Pi) were obtained by analyzing the data in terms of the theoretical relation between angular intensity distribution and Pi, i.e. Iota (theta) = Iota (90) (1 - Pi sq cos theta). The experimental values for Pi are compared with recent theoretical results and with previous experimental values for the (3 1P - 2 1S) transition.

  2. Novel Approaches to Adaptive Angular Approximations in Computational Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin L. Adams; Igor Carron; Paul Nelson

    2006-06-04

    The particle-transport equation is notoriously difficult to discretize accurately, largely because the solution can be discontinuous in every variable. At any given spatial position and energy E, for example, the transport solution  can be discontinuous at an arbitrary number of arbitrary locations in the direction domain. Even if the solution is continuous it is often devoid of smoothness. This makes the direction variable extremely difficult to discretize accurately. We have attacked this problem with adaptive discretizations in the angle variables, using two distinctly different approaches. The first approach used wavelet function expansions directly and exploited their ability to capture sharp local variations. The second used discrete ordinates with a spatially varying quadrature set that adapts to the local solution. The first approach is very different from that in today’s transport codes, while the second could conceivably be implemented in such codes. Both approaches succeed in reducing angular discretization error to any desired level. The work described and results presented in this report add significantly to the understanding of angular discretization in transport problems and demonstrate that it is possible to solve this important long-standing problem in deterministic transport. Our results show that our adaptive discrete-ordinates (ADO) approach successfully: 1) Reduces angular discretization error to user-selected “tolerance” levels in a variety of difficult test problems; 2) Achieves a given error with significantly fewer unknowns than non-adaptive discrete ordinates methods; 3) Can be implemented within standard discrete-ordinates solution techniques, and thus could generate a significant impact on the field in a relatively short time. Our results show that our adaptive wavelet approach: 1) Successfully reduces the angular discretization error to arbitrarily small levels in a variety of difficult test problems, even when using the

  3. Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections and angular distributions for the light, deformed nucleus 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhove, E.; Ferdinande, H.; van de Vyver, R.; Berkvens, P.; van Otten, P.; van Camp, E.; Ryckbosch, D.

    1984-06-01

    Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) differential cross sections for 19F have been measured at seven angles in the energy interval between 13.4 and 25.8 MeV. A sum of Legendre polynomials was fitted to the angular distributions to deduce the angular distribution coefficients. The (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections have a similar magnitude and represent a minor fraction of the total photoproton channel. The global difference between the two cross sections is attributed to configurational splitting effects. From the (γ,p0) angular distribution coefficients, an E2 cross section was estimated, contributing about 37% to the total E2 energy-weighted sum rule.

  4. Some factors affecting angular resolution in an adaptive antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, B. M.; Mayhan, J. T.; Simmons, A. J.

    Aperture diameter is the fundamental determinant of angular resolution for an area-coverage satellite communication adaptive nulling antenna. The choice of reference element for a phased array and the choice of phase taper for a multibeam antenna also have a large effect on resolution. For both a multibeam antenna and an array, the choice of quiescent (or unadapted) pattern will affect the resolution. In using an algorithm in which a steering weight vector is prescribed to determine the quiescent pattern, the amplitude and phase distribution of the quiescent vector may be chosen to maximize the resolution of the adapted pattern, at least in certain directions. With an array, the choice of reference element for the quiescent pattern is of most concern.

  5. The VMI study on angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/26d autoionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Shen, Li; Dong, Cheng; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2015-10-01

    The combination of a velocity mapping imaging technique and mathematical transformation is adopted to study the angular distribution of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/26d autoionizing states, which are excited with a three-step excitation scheme via different Eu 4f76s6d 8 DJ (J = 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2) intermediate states. In order to determine the energy dependence of angular distribution of the ejected electrons, the anisotropic parameters are measured in the spectral profile of the 6p1/26d autoionizing states by tuning the wavelength of the third-step laser across the ionic resonance lines of the Eu 6s+ → 6p+. The configuration interaction is discussed by comparing the angular distributions of ejected electrons from the different states. The present study reveals the profound variations of anisotropic parameters in the entire region of autoionization resonance, highlighting the complicated nature of the autoionization process for the lowest member of 6p1/26d autoionization series. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  6. Adaptive power-controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) multicasting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We report feedback-assisted adaptive multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single phase-only spatial light modulator loaded with a complex phase pattern. By designing and optimizing the complex phase pattern through the adaptive correction of feedback coefficients, the power of each multicast OAM channel can be arbitrarily controlled. We experimentally demonstrate power-controllable multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to two and six OAM modes with different target power distributions. Equalized power multicasting, “up-down” power multicasting and “ladder” power multicasting are realized in the experiment. The difference between measured power distributions and target power distributions is assessed to be less than 1 dB. Moreover, we demonstrate data-carrying OAM multicasting by employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 64-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM 64-QAM) signal. The measured bit-error rate curves and observed optical signal-to-noise ratio penalties show favorable operation performance of the proposed adaptive power-controllable OAM multicasting. PMID:25989251

  7. Adaptive power-controllable orbital angular momentum (OAM) multicasting.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We report feedback-assisted adaptive multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes using a single phase-only spatial light modulator loaded with a complex phase pattern. By designing and optimizing the complex phase pattern through the adaptive correction of feedback coefficients, the power of each multicast OAM channel can be arbitrarily controlled. We experimentally demonstrate power-controllable multicasting from a single Gaussian mode to two and six OAM modes with different target power distributions. Equalized power multicasting, "up-down" power multicasting and "ladder" power multicasting are realized in the experiment. The difference between measured power distributions and target power distributions is assessed to be less than 1 dB. Moreover, we demonstrate data-carrying OAM multicasting by employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing 64-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM 64-QAM) signal. The measured bit-error rate curves and observed optical signal-to-noise ratio penalties show favorable operation performance of the proposed adaptive power-controllable OAM multicasting. PMID:25989251

  8. Photoelectron angular distributions from autoionizing 4s14p66p1 states in atomic krypton probed with femtosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Benjamin; Haber, Louis H.; Hackett, Christina; Leone, Stephen R.

    2011-03-01

    Photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) are obtained for a pair of 4s14p66p1 (a singlet and a triplet) autoionizing states in atomic krypton. A high-order harmonic pulse is used to excite the pair of states and a time-delayed 801 nm ionization pulse probes the PADs to the final 4s14p6 continuum with femtosecond time resolution. The ejected electrons are detected with velocity map imaging to retrieve the time-resolved photoelectron spectrum and PADs. The PAD for the triplet state is inherently separable by virtue of its longer autoionization lifetime. Measuring the total signal over time allows for the PADs to be extracted for both the singlet state and the triplet state. Anisotropy parameters for the triplet state are measured to be β2 = 0.55 ± 0.17 and β4 = -0.01 ± 0.10, while the singlet state yields β2 = 2.19 ± 0.18 and β4 = 1.84 ± 0.14. For the singlet state, the ratio of radial transition dipole matrix elements, X, of outgoing S to D partial waves and total phase shift difference between these waves, Δ, are determined to be X = 0.56 ± 0.08 and Δ = 2.19 ± 0.11 rad. The continuum quantum defect difference between the S and D electron partial waves is determined to be -0.15 ± 0.03 for the singlet state. Based on previous analyses, the triplet state is expected to have anisotropy parameters independent of electron kinetic energy and equal to β2 = 5/7 and β4 = -12/7. Deviations from the predicted values are thought to be a result of state mixing by spin-orbit and configuration interactions in the intermediate and final states; theoretical calculations are required to quantify these effects.

  9. Goal-based angular adaptivity applied to a wavelet-based discretisation of the neutral particle transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Dargaville, Steven; Pain, Christopher C.; Smith, Paul N.; Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.

    2015-01-15

    A method for applying goal-based adaptive methods to the angular resolution of the neutral particle transport equation is presented. The methods are applied to an octahedral wavelet discretisation of the spherical angular domain which allows for anisotropic resolution. The angular resolution is adapted across both the spatial and energy dimensions. The spatial domain is discretised using an inner-element sub-grid scale finite element method. The goal-based adaptive methods optimise the angular discretisation to minimise the error in a specific functional of the solution. The goal-based error estimators require the solution of an adjoint system to determine the importance to the specified functional. The error estimators and the novel methods to calculate them are described. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods. It is shown that the methods can significantly reduce the number of unknowns and computational time required to obtain a given error. The novelty of the work is the use of goal-based adaptive methods to obtain anisotropic resolution in the angular domain for solving the transport equation. -- Highlights: •Wavelet angular discretisation used to solve transport equation. •Adaptive method developed for the wavelet discretisation. •Anisotropic angular resolution demonstrated through the adaptive method. •Adaptive method provides improvements in computational efficiency.

  10. Compensation of a distorted N-fold orbital angular momentum multicasting link using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2016-04-01

    By using an adaptive feedback correction technique, we experimentally demonstrate turbulence compensation for free-space four-fold and eight-fold 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) multicasting links. The performance of multicasted OAM beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and adaptive optics assisted compensation loop is investigated. The experimental results show that the scheme can efficiently compensate for the atmospheric turbulence induced distortions, i.e., reducing power fluctuation of multicasted OAM channels, suppressing inter-channel crosstalk, and improving the bit-error rate (BER) performance. PMID:27192267

  11. Spatio-angular minimum-variance tomographic controller for multi-object adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos M; Jackson, Kate; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Andersen, David; Lardière, Olivier; Bradley, Colin

    2015-06-10

    Multi-object astronomical adaptive optics (MOAO) is now a mature wide-field observation mode to enlarge the adaptive-optics-corrected field in a few specific locations over tens of arcminutes. The work-scope provided by open-loop tomography and pupil conjugation is amenable to a spatio-angular linear-quadratic-Gaussian (SA-LQG) formulation aiming to provide enhanced correction across the field with improved performance over static reconstruction methods and less stringent computational complexity scaling laws. Starting from our previous work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A31, 101 (2014)10.1364/JOSAA.31.000101JOAOD61084-7529], we use stochastic time-progression models coupled to approximate sparse measurement operators to outline a suitable SA-LQG formulation capable of delivering near optimal correction. Under the spatio-angular framework the wavefronts are never explicitly estimated in the volume, providing considerable computational savings on 10-m-class telescopes and beyond. We find that for Raven, a 10-m-class MOAO system with two science channels, the SA-LQG improves the limiting magnitude by two stellar magnitudes when both the Strehl ratio and the ensquared energy are used as figures of merit. The sky coverage is therefore improved by a factor of ~5. PMID:26192825

  12. High-Velocity Angular Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Adaptation to Position Error Signals

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Matthew; Schubert, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Vestibular rehabilitation strategies including gaze stabilization exercises have been shown to increase gain of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) using a retinal slip error signal (ES). The identification of additional ESs capable of promoting substitution strategies or aVOR adaptation is an important goal in the management of vestibular hypofunction. Position ESs have been shown to increase both aVOR gain and recruitment of compensatory saccades (CSs) during passive whole body rotation. This may be a useful compensatory strategy for gaze instability during active head rotation as well. In vestibular rehabilitation, the imaginary target exercise is often prescribed to improve gaze stability. This exercise uses a position ES; however, the mechanism for its effect has not been investigated. We compared aVOR gain adaptation using 2 types of small position ES: constant versus incremental. Methods Ten subjects with normal vestibular function were assessed with unpredictable and active head rotations before and after a 20-minute training session. Subjects performed 9 epochs of 40 active, high-velocity head impulses using a position ES stimulus to increase aVOR gain. Results Five subjects demonstrated significant aVOR gain increases with the constant-position ES (mean, 2%; range, −18% to 12%) compared with another 5 subjects showing significant aVOR gain increases to the incremental-position ES (mean, 3.7%; range, −2% to 22.6%). There was no difference in aVOR gain adaptation or CS recruitment between the 2 paradigms. Discussion and Conclusion These findings suggest that some subjects can increase their aVOR gain in response to high-velocity active head movement training using a position ES. The primary mechanism for this seems to be aVOR gain adaptation because CS use was not modified. The overall low change in aVOR gain adaptation with position ES suggests that retinal slip is a more powerful aVOR gain modifier. PMID:20588093

  13. Non Local Spatial and Angular Matching: Enabling higher spatial resolution diffusion MRI datasets through adaptive denoising.

    PubMed

    St-Jean, Samuel; Coupé, Pierrick; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets suffer from low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), especially at high b-values. Acquiring data at high b-values contains relevant information and is now of great interest for microstructural and connectomics studies. High noise levels bias the measurements due to the non-Gaussian nature of the noise, which in turn can lead to a false and biased estimation of the diffusion parameters. Additionally, the usage of in-plane acceleration techniques during the acquisition leads to a spatially varying noise distribution, which depends on the parallel acceleration method implemented on the scanner. This paper proposes a novel diffusion MRI denoising technique that can be used on all existing data, without adding to the scanning time. We first apply a statistical framework to convert both stationary and non stationary Rician and non central Chi distributed noise to Gaussian distributed noise, effectively removing the bias. We then introduce a spatially and angular adaptive denoising technique, the Non Local Spatial and Angular Matching (NLSAM) algorithm. Each volume is first decomposed in small 4D overlapping patches, thus capturing the spatial and angular structure of the diffusion data, and a dictionary of atoms is learned on those patches. A local sparse decomposition is then found by bounding the reconstruction error with the local noise variance. We compare against three other state-of-the-art denoising methods and show quantitative local and connectivity results on a synthetic phantom and on an in-vivo high resolution dataset. Overall, our method restores perceptual information, removes the noise bias in common diffusion metrics, restores the extracted peaks coherence and improves reproducibility of tractography on the synthetic dataset. On the 1.2 mm high resolution in-vivo dataset, our denoising improves the visual quality of the data and reduces the number of spurious tracts when compared to the noisy acquisition. Our

  14. Is Linear Displacement Information Or Angular Displacement Information Used During The Adaptation of Pointing Responses To An Optically Shifted Image?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, Abigail B.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-four observers looked through a pair of 20 diopter wedge prisms and pointed to an image of a target which was displaced vertically from eye level by 6 cm at a distance of 30 cm. Observers pointed 40 times, using only their right hand, and received error-corrective feedback upon termination of each pointing response (terminal visual feedback). At three testing distances, 20, 30, and 40 cm, ten pre-exposure and ten post-exposure pointing responses were recorded for each hand as observers reached to a mirror-viewed target located at eye level. The difference between pre- and post-exposure pointing response (adaptive shift) was compared for both Exposed and Unexposed hands across all three testing distances. The data were assessed according to the results predicted by two alternative models for processing spatial-information: one using angular displacement information and another using linear displacement information. The angular model of spatial mapping best predicted the observer's pointing response for the Exposed hand. Although the angular adaptive shift did not change significantly as a function of distance (F(2,44) = 1.12, n.s.), the linear adaptive shift increased significantly over the three testing distances 02 44) = 4.90 p less than 0.01).

  15. Adaptive non-collinear autocorrelation of few-cycle pulses with an angular tunable bi-mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treffer, A.; Brunne, J.; Bock, M.; König, S.; Wallrabe, U.; Grunwald, R.

    2016-02-01

    Adaptive autocorrelation with an angular tunable micro-electro-mechanical system is reported. A piezo-actuated Fresnel bi-mirror structure was applied to measure the second order autocorrelation of near-infrared few-cycle laser pulses in a non-collinear setup at tunable superposition angles. Because of enabling measurements with variable scaling and minimizing the influence of distortions by adaptive self-reconstruction, the approach extends the capability of autocorrelators. Flexible scaling and robustness against localized amplitude obscurations are demonstrated. The adaptive reconstruction of temporal frequency information by the Fourier analysis of autocorrelation data is shown. Experimental results and numerical simulations of the beam propagation and interference are compared for variable angles.

  16. Effects of visual reference on adaptation to motion sickness and subjective responses evoked by graded cross-coupled angular accelerations. [vestibular oculogravic effect in human acceleration adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reason, J. T.; Diaz, E.

    1973-01-01

    Three groups of 10 subjects each were exposed to stepwise increments of cross coupled angular accelerations in three visual modes: internal visual reference (IVR), external visual reference (EVR), and vision absent (VA). The subjects in the IVR condition required significantly greater amounts of stimulus exposure to neutralize their illusory subjective reactions. They also suffered a greater loss of well-being and a more marked incidence of motion sickness than did subjects in the EVR and VA conditions. The same 30 subjects were reexposed to the same graded cross coupled stimulation 1 week later. This time, however, all the subjects were tested under only the IVR condition. All three groups showed some positive transfer of adaptation, but only the IVR-IVR combination required significantly fewer head motions to achieve the same level of adaptation on the second occasion. Taken overall, however, the most efficient and least disturbing route to adaptation at the completion of the second test was via the VA-IVR combination.

  17. Adaptive filtering and maximum entropy spectra with application to changes in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Cecile; Ghil, Michael; Weickmann, Klaus M.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral resolution and statistical significance of a harmonic analysis obtained by low-order MEM can be improved by subjecting the data to an adaptive filter. This adaptive filter consists of projecting the data onto the leading temporal empirical orthogonal functions obtained from singular spectrum analysis (SSA). The combined SSA-MEM method is applied both to a synthetic time series and a time series of AAM data. The procedure is very effective when the background noise is white and less so when the background noise is red. The latter case obtains in the AAM data. Nevertheless, reliable evidence for intraseasonal and interannual oscillations in AAM is detected. The interannual periods include a quasi-biennial one and an LF one, of 5 years, both related to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. In the intraseasonal band, separate oscillations of about 48.5 and 51 days are ascertained.

  18. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  19. The parity-adapted basis set in the formulation of the photofragment angular momentum polarization problem: The role of the Coriolis interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shternin, Peter S.; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2008-05-21

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating the recoil-angle dependence of the photofragment angular momentum polarization taking into account both radial and Coriolis nonadiabatic interactions in the diatomic/linear photodissociating molecules. The parity-adapted representation of the total molecular wave function has been used throughout the paper. The obtained full quantum-mechanical expressions for the photofragment state multipoles have been simplified by using the semiclassical approximation in the high-J limit and then analyzed for the cases of direct photodissociation and slow predissociation in terms of the anisotropy parameters. In both cases, each anisotropy parameter can be presented as a linear combination of the generalized dynamical functions f{sub K}(q,q{sup '},q-tilde,q-tilde{sup '}) of the rank K representing contribution from different dissociation mechanisms including possible radial and Coriolis nonadiabatic transitions, coherent effects, and the rotation of the recoil axis. In the absence of the Coriolis interactions, the obtained results are equivalent to the earlier published ones. The angle-recoil dependence of the photofragment state multipoles for an arbitrary photolysis reaction is derived. As shown, the polarization of the photofragments in the photolysis of a diatomic or a polyatomic molecule can be described in terms of the anisotropy parameters irrespective of the photodissociation mechanism.

  20. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  1. Angular Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mouth. Overview Angular cheilitis (perlèche) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the corners of the mouth. Usually associated with a fungal ( Candidal ) or bacterial ( Staphylococcal ) infection, those ... people of all ages. Chronic pooling of saliva encourages fungal and bacterial growth, ...

  2. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-12-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in the physics laboratory. Many traditional physics experiments can now be performed very conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment while simultaneously reducing the laboratory budget substantially by using student-owned smartphones.

  3. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  4. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  5. Genome of Bacteriophage P1

    PubMed Central

    Łobocka, Małgorzata B.; Rose, Debra J.; Plunkett, Guy; Rusin, Marek; Samojedny, Arkadiusz; Lehnherr, Hansjörg; Yarmolinsky, Michael B.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2004-01-01

    P1 is a bacteriophage of Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria. It lysogenizes its hosts as a circular, low-copy-number plasmid. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequences of two strains of a P1 thermoinducible mutant, P1 c1-100. The P1 genome (93,601 bp) contains at least 117 genes, of which almost two-thirds had not been sequenced previously and 49 have no homologs in other organisms. Protein-coding genes occupy 92% of the genome and are organized in 45 operons, of which four are decisive for the choice between lysis and lysogeny. Four others ensure plasmid maintenance. The majority of the remaining 37 operons are involved in lytic development. Seventeen operons are transcribed from σ70 promoters directly controlled by the master phage repressor C1. Late operons are transcribed from promoters recognized by the E. coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme in the presence of the Lpa protein, the product of a C1-controlled P1 gene. Three species of P1-encoded tRNAs provide differential controls of translation, and a P1-encoded DNA methyltransferase with putative bifunctionality influences transcription, replication, and DNA packaging. The genome is particularly rich in Chi recombinogenic sites. The base content and distribution in P1 DNA indicate that replication of P1 from its plasmid origin had more impact on the base compositional asymmetries of the P1 genome than replication from the lytic origin of replication. PMID:15489417

  6. Angular anisotropy in valence photoionization of Na clusters: theoretical investigation using jellium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jänkälä, Kari

    2013-03-01

    Calculation of the behaviour of photoelectron angular anisotropy in valence ionization of initially neutral NaX (X = 34-58) clusters is provided. The calculations are carried out for 1p, 1d and 1g jellium orbitals as a function of photon energy. The adapted theoretical framework is spherical jellium model using Woods-Saxon potential, which is modified to account for the long-range Coulomb tail in the final state. We discuss on the observed dramatic variations of the angular anisotropy parameter β as a function incident photon energy. It is shown that the behaviour is connected to the oscillation of the valence photoionization cross sections, that is a specific interference property of such metallic clusters whose valence structure can be described using the jellium model. ISSPIC 16 - 16th International Symposium on Small Particles and Inorganic Clusters, edited by Kristiaan Temst, Margriet J. Van Bael, Ewald Janssens, H.-G. Boyen and Françoise Remacle.

  7. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers oversee the placement of the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, onto a flatbed truck that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P- 1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  8. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P- 1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  9. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives inside the RLV hangar, located near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. Approaching bad weather caused the detour as a precaution. The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  10. Partonic orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh; Shahveh, Abolfazl

    2013-04-01

    Ji's decomposition of nucleon spin is used and the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluon are calculated. We have utilized the so called valon model description of the nucleon in the next to leading order. It is found that the average orbital angular momentum of quarks is positive, but small, whereas that of gluon is negative and large. Individual quark flavor contributions are also calculated. Some regularities on the total angular momentum of the quarks and gluon are observed.

  11. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  12. Electron impact excitation of the 3s3p 1P1 state in magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predojević, Branko

    2006-12-01

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact excitation of the 3s3p 1P1 resonance state of magnesium have been measured at 10, 15, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 eV incident electron energies (Eo). Scattered-electron intensities were measured over wide range of scattering angles from 2° to 150°. The absolute DCS scale for the 1P1 state was determined through normalizations of its relative DCSs to optical oscillator strength using forward scattering function method, except at Eo ⩽ 15 eV where the excitation function of the 3s3p 1P1 state experimentally obtained by Leep and Gallagher (1976 Phys. Rev. A 13 148) was utilized for normalization. These absolute DCSs were extrapolated to 0° and 180° and numerically integrated to yield integral, momentum transfer and viscosity cross sections. Our results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  13. P1-Marx Modulator for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    A first generation prototype, P1, Marx-topology klystron modulator has been developed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC) project. It is envisioned as a lower cost, smaller footprint, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, baseline design. The application requires 120 kV (+/-0.5%), 140 A, 1.6 ms pulses at a rate of 5 Hz. The Marx constructs the high voltage pulse by combining, in series, a number of lower voltage cells. The Marx employs solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the cells. Active compensation of the output is used to achieve the voltage regulation while minimizing the stored energy. The P1-Marx has been integrated into a test stand with a 10 MW L-band klystron, where each is undergoing life testing. A review of the P1-Marx design and its operational history in the L-band test stand are presented.

  14. Angular Acceleration Without Torque?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.2

  15. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  16. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  17. Absolute angular positioning in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Schief, H.; Marsico, V.; Kern, K.

    1996-05-01

    Commercially available angular resolvers, which are routinely used in machine tools and robotics, are modified and adapted to be used under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions. They provide straightforward and reliable measurements of angular positions for any kind of UHV sample manipulators. The corresponding absolute reproducibility is on the order of 0.005{degree}, whereas the relative resolution is better than 0.001{degree}, as demonstrated by high-resolution helium-reflectivity measurements. The mechanical setup and possible applications are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  19. Genome Sequences of Three Pseudoalteromonas Strains (P1-8, P1-11, and P1-30), Isolated from the Marine Hydroid Hydractinia echinata

    PubMed Central

    Rischer, Maja; Wolf, Thomas; Guo, Huijuan; Shelest, Ekaterina; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of three Pseudoalteromonas strains (P1-8, P1-11, and P1-30) were sequenced and assembled. These genomes will inform future study of the genes responsible for the production of biologically active compounds responsible for these strains’ antimicrobial, biofouling, and algicidal activities. PMID:26659670

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Pseudoalteromonas Strains, P1-7a, P1-9, P1-13-1a, P1-16-1b, P1-25, and P1-26, Which Induce Larval Settlement and Metamorphosis in Hydractinia echinata

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Thomas; Rischer, Maja; Guo, Huijuan; Shelest, Ekaterina; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    To gain a broader understanding of the importance of a surface-associated lifestyle and morphogenic capability, we have assembled and annotated the genome sequences of Pseudoalteromonas strains P1-7a, P1-9, P1-13-1a, P1-16-1b, P1-25, and P1-26, isolated from Hydractinia echinata. These genomes will allow detailed studies on bacterial factors mediating interkingdom communication. PMID:26679587

  1. Angular momentum radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thidé, B.; Tamburini, F.; Then, H.; Someda, C. G.; Mari, Elletra; Parisi, G.; Spinello, F.; Romanato, Fra

    2014-02-01

    Wireless communication amounts to encoding information onto physical observables carried by electromagnetic (EM) fields, radiating them into surrounding space, and detecting them remotely by an appropriate sensor connected to an informationdecoding receiver. Each observable is second order in the fields and fulfills a conservation law. In present-day radio only the EM linear momentum observable is fully exploited. A fundamental physical limitation of this observable, which represents the translational degrees of freedom of the charges (typically an oscillating current along a linear antenna) and the fields, is that it is single-mode. This means that a linear-momentum radio communication link comprising one transmitting and one receiving antenna, known as a single-input-single-output (SISO) link, can provide only one transmission channel per frequency (and polarization). In contrast, angular momentum, which represents the rotational degrees of freedom, is multi-mode, allowing an angular-momentum SISO link to accommodate an arbitrary number of independent transmission channels on one and the same frequency (and polarization). We describe the physical properties of EM angular momentum and how they can be exploited, discuss real-world experiments, and outline how the capacity of angular momentum links may be further enhanced by employing multi-port techniques, i.e., the angular momentum counterpart of linear-momentum multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO).

  2. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  3. Metamaterial broadband angular selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yichen; Ye, Dexin; Wang, Li; Celanovic, Ivan; Ran, Lixin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate how broadband angular selectivity can be achieved with stacks of one-dimensionally periodic photonic crystals, each consisting of alternating isotropic layers and effective anisotropic layers, where each effective anisotropic layer is constructed from a multilayered metamaterial. We show that by simply changing the structure of the metamaterials, the selective angle can be tuned to a broad range of angles; and, by increasing the number of stacks, the angular transmission window can be made as narrow as desired. As a proof of principle, we realize the idea experimentally in the microwave regime. The angular selectivity and tunability we report here can have various applications such as in directional control of electromagnetic emitters and detectors.

  4. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  5. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  6. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure. PMID:24656273

  7. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  9. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  10. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  11. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  12. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  13. Angular momentum projected semiclassics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasse, Rainer W.

    1987-06-01

    By using angular momentum projected plane waves as wave functions, we derive semiclassical expressions for the single-particle propagator, the partition function, the nonlocal density matrix, the single-particle density and the one particle-one hole level density for fixed angular momentum and fixed z-component or summed over the z-components. Other quantities can be deduced from the propagator. In coordinate space ( r, r') the relevant quantities depend on |r-r'| instead of | r- r'| and in Wigner space ( R, P) they become proportional to the angular momentum constraints δ(| R × P|/ h̵-l) and δ( R × P) z/ h̵-m) . As applications we calculate the single-particle and one-particle-one hole level densities for harmonic oscillator and Hill-Wheeler box potentials and the imaginary part of the optical potential and its volume integral with an underlying harmonic oscillator potential and a zero range two-body interaction.

  14. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  15. Uniaxial angular accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, A. V.; Shvab, I. A.

    1985-05-01

    The basic mechanical components of an angular accelerometer are the sensor, the damper, and the transducer. Penumatic dampers are simplest in construction, but the viscosity of air is very low and, therefore, dampers with special purpose oils having a high temperature stability (synthetic silicon or organosilicon oils) are most widely used. The most common types of viscous dampers are lamellar with meshed opposed arrays of fixed and movable vanes in the dashpot, piston dampers regulated by an adjustable-length capillary tube, and dampers with paddle wheel in closed tank. Another type of damper is an impact-inertial one with large masses absorbing the rotational energy upon collision with the sensor. Conventional measuring elements are resistive, capacitive, electromagnetic, photoelectric, and penumatic or hydraulic. Novel types of angular accelerometers are based on inertia of gas jets, electron beams, and ion beams, the piezoelectric effect in p-n junctions of diode and transistors, the electrokinetic effect in fluids, and cryogenic suspension of the sensor.

  16. House dust mite Der p 1 downregulates defenses of the lung by inactivating elastase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Farmer, Kinley; MacDonald, Louise; Kalsheker, Noor; Pritchard, Dave; Haslett, Chris; Lamb, Jonathan; Sallenave, J-M

    2003-09-01

    House dust mites (HDM) are the most common source of aeroallergens and in genetic susceptible individuals can cause symptoms ranging from atopic dermatitis to bronchial asthma. Der p 1, a major target of the human immune responses to HDM, through its enzymatic properties can modulate the adaptive immune system by the cleavage of CD23 and CD25. The consequences of this would be to promote allergic inflammatory responses. Furthermore, by disrupting epithelial tight junctions Der p 1 facilitates the transport of allergen across the epithelium. Here, we report that Der p 1 has additional effects on the innate defense mechanisms of the lung, by inactivating in vitro and ex vivo the elastase inhibitors human (h) alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (h-A1-Pi), mouse (m-), (but not human [h])-SLPI and h-elafin. We confirm that Der p 1 contain both cysteine and serine proteinases, and extend this finding to demonstrate for the first time that h-elafin is particularly sensitive to the biological activity of the latter. Because these elastase inhibitors have antimicrobial, as well as antielastase activity, our results suggest that inactivation of these innate components of the lung defense system by Der p 1 may increase the susceptibility of patients with allergic inflammation to infection. PMID:12689923

  17. Orbital angular momentum microlaser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-29

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes. PMID:27471299

  18. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  19. On the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. P.; Tavares, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Students of mechanics usually have difficulties when they learn about the rotation of a rigid body. These difficulties are rooted in the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity, because these vectors are not parallel, and we need in general to utilize a rotating frame of reference or a time dependent inertia tensor. We discuss a series of problems that introduce both difficulties.

  20. The P-1 truss in the O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the foreground is the P-1 truss, resting in a blue workstand in the long, crowded Operations and Checkout Building. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14- by 15-foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the International Space Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  1. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians use an overhead crane to lower the P1 Truss Segment into the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  2. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the P1 Truss Segment is lowered into the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  3. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians prepare the P1 Truss Segment to be hooked to the overhead crane and moved toward the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station's central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  4. STS-113 P1 Truss payload in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the P1 Truss Segment is moved by overhead crane through the highbay toward the payload canister. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  5. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  6. Angular anisoplanatism of a focused beam using beacons over horizontal path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wu-ming; Ning, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the achieve laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence with adaptive optics is degraded by the fact that the wavefront aberrations difference. This error is only include the angular anisoplanatism when there is separation between the achieve laser beam and beacon. In the paper we derive an analytic expression for the effective angular anisoplanatism as a function of displacement angular when the turbulence profile is uniform. It shows that the effective angular anisoplanatism becomes weaker as the diameter of laser beams and the Fried transverse coherence length increase. We report results from field experiments that the effective angular anisoplanatism of a focused beam over horizontal path. It is found that measured and theoretical results are consistent. The effective wavefront variance increases with the strength of atmospheric turbulence and the angular displacement. And the constant phase of angular anisoplanatism has no effect on the Strehl ratio of the beam.

  7. Angular signal radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Panyun; Zhang, Kai; Bao, Yuan; Ren, Yuqi; Ju, Zaiqiang; Wang, Yan; He, Qili; Zhu, Zhongzhu; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi; Zhu, Peiping

    2016-03-21

    Microscopy techniques using visible photons, x-rays, neutrons, and electrons have made remarkable impact in many scientific disciplines. The microscopic data can often be expressed as the convolution of the spatial distribution of certain properties of the specimens and the inherent response function of the imaging system. The x-ray grating interferometer (XGI), which is sensitive to the deviation angle of the incoming x-rays, has attracted significant attention in the past years due to its capability in achieving x-ray phase contrast imaging with low brilliance source. However, the comprehensive and analytical theoretical framework is yet to be presented. Herein, we propose a theoretical framework termed angular signal radiography (ASR) to describe the imaging process of the XGI system in a classical, comprehensive and analytical manner. We demonstrated, by means of theoretical deduction and synchrotron based experiments, that the spatial distribution of specimens' physical properties, including absorption, refraction and scattering, can be extracted by ASR in XGI. Implementation of ASR in XGI offers advantages such as simplified phase retrieval algorithm, reduced overall radiation dose, and improved image acquisition speed. These advantages, as well as the limitations of the proposed method, are systematically investigated in this paper. PMID:27136780

  8. The Angular Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the structural and functional properties of the angular gyrus (AG). Located in the posterior part of the inferior parietal lobule, the AG has been shown in numerous meta-analysis reviews to be consistently activated in a variety of tasks. This review discusses the involvement of the AG in semantic processing, word reading and comprehension, number processing, default mode network, memory retrieval, attention and spatial cognition, reasoning, and social cognition. This large functional neuroimaging literature depicts a major role for the AG in processing concepts rather than percepts when interfacing perception-to-recognition-to-action. More specifically, the AG emerges as a cross-modal hub where converging multisensory information is combined and integrated to comprehend and give sense to events, manipulate mental representations, solve familiar problems, and reorient attention to relevant information. In addition, this review discusses recent findings that point to the existence of multiple subdivisions in the AG. This spatial parcellation can serve as a framework for reporting AG activations with greater definition. This review also acknowledges that the role of the AG cannot comprehensibly be identified in isolation but needs to be understood in parallel with the influence from other regions. Several interesting questions that warrant further investigations are finally emphasized. PMID:22547530

  9. Binding Forces of Streptococcus mutans P1 Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Li, James K.; Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive oral bacterium that is a primary etiological agent associated with human dental caries. In the oral cavity, S. mutans adheres to immobilized salivary agglutinin (SAG) contained within the salivary pellicle on the tooth surface. Binding to SAG is mediated by cell surface P1, a multifunctional adhesin that is also capable of interacting with extracellular matrix proteins. This may be of particular importance outside of the oral cavity as S. mutans has been associated with infective endocarditis and detected in atherosclerotic plaque. Despite the biomedical importance of P1, its binding mechanisms are not completely understood. In this work, we use atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule and single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify the nanoscale forces driving P1-mediated adhesion. Single-molecule experiments show that full-length P1, as well as fragments containing only the P1 globular head or C-terminal region, binds to SAG with relatively weak forces (~50 pN). In contrast, single-cell analyses reveal that adhesion of a single S. mutans cell to SAG is mediated by strong (~500 pN) and long-range (up to 6000 nm) forces. This is likely due to the binding of multiple P1 adhesins to self-associated gp340 glycoproteins. Such a cooperative, long-range character of the S. mutans–SAG interaction would therefore dramatically increase the strength and duration of cell adhesion. We also demonstrate, at single-molecule and single-cell levels, the interaction of P1 with fibronectin and collagen, as well as with hydrophobic, but not hydrophilic, substrates. The binding mechanism (strong forces, cooperativity, broad specificity) of P1 provides a molecular basis for its multifunctional adhesion properties. Our methodology represents a valuable approach to probe the binding forces of bacterial adhesins and offers a tractable methodology to assess anti-adhesion therapy. PMID:25671413

  10. Mutational Analysis of the P1 Phosphorylation Domain in Escherichia coli CheA, the Signaling Kinase for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Garzón, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The histidine autokinase CheA functions as the central processing unit in the Escherichia coli chemotaxis signaling machinery. CheA receives autophosphorylation control inputs from chemoreceptors and in turn regulates the flux of signaling phosphates to the CheY and CheB response regulator proteins. Phospho-CheY changes the direction of flagellar rotation; phospho-CheB covalently modifies receptor molecules during sensory adaptation. The CheA phosphorylation site, His-48, lies in the N-terminal P1 domain, which must engage the CheA ATP-binding domain, P4, to initiate an autophosphorylation reaction cycle. The docking determinants for the P1-P4 interaction have not been experimentally identified. We devised mutant screens to isolate P1 domains with impaired autophosphorylation or phosphotransfer activities. One set of P1 mutants identified amino acid replacements at surface-exposed residues distal to His-48. These lesions reduced the rate of P1 transphosphorylation by P4. However, once phosphorylated, the mutant P1 domains transferred phosphate to CheY at the wild-type rate. Thus, these P1 mutants appear to define interaction determinants for P1-P4 docking during the CheA autophosphorylation reaction. PMID:24163342

  11. Effects of orally applied Fes p1-displaying L. plantarum WCFS1 on Fes p1 induced allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Minic, Rajna; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija; Petrusic, Vladimir; Zivkovic, Irena; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Dimitrijevic, Ljiljana; Mathiesen, Geir

    2015-04-10

    Group I grass pollen allergens are major contributors to grass pollen-related seasonal allergic rhinitis, and as such a primary target for allergen specific immunotherapy. In this study the potential therapeutic role of oral application of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, directing cell wall attachment of the recombinant Fes p1 allergen, from Festuca pratensis was tested in a mouse model of Fes p1 allergy. For surface expression of Fes p1 allergen in L. plantarum WCFS1 pSIP system with inducible expression was used. Balb/c mice were sensitized with Fes p1 protein in alum and subsequently received live recombinant L. plantarum orally. Antibody levels (IgE, total IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgA) were determined by ELISA. Differential eosinophil count in peripheral blood was performed. Reduced peripheral blood eosinophilia and increased serum IgG2A levels was detected in both groups which received live L. plantarum orally. Specific serum IgA levels were increased only in mice treated with the recombinant bacteria. Oral application of L. plantarum WCFS1 has a beneficial therapeutic effect in a mouse model of Fes p1 allergy. Cell surface expression of Fes p1 allergen potentiates this phenomenon in an allergen specific way. PMID:25687100

  12. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  13. Electromagnetically induced angular Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian

    2015-12-01

    The discrete angular spectrum (angular Talbot effect) of a periodic grating illuminated by a suitable spherical wave front has been observed recently (Azaña and Chatellus 2104 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 213902). In this paper we study the possibility of such a phenomenon being realized with a medium that has no macroperiodic structure itself. Tunable electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) could be such a kind of medium. We obtain an EIG based on the periodically modulated strong susceptibility due to the third-order nonlinear effect generated in a double Λ-type four-level atomic system, and show the angular Talbot effect of an amplitude EIG, as well as a hybrid EIG, as the condition of the discrete phase-modulation shift of the illumination light front is satisfied. EIG parameters are tunable and the EIG-based angular Talbot effect may have the same potential applications as its periodic grating counterpart has.

  14. Transverse angular momentum of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    We develop the quantum theory of transverse angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order transverse derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.

  15. P-1 truss arrives at O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives in the parking lot outside the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Space Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  16. P-1 truss moved to O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers oversee the placement of the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, onto the bed of a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  17. Structural biology of the S1P1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Michael A; Peach, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The sphingosine 1 phosphate receptor family has been studied widely since the initial discovery of its first member, endothelium differentiation gene 1. Since this initial discovery, the family has been renamed and the primary member of the family, the S1P1 receptor, has been targeted for a variety of disease indications and successfully drugged for the treatment of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the S1P1 receptor has been determined by X-ray crystallography and the specifics of the sphingosine 1 phosphate ligand binding pocket mapped. Key structural features for the S1P1 receptor will be reviewed and the potential binding modes of additional pharmacologically active agents against the receptor will be analyzed in an effort to better understand the structural basis of important receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:24728592

  18. P-1 truss moved to O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Cranes place the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, on a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The truss had been temporarily stored in the RLV hangar in the background as a precaution against approaching bad weather. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  19. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E.

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5’UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription. PMID:26901859

  20. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription. PMID:26901859

  1. Angular Momentum Ejection and Recoil*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohia, O.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation phenomenon observed in axisymmetric magnetically confined plasmas has been explained by the ``accretion theory'' [1] that considers the plasma angular momentum as gained from its interaction with the magnetic field and the surrounding material wall. The ejection of angular momentum to the wall, and the consequent recoil are attributed to modes excited at the edge while the transport of the (recoil) angular momentum from the edge toward the center is attributed to a different kind of mode. The toroidal phase velocity of the edge mode, to which the sign of the ejected angular momentum is related, is considered to change its direction in the transition from the H-regime to the L-regime. For the latter case, edge modes with phase velocity in the direction of vdi are driven by the temperature gradient of a cold ion population at the edge and damped on the ``hot'' ion population. The ``balanced'' double interaction [2] of the mode with the two populations, corresponding to a condition of marginal stability, leads to ejection of hot ions and loss of angular momentum in the direction of vdi while the cold population acquires angular momentum in the opposite direction. In the H-regime resistive ballooning modes with phase velocities in the direction of vde are viewed as the best candidates for the excited edge modes. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE. [1] B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42, 1 (2002) [2] B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)

  2. P-1 truss moves into O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, sits inside the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. The truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  3. STS-113 P1 Truss paylad in Payload Changeout Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From the Payload Changeout Room on Launch Pad 39A, the P1 truss payload, plus the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart B, are moved into the payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on mission STS-113, Endeavour will make the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1 in 2003 when it will be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the Space Station. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth.

  4. Uncertainty principle for angular position and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Eric; Leach, Jonathan; Courtial, Johannes; Padgett, Miles

    2004-08-01

    The uncertainty principle places fundamental limits on the accuracy with which we are able to measure the values of different physical quantities (Heisenberg 1949 The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory (New York: Dover); Robertson 1929 Phys. Rev. 34 127). This has profound effects not only on the microscopic but also on the macroscopic level of physical systems. The most familiar form of the uncertainty principle relates the uncertainties in position and linear momentum. Other manifestations include those relating uncertainty in energy to uncertainty in time duration, phase of an electromagnetic field to photon number and angular position to angular momentum (Vaccaro and Pegg 1990 J. Mod. Opt. 37 17; Barnett and Pegg 1990 Phys. Rev. A 41 3427). In this paper, we report the first observation of the last of these uncertainty relations and derive the associated states that satisfy the equality in the uncertainty relation. We confirm the form of these states by detailed measurement of the angular momentum of a light beam after passage through an appropriate angular aperture. The angular uncertainty principle applies to all physical systems and is particularly important for systems with cylindrical symmetry.

  5. The Angular Momentum of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Babiker, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    Preface D. L. Andrews and M. Babiker; 1. Light beams carrying orbital angular momentum J. B. Götte and S. M. Barnett; 2. Vortex transformation and vortex dynamics in optical fields G. Molina-Terriza; 3. Vector beams in free space E. J. Galvez; 4. Optical beams with orbital angular momentum in nonlinear media A. S. Desyatnikov and Y. S. Kivshar; 5. Ray optics, wave optics and quantum mechanics G. Nienhuis; 6. Quantum formulation of angle and orbital angular momentum J. B. Götte and S. M. Barnett; 7. Dynamic rotational frequency shift I. Bialynicki-Birula and Z. Bialynicka-Birula; 8. Spin-orbit interactions of light in isotropic media K. Y. Bliokh, A. Aiello and M. A. Alonso; 9. Quantum electrodynamics, angular momentum and chirality D. L. Andrews and M. Babiker; 10. Trapping of charged particles by Bessel beams I. Bialynicki-Birula, Z. Bialynicka-Birula and N. Drozd; 11. Theory of atoms in twisted light M. Babiker, D. L. Andrews and V. E. Lembessis; 12. An experimentalist's introduction to orbital angular momentum for quantum optics J. Romero, D. Giovannini, S. Franke-Arnold and M. J. Padgett; 13. Measurement of light's orbital angular momentum M. P. J. Lavery, J. Courtial and M. J. Padgett; 14. Efficient generation of optical twisters using helico-conical beams V. R. Daria, D. Palima and J. Glückstad; 15. Self similar modes of coherent diffusion with orbital angular momentum O. Firstenberg, M. Shuker, R. Pugatch and N. Davidson; 16. Dimensionality of azimuthal entanglement M. van Exter, E. Eliel and H. Woerdman; Index.

  6. Two-dimensional angular transmission characterization of CPV modules.

    PubMed

    Herrero, R; Domínguez, C; Askins, S; Antón, I; Sala, G

    2010-11-01

    This paper proposes a fast method to characterize the two-dimensional angular transmission function of a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system. The so-called inverse method, which has been used in the past for the characterization of small optical components, has been adapted to large-area CPV modules. In the inverse method, the receiver cell is forward biased to produce a Lambertian light emission, which reveals the reverse optical path of the optics. Using a large-area collimator mirror, the light beam exiting the optics is projected on a Lambertian screen to create a spatially resolved image of the angular transmission function. An image is then obtained using a CCD camera. To validate this method, the angular transmission functions of a real CPV module have been measured by both direct illumination (flash CPV simulator and sunlight) and the inverse method, and the comparison shows good agreement. PMID:21165081

  7. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  8. Enhancer of Rudimentary(p1), E(r)(p1), a Highly Conserved Enhancer of the Rudimentary Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, E.; Murphy, A. M.; Fares, H.; Dang-Vu, K.; Tsubota, S. I.

    1994-01-01

    A hybrid dysgenesis-induced mutation, enhancer of rudimentary(p1) (e(r)(p1)), is a recessive enhancer of a weak rudimentary mutant phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster. The e(r) gene was cloned using P element tagging and localized to region 8B on the X chromosome. It encodes a 1.0-kb and a 1.2-kb transcript. The 1.0-kb transcript is present in both adult males and females, while the 1.2-kb transcript is predominantly found in females. The difference in the lengths of the two e(r) transcripts is caused by two different polyadenylation sites spaced 228 bp apart. The amounts of both of these transcripts are drastically reduced in the e(r)(p1) mutant. The P element in e(r)(p1) is inserted in the 5'-untranslated leader region near the start of transcription. It may be producing its effect by suppressing transcription and/or by providing transcription termination and polyadenylation signals. The putative e(r) protein is 104 amino acids in length and bears no striking resemblance to protein sequences in GenBank or PIR. While its biochemical function is unknown at this time, sequence analysis indicates that the e(r) protein is highly conserved and, presumably, functionally very important. The amino acid sequences of the D. melanogaster and the Drosophila virilis proteins are 95% identical. PMID:7896098

  9. Phenomenology of preequilibrium angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbach, C.; Mann, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    The systematics of continuum angular distributions from a wide variety of light ion nuclear reactions have been studied. To first order, the shape of the angular distributions have been found to depend only on the energy of the outgoing particle and on the division of the cross section into multi-step direct and multi-step compound parts. The angular distributions can be described in terms of Legendre polynomials with the reduced polynomial coefficients exhibiting a simple dependence on the outgoing particle energy. Two integer and four continuous parameters with universal values are needed to describe the coefficients for outgoing energies of 2 to 60 MeV in all the reaction types studied. This parameterization combined with a modified Griffin model computer code permits the calculation of double differential cross sections for light ion continuum reactions where no data is available.

  10. Variations in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Twice-daily values of the atmosphere's angular momentum about the polar axis during the five years from 1976 through 1980 are presented in graphs and a table. The compilation is based on a global data set, incorporating 90 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. The relationship between changes in the angular momentum of the atmosphere and changes in the length of day is described, as are the main sources of error in the data. The variability in angular momentum is revealed in a preliminary fashion by means of a spectral decomposition. The data presented should stimulate comparisons with other measures of the length of day and so provide a basis for greater understanding of Earth-atmosphere interactions.

  11. Interferometric measurement of angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10-11 rad/sqrt{textrm {Hz}} from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  12. STS-113 P1 Truss paylad in Payload Changeout Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A worker in the Payload Changeout Room on Launch Pad 39A watches as the P1 truss payload, plus the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart B, move into the payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on mission STS-113, Endeavour will make the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1 in 2003 when it will be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the Space Station. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth.

  13. A remedy to prevent the P1SA scheme degradation in multidimensional S{sub n} calculations in the presence of material discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Voloschenko, A. M.

    2006-07-01

    In the paper a way to prevent the P1 synthetic acceleration (P1SA) scheme degradation in solving small absorption highly heterogeneous (SAHH) multidimensional problems that ensures fast pointwise convergence of the P1SA scheme is discussed. Numerical experiment has shown that the lack of the difference scheme mono-tonicity is the reason of the consistent P1SA scheme degradation in solving SAHH problems. So, improvement of the difference scheme mono-tonicity also improves convergence of the consistent P1SA scheme in solving SAHH problems. In the paper we discuss remedies those improve the difference scheme mono-tonicity without essential degradation in accuracy. We also present results which demonstrate that a suitable choice of the fix-up function in the adaptive weighted diamond difference (AWDD) scheme essentially extends the class of SAHH problems, which can be efficiently accelerated by the consistent P1SA scheme. (authors)

  14. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  15. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers prepare to attach an overhead crane to the radiator assembly that just arrived. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  16. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers oversee the lowering of the newly arrived radiator assembly onto a workstand. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  17. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the newly arrived radiator assembly toward a workstand. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  18. P1 Truss Radiator assembly processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers help guide the newly arrived radiator assembly onto a workstand. The radiator is part of the payload on mission STS-113, which also includes the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  19. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  20. Angular velocity estimation from measurement vectors of star tracker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jun-cai; Yi, Wen-jun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Yang, Jian-kun; Li, Xiu-jian; Tan, Ji-chun

    2012-06-01

    In most spacecraft, there is a need to know the craft's angular rate. Approaches with least squares and an adaptive Kalman filter are proposed for estimating the angular rate directly from the star tracker measurements. In these approaches, only knowledge of the vector measurements and sampling interval is required. The designed adaptive Kalman filter can filter out noise without information of the dynamic model and inertia dyadic. To verify the proposed estimation approaches, simulations based on the orbit data of the challenging minisatellite payload (CHAMP) satellite and experimental tests with night-sky observation are performed. Both the simulations and experimental testing results have demonstrated that the proposed approach performs well in terms of accuracy, robustness, and performance. PMID:22695598

  1. Constitutive relations in TRAC-P1A

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Saha, P.

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the basic thermal-hydraulic models and correlations that are in the TRAC-P1A code, as released in March 1979. It is divided into two parts, A and B. Part A describes the models in the three-dimensional vessel module of TRAC, whereas Part B focuses on the loop components that are treated by one-dimensional formulations. The report follows the format of the questions prepared by the Analysis Development Branch of USNRC and the questionnaire has been attached to this document for completeness. Concerted efforts have been made in understanding the present models in TRAC-P1A by going through the FORTRAN listing of the code. Some discrepancies between the code and the TRAC-P1A manual have been found. These are pointed out in this document. Efforts have also been made to check the TRAC references for the range of applicability of the models and correlations used in the code. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  3. Characterization and adsorption of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Xi, Y; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; Fan, M; Liu, Y; Wu, W

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophage infection of lactic acid bacteria is considered an important problem worldwide in the food fermentation industry, as it may produce low quality or unsafe foods, cause fermentation failure, and result in economic losses. To increase current knowledge on the properties of Lactobacillus virulent phages, we evaluated the effect of divalent cations, temperature, pH, and chloramphenicol on the adsorption ability of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1. Phage P1 was isolated from the abnormal fermentation liquid of Lactobacillus plantarum IMAU10120. The results showed that this phage belonged to the Siphoviridae family. The latent period of this phage was 45min, and the burst time was 90min. Burst size was 132.88±2.37 phage counts expressed per milliliter per infective center. This phage showed good tolerance at different temperatures, but incubation at 50°C only affected its adsorption. Adsorption rate reached a maximum value between 30 and 42°C. A high adsorption value of phage infectivity was obtained from pH 6 to 8. Moreover, calcium ions promoted and increased the adsorption capacity of phage P1, but magnesium ions had negative effects. Chloramphenicol had no effect on phage adsorption. This study increased current knowledge on the characterization and biological aspects of Lactobacillus virulent phages, and may provide some basic information that can be used to design successful antiphage strategies in the food industry. PMID:27372579

  4. Safety evaluation of nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Okado, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2016-02-01

    Nuclease P1 has been widely used in the food industry to enhance or create flavor. One commercial source of this enzyme is Penicillium citrinum, an anamorphic mesophilic fungus with a long history of safe use in Europe and Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of ribonucleases. Given the intended use in food for human consumption, and noting its potential presence at trace levels in finished products, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames and chromosome aberration assay, an in vivo rat erythrocyte micronucleus assay and a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats were conducted. No mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames assay. Equivocal activity in the chromosome aberration assay was not replicated in the micronucleus assay at doses of up to 1007 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day. Following oral administration of nuclease P1 at dosages of 10.1, 101 or 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day to Sprague-Dawley rats, no adverse effects on any study parameter were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day. The results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use in food production of nuclease P1 produced from P. citrinum. PMID:26686996

  5. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  6. SPC-P1: a pathogenicity-associated prophage of Salmonella paratyphi C

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella paratyphi C is one of the few human-adapted pathogens along with S. typhi, S. paratyphi A and S. paratyphi B that cause typhoid, but it is not clear whether these bacteria cause the disease by the same or different pathogenic mechanisms. Notably, these typhoid agents have distinct sets of large genomic insertions, which may encode different pathogenicity factors. Previously we identified a novel prophage, SPC-P1, in S. paratyphi C RKS4594 and wondered whether it might be involved in pathogenicity of the bacteria. Results We analyzed the sequence of SPC-P1 and found that it is an inducible phage with an overall G+C content of 47.24%, similar to that of most Salmonella phages such as P22 and ST64T but significantly lower than the 52.16% average of the RKS4594 chromosome. Electron microscopy showed short-tailed phage particles very similar to the lambdoid phage CUS-3. To evaluate its roles in pathogenicity, we lysogenized S. paratyphi C strain CN13/87, which did not have this prophage, and infected mice with the lysogenized CN13/87. Compared to the phage-free wild type CN13/87, the lysogenized CN13/87 exhibited significantly increased virulence and caused multi-organ damages in mice at considerably lower infection doses. Conclusions SPC-P1 contributes pathogenicity to S. paratyphi C in animal infection models, so it is possible that this prophage is involved in typhoid pathogenesis in humans. Genetic and functional analyses of SPC-P1 may facilitate the study of pathogenic evolution of the extant typhoid agents, providing particular help in elucidating the pathogenic determinants of the typhoid agents. PMID:21192789

  7. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  8. The lunar angular momentum problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Formation of the Moon by classical Darwin-type fission of a rapidly spinning proto-Earth is discussed. The relationship of angular momentum to accretion disks is examined. The co-accretion scenario and Darwin-type fission are compared and evaluated.

  9. Olympic Wrestling and Angular Momentum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Reported is the use of a wrestling photograph in a noncalculus introductory physics course. The photograph presents a maneuver that could serve as an example for a discussion on equilibrium, forces, torque, and angular motion. Provided are some qualitative thoughts as well as quantitative calculations. (YP)

  10. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites

  11. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion–fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways. PMID:26019234

  12. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-08-15

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways. PMID:26019234

  13. On Dunkl angular momenta algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Misha; Hakobyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    We consider the quantum angular momentum generators, deformed by means of the Dunkl operators. Together with the reflection operators they generate a subalgebra in the rational Cherednik algebra associated with a finite real reflection group. We find all the defining relations of the algebra, which appear to be quadratic, and we show that the algebra is of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) type. We show that this algebra contains the angular part of the Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian and that together with constants it generates the centre of the algebra. We also consider the gl( N ) version of the subalge-bra of the rational Cherednik algebra and show that it is a non-homogeneous quadratic algebra of PBW type as well. In this case the central generator can be identified with the usual Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian associated with the Coxeter group in the harmonic confinement.

  14. Neoclassical Angular Momentum Flux Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2004-11-01

    The toroidal angular momentum flux in neoclassical transport theory of small rotations depends on the second order (in ion poloidal gyroradius over plasma scale length) ion distribution function. Owing to the complexity of the calculation, the result obtained a long time ago for circular cross-section tokamak plasmas in the banana regime [M.N. Rosenbluth, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, Vienna, 1971), Vol. 1, p. 495] has never been reproduced. Using a representation of the angular momentum flux based on the solution of an adjoint equation to the usual linearized drift kinetic equation, and performing systematically a large-aspect-ratio expansion, we have obtained the flux for flux surfaces of arbitrary shape. We have found the same analytic form for the temperature gradient driven part of the flux, but the overall numerical multiplier is different and has the opposite sign. Implications for rotations in discharges with no apparent momentum input will be discussed.

  15. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-01

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  16. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  17. Discrete ordinates methods in xy geometry with spatially varying angular discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Bal, G.; Warin, X.

    1997-10-01

    The efficiency of a new quadrature rule adapted to the numerical resolution of a neutron transport problem in xy geometry is presented based on the use of the discrete ordinates method for the angular variable. The purpose of introducing this quadrature rule is to couple two different angular discretizations used on two nonoverlapping subdomains, which is useful for performing local refinement. This coupling and some numerical results of source problems are presented.

  18. NUCLEI AT HIGH ANGULAR MOMENTUM

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    It appears that most nuclei show a compromise between purely collective and purely non-collective behavior at very high spins.non~collective behavior in nuclei has been seen only as high as 36 or 37{bar h}, at which point a more collective structure seems to develop. The concepts underlying the study of high angular momentum states are discussed. The factors that limit angular momentum in nuclei are considered. The currently emerging state of physics of very high spin states is reviewed. The detailed calculations currently made for high spin states are described, focusing not on the calculations themselves, but on the physical input to them and results that come out. Production of high-spin states using heavy-ion reactions is reviewed. Studies of {gamma}-rays de-exciting the evaporation residues from heavy-ion reactions are covered. Two types of {gamma} rays occur: those that cool the nucleus to or toward the yrast line, called "statistical," and those that are more or less parallel to the yrast line and remove the angular momentum, called "yrast~like." Collective rotation, in simplest form the motion of a deformed nucleus around an axis perpendicular to its symmetry axis, is also covered.

  19. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  20. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1_BLUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD ox) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1_BLUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD ox cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD ox in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD redH - and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  1. P1 Epigenetic Regulation in Leaves of High Altitude Maize Landraces: Effect of UV-B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rius, Sebastián P.; Emiliani, Julia; Casati, Paula

    2016-01-01

    P1 is a R2R3-MYB transcription factor that regulates the accumulation of a specific group of flavonoids in maize floral tissues, such as flavones and phlobaphenes. P1 is also highly expressed in leaves of maize landraces adapted to high altitudes and higher levels of UV-B radiation. In this work, we analyzed the epigenetic regulation of the P1 gene by UV-B in leaves of different maize landraces. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation in the P1 proximal promoter, intron1 and intron2 is decreased by UV-B in all lines analyzed; however, the basal DNA methylation levels are lower in the landraces than in B73, a low altitude inbred line. DNA demethylation by UV-B is accompanied by a decrease in H3 methylation at Lys 9 and 27, and by an increase in H3 acetylation. smRNAs complementary to specific regions of the proximal promoter and of intron 2 3′ end are also decreased by UV-B; interestingly, P1 smRNA levels are lower in the landraces than in B73 both under control conditions and after UV-B exposure, suggesting that smRNAs regulate P1 expression by UV-B in maize leaves. Finally, we investigated if different P1 targets in flower tissues are also regulated by this transcription factor in response to UV-B. Some targets analyzed show an induction in maize landraces in response to UV-B, with higher basal expression levels in the landraces than in B73; however, not all the transcripts analyzed were found to be regulated by UV-B in leaves. PMID:27148340

  2. P1 Epigenetic Regulation in Leaves of High Altitude Maize Landraces: Effect of UV-B Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rius, Sebastián P; Emiliani, Julia; Casati, Paula

    2016-01-01

    P1 is a R2R3-MYB transcription factor that regulates the accumulation of a specific group of flavonoids in maize floral tissues, such as flavones and phlobaphenes. P1 is also highly expressed in leaves of maize landraces adapted to high altitudes and higher levels of UV-B radiation. In this work, we analyzed the epigenetic regulation of the P1 gene by UV-B in leaves of different maize landraces. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation in the P1 proximal promoter, intron1 and intron2 is decreased by UV-B in all lines analyzed; however, the basal DNA methylation levels are lower in the landraces than in B73, a low altitude inbred line. DNA demethylation by UV-B is accompanied by a decrease in H3 methylation at Lys 9 and 27, and by an increase in H3 acetylation. smRNAs complementary to specific regions of the proximal promoter and of intron 2 3' end are also decreased by UV-B; interestingly, P1 smRNA levels are lower in the landraces than in B73 both under control conditions and after UV-B exposure, suggesting that smRNAs regulate P1 expression by UV-B in maize leaves. Finally, we investigated if different P1 targets in flower tissues are also regulated by this transcription factor in response to UV-B. Some targets analyzed show an induction in maize landraces in response to UV-B, with higher basal expression levels in the landraces than in B73; however, not all the transcripts analyzed were found to be regulated by UV-B in leaves. PMID:27148340

  3. Catalytic activity of nuclease P1: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Falcone, J.M.; Shibata, M.; Box, H.C.

    1994-10-01

    Nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum is a zinc dependent glyco-enzyme that recognizes single stranded DNA and RNA as substrates and hydrolyzes the phosphate ester bond. Nuclease Pl seems to recognize particular conformations of the phosphodiester backbone and shows significant variation in the rate of hydrolytic activity depending upon which nucleosides are coupled by the phosphodiester bond. The efficiency of nuclease Pl in hydrolyzing the phosphodiester bonds of a substrate can be altered by modifications to one of the substrate bases induced by ionizing radiation or oxidative stress. Measurements have been made of the effect of several radiation induced lesions on the catalytic rate of nuclease Pl. A model of the structure of the enzyme has been constructed in order to better understand the binding and activity of this enzyme on various ssDNA substrates.

  4. Anomalous photoluminescence in InP1-xBix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiren; Pan, Wenwu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Liyao; Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Kai; Shao, Jun; Wang, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from InP1-xBix thin films with Bi concentrations in the 0-2.49% range reveals anomalous spectral features with strong and very broad (linewidth of 700 nm) PL signals compared to other bismide alloys. Multiple transitions are observed and their energy levels are found much smaller than the band-gap measured from absorption measurements. These transitions are related to deep levels confirmed by deep level transient spectroscopy, which effectively trap free holes and enhance radiative recombination. The broad luminescence feature is beneficial for making super-luminescence diodes, which can theoretically enhance spatial resolution beyond 1 μm in optical coherent tomography (OCT). PMID:27291823

  5. Micrococcin P1 - A bactericidal thiopeptide active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Degiacomi, Giulia; Personne, Yoann; Mondésert, Guillaume; Ge, Xueliang; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Boldrin, Francesca; Goel, Pavitra; Peisker, Kristin; Benjak, Andrej; Barrio, Maria Belén; Ventura, Marcello; Brown, Amanda C; Leblanc, Véronique; Bauer, Armin; Sanyal, Suparna; Cole, Stewart T; Lagrange, Sophie; Parish, Tanya; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    The lack of proper treatment for serious infectious diseases due to the emergence of multidrug resistance reinforces the need for the discovery of novel antibiotics. This is particularly true for tuberculosis (TB) for which 3.7% of new cases and 20% of previously treated cases are estimated to be caused by multi-drug resistant strains. In addition, in the case of TB, which claimed 1.5 million lives in 2014, the treatment of the least complicated, drug sensitive cases is lengthy and disagreeable. Therefore, new drugs with novel targets are urgently needed to control resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. In this manuscript we report the characterization of the thiopeptide micrococcin P1 as an anti-tubercular agent. Our biochemical experiments show that this antibiotic inhibits the elongation step of protein synthesis in mycobacteria. We have further identified micrococcin resistant mutations in the ribosomal protein L11 (RplK); the mutations were located in the proline loop at the N-terminus. Reintroduction of the mutations into a clean genetic background, confirmed that they conferred resistance, while introduction of the wild type RplK allele into resistant strains re-established sensitivity. We also identified a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. These data, in good agreement with previous structural studies suggest that also in M. tuberculosis micrococcin P1 functions by binding to the cleft between the 23S rRNA and the L11 protein loop, thus interfering with the binding of elongation factors Tu and G (EF-Tu and EF-G) and inhibiting protein translocation. PMID:27553416

  6. An optical filter with angular selectivity of the light transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirullin, Rustam S.

    2015-09-01

    Features of the application of a novel optical filter with angular selectivity of the light transmission to architectural glazing are considered. The filter consists of a sheet transparent substrate with thin-film grating layers on both surfaces. The gratings formed by directionally transmissive strips, alternating with absorptive, reflective, or scattering strips. Their relative position on the input and output surfaces provides angular selectivity of the directional light transmission - as the incidence angle changes, the proportion of radiation that passes through both gratings of the filter also changes. Chromogenic materials currently used in the laminated smart windows, providing control over the intensity and spectrum of the transmitted solar radiation, cannot achieve the selective regulation on the ranges of incidence angles. Such a regulation requires the use of additional daylight-redirecting devices, especially blinds, to dynamically adapt to the position of the sun. The grating optical filter provides angular selectivity of the light transmission of a window without such devices. The features of using this filter in the single and double glazed windows are described. A graphic analytical calculation method is proposed for estimating the effect of geometrical and optical parameters of the filter on the angular characteristics of the light transmission. An algorithm to optimize filtering solar radiation taking into account the geographical coordinates of terrain, time of day and year and the orientation of the window to the cardinal is set. An algorithm to calculating geometrical parameters of the filter with pre-specified characteristics of the light transmission is obtained.

  7. Angular momentum of binary asteroids: Implications for their possible origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, P.; Marchis, F.

    2008-01-01

    We describe in this work a thorough study of the physical and orbital characteristics of extensively observed main-belt and trojan binaries, mainly taken from the LAOSA (Large Adaptive Optics Survey of Asteroids [Marchis, F., Baek, M., Berthier, J., Descamps, P., Hestroffer, D., Kaasalainen, M., Vachier, F., 2006c. In: Workshop on Spacecraft Reconnaissance of Asteroid and Comet Interiors. Abstract #3042]) database, along with a selection of bifurcated objects. Dimensionless quantities, such as the specific angular momentum and the scaled primary spin rate, are computed and discussed for each system. They suggest that these asteroidal systems might be the outcome of rotational fission or mass shedding of a parent body presumably subjected to an external torque. One of the most striking features of separated binaries composed of a large primary ( R>100 km) with a much smaller secondary ( R<20 km) is that they all have total angular momentum of ˜0.27. This value is quite close to the Maclaurin-Jacobi bifurcation (0.308) of a spinning fluid body. Alternatively, contact binaries and tidally locked double asteroids, made of components of similar size, have an angular momentum larger than 0.48. They compare successfully with the fission equilibrium sequence of a rotating fluid mass. In conclusion, we find that total angular momentum is a useful proxy to assess the internal structure of such systems.

  8. Two-dimensional angular filter array for angular domain imaging with 3D printed angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) is a technique that is capable of generating two dimensional shadowgrams of attenuating targets embedded in a scattering medium. In ADI, an angular filter array (AFA) is positioned between the sample and the detector to distinguish between quasi-ballistic photons and scattered photons. An AFA is a series of micro-channels with a high aspect ratio. Previous AFAs from our group were constructed by micro-machining the micro-channels into a silicon wafer, limiting the imaging area to a one dimensional line. Two dimensional images were acquired via scanning. The objective of this work was to extend the AFA design to two dimensions to allow for two dimensional imaging with minimal scanning. The second objective of this work was to perform an initial characterization of the imaging capabilities of the 2D AFA. Our approach was to use rapid 3D prototyping techniques to generate an array of micro-channels. The imaging capabilities were then evaluated by imaging a 0.9 mm graphite rod submerged in a scattering media. Contrast was observed to improve when a second angular filter array was placed in front of the sample to mask the incoming light.

  9. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  10. Uncertainty relations for angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammeier, Lars; Schwonnek, René; Werner, Reinhard F.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we study various notions of uncertainty for angular momentum in the spin-s representation of SU(2). We characterize the ‘uncertainty regions’ given by all vectors, whose components are specified by the variances of the three angular momentum components. A basic feature of this set is a lower bound for the sum of the three variances. We give a method for obtaining optimal lower bounds for uncertainty regions for general operator triples, and evaluate these for small s. Further lower bounds are derived by generalizing the technique by which Robertson obtained his state-dependent lower bound. These are optimal for large s, since they are saturated by states taken from the Holstein-Primakoff approximation. We show that, for all s, all variances are consistent with the so-called vector model, i.e., they can also be realized by a classical probability measure on a sphere of radius \\sqrt{s(s+1)}. Entropic uncertainty relations can be discussed similarly, but are minimized by different states than those minimizing the variances for small s. For large s the Maassen-Uffink bound becomes sharp and we explicitly describe the extremalizing states. Measurement uncertainty, as recently discussed by Busch, Lahti and Werner for position and momentum, is introduced and a generalized observable (POVM) which minimizes the worst case measurement uncertainty of all angular momentum components is explicitly determined, along with the minimal uncertainty. The output vectors for the optimal measurement all have the same length r(s), where r(s)/s\\to 1 as s\\to ∞ .

  11. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  12. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  13. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1T - Voluntary Withholding Agreements (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...). 31.3402(p)-1T Section 31.3402(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1T Voluntary Withholding Agreements (temporary). (a)-(b) For further guidance, see § 31.3402(p)-1(a) and (b). (c) Other payments....

  14. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies. PMID:26399831

  15. Useful angular selectivity in oblique columnar aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditchburn, R. J.; Smith, G. B.

    1991-03-01

    A useful magnitude of angular selective transmittance of incident unpolarized light is demonstrated in obliquely deposited aluminum. Required deposition procedures and anisotropic optical properties are discussed. Angular selectivity is very strong at visible wavelengths but both experiment and theory indicate that a single oblique layer with well defined columns gives high transmittance at near-infrared wavelengths compared with normal films. There are ways of reducing this to enhance the energy control capability. Both solar and luminous angular selectivity are reported.

  16. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  17. Configuration interaction calculations with infinite angular = expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.P.; Glickman, T.

    1996-05-01

    The Modified Configuration Interaction (MCI) method improves the angular convergence of Configuration Interaction (CI) calculations by several orders of magnitude by mixing a priori a large number of angular basis functions. With MCI one can therefore use basis functions with very large angular momentum quantum numbers, overcoming an important limitation of conventional CI. Although this is desirable given the excellent convergence obtained, the large number of angular integrations and the calculation of n-j symbols with large values of l to high accuracy, make the angular calculations lengthy. In this work a new angular representation for CI calculations is presented that is much more efficient and powerful. Instead of the large number of angular functions of MCI the authors use a basis set containing an infinite linear combination of angular functions. All the necessary integrations involving these infinite expansions are done in closed form and are actually easy and fast to compute. The linear coefficients in the angular expansion are optimized in terms of a few non-linear parameters. Several examples will be presented with applications to two-electron systems.

  18. Possible evidence for the SIGMA* resonance with J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} around 1380 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Dulat, S.; Zou, B. S.

    2010-04-15

    The unquenched quark models predict the new particle SIGMA* with spin-parity J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} and its mass is around the well-established SIGMA*(1385) with J{sup P}=3/2{sup +}. Here, by using the effective Lagrangian approach, we study K{sup -}p->LAMBDApi{sup -}pi{sup +} reaction at the range of LAMBDA*(1520) peak, comparing the resulting total cross section, and pi{sup +}pi{sup -}, LAMBDApi{sup +}, LAMBDApi{sup -} invariant squared mass distributions for various incident K{sup -} momenta, as well as the production angular distribution of the LAMBDA with the data from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber; we find that, apart from the existing resonance SIGMA*(1385) with J{sup P}=3/2{sup +}, there is evidence for possible existence of the new resonance SIGMA* with J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} around 1380 MeV. Higher statistic data on relevant reactions are needed to clarify the situation.

  19. Computer program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-0 and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, G.; Gibson, G.

    1968-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-O and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas. The equations used are based on the conditions that there is isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass coordinate system, the scattering cross section is constant, and the target nuclear velocities satisfy a Maxwellian distribution.

  20. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    In most spacecraft (SC) there is a need to know the SC angular rate. Precise angular rate is required for attitude determination, and a coarse rate is needed for attitude control damping. Classically, angular rate information is obtained from gyro measurements. These days, there is a tendency to build smaller, lighter and cheaper SC, therefore the inclination now is to do away with gyros and use other means and methods to determine the angular rate. The latter is also needed even in gyro equipped satellites when performing high rate maneuvers whose angular-rate is out of range of the on board gyros or in case of gyro failure. There are several ways to obtain the angular rate in a gyro-less SC. When the attitude is known, one can differentiate the attitude in whatever parameters it is given and use the kinematics equation that connects the derivative of the attitude with the satellite angular-rate and compute the latter. Since SC usually utilize vector measurements for attitude determination, the differentiation of the attitude introduces a considerable noise component in the computed angular-rate vector.

  1. Mean Angular Momenta of Primary Photofission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Bezshyyko, O.A.; Kadenko, I.M.; Plujko, V.A.; Yermolenko, R.V.; Mazur, V.M.; Strilchuk, N.V.; Vishnevsky, I.M.; Zheltonozhsky, V.A.

    2005-05-24

    Isomer ratios and mean angular momenta for photofission products of 237Np and 238U are obtained. The technique of gamma-ray spectrometry for isomeric ratio determination was used. Fissionable nuclei were irradiated by bremsstrahlung spectrum of microtron M-30 with electron energy 16 MeV. Calculations of mean angular momenta were performed by modified version of the EMPIRE II code.

  2. Orbital angular momentum in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Gerald T.

    2010-05-15

    Analysis of the measured value of the integrated d-bar-u-bar asymmetry (I{sub fas} = 0.147 +- 0.027) in the nucleon show it to arise from nucleon fluctuations into baryon plus pion. Requiring angular momentum conservation in these fluctuations shows the associated orbital angular momentum is equal to the value of the flavor asymmetry.

  3. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  4. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  5. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  6. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  7. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  9. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  10. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  11. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE.... § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a nonallocation year...

  12. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  13. Stellar Angular Diameter Relations for Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Arthur; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2016-01-01

    Determining the physical properties of microlensing events depends on having accurate angular radii of the source star. Using long-baseline optical interferometry we are able to determine the angular sizes of nearby stars with uncertainties less than 2 percent. We present empirical estimates of angular diameters for both dwarfs/subgiants and giant stars as functions of five color indices which are relevant to planned microlensing surveys. We find in all considered colors that metallicity does not play a statistically significant role in predicting stellar size for the samples of stars considered.

  14. Angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.; Dines, E.L.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Lisle, J.C.; Schmitt, R.P.; Majka, Z.; Nebbia, G.

    1987-12-01

    The angular momentum dependence of large fragment production in long-lived reactions is studied by measurements of fragment cross sections from reactions with substantially different angular momentum distributions and the coincident ..gamma..-ray multiplicity distributions. The results indicate that the primary l-wave distributions move to larger mean values and decrease in width and skewness with increasing mass symmetry in the decay channel. The results also confirm that the partition of angular momentum kinetic energy relaxed heavy-ion reactions is that expected for a rigidly rotating intermediate.

  15. Optical Mixing of Rydberg Angular Momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Corless, J.D.; Stroud, C.R., Jr.

    1997-07-01

    When optical frequency fields are used to couple a ground state to a Rydberg state, the resonant dipole coupling is to a low angular momentum state. Higher angular momentum states are typically thought not to play a role in the excitation. The extremely large dipole matrix elements coupling Rydberg states of the same n but differing l , however, allow optical fields of modest strengths to produce Rabi frequencies larger than optical frequencies. We demonstrate that these optical fields can therefore readily excite the higher angular momentum states, and we examine the consequences of this coupling. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Inorganic polyphosphate essential for lytic growth of phages P1 and fd.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Rao, Narayana N; Kornberg, Arthur

    2007-02-01

    Transduction frequency with phage P1 had been observed to be very low in Escherichia coli K-12 mutants lacking the operon (ppk1-ppx) responsible for the synthesis of inorganic polyphosphate (poly P). We now find that these mutants, for lack of poly P, are lysogenic for P1 and when infected with phage P1 produce only approximately 1% the number of infective centers compared with the WT host. Both phage adsorption and release were unaffected. The host-encoded P1 late-gene transcriptional activator, SspA, failed to show the transcriptional increase in the mutant, observed in the WT. UV induction of a P1-infected mutant resulted in a 200-fold increase in the production of infectious phage particles. The lysogenized P1 (P1mut) and P1 progeny from the mutant host (Deltappk1-ppx) produced plaques of differing morphologies, whereas P1 progeny from the WT yielded only small, clear plaques. Two discernable variants, one producing small and clear plaques (P1small) and the other large plaques with turbid rims (P1large), had broader host range and produced larger burst sizes in WT compared with P1. Transmission electron microscopy showed P1mut had contractile sheath defects. Thus, the lack of poly P/PPK1 in the mutant host resulted in the formation of defective P1 particles during intracellular growth. A filamentous phage, fd, also failed to produce plaques on a mutant lawn. Although fd adsorbed to the F-pilus, its DNA failed to enter the mutant host. PMID:17261797

  17. Chemotactic signaling by the P1 phosphorylation domain liberated from the CheA histidine kinase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, A; Parkinson, J S

    1996-01-01

    CheA is a histidine kinase central to the signal transduction pathway for chemotaxis in Escherichia coli. CheA autophosphorylates at His-48, with ATP as the phosphodonor, and then donates its phosphoryl groups to two aspartate autokinases, CheY and CheB. Phospho-CheY controls the flagellar motors, whereas phospho-CheB participates in sensory adaptation. Polypeptides encompassing the N-terminal P1 domain of CheA can be transphosphorylated in vitro by the CheA catalytic domain and yet have no deleterious effect on chemotactic ability when expressed at high levels in wild-type cells. To find out why, we examined the effects of a purified P1 fragment, CheA[1-149], on CheA-related signaling activities in vitro and devised in vivo assays for those same activities. Although readily phosphorylated by CheA[260-537], the CheA catalytic domain, CheA[1-149], was a poor substrate for transphosphorylation by full-length CheA molecules, implying that the resident P1 domain monopolizes the CheA catalytic center. CheA-H48Q, a nonphosphorylatable mutant, failed to transphosphorylate CheA[1-149], suggesting that phosphorylation of the P1 domain in cis may alleviate the exclusion effect. In agreement with these findings, a 40-fold excess of CheA[1-149] fragments did not impair the CheA autophosphorylation reaction. CheA[1-149] did acquire phosphoryl groups via reversible phosphotransfer reactions with CheB and CheY molecules. An H48Q mutant of CheA[1-149] could not participate in these reactions, indicating that His-48 is probably the substrate site. The low level of efficiency of these phosphotransfer reactions and the inability of CheA[1-149] to interfere with CheA autophosphorylation most likely account for the failure of liberated P1 domains to jam chemotactic signaling in wild-type cells. However, an excess of CheA[1-149] fragments was able to support chemotactic signaling by P1-deficient cheA mutants, demonstrating that CheA[1-149] fragments have both transphosphorylation and

  18. Gravitational waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2016-02-01

    Spinorial formalism is used to map every electromagnetic wave into the gravitational wave (within the linearized gravity). In this way we can obtain the gravitational counterparts of Bessel, Laguerre-Gauss, and other light beams carrying orbital angular momentum.

  19. Calculates Angular Quadrature Weights and Cosines.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1988-02-18

    DSNQUAD calculates the angular quadrature weights and cosines for use in CCC-254/ANISN-ORNL. The subroutines in DSNQUAD were lifted from the XSDRN-PM code, which is supplied with the CCC-475/ SCALIAS-77 package.

  20. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X.; Anderson, G.

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  1. Subcellular localization of the Streptococcus mutans P1 protein C terminus.

    PubMed

    Homonylo-McGavin, M K; Lee, S F; Bowden, G H

    1999-06-01

    To determine the subcellular location of the Streptococcus mutans P1 protein C-terminal anchor, cell envelope fractionation experiments were conducted in combination with Western immunoblotting, using monoclonal antibody MAb 6-8C specific for an epitope that maps near the C terminus of P1 protein and also a polyclonal antibody preparation directed against the P1 C-terminal 144 amino acids (P1COOH). P1 protein was detected in cell walls but not the membrane purified from S. mutans cells by the monoclonal antibody. In contrast, P1 protein was not detected in the same cell wall preparation using the anti-P1COOH polyclonal antibody. However, proteins released from the cell walls by treatment with mutanolysin contained antigen that was recognized by the anti-P1COOH antibody, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by the antibody were masked by peptidoglycan in the cell wall preparations. When cell walls were treated with boiling trichloroacetic acid to solubilize cell-wall-associated carbohydrate, P1 antigen could not be detected in either the solubilized carbohydrate, or in the remaining peptidoglycan, regardless of whether polyclonal or monoclonal antibody was used. However, when the peptidoglycan was treated with mutanolysin, P1 antigen could be detected in the mutanolysin solubilized fraction by MAb 6-8C. Collectively, these data suggest that the C-terminal 144 amino acids of the P1 protein are embedded within the cell wall, and associated exclusively with the peptidoglycan. Furthermore, the ability of the anti-P1COOH antibody to recognize P1 antigen only after mutanolysin treatment of cell walls suggests these C-terminal 144 amino acids are tightly intercalated within the peptidoglycan strands. PMID:10453480

  2. A new integrated optical angular velocity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Peluso, Francesco; Armenise, Mario N.

    2005-03-01

    Very compact and low-cost rotation sensors are strongly required for any moving systems in several applications. Integrated optical angular velocity sensors seem to be very promising in terms of low cost, compactness, light weight and high-performance. In the paper a new integrated optical angular velocity sensor having a passive resonant configuration is proposed. Preliminary results are really encouraging and demonstrate the possibility of using the sensor in gyro systems for satellite applications.

  3. Angular performance measure for tighter uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Hradil, Z.; Rehacek, J.; Klimov, A. B.; Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.

    2010-01-15

    The uncertainty principle places a fundamental limit on the accuracy with which we can measure conjugate quantities. However, the fluctuations of these variables can be assessed in terms of different estimators. We propose an angular performance that allows for tighter uncertainty relations for angle and angular momentum. The differences with previous bounds can be significant for particular states and indeed may be amenable to experimental measurement with the present technology.

  4. Angular wander measurements of maser clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutel, Robert L.

    Angular wander measurements of the relative positions of closely spaced maser features provides a powerful probe of interstellar turbulence associated with regions of star formation. Differential angular wander is easily measured in a maser complex and can strongly distinguish between shallow and steep power-law turbulence. The best candidates for such measurements appear to be the 6 and 12 GHz type II methanol masers.

  5. Backup Expression of the PhaP2 Phasin Compensates for phaP1 Deletion in Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Maintaining Fitness and PHB Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luis P. S.; Teixeira, Cícero S.; Tirapelle, Evandro F.; Donatti, Lucélia; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; de Souza, Emanuel M.; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fabio; Chubatsu, Leda S.; Müller-Santos, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Phasins are important proteins controlling poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules formation, their number into the cell and stability. The genome sequencing of the endophytic and diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 revealed two homologous phasin genes. To verify the role of the phasins on PHB accumulation in the parental strain H. seropedicae SmR1, isogenic strains defective in the expression of phaP1, phaP2 or both genes were obtained by gene deletion and characterized in this work. Despite of the high sequence similarity between PhaP1 and PhaP2, PhaP1 is the major phasin in H. seropedicae, since its deletion reduced PHB accumulation by ≈50% in comparison to the parental and ΔphaP2. Upon deletion of phaP1, the expression of phaP2 was sixfold enhanced in the ΔphaP1 strain. The responsive backup expression of phaP2 partially rescued the ΔphaP1 mutant, maintaining about 50% of the parental PHB level. The double mutant ΔphaP1.2 did not accumulate PHB in any growth stage and showed a severe reduction of growth when glucose was the carbon source, a clear demonstration of negative impact in the fitness. The co-occurrence of phaP1 and phaP2 homologous in bacteria relatives of H. seropedicae, including other endophytes, indicates that the mechanism of phasin compensation by phaP2 expression may be operating in other organisms, showing that PHB metabolism is a key factor to adaptation and efficiency of endophytic bacteria. PMID:27242754

  6. Geometric absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konz, C.; Benford, Gregory

    2003-10-01

    Circularly polarized electromagnetic fields carry both energy and angular momentum. We investigate the conditions under which a circularly polarized wave field transfers angular momentum to a perfectly conducting macroscopic object, using exact electromagnetic wave theory in a steady-state calculation. We find that axisymmetric perfect conductors cannot absorb or radiate angular momentum when illuminated. However, any asymmetry allows absorption. A rigorous, steady-state solution of the boundary value problem for the reflection from a perfectly conducting infinite wedge shows that waves convey angular momentum at the edges of asymmetries. Conductors can also radiate angular momentum, so their geometric absorption coefficient for angular momentum can be negative. Such absorption or radiation depends solely on the specific geometry of the conductor. The geometric absorption coefficient can be as high as 0.8, and the coefficient for radiation can be -0.4, larger than typical material absorption coefficients. We apply the results to recent experiments which spun roof-shaped aluminum sheets with polarized microwave beams. Applications of geometric, instead of material, absorption can be quite varied. Though experiments testing these ideas will be simpler at microwavelengths, the ideas work for optical ones as well.

  7. The glycosphingolipid P1 is an ovarian cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen involved in migration

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, F; Anugraham, M; Pochechueva, T; Tse, B W C; Alam, S; Guertler, R; Bovin, N V; Fedier, A; Hacker, N F; Huflejt, M E; Packer, N; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A

    2014-01-01

    Background: The level of plasma-derived naturally circulating anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) to P1 trisaccharide has previously been shown to significantly discriminate between ovarian cancer patients and healthy women. Here we aim to identify the Ig class that causes this discrimination, to identify on cancer cells the corresponding P1 antigen recognised by circulating anti-P1 antibodies and to shed light into the possible function of this glycosphingolipid. Methods: An independent Australian cohort was assessed for the presence of anti-P1 IgG and IgM class antibodies using suspension array. Monoclonal and human derived anti-glycan antibodies were verified using three independent glycan-based immunoassays and flow cytometry-based inhibition assay. The P1 antigen was detected by LC-MS/MS and flow cytometry. FACS-sorted cell lines were studied on the cellular migration by colorimetric assay and real-time measurement using xCELLigence system. Results: Here we show in a second independent cohort (n=155) that the discrimination of cancer patients is mediated by the IgM class of anti-P1 antibodies (P=0.0002). The presence of corresponding antigen P1 and structurally related epitopes in fresh tissue specimens and cultured cancer cells is demonstrated. We further link the antibody and antigen (P1) by showing that human naturally circulating and affinity-purified anti-P1 IgM isolated from patients ascites can bind to naturally expressed P1 on the cell surface of ovarian cancer cells. Cell-sorted IGROV1 was used to obtain two study subpopulations (P1-high, 66.1% and P1-low, 33.3%) and observed that cells expressing high P1-levels migrate significantly faster than those with low P1-levels. Conclusions: This is the first report showing that P1 antigen, known to be expressed on erythrocytes only, is also present on ovarian cancer cells. This suggests that P1 is a novel tumour-associated carbohydrate antigen recognised by the immune system in patients and may have a role in cell

  8. Dose of house dust mite antigen (P1) inhaled by infants aged one month

    SciTech Connect

    Carswell, F.; Clark, J.; Robinson, P.; Platts-Mills, T.A.

    1983-11-01

    A survey of the habitats occupied by 12 infants of one month of age revealed that approximately 10% of their day was spent in conditions of potential exposure to the major (P1) allergen of the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. A respiratory pump which reproduced the minute ventilation of an infant was placed in representative infant habitats. The P1 allergen trapped by the filter in this pump was measured as an estimate of infants' allergen intake. Detectable P1 intake was only present when there was active air disturbance (bed making and vacuuming). The average P1 intake was approximately 3 ng P1/24 hours. Comparison of this P1 intake with that which sensitizes in other situations suggests that it is usually inadequate to sensitize infants.

  9. A detection system with broad angular acceptance for particle identification and angular distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Arazi, A.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Capurro, O. A.; Cardona, M. A.; de Barbará, E.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martí, G. V.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    A new detection system for time-optimized heavy-ion angular distribution measurements has been designed and constructed. This device is composed by an ionization chamber with a segmented-grid anode and three position-sensitive silicon detectors. This particular arrangement allows identifying reaction products emitted within a 30° wide angular range with better than 1° angular resolution. As a demonstration of its capabilities, angular distributions of the elastic scattering cross-section and the production of alpha particles in the 7Li+27Al system, at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, are presented.

  10. Pentapeptide Boronic Acid Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MycP1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Frasinyuk, Mykhaylo S.; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Wagner, Jonathan M.; Evans, Timothy J.; Reed, Robert W.; Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Watt, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycosin protease-1 (MycP1) cleaves ESX secretion-associated protein B (EspB) that is a virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and accommodates an octapeptide, AVKAASLG, as a short peptide substrate. Because peptidoboronic acids are known inhibitors of serine proteases, the synthesis and binding of a boronic acid analog of the pentapeptide cleavage product, AVKAA, was studied using MycP1 variants from M. thermoresistible (MycP1mth), M. smegmatis (MycP1msm) and M. tuberculosis (MycP1mtu). We synthesized the boropentapeptide, HAlaValLysAlaAlaB(OH)2 (1) and the analogous pinanediol PD-protected HAlaValLysAlaAlaBO2(PD) (2) using an Fmoc/Boc peptide strategy. The pinanediol boropentapeptide 2 displayed IC50 values 121.6±25.3 μM for MycP1mth, 93.2±37.3 μM for MycP1msm and 37.9±5.2 μM for MycP1mtu. Such relatively strong binding creates a chance for crystalizing the complex with 2 and finding the structure of the unknown MycP1 catalytic site that would potentially facilitate the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. PMID:24915878

  11. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1999-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1". The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have successfully used adaptive optics on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1" resolution images of solar system objects in the far red and near infrared (0.7-2.5 microns), aE wavelengths which best discl"lmlnate their spectral signatures. Our efforts have been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential.

  12. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.

  13. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  14. Magnetic field and angular momentum evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic field in young stellar object is clearly the most important component when one dealing with the angular momentum evolution of solar-like stars. It controls this latter one from the pre-main sequence, during the ``disk locking'' phase where the stars magnetically interact with their surrounding disk, to the main-sequence through powerful stellar winds that remove angular momentum from the stellar surface. We present new models for the rotational evolution of solar-like stars between 1 Myr and 10 Gyr with the aim to reproduce the distributions of rotational periods observed for star forming regions and young open clusters within this age range. Our simulations are produced by a recent model dedicated to the study of the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars. This model include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetized stellar winds and a specific dynamo and mass-loss prescription are used to link the angular momentum loss-rate to angular velocity evolution. The model additionally allows for a core/envelope decoupling with an angular momentum transfer between these two regions. Since this former model didn't include any physical star/disk interaction description, two star/disk interaction processes are eventually added to it in order to reproduce the apparent small angular velocities to which the stellar surface is subject during the disk accretion phase. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow, median and fast rotators including two star/disk interaction scenarios that are the magnetospheric ejection and the accretion powered stellar winds processes. The models appear to fail at reproducing the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars except when a more intense magnetic field is used during the disk accretion phase.

  15. Development of a High Accuracy Angular Measurement System for Langley Research Center Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett; Yu, Si-bok; Rhew, Ray D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern experimental and test activities demand innovative and adaptable procedures to maximize data content and quality while working within severely constrained budgetary and facility resource environments. This report describes development of a high accuracy angular measurement capability for NASA Langley Research Center hypersonic wind tunnel facilities to overcome these deficiencies. Specifically, utilization of micro-electro-mechanical sensors including accelerometers and gyros, coupled with software driven data acquisition hardware, integrated within a prototype measurement system, is considered. Development methodology addresses basic design requirements formulated from wind tunnel facility constraints and current operating procedures, as well as engineering and scientific test objectives. Description of the analytical framework governing relationships between time dependent multi-axis acceleration and angular rate sensor data and the desired three dimensional Eulerian angular state of the test model is given. Calibration procedures for identifying and estimating critical parameters in the sensor hardware is also addressed.

  16. Ultrafast angular momentum transfer in multisublattice ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; López-Flores, V; Halté, V; Hehn, M; Stamm, C; Pontius, N; Beaurepaire, E; Boeglin, C

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to induce ultrafast changes of the magnetization in magnetic materials. However, one of the unsolved questions is that of conservation of the total angular momentum during the ultrafast demagnetization. Here we report the ultrafast transfer of angular momentum during the first hundred femtoseconds in ferrimagnetic Co0.8Gd0.2 and Co0.74Tb0.26 films. Using time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism allowed for time-resolved determination of spin and orbital momenta for each element. We report an ultrafast quenching of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and show that at early times the demagnetization in ferrimagnetic alloys is driven by the local transfer of angular momenta between the two exchange-coupled sublattices while the total angular momentum stays constant. In Co0.74Tb0.26 we have observed a transfer of the total angular momentum to an external bath, which is delayed by ~150 fs. PMID:24614016

  17. Dirac Green function for angular projection potentials.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Rudolf

    2015-11-25

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, it is shown that the angular dependence of the Dirac Green function can be described analytically for potentials with non-local dependence on the angular variables if they are chosen as projection potentials in angular momentum space. Because the local dependence on the radial variable can be treated to any precision with present computing capabilities, this means that the Green function can be calculated practically exactly. Second, it is shown that a result of this kind not only holds for a single angular projection potential but also more generally, for instance if space is divided into non-overlapping cells and a separate angular projection potential is used in each cell. This opens the way for relativistic density-functional calculations within a different perspective than the conventional one. Instead of trying to obtain the density for a given potential approximately as well as possible, the density is determined exactly for non-local potentials which can approximate arbitrary local potentials as well as desired. PMID:26523824

  18. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  19. Angular momentum conservation for dynamical black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2006-11-15

    Angular momentum can be defined by rearranging the Komar surface integral in terms of a twist form, encoding the twisting around of space-time due to a rotating mass, and an axial vector. If the axial vector is a coordinate vector and has vanishing transverse divergence, it can be uniquely specified under certain generic conditions. Along a trapping horizon, a conservation law expresses the rate of change of angular momentum of a general black hole in terms of angular momentum densities of matter and gravitational radiation. This identifies the transverse-normal block of an effective gravitational-radiation energy tensor, whose normal-normal block was recently identified in a corresponding energy conservation law. Angular momentum and energy are dual, respectively, to the axial vector and a previously identified vector, the conservation equations taking the same form. Including charge conservation, the three conserved quantities yield definitions of an effective energy, electric potential, angular velocity and surface gravity, satisfying a dynamical version of the so-called first law of black-hole mechanics. A corresponding zeroth law holds for null trapping horizons, resolving an ambiguity in taking the null limit.

  20. Dirac Green function for angular projection potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Rudolf

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, it is shown that the angular dependence of the Dirac Green function can be described analytically for potentials with non-local dependence on the angular variables if they are chosen as projection potentials in angular momentum space. Because the local dependence on the radial variable can be treated to any precision with present computing capabilities, this means that the Green function can be calculated practically exactly. Second, it is shown that a result of this kind not only holds for a single angular projection potential but also more generally, for instance if space is divided into non-overlapping cells and a separate angular projection potential is used in each cell. This opens the way for relativistic density-functional calculations within a different perspective than the conventional one. Instead of trying to obtain the density for a given potential approximately as well as possible, the density is determined exactly for non-local potentials which can approximate arbitrary local potentials as well as desired.

  1. Absolute frequency measurement of the 7s2 1S0-7s7p 1P1 transition in Ra225

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, B.; Dammalapati, U.; Groot, A.; Jungmann, K.; Willmann, L.

    2014-10-01

    Transition frequencies were determined for transitions in Ra in an atomic beam and for reference lines in Te2 molecules in a vapor cell. The absolute frequencies were calibrated against a GPS stabilized Rb clock by means of an optical frequency comb. The 7s21S0(F=1/2)-7s7p1P1(F =3/2) transition in Ra225 was determined to be 621042124(2)MHz. The measurements provide input for designing efficient and robust laser cooling of Ra atoms in preparation of a search for a permanent electric dipole moment in Ra isotopes.

  2. Optimal method for exoplanet detection by angular differential imaging.

    PubMed

    Mugnier, Laurent M; Cornia, Alberto; Sauvage, Jean-François; Rousset, Gérard; Fusco, Thierry; Védrenne, Nicolas

    2009-06-01

    We propose a novel method for the efficient direct detection of exoplanets from the ground using angular differential imaging. The method combines images appropriately, then uses the combined images jointly in a maximum-likelihood framework to estimate the position and intensity of potential planets orbiting the observed star. It takes into account the mixture of photon and detector noises and a positivity constraint on the planet's intensity. A reasonable detection criterion is also proposed based on the computation of the noise propagation from the images to the estimated intensity of the potential planet. The implementation of this method is tested on simulated data that take into account static aberrations before and after the coronagraph, residual turbulence after adaptive optics correction, and noise. PMID:19488172

  3. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  4. Including an Exam P/1 Prep Course in a Growing Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students' problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of…

  5. A Study of Perkins 2P1 Graduation Performance Rates at Virginia Western Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, J. Andrew.

    2006-01-01

    "2P1" is the Carl Perkins label for an institution's graduation performance rate. Systems receiving Perkins funds, like Virginia's 23 community colleges, are expected to meet a federally approved 2P1 target rate. For the 3-year period 1999-2001 Virginia Western Community College (VWCC) was one of seven community colleges in the VCCS (Virginia…

  6. Delineation of immunodominant and cytadherence segment(s) of Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adhesion of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) to host epithelial cells requires several adhesin proteins like P1, P30 and P116. Among these proteins, P1 protein has been inedited as one of the major adhesin and immunogenic protein present on the attachment organelle of M. pneumoniae. In the present study, we scanned the entire sequence of M. pneumoniae P1 protein to identify the immunodominant and cytadherence region(s). M. pneumoniae P1 gene was synthesized in four segments replacing all the UGA codons to UGG codons. Each of the four purified P1 protein fragment was analyzed for its immunogenicity with anti-M. pneumoniae M129 antibodies (Pab M129) and sera of M. pneumoniae infected patients by western blotting and ELISA. Antibodies were produced against all the P1 protein fragments and these antibodies were used for M. pneumoniae adhesion, M. pneumoniae adhesion inhibition and M. pneumoniae surface exposure assays using HEp-2 cells lines. Results Our results show that the immunodominant regions are distributed throughout the entire length of P1 protein, while only the N- and C- terminal region(s) of P1 protein are surface exposed and block cytadhesion to HEp-2 cells, while antibodies to two middle fragments failed to block cytadhesion. Conclusions These results have important implications in designing strategies to block the attachment of M. pneumoniae to epithelial cells, thus preventing the development of atypical pneumonia. PMID:24774062

  7. [Expression of cecropin P1 gene increases resistance of Camelina sativa (L.) plants to microbial phytopathogenes].

    PubMed

    Zakharchenko, N S; Kaliaeva, M A; Bur'ianov, Ia I

    2013-05-01

    Transgenic plants of camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz) with the synthetic gene of antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (cecP1) were obtained. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is performed using the binary vector pGA482::cecP1 by vacuum infiltration of flower buds. The presence of the cecP1 gene in the genome of plants was confirmed by PCR. cecP1 gene expression in transgenic plants was shown by Western blot analysis and by antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against the bacterial phytopathogene Erwinia carotovora. The plants of F0 and F1 generations had the normal phenotype and retained the ability to form viable seeds in self-pollination. cecP1 plants exhibit enhanced resistance to bacterial and fungal phytopathogens: Erwinia carotovora and Fusarium sporotrichioides. The increased sustainability of cecropin P1-expressing plants against salt stress is shown. The possibility of the integration of the cecP1 gene into the overall protective system of plants against biotic and abiotic stresses is discussed. PMID:24159802

  8. A genome-wide regulatory framework identifies maize Pericarp Color1 (P1) controlled genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P1 encodes an R2R3-MYB transcription factor responsible for the accumulation of insecticidal flavones in maize silks and red phlobaphene pigments in pericarps and other floral tissues. Using genome-wide expression analyses (RNA-Seq) in pericarps and silks of plants with contrasting P1 alleles combin...

  9. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  10. Inequalities for angular derivatives and boundary interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, Vladimir; Elin, Mark; Shoikhet, David

    2013-03-01

    The classical Julia-Wolff-Carathéodory theorem asserts that the angular derivative of a holomorphic self-mapping of the open unit disk (Schur function) at its boundary fixed point is a positive number. Cowen and Pommerenke (J Lond Math Soc 26:271-289, 1982) proved that if a Schur function has several boundary regular fixed (or mutual contact) points, then the angular derivatives at these points are subject to certain inequalities. We develop a unified approach to establish relations between angular derivatives of Schur functions with a prescribed (possibly, infinite) collection of either mutual contact points or boundary fixed points. This approach yields diverse inequalities improving both classical and more recent results. We apply them to study the Nevanlinna-Pick interpolation problem with boundary data. Our methods lead to fairly explicit formulas describing the set of solutions.

  11. Improved numerical projection of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Kevin; Johnson, Calvin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear many-body states have good angular momenta, but many theoretical building blocks such as deformed Slater determinants do not. Hence one must numerically project out states of good angular momenta, usually through a computationally taxing three-dimensional integral. We took an existing code for angular-momentum projected Hartree-Fock and improved its performance, partly through judicious ordering of the loops, precomputing arrays of important combinatorics, and careful application of parallelization. We also investigated a novel inversion scheme. This work is potentially applicable to multiple approaches in many-body calculations, and should also be generalizable to particle number projection. Supported by SDSU Summer Undergraduate Research Program and by DOE Award Number DE-FG02-96ER40985.

  12. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  13. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions. PMID:22194572

  14. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  15. A Methodologic Approach for Normalizing Angular Work and Velocity During Isotonic and Isokinetic Eccentric Training

    PubMed Central

    Guilhem, Gaël; Cornu, Christophe; Guével, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Context: Resistance exercise training commonly is performed against a constant external load (isotonic) or at a constant velocity (isokinetic). Researchers comparing the effectiveness of isotonic and isokinetic resistance-training protocols need to equalize the mechanical stimulus (work and velocity) applied. Objective: To examine whether the standardization protocol could be adjusted and applied to an eccentric training program. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Controlled research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-one sport science male students (age = 20.6 ± 1.5 years, height = 178.0 ± 4.0 cm, mass = 74.5 ± 9.1 kg). Intervention(s): Participants performed 9 weeks of isotonic (n = 11) or isokinetic (n = 10) eccentric training of knee extensors that was designed so they would perform the same amount of angular work at the same mean angular velocity. Main Outcome Measure(s): Angular work and angular velocity. Results: The isotonic and isokinetic groups performed the same total amount of work (−185.2 ± 6.5 kJ and −184.4 ± 8.6 kJ, respectively) at the same angular velocity (21 ± 1°/s and 22°/s, respectively) with the same number of repetitions (8.0 and 8.0, respectively). Bland-Altman analysis showed that work (bias = 2.4%) and angular velocity (bias = 0.2%) were equalized over 9 weeks between the modes of training. Conclusions: The procedure developed allows angular work and velocity to be standardized over 9 weeks of isotonic and isokinetic eccentric training of the knee extensors. This method could be useful in future studies in which researchers compare neuromuscular adaptations induced by each type of training mode with respect to rehabilitating patients after musculoskeletal injury. PMID:22488276

  16. Synthetic aperture methods for angular scatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Drake A.; Ranganathan, Karthik; McAllister, Michael J.; Rigby, K. W.; Walker, William F.

    2004-04-01

    Angular scatter offers a new source of tissue contrast and an opportunity for tissue characterization in ultrasound imaging. We have previously described the application of the translating apertures algorithm (TAA) to coherently acquire angular scatter data over a range of scattering angles. While this approach works well at the focus, it suffers from poor depth of field (DOF) due to a finite aperture size. Furthermore, application of the TAA with large focused apertures entails a tradeoff between spatial resolution and scattering angle resolution. While large multielement apertures improve spatial resolution, they encompass many permutations of transmit/receive element pairs. This results in the simultaneous interrogation of multiple scattering angles, limiting angular resolution. We propose a synthetic aperture imaging scheme that achieves both high spatial resolution and high angular resolution. In backscatter acquisition mode, we transmit successively from single transducer elements, while receiving on the same element. Other scattering angles are interrogated by successively transmitting and receiving on different single elements chosen with the appropriate spatial separation between them. Thus any given image is formed using only transmit/receive element pairs at a single separation. This synthetic aperture approach minimizes averaging across scattering angles, and yields excellent angular resolution. Likewise, synthetic aperture methods allow us to build large effective apertures to maintain a high spatial resolution. Synthetic dynamic focusing and dynamic apodization are applied to further improve spatial resolution and DOF. We present simulation results and experimental results obtained using a GE Logiq 700MR system modified to obtain synthetic aperture TAA data. Images of wire targets exhibit high DOF and spatial resolution. We also present a novel approach for combining angular scatter data to effectively reduce grating lobes. With this approach we have

  17. An Adaptive Critic Approach to Reference Model Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, G.; Gundy-Burlet, K.; Bryant, D.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks have been successfully used for implementing control architectures for different applications. In this work, we examine a neural network augmented adaptive critic as a Level 2 intelligent controller for a C- 17 aircraft. This intelligent control architecture utilizes an adaptive critic to tune the parameters of a reference model, which is then used to define the angular rate command for a Level 1 intelligent controller. The present architecture is implemented on a high-fidelity non-linear model of a C-17 aircraft. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of the C-17 under degraded conditions such as control failures and battle damage. Pilot ratings using a motion based simulation facility are included in this paper. The benefits of using an adaptive critic are documented using time response comparisons for severe damage situations.

  18. Nonadiabatic tunnel ionization in strong circularly polarized laser fields: counterintuitive angular shifts in the photoelectron momentum distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lan, Pengfei; Xie, Hui; He, Mingrui; Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-11-01

    We perform time-dependent calculation of strong-field ionization of neon, initially prepared in 2p(-1) and 2p(+1) states, with intense near-circularly polarized laser pulses. By solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we find clear different offset angles of the maximum in the photoelectron momentum distribution in the polarization plane of the laser pulses for the two states. We provide clear interpretation that this different angular offset is linked to the sign of the magnetic quantum number, thus it can be used to map out the orbital angular momentum of the initial state. Our results provide a potential tool for studying orbital symmetry in atomic and molecular systems. PMID:26561149

  19. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  20. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  1. Angular momentum in spin-phonon processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum theory of spin relaxation in the elastic environment is revised with account of the concept of a phonon spin recently introduced by Zhang and Niu [L. Zhang and Q. Niu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 085503 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.085503]. Similar to the case of the electromagnetic field, the division of the angular momentum associated with elastic deformations into the orbital part and the part due to phonon spins proves to be useful for the analysis of the balance of the angular momentum. Such analysis sheds important light on microscopic processes leading to the Einstein-de Haas effect.

  2. On the vector model of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  3. Angular distribution of emission from hyperbolic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Livenere, J. E.; Zhu, G.; Tumkur, T. U.; Hu, H.; Cortes, C. L.; Jacob, Z.; Prokes, S. M.; Noginov, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied angular distribution of emission of dye molecules deposited on lamellar metal/dielectric and Si/Ag nanowire based metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion. In agreement with the theoretical prediction, the emission pattern of dye on top of lamellar metamaterial is similar to that on top of metal. At the same time, the effective medium model predicts the emission patterns of the nanowire array and the dye film deposited on glass to be nearly identical to each other. This is not the case of our experiment. We tentatively explain the nearly Lambertian (∝cosθ) angular distribution of emission of the nanowire based sample by a surface roughness. PMID:25476126

  4. Angular Resolution of Multi-Lisa Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Gong, Xue-Fei

    2010-04-01

    In this article, we present a detailed derivation of the angular resolution of arbitrary sets of LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) constellations with a toy model for gravitational wave signals, and further generalized to more complicated cases with slowly varying gravitational wave signals of well-defined frequency at any time instant. For future space-borne LISA-like gravitational wave detectors, our results may serve as a conservative quick estimate of the detector's angular resolution and hopefully moreover a reference for the configuration designs.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoomi; Kang, Min-Young; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, JeeNa; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper) production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase). Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum ‘Bukang’ cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic) leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection. PMID:26751216

  6. Characterization of the enterovirus 71 P1 polyprotein expressed in Pichia pastor as a candidate vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue; Ying, Xiao-ling; Zhou, Shi-li; Han, Tao; Huang, Hao; Jin, Qi; Yang, Fan; Sun, Qi-ying; Sun, Xian-xun

    2014-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) plays an important role in hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which recently caused the death of hundreds of children in the Asia-Pacific region. However, there are no specific treatments available for EV71 infections; thus, a safe and effective vaccine is needed urgently. In this study, we developed an effective and economical method for producing EV71 polyprotein (P1 protein) in Pichia pastoris. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential of P1 protein as a candidate vaccine against EV71 virus. The data revealed that P1 protein induced persistent high cross-neutralization antibodies for different EV71 subtypes, and elicited significant splenocyte proliferation. The high levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) showed that P1 protein induced Th1 and Th2 immune responses. Interestingly, vaccinating female mice with the P1 protein conferred cross-protection against different EV71 subtypes to their neonatal offspring.Compared with heat-inactivated EV71, the P1 protein elicited improved humoral and cellular immune responses and showed good cross-protection with different EV71 subtypes. Therefore, the EV71-P1 protein produced by P. pastoris is a promising candidate vaccine against EV71. PMID:25424925

  7. The Hypervariable Amino-Terminus of P1 Protease Modulates Potyviral Replication and Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Fabio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The replication of many RNA viruses involves the translation of polyproteins, whose processing by endopeptidases is a critical step for the release of functional subunits. P1 is the first protease encoded in plant potyvirus genomes; once activated by an as-yet-unknown host factor, it acts in cis on its own C-terminal end, hydrolyzing the P1-HCPro junction. Earlier research suggests that P1 cooperates with HCPro to inhibit host RNA silencing defenses. Using Plum pox virus as a model, we show that although P1 does not have a major direct role in RNA silencing suppression, it can indeed modulate HCPro function by its self-cleavage activity. To study P1 protease regulation, we used bioinformatic analysis and in vitro activity experiments to map the core C-terminal catalytic domain. We present evidence that the hypervariable region that precedes the protease domain is predicted as intrinsically disordered, and that it behaves as a negative regulator of P1 proteolytic activity in in vitro cleavage assays. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic regulator is associated with greater symptom severity, induction of salicylate-dependent pathogenesis-related proteins, and reduced viral loads. We suggest that fine modulation of a viral protease activity has evolved to keep viral amplification below host-detrimental levels, and thus to maintain higher long-term replicative capacity. PMID:24603811

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoomi; Kang, Min-Young; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, JeeNa; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper) production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase). Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic) leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection. PMID:26751216

  9. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  10. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the P1 Truss Segment arrives at the pad for transfer into the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  11. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the P1 Truss Segment is lifted to the level of the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  12. Angular distribution of turbulence in wave space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G.; Ferziger, J. H.; Bertoglio, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative to the one-point closure model for turbulence, the large eddy simulation (LES), together with its more exact relative, direct numerical simulation (DNS) are discussed. These methods are beginning to serve as partial substitutes for turbulence experiments. The eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) theory is reviewed. Angular distribution of the converted data was examined in relationship to EDQNM.

  13. Inclusion of angular momentum in FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    2015-05-18

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  14. Spacecraft Angular State Estimation After Sensor Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor); BarItzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes two algorithms for computing the angular rate and attitude in case of a gyro failure in a spacecraft (SC) with a special mission profile. The source of the problem is presented, two algorithms are suggested, an observability study is carried out, and the efficiency of the algorithms is demonstrated.

  15. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  16. Inclusion of Angular Momentum in FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  17. The Role of Angularity in Route Choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Alasdair

    The paths of 2425 individual motorcycle trips made in London were analyzed in order to uncover the route choice decisions made by drivers. The paths were derived from global positioning system (GPS) data collected by a courier company for each of their drivers, using algorithms developed for the purpose of this paper. Motorcycle couriers were chosen due to the fact that they both know streets very well and that they do not rely on the GPS to guide their navigation. Each trace was mapped to the underlying road network, and two competing hypotheses for route choice decisions were compared: (a) that riders attempt to minimize the Manhattan distance between locations and (b) that they attempt to minimize the angular distance. In each case, the distance actually traveled was compared to the minimum possible either block or angular distance through the road network. It is usually believed that drivers who know streets well will navigate trips that reduce Manhattan distance; however, here it is shown that angularity appears to play an important role in route choice. 63% of trips made took the minimum possible angular distance between origin and destination, while 51% of trips followed the minimum possible block distance. This implies that impact of turns on cognitive distance plays an important role in decision making, even when a driver has good knowledge of the spatial network.

  18. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael F.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Cook, Philip A.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:23333416

  19. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s(-2)). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  20. Angular momentum evolution of Algol binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanoǧlu, C.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Dervişoǧlu, A.

    2006-11-01

    We have compiled the well-determined absolute parameters of Algol-type binaries. The lists contain the parameters of 74 detached and 61 semidetached close binaries. The double-lined eclipsing binaries provide not only the most accurate determinations of stellar mass, radius and temperatures but also distance-independent luminosity for each of their individual components. The distributions of the primary and secondary masses of detached binaries (DBs) are similar, whilst the secondary masses of the semidetached binaries (SDBs) are mostly smaller than 2 Msolar with a peak in the M2-bin (0.21-1.0). The components of the DBs are almost all located in the main-sequence band. On the contrary, the secondary components of the SDBs have larger radii and luminosity with respect to the same mass and the same effective temperature of main-sequence counterparts. They occupy a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram between terminal-age main sequence and giants. Moreover, the total angular momenta and specific angular momenta are larger for the SDBs of orbital periods with P > 5 d than those of the shorter period ones. The specific angular momenta of SDBs with periods longer than 5 d are 65 per cent greater than that of the short period group with the same mass. The DBs and the SDBs with orbital periods longer and shorter than 5 d are separated into three groups in the J/M5/3 - q diagram. The SDBs with mass ratios greater than 0.3 and P > 5 d have almost the same angular momentum to those of DBs. However, the SDBs with short periods have the smallest angular momentum even though they have the same mass ratios. This result reveals that angular momentum loss (AML) considerably affects the evolution of close binary systems. Recently, Chen, Li & Qian suggested that, in addition to magnetic braking, a circumbinary disc may play an important role in AML from Algol-type binaries. Their calculations indicated that the evolution of Algol-type binaries can be significantly affected by

  1. Miniaturized photoelectric angular sensor with simplified design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Schiaua, Silviu

    1999-09-01

    In building the movable elements of robots, peripheral devices and measuring apparata, increasing the resolution of the angular sensor systems, based on incremental rotary encoders, is essential, together with decreasing the complexity, dimensions and weight. Especially when the angular sensor is integrated in a measuring system, belonging to a programmed light airplane for surveillance, the key issue is to reduce both dimensions and weight. This can be done using a simplified design, which consists in the following solutions: replacement of the fragile Cr on glass substrate, 1.5 mm thick (normally used for the fabrication of incremental disks), with light Cr on polycarbonate substrate, with only 0.15 mm thick; the absence of collimating optics (based on microlenses, used in IR emitter-photocell receiver assembly), as a result of the good coupling efficiency (due to the possible approaching of these elements at minimum 0.45 mm); the shrinkage of the disk's diameters to only 14 mm; the use of surface mounting devices and the related surface mounting technology, enabling to reduce dimensions and weight. The maximum number of slits on a 14 mm diameter dividing disk, usually obtained in a Cr on polycarbonate version, being approx. 1000, no problem occurs in our case, for 360 slits. The requested angular resolution (only 0.5 degrees for the light airplane), using the whole classical '4x digital multiplication' is not necessary, but a lower one of only 2x, resulting in a simplified electronics. The proposed design permitted, that an original arrangement, for building a small size, lightweight, heavy-duty incremental transducer based angular sensor system, to be obtained, useful not only in avionics, but also in robotics, or other special applications. Besides, extending the number of fixed gratings (masks) allows, that many primary signals to be derived, and a further increase in resolution of even 6 angular minutes to be obtained from the initial 360 slits.

  2. New p+1 dimensional nonrelativistic theories from Euclidean stable and unstable Dp-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Kluson, J.

    2009-08-15

    In this paper we continue the study of nonrelativistic p+1 dimensional theories that we started in [arXiv:0904.1343]. We extend the analysis presented there to the case of stable and unstable Dp-branes.

  3. Pathway specific modulation of S1P1 receptor signalling in rat and human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Luke M; Sheridan, Graham K; Pritchard, Adam J; Rutkowska, Aleksandra; Mullershausen, Florian; Dev, Kumlesh K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 (S1P1R) is modulated by phosphorylated FTY720 (pFTY720), which causes S1P1R internalization preventing lymphocyte migration thus limiting autoimmune response. Studies indicate that internalized S1P1Rs continue to signal, maintaining an inhibition of cAMP, thus raising question whether the effects of pFTY720 are due to transient initial agonism, functional antagonism and/or continued signalling. To further investigate this, the current study first determined if continued S1P1R activation is pathway specific. Experimental Approach Using human and rat astrocyte cultures, the effects of S1P1R activation on cAMP, pERK and Ca2+ signalling was investigated. In addition, to examine the role of S1P1R redistribution on these events, a novel biologic (MNP301) that prevented pFTY720-mediated S1P1R redistribution was engineered. Key Results The data showed that pFTY720 induced long-lasting S1P1R redistribution and continued cAMP signalling in rat astrocytes. In contrast, pFTY720 induced a transient increase of Ca2+ in astrocytes and subsequent antagonism of Ca2+ signalling. Notably, while leaving pFTY720-induced cAMP signalling intact, the novel MNP301 peptide attenuated S1P1R-mediated Ca2+ and pERK signalling in cultured rat astrocytes. Conclusions and Implications These findings suggested that pFTY720 causes continued cAMP signalling that is not dependent on S1P1R redistribution and induces functional antagonism of Ca2+ signalling after transient stimulation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that pFTY720 causes continued signalling in one pathway (cAMP) versus functional antagonism of another pathway (Ca2+) and which also suggests that redistributed S1P1Rs may have differing signalling properties from those expressed at the surface. PMID:23587004

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium populi P-1M, Isolated from Pink-Pigmented Household Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium populi P-1M is isolated from the pink-pigmented household biofilm. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of P-1M, consisting of one chromosome of 5,705,640 bp and five plasmids of 64,864 bp, 59,879 bp, 42,569 bp, 41,417 bp, and 29,506 bp. PMID:27313289

  5. STS-113 Mission Specialists review data on the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-113 Mission Specialists John Herrington (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (right) look over the P1 Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload for the mission. The P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002

  6. STS-113 Mission Specialists review data on the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-113 Mission Specialists John Herrington (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (right) look over the P1 Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload for the mission. The P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002.

  7. STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria looks over the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria looks over the P1 Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload for the mission. The P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002.

  8. Activation of Trp-P-1 and Trp-P-2 in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Dolara, P.; Caderni, G.; Benetti, D.

    1982-01-01

    Isolated perfused livers were not able to activate the promutagens Trp-P-1 and Trp-P-2 to their genotoxic metabolites. On the contrary, inherently active mutagenic compounds were detected in the bile of living rats to which Trp-P-1 and Trp-P-2 had been administered intravenously. The excretion of active mutagens through the bile may explain the tumorigenic effect that these compounds exert on the liver during chronic feeding experiments.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium populi P-1M, Isolated from Pink-Pigmented Household Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium populi P-1M is isolated from the pink-pigmented household biofilm. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of P-1M, consisting of one chromosome of 5,705,640 bp and five plasmids of 64,864 bp, 59,879 bp, 42,569 bp, 41,417 bp, and 29,506 bp. PMID:27313289

  10. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  11. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  12. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  13. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  14. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  15. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss. PMID:27519107

  16. Angular description for 3D scattering centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Raynal, Ann Marie; Ling, Hao; Moore, John; Velten, Vincent J.

    2006-05-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field from an electrically large target can often be well modeled as if it is emanating from a discrete set of scattering centers (see Fig. 1). In the scattering center extraction tool we developed previously based on the shooting and bouncing ray technique, no correspondence is maintained amongst the 3D scattering center extracted at adjacent angles. In this paper we present a multi-dimensional clustering algorithm to track the angular and spatial behaviors of 3D scattering centers and group them into features. The extracted features for the Slicy and backhoe targets are presented. We also describe two metrics for measuring the angular persistence and spatial mobility of the 3D scattering centers that make up these features in order to gather insights into target physics and feature stability. We find that features that are most persistent are also the most mobile and discuss implications for optimal SAR imaging.

  17. Phenomenological Determination of the Orbital Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Gordon P.

    2009-08-04

    Measurements involving the gluon spin, {delta}G(x, t) and the corresponding asymmetry, A(x,t) = {delta}G(x,t)/G(x,t) play an important role in quantitative understanding of proton structure. We have modeled the asymmetry perturbatively and calculated model corrections to obtain information about non-perturbative spin-orbit effects. These models are consistent with existing COMPASS and HERMES data on the gluon asymmetry. The J{sub z} = (1/2) sum rule is used to generate values of orbital angular momentum at LO and NLO. For models consistent with data, the orbital angular momentum is small. Our studies specify accuracy that future measurements should achieve to constrain theoretical models for nucleon structure.

  18. Precompound nucleon angular distributions in the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Scobel, W.; Plechaty, E.

    1985-08-01

    Angular distributions for nucleon induced reactions (incident energies 14 to 90 MeV) leading to precompound nucleon emission in the continuum (emitted particle energies 9-70 MeV) are calculated based on nucleon-nucleon scattering kinematics for an incident nucleon on a Fermi gas. Analytic expressions due to Kikuchi and Kawai are used for the single scattering kernel. The geometry dependent hybrid model is used to generate the differential cross sections for first, second, etc. order scattering, these weightings being used to fold the single scattering kernel. Results are found to reproduce all experimental angular distributions quite well at angles in the 20/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/ range. Ad-hoc modifications to approximate quantal effects and Coulomb deflections are explored, but the results do not seem to offer a consistent means of reproducing back angle yields, and give generally poorer results at very forward angles.

  19. Performance criteria for dosimeter angular response

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R. A.; Cummings, F. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Jones, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides criteria for evaluating the response of personnel dosimeters to radiation at nonperpendicular incidence. The US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) ensures that dosimetry systems at DOE facilities meet acceptable standards for precision and accuracy. In the past, these standards were limited to tests for system variability, energy dependence, and level of detection. The proposed criteria will broaden the scope of DOELAP to include the angular response of personnel dosimeters. Because occupational exposures in the workplace are rarely due to radiation from only one direction, dosimeters must accurately assign individual dose equivalent from irradiation at any forward angle of incidence. Including an angular response criterion in DOELAP would improve the quality of personnel monitoring provided that the criterion is developed from appropriate dose quantities. This report provides guidance for assigning individual dose equivalents for radiation fields at nonperpendicular incidence to the dosimeter. 21 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. From transverse angular momentum to photonic wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter; Neugebauer, Martin; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Scientists have known for more than a century that light possesses both linear and angular momenta along the direction of propagation. However, only recent advances in optics have led to the notion of spinning electromagnetic fields capable of carrying angular momenta transverse to the direction of motion. Such fields enable numerous applications in nano-optics, biosensing and near-field microscopy, including three-dimensional control over atoms, molecules and nanostructures, and allowing for the realization of chiral nanophotonic interfaces and plasmonic devices. Here, we report on recent developments of optics with light carrying transverse spin. We present both the underlying principles and the latest achievements, and also highlight new capabilities and future applications emerging from this young yet already advanced field of research.

  1. Satellite Angular Rate Estimation From Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the angular rate vector of a satellite which is based on the time derivatives of vector measurements expressed in a reference and body coordinate. The computed derivatives are fed into a spacial Kalman filter which yields an estimate of the spacecraft angular velocity. The filter, named Extended Interlaced Kalman Filter (EIKF), is an extension of the Kalman filter which, although being linear, estimates the state of a nonlinear dynamic system. It consists of two or three parallel Kalman filters whose individual estimates are fed to one another and are considered as known inputs by the other parallel filter(s). The nonlinear dynamics stem from the nonlinear differential equation that describes the rotation of a three dimensional body. Initial results, using simulated data, and real Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data indicate that the algorithm is efficient and robust.

  2. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriage, Tobias; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Araujo, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Boone, F.; Chan, M.; Cho, H.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F.; Crowe, E.; Denis, K.; Dünner, R.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Huang, C.; Irwin, K.; Jones, G.; Karakla, J.; Kogut, A. J.; Larson, D.; Limon, M.; Lowry, L.; Mehrle, N.; Miller, A. D.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Novak, G.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; Stevenson, T.; Towner, D.; U-Yen, K.; Wagner, E.; Watts, D.; Wollack, E.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most compelling inflation models predict a background of primordial gravitational waves (PGW) detectable by their imprint of a curl-like "B-mode" pattern in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a novel array of telescopes to measure the B-mode signature of the PGW. By targeting the largest angular scales (>2°) with a multifrequency array, novel polarization modulation and detectors optimized for both control of systematics and sensitivity, CLASS sets itself apart in the field of CMB polarization surveys and opens an exciting new discovery space for the PGW and inflation. This poster presents an overview of the CLASS project.

  3. Behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1982-07-01

    The present report begins with a brief overview of nuclear shapes and level structures at high-spin values. The new spectroscopy associated with angular-momentum alignments is described, and some of the exciting possibilities of this spectroscopy are explored. Nuclear moments of inertia are discussed and a somewhat different one is defined, together with a method for measuring it and some early results. Finally a few comments on the future prospects for high-spin physics are offered.

  4. Diaphyseal angular deformities in three foals.

    PubMed

    White, K K

    1983-02-01

    Angular limb deformities in 3 foals were found to originate in the diaphyseal region of the 3rd metacarpal (2) and metatarsal (1) bones. In each case, treatment consisted of wedge ostectomy followed by compression plating. Two foals survived for useful performance; the 3rd was euthanatized because of ischemia of the operated limb. The condition appeared to resemble a similar syndrome in man involving tibial curvature. PMID:6826451

  5. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  6. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  7. Angular Fock coefficients: Refinement and further development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2015-10-01

    The angular coefficients ψk ,p(α ,θ ) of the Fock expansion characterizing the S -state wave function of the two-electron atomic system are calculated in hyperspherical angular coordinates α and θ . To solve the problem the Fock recurrence relations separated into the independent individual equations associated with definite power j of the nucleus charge Z are applied. The "pure" j components of the angular Fock coefficients, orthogonal to the hyperspherical harmonics Yk l, are found for even values of k . To this end, the specific coupling equation is proposed and applied. Effective techniques for solving the individual equations with the simplest nonseparable and separable right-hand sides are proposed. Some mistakes or misprints made earlier in representations of ψ2 ,0, are noted and corrected. All j components of ψ4 ,1 and the majority of components and subcomponents of ψ3 ,0 are calculated and presented. All calculations are carried out with the help of Wolfram Mathematica.

  8. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  9. Nuclear structure at high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    This review paper begins by discussing the limits faced in the attempts to get nuclei to hold very high angular momentum. The method presently used to produce nuclei with the maximum angular momentum is described. Then the physics of high-spin states is taken up; some properties of a purely collective, classical rotor are described, and the effects of coupling single-particle motion to this are considered. Next, backbending, its causes, and a new spectroscopy of bands and backbends at high spin values are discussed. Noncollective states occur when the nuclear angular momentum is carried by a few high-j particles and is aligned along a symmetry axis. There results an irregular yrast line, along which there are no collective transitions. Noncollective behavior in the lead region, the hafnium region, and the N = 82 region is examined. Then the discussion moves on to collective behavior and recent studies on continuum spectra. Evidence for rotation is given, and effective moments of inertia for this rotation are evaluated. Finally, current ..gamma..-ray energy correlation studies are described. 68 references, 36 figures. (RWR)

  10. A Neural Circuit for Angular Velocity Computation

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Samuel B.; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob. PMID:21228902

  11. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob. PMID:21228902

  12. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect. PMID:24978243

  13. Assembly and proteolytic processing of mycobacterial ClpP1 and ClpP2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Caseinolytic proteases (ClpPs) are barrel-shaped self-compartmentalized peptidases involved in eliminating damaged or short-lived regulatory proteins. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) genome contains two genes coding for putative ClpPs, ClpP1 and ClpP2 respectively, that are likely to play a role in the virulence of the bacterium. Results We report the first biochemical characterization of ClpP1 and ClpP2 peptidases from MTB. Both proteins were produced and purified in Escherichia coli. Use of fluorogenic model peptides of diverse specificities failed to show peptidase activity with recombinant mycobacterial ClpP1 or ClpP2. However, we found that ClpP1 had a proteolytic activity responsible for its own cleavage after the Arg8 residue and cleavage of ClpP2 after the Ala12 residue. In addition, we showed that the absence of any peptidase activity toward model peptides was not due to an obstruction of the entry pore by the N-terminal flexible extremity of the proteins, nor to an absolute requirement for the ClpX or ClpC ATPase complex. Finally, we also found that removing the putative propeptides of ClpP1 and ClpP2 did not result in cleavage of model peptides. We have also shown that recombinant ClpP1 and ClpP2 do not assemble in the conventional functional tetradecameric form but in lower order oligomeric species ranging from monomers to heptamers. The concomitant presence of both ClpP1 and ClpP2 did not result in tetradecameric assembly. Deleting the amino-terminal extremity of ClpP1 and ClpP2 (the putative propeptide or entry gate) promoted the assembly in higher order oligomeric species, suggesting that the flexible N-terminal extremity of mycobacterial ClpPs participated in the destabilization of interaction between heptamers. Conclusion Despite the conservation of a Ser protease catalytic triad in their primary sequences, mycobacterial ClpP1 and ClpP2 do not have conventional peptidase activity toward peptide models and display an unusual

  14. Resolution analysis of an angular domain imaging system with two dimensional angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter to distinguish between quasi-ballistic and scattered photons based on trajectory. A 2D angular filter array was constructed using 3D printing technology to generate an array of micro-channels 500 μm x 500 μm with a length of 12 cm. The main barrier to 2D imaging with the 2D angular filter array was the shadows cast on the image by the 500 μm walls of the angular filter. The objective of this work was to perform a resolution analysis of the 2D angular filter array. The approach was to position the AFA with a two dimensional positioning stage to obtain images of areas normally obstructed by the walls of the AFA. A digital light processor was also incorporated to generate various light patterns to improve the contrast of the images. A resolution analysis was completed by imaging a knife edge submerged in various uniform scattering media (Intralipid® dilutions with water). The edge response functions obtained were then used to compute the line spread function and the theoretical resolution of the imaging system. The theoretical system resolution was measured to be between 110 μm - 180 μm when the scattering level was at or below 0.7% Intralipid®. The theoretical resolution was in agreement with a previous resolution analysis of a silicon-based angular filter with a similar aspect ratio. The measured resolution was also found to be smaller than the size of an individual channel, suggesting that the resolution of an AFA based ADI system is not dependent on the size of the micro-channel.

  15. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11346.001 PMID:26714106

  16. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Erin A; Wan, Y C Serena; Boudreau, Beth A; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence. PMID:26765929

  17. STS-113 Astronauts Work on Port One (P1) Truss on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 16th American assembly flight and 112th overall American flight to the International Space Station (ISS) launched on November 23, 2002 from Kennedy's launch pad 39A aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-113. Mission objectives included the delivery of the Expedition Six Crew to the ISS, the return of Expedition Five crew back to Earth, and the installation and activation of the Port 1 Integrated Truss Assembly (P1). The first major component installed on the left side of the Station, the P1 truss provides an additional three External Thermal Control System radiators. Weighing in at 27,506 pounds, the P1 truss is 45 feet (13.7 meters) long, 15 feet (4.6 meters) wide, and 13 feet (4 meters) high. Three space walks, aided by the use of the Robotic Manipulator Systems of both the Shuttle and the Station, were performed in the installation of P1. In this photograph, astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (above) and John B. Herrington (below) work on the newly installed P1 truss during the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity. The space walk lasted 6 hours, 10 minutes. The end effector of the Canadarm2 or Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Earth's horizon are visible in the bottom of frame.

  18. FoxP1 orchestration of ASD-relevant signaling pathways in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Daniel J; Anderson, Ashley G; Berto, Stefano; Runnels, Wesley; Harper, Matthew; Ammanuel, Simon; Rieger, Michael A; Huang, Hung-Chung; Rajkovich, Kacey; Loerwald, Kristofer W; Dekker, Joseph D; Tucker, Haley O; Dougherty, Joseph D; Gibson, Jay R; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-10-15

    Mutations in the transcription factor Forkhead box p1 (FOXP1) are causative for neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. However, the function of FOXP1 within the brain remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we identify the gene expression program regulated by FoxP1 in both human neural cells and patient-relevant heterozygous Foxp1 mouse brains. We demonstrate a role for FoxP1 in the transcriptional regulation of autism-related pathways as well as genes involved in neuronal activity. We show that Foxp1 regulates the excitability of striatal medium spiny neurons and that reduction of Foxp1 correlates with defects in ultrasonic vocalizations. Finally, we demonstrate that FoxP1 has an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating pathways involved in striatal neuron identity through gene expression studies in human neural progenitors with altered FOXP1 levels. These data support an integral role for FoxP1 in regulating signaling pathways vulnerable in autism and the specific regulation of striatal pathways important for vocal communication. PMID:26494785

  19. Avian P1 antigens inhibit agglutination mediated by P fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R; Swanson, J L; Neill, M A

    1992-01-01

    Whole egg white from pigeon, dove, and cockatiel eggs, as well as the ovomucoid fraction of pigeon egg white, exhibited strong P1 antigenic activities and inhibited agglutination of human P1 erythrocytes and of digalactoside-coated latex beads by P-fimbriated Escherichia coli strains. In contrast, chicken egg white exhibited only weak P1 antigenic activity and had little impact on P-fimbrial agglutination. These preparations did not affect hemagglutination by E. coli strains expressing mannose-resistant adhesins other than P fimbriae, i.e., Dr, F1845, and S adhesins. Human anti-P1 serum diminished the P-fimbrial inhibitory activities of pigeon egg white and pigeon ovomucoid. Pigeon ovomucoid was equipotent on a molar basis with globoside, and the pigeon, dove, and cockatiel egg white preparations were equipotent with each other in P-fimbrial inhibition. Incubation of p erythrocytes in whole egg whites or in pigeon ovomucoid did not render them agglutinable by P-fimbriated bacteria, whereas incubation in globoside did. These data demonstrate that whole egg whites (and their ovomucoid fraction) from members of the families Columbidae (pigeons and doves) and Psittacidae (parrots) specifically and potently inhibit P-fimbrial agglutination, probably by providing P1 antigen as a receptor for the P-fimbrial adhesin. Avian egg white preparations may facilitate adhesin characterization of wild-type uropathogenic strains and may useful in preventing upper urinary tract infections due to P-fimbriated E. coli. PMID:1346125

  20. Phytopathogenic bacteria phenotype conversion as a result of their lysogenisation by coliphage P1.

    PubMed

    Faidiuk, I V; Tovkach, E I

    2014-01-01

    A set of lysogenic strains of phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia "horticola" and Erwinia amylovora associated with woody plants was obtained using bacteriophage P1 Cmc1ts100. The phenotype conversion from Cm(S) to Cm(R) was shown to be connected with introducing of authentic prophage DNA of 94.8 kb as a single-copy plasmid into the cells. Prophage state is unstable: P1 plasmid is spontaneously lost with high frequency by the cells. In lysogenic cells the prophage genes of type III restriction-modification complex EcoP1I are actively expressed. The system formed by E. "horticola" 450 and 60 as well as their lysogenic derivatives and specific bacteriophages provides an opportunity to divide the latter into three groups according to the level of restriction in the course of their interaction with the enzyme EcoP1I. The difference in phage responses to the endonuclease presence in a lysogenized host presumably correlates with the number of enzyme recognition sequences and the adsorption sites availability. After the prophage plasmid DNA curing the characteristic value of phage sensitivity of cells is changed. The lysogenic strains obtained in this work allow for the exploration of EcoP1I restriction-modification gene complex interaction with polyvalent phages able to grow not only on E. coli, but also on such phytopathogens as E. "horticola" and E. amylovora. PMID:25000732

  1. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ronayne, Erin A.; Wan, Y. C. Serena; Boudreau, Beth A.; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence. PMID:26765929

  2. FoxP1 orchestration of ASD-relevant signaling pathways in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Daniel J.; Anderson, Ashley G.; Berto, Stefano; Runnels, Wesley; Harper, Matthew; Ammanuel, Simon; Rieger, Michael A.; Huang, Hung-Chung; Rajkovich, Kacey; Loerwald, Kristofer W.; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley O.; Dougherty, Joseph D.; Gibson, Jay R.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factor Forkhead box p1 (FOXP1) are causative for neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. However, the function of FOXP1 within the brain remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we identify the gene expression program regulated by FoxP1 in both human neural cells and patient-relevant heterozygous Foxp1 mouse brains. We demonstrate a role for FoxP1 in the transcriptional regulation of autism-related pathways as well as genes involved in neuronal activity. We show that Foxp1 regulates the excitability of striatal medium spiny neurons and that reduction of Foxp1 correlates with defects in ultrasonic vocalizations. Finally, we demonstrate that FoxP1 has an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating pathways involved in striatal neuron identity through gene expression studies in human neural progenitors with altered FOXP1 levels. These data support an integral role for FoxP1 in regulating signaling pathways vulnerable in autism and the specific regulation of striatal pathways important for vocal communication. PMID:26494785

  3. Modeling and estimation of C1-P1 bias in GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Lahaye, F.; Héroux, P.; Liao, X.; Beck, N.; Olynik, M.

    2001-01-01

    Modern dual-frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers are capable of providing direct measurements of both L1 C/A (C1) and P code (P1) without the use of the Y-codes under Anti-Spoofing. A discrepancy or bias between the C1 and P1 measurements from these receivers has however been of concern to operators and users of GPS reference networks. For the purpose of modeling and estimation, the nature and characteristics of the discrepancy must be investigated. The research results presented indicate that the discrepancy between the C1 and P1 measurements contains two different types of components: one is of constant type while another is time variant. A method has been developed for their modeling and estimation. The residual C1-P1 time series after a satellite-dependent bias removal agree at a few-centimeter level, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed model. This allows the C1-P1 discrepancy, both constant and non-constant components, to be removed from GPS reference network solutions. Numerical results are provided to support the analysis.

  4. Der p 1 facilitates transepithelial allergen delivery by disruption of tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hong; Winton, Helen L.; Soeller, Christian; Tovey, Euan R.; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Thompson, Philip J.; Stewart, Geoffrey A.; Taylor, Graham W.; Garrod, David R.; Cannell, Mark B.; Robinson, Clive

    1999-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens are important factors in the increasing prevalence of asthma. The lung epithelium forms a barrier that allergens must cross before they can cause sensitization. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that the cysteine proteinase allergen Der p 1 from fecal pellets of the HDM Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus causes disruption of intercellular tight junctions (TJs), which are the principal components of the epithelial paracellular permeability barrier. In confluent airway epithelial cells, Der p 1 led to cleavage of the TJ adhesion protein occludin. Cleavage was attenuated by antipain, but not by inhibitors of serine, aspartic, or matrix metalloproteinases. Putative Der p 1 cleavage sites were found in peptides from an extracellular domain of occludin and in the TJ adhesion protein claudin-1. TJ breakdown nonspecifically increased epithelial permeability, allowing Der p 1 to cross the epithelial barrier. Thus, transepithelial movement of Der p 1 to dendritic antigen-presenting cells via the paracellular pathway may be promoted by the allergen’s own proteolytic activity. These results suggest that opening of TJs by environmental proteinases may be the initial step in the development of asthma to a variety of allergens. PMID:10393706

  5. Measurement and analysis of angular velocity variations of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatović, Ž. M.; Štavljanin, M. S.; Tomić, M. V.; Knežević, D. M.; Biočanin, S. Lj.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the procedures for measuring and analyzing the angular velocity variation of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft on its free end and on the power-output end. In addition, the paper deals with important aspects of the measurement of crankshaft torsional oscillations. The method is based on digital encoders placed at two distances, and one of them is a sensor not inserted directly on the shaft, i.e. a non-contact method with a toothed disc is used. The principle based on toothed disc is also used to measure the actual camshaft angular velocity of in-line compact high-pressure pump the engine is equipped with, and this paper aims to demonstrate the possibility of measuring the actual angular velocity of any rotating shaft in the engine, on which it is physically possible to mount a toothed disc. The method was created completely independently during long-range development and research tests of V46 family engines. This method is specific for its particular adaptability for use on larger engines with extensive vibrations and torsional oscillations. The main purpose of this paper is a practical contribution to all the more interesting research of the use of engine crankshaft angular velocity as a diagnostic tool for identifying the engine irregular running.

  6. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved the length of the Operations and Checkout Building to its work stand where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  7. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a work stand in the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  8. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss (top of photo), a component of the International Space Station, nears its work stand in the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  9. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is lifted out of its canister to move to a work stand where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000- pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  10. Visualization of bacteriophage P1 infection by cryo-electron tomography of tiny Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jun; Chen Chengyen; Shiomi, Daisuke; Niki, Hironori; Margolin, William

    2011-09-01

    Bacteriophage P1 has a contractile tail that targets the conserved lipopolysaccharide on the outer membrane surface of the host for initial adsorption. The mechanism by which P1 DNA enters the host cell is not well understood, mainly because the transient molecular interactions between bacteriophage and bacteria have been difficult to study by conventional approaches. Here, we engineered tiny E. coli host cells so that the initial stages of P1-host interactions could be captured in unprecedented detail by cryo-electron tomography. Analysis of three-dimensional reconstructions of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed three predominant configurations: an extended tail stage with DNA present in the phage head, a contracted tail stage with DNA, and a contracted tail stage without DNA. Comparative analysis of various conformations indicated that there is uniform penetration of the inner tail tube into the E. coli periplasm and a significant movement of the baseplate away from the outer membrane during tail contraction.

  11. Synthesis of new ligands for targeting the S1P1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Schilson, Stefanie S; Keul, Petra; Shaikh, Rizwan S; Schäfers, Michael; Levkau, Bodo; Haufe, Günter

    2015-03-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) influences various fundamental biological processes by interacting with a family of five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-5). FTY720, a sphingosine analogue, which was approved for treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, is phosphorylated in vivo and acts as an agonist of four of the five S1P receptor subtypes. Starting from these lead structures we developed new agonists for the S1P1 receptor. The biological activity was tested in vivo and promising ligands were fluorinated at different positions to identify candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging after [(18)F]-labelling. The radioligands shall enable the imaging of S1P1 receptor expression in vivo and thus may serve as novel imaging markers of S1P-related diseases. PMID:25656338

  12. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the payload canister doors are open to reveal the P1 truss before transfer to the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  13. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, technicians prepare to move the P1 truss segment from the payload canister into the Payload Changeout Room. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  14. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, technicians in the Payload Changout Room supervise the opening of the payload canister doors for transfer of the P1 truss. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  15. STS-113 P1 Truss payload arrives at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Complex 39A, the P1 Truss Segment arrives at the Payload Changeout Room in preparation for installation into Endeavour's payload bay. The P1 truss is the primary payload for Mission STS-113 to the International Space Station. It is the first port truss segment which will be attached to the Station'''s central truss segment, S0. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch no earlier than Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  16. Determination of the lifetime of the Mercury 6/3/P-1 state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, J. A.; Reeves, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    A pulsed tunable dye laser was used for a high resolution experimental study of mercury fluorescence from the 6(3)P-1 state. The output of the dye laser was frequency doubled into the 253.7 nm region using a potassium pentaborate crystal. Exponential decays were separately observed for each of the five individual components of the hyperfine structure and the effects of the trapping of resonance radiation on the observed lifetime of the 6(3)P-1 state of mercury were investigated for each resolvable component. Within experimental error, the natural radiative lifetime of the 6(3)P-1 state was found to be independent of the hyperfine component irradiated and a value of 122 + or 2 nsec was obtained, consistent with results found by other methods.

  17. Pulsed EPR of P1 centers in synthetic diamond under bichromatic excitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoruk, G. G.; Saiko, A. P.; Markevich, S. A.; Poklonskaya, O. N.

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of the interaction of P1 centers in synthetic diamond with a bichromatic radiation, representing microwave (MW) and radio frequency (RF) fields in a configuration characteristic of the stationary EPR spectroscopy with modulated magnetic field, has been studied using the transient nutation technique. It is demonstrated that a thermobaric treatment of the crystal leads to an increase in the phase relaxation time of P1 centers. Additional increase in this relaxation time is observed under the conditions of a nutation resonance, where the RF field frequency is close to the effective Rabi frequency in the MW field. These data are taken into account in considering the inversion of the EPR lines of P1 centers that was recently discovered in the stationary EPR.

  18. Heterogeneous and hyperfine interactions between valence states of molecular iodine correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) dissociation limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturo, Vera V.; Cherepanov, Igor N.; Lukashov, Sergey S.; Poretsky, Sergey A.; Pravilov, Anatoly M.; Zhironkin, Anatoly I.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed analysis of interactions between all 0g + , 1u, and 0u - weakly bound states of iodine molecule correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) (bb) dissociation limit has been performed. For this purpose, the 0u - (bb) state has been described using analysis of rotationally resolved excitation spectra of luminescence from the g 0g - state populated in a three-step three-color perturbation facilitated excitation scheme via the 0u - state. Energies of 41 rovibrational levels, molecular constants, and potential energy curve have been determined. Energy gaps between closest rovibrational levels of the 0u - and 0g + , 1u (bb) states are found to be large, ˜6 cm-1. However, interaction of all three 0g + , 1u, and 0u - (bb) states has been observed. It has been found that the 0u - and 1u electronic states are mixed by heterogeneous interactions, while their mixing with the 0g + one is due to hyperfine interactions predominantly. Admixture coefficients and electronic matrix elements of the coupling between the 0g + ˜1u, 0g + ˜ 0u - , and 0u - ˜1u states have been estimated.

  19. Genetic diversity and silencing suppression effects of Rice yellow mottle virus and the P1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Siré, Christelle; Bangratz-Reyser, Martine; Fargette, Denis; Brugidou, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Background PTGS (post-transcriptional gene silencing) is used to counter pathogenic invasions, particularly viruses. In return, many plant viruses produce proteins which suppress silencing directed against their RNA. The diversity of silencing suppression at the species level in natural hosts is unknown. Results We investigated the functional diversity of silencing suppression among isolates of the African RYMV (Rice yellow mottle virus) in rice. The RYMV-P1 protein is responsible for cell-to-cell movement and is a silencing suppressor. Transgenic gus-silencing rice lines were used to investigate intra-specific and serogroup silencing suppression diversity at two different levels: that of the virion and the P1 silencing suppressor protein. Our data provide evidence that silencing suppression is a universal phenomenon for RYMV species. However, we found considerable diversity in their ability to suppress silencing which was not linked to RYMV phylogeny, or pathogenicity. At the level of the silencing suppressor P1 alone, we found similar results to those previously found at the virion level. In addition, we showed that cell-to-cell movement of P1 was crucial for the efficiency of silencing suppression. Mutagenesis of P1 demonstrated a strong link between some amino acids and silencing suppression features with, one on the hand, the conserved amino acids C95 and C64 involved in cell-to-cell movement and the strength of suppression, respectively, and on the other hand, the non conserved F88 was involved in the strength of silencing suppression. Conclusion We demonstrated that intra-species diversity of silencing suppression is highly variable and by mutagenesis of P1 we established the first link between silencing suppression and genetic diversity. These results are potentially important for understanding virus-host interactions. PMID:18447922

  20. Bacterial Transition Metal P1B-ATPases, Transport Mechanism and Roles in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Argüello, José M.; González-Guerrero, Manuel; Raimunda, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    P1B-type ATPases are polytopic membrane proteins that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to the efflux of cytoplasmic transition metals. This article reviews recent progress in our understanding of the structure and function of these proteins in bacteria. These are members of the P-type superfamily of transport ATPases. Cu+-ATPases are the most frequently observed and best-characterized members of this group of transporters. However, bacterial genomes show diverse arrays of P1B-type ATPases with a range of substrates (Cu+, Zn2+, Co2+). Furthermore, because of the structural similarities among transitions metals, these proteins can also transport non-physiological substrates (Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Au+, Ag+). P1B-type ATPases have six or eight transmembrane segments (TM) with metal coordinating amino acids in three core TMs flanking the cytoplasmic domain responsible for ATP binding and hydrolysis. In addition, regulatory cytoplasmic metal binding domains are present in most P1B-type ATPases. Central to the transport mechanism is the binding of the uncomplexed metal to these proteins when cytoplasmic substrates are bound to chaperone and chelating molecules. Metal binding to regulatory sites is through a reversible metal exchange among chaperones and cytoplasmic metal binding domains. In contrast, the chaperone-mediated metal delivery to transport sites appears as a largely irreversible event. P1B-ATPases have two overarching physiological functions: to maintain cytoplasmic metal levels and to provide metals for the periplasmic assembly of metalloproteins. Recent studies have shown that both roles are critical for bacterial virulence, since P1B-ATPases appear key to overcome high phagosomal metal levels and are required for the assembly of periplasmic and secreted metalloproteins that are essential for survival in extreme oxidant environments. PMID:21999638

  1. Defect selective etching of GaAsyP1-y photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaung, Kevin Nay; Tomasulo, Stephanie; Lang, Jordan R.; Faucher, Joseph; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2014-10-01

    Rapid and accurate threading dislocation density (TDD) characterization of direct-gap GaAsyP1-y photovoltaic materials using molten KOH defect selective etching (DSE) is demonstrated. TDDs measured using molten KOH DSE show close agreement with those from both electron beam-induced current mapping and planar view transmission electron microscopy, provided TDD<107 cm-2. H3PO4 DSE is also demonstrated as an accurate method for characterizing TDD of GaP substrates. Taken together, the DSE methods described here enable TDD characterization over large areas (>105 μm2) from substrate to GaAsyP1-y device layer.

  2. STS-113 Mission Specialists review data on the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-113 Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria (left) and John Herrington (center) review data on the P1 Integrated Truss Structure with a technician in the Space Station Processing Facility. During the mission, the P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002.

  3. Discovery of novel P1 groups for coagulation factor VIIa inhibition using fragment-based screening.

    PubMed

    Cheney, Daniel L; Bozarth, Jeffrey M; Metzler, William J; Morin, Paul E; Mueller, Luciano; Newitt, John A; Nirschl, Alexandra H; Rendina, Alan R; Tamura, James K; Wei, Anzhi; Wen, Xiao; Wurtz, Nicholas R; Seiffert, Dietmar A; Wexler, Ruth R; Priestley, E Scott

    2015-03-26

    A multidisciplinary, fragment-based screening approach involving protein ensemble docking and biochemical and NMR assays is described. This approach led to the discovery of several structurally diverse, neutral surrogates for cationic factor VIIa P1 groups, which are generally associated with poor pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Among the novel factor VIIa inhibitory fragments identified were aryl halides, lactams, and heterocycles. Crystallographic structures for several bound fragments were obtained, leading to the successful design of a potent factor VIIa inhibitor with a neutral lactam P1 and improved permeability. PMID:25764119

  4. Capitulation in Abelian extensions of some fields ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Abdelmalek; Zekhnini, Abdelkader; Taous, Mohammed

    2016-02-01

    We study the capitulation of the 2-ideal classes of an infinite family of imaginary biquadratic number fields consisting of fields k =ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i ), where i =√{-1 } and p1 ≡ p2 ≡ -q ≡ 1 (mod 4) are different primes. For each of the three quadratic extensions K /k inside the absolute genus field k(*) of k , we compute the capitulation kernel of K /k . Then we deduce that each strongly ambiguous class of k /ℚ (i ) capitulates already in k(*), which is smaller than the relative genus field (k/ℚ (i )) *.

  5. Impurity-Band Model for GaP1-xNx

    SciTech Connect

    Fluegel, B.; Zhang, Y.; Geisz, J. F.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2005-11-01

    Low-temperature absorption studies on free-standing GaP1-xNx films provide direct experimental evidence that the host conduction-band minimum (CBM) near X1C does not plunge downward with increased nitrogen doping, contrary to what has been suggested recently; rather, it remains stationary for x up to 0.1%. This fact, combined with the results of earlier studies of the CBM at ..GAMMA.. and conduction-band edge near L, confirms that the giant bandgap lowering observed in GaP1-xNx results from a CBM that evolves purely from nitrogen impurity bands.

  6. Angular Momentum and Galaxy Formation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j sstarf and mass M sstarf (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j sstarf reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j sstarf in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ~100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j sstarf versus M sstarf. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j sstarf-M sstarf tracks, with log-slopes of ~0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ~3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ~7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j sstarf-M sstarf trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j sstarf

  7. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-15

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j{sub *} and mass M{sub *} (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j{sub *} reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j{sub *} in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of {approx}100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j{sub *} versus M{sub *}. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j{sub *}-M{sub *} tracks, with log-slopes of {approx}0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of {approx}3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and {approx}7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j{sub *}-M{sub *} trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow

  8. Asymmetric angular-selective thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Enas; Dhaka, Shailja; Bermel, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Thermal emission from blackbodies and flat metallic surfaces is non-directional, following the Lambert cosine law. However, highly directional thermal emission could be useful for improving the efficiency of a broad range of different applications, including thermophotovoltaics, spectroscopy and infra-red light sources. This is particularly true if strong symmetry breaking could ensure emission only in one particular direction. In this work, we investigate the possibility of tailoring asymmetric thermal emission using structured metasurfaces. These are built from surface grating unit elements that support asymmetric localization of thermal surface plasmon polaritons. The angular dependence of emissivity is studied using a rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) of absorption, plus Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation. It is further validated using a direct thermal simulation of emission originating from the metal. Asymmetric angular selectivity with near-blackbody emissivity is demonstrated for different shallow blazed grating structures. We study the effect of changing the period, depth and shape of the grating unit cell on the direction angle, angular spread, and magnitude of coupled radiation mode. In particular, a periodic sawtooth structure with a period of 1.5λ and angle of 8°was shown to create significant asymmetry of at least a factor of 3. Such structures can be considered arbitrary directional sources that can be carefully patterned on metallic surfaces to yield thermal lenses with designed focal lengths, targeted to particular concentration ratios. The benefit of this approach is that it can enhance the view factor between thermal emitters and receivers, without restricting the area ratio or separation distance.

  9. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  10. Adaptive Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop and demonstrate innovative adaptive seal technologies that can lead to dramatic improvements in engine performance, life, range, and emissions, and enhance operability for next generation gas turbine engines. This work is concentrated on the development of self-adaptive clearance control systems for gas turbine engines. Researchers have targeted the high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip seal location for following reasons: Current active clearance control (ACC) systems (e.g., thermal case-cooling schemes) cannot respond to blade tip clearance changes due to mechanical, thermal, and aerodynamic loads. As such they are prone to wear due to the required tight running clearances during operation. Blade tip seal wear (increased clearances) reduces engine efficiency, performance, and service life. Adaptive sealing technology research has inherent impact on all envisioned 21st century propulsion systems (e.g. distributed vectored, hybrid and electric drive propulsion concepts).

  11. Hepatitis C virus NS3-4A serine protease inhibitors: SAR of new P1 derivatives of SCH 503034.

    PubMed

    Bogen, S; Arasappan, A; Pan, W; Ruan, S; Padilla, A; Saksena, A K; Girijavallabhan, V; Njoroge, F G

    2008-07-15

    Substitutions on the P(1) cyclobutyl side chain of SCH 503034 were studied by introduction of hydroxyl and fluoro substituents. Additionally, effects of fluoro substitution on other P1 moieties were evaluated. PMID:18547808

  12. A Cadmium-transporting P1B-type ATPase in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Adle, David J.; Sinani, Devis; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2014-01-01

    Detoxification and homeostatic acquisition of metal ions are vital for all living organisms. We have identified PCA1 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an overexpression suppressor of copper toxicity. PCA1 possesses signatures of a P1B-type heavy metal-transporting ATPase that is widely distributed from bacteria to humans. Copper resistance conferred by PCA1 is not dependent on catalytic activity, but it appears that a cysteine-rich region located in the N terminus sequesters copper. Unexpectedly, when compared with two independent natural isolates and an industrial S. cerevisiae strain, the PCA1 allele of the common laboratory strains we have examined possesses a missense mutation in a predicted ATP-binding residue conserved in P1B-type ATPases. Consistent with a previous report that identifies an equivalent mutation in a copper-transporting P1B-type ATPase of a Wilson disease patient, the PCA1 allele found in laboratory yeast strains is nonfunctional. Overexpression or deletion of the functional allele in yeast demonstrates that PCA1 is a cadmium efflux pump. Cadmium as well as copper and silver, but not other metals examined, dramatically increase PCA1 protein expression through post-transcriptional regulation and promote subcellular localization to the plasma membrane. Our study has revealed a novel metal detoxification mechanism in yeast mediated by a P1B-type ATPase that is unique in structure, substrate specificity, and mode of regulation. PMID:17107946

  13. Diversity of the metal-transporting P1B-type ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Aaron T.; Smith, Kyle P.

    2014-01-01

    The P1B-ATPases are integral membrane proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis to metal cation transport. Widely distributed across all domains of life, these enzymes have been previously shown to transport copper, zinc, cobalt, and other thiophilic heavy metals. Recent data suggest that these enzymes may also be involved in nickel and/or iron transport. Here we have exploited large amounts of genomic data to examine and classify the various P1B-ATPase subfamilies. Specifically, we have combined new methods of data partitioning and network visualization known as Transitivity Clustering and Protein Similarity Networks with existing biochemical data to examine properties such as length, speciation, and metal-binding motifs of the P1B-ATPase subfamily sequences. These data reveal interesting relationships among the enzyme sequences of previously established subfamilies, indicate the presence of two new subfamilies, and suggest the existence of new regulatory elements in certain subfamilies. Taken together, these findings underscore the importance of P1B-ATPases in homeostasis of nearly every biologically relevant transition metal and provide an updated framework for future studies. PMID:24729073

  14. Inhibition of human placenta glutathione transferase P1-1 by calvatic acid.

    PubMed

    Caccuri, A M; Ricci, G; Desideri, A; Buffa, M; Fruttero, R; Gasco, A; Ascenzi, P

    1994-04-01

    The inhibition mechanism of the dimeric human placenta glutathione transferase (GST P1-1) by the antibiotic p-carboxyphenylazoxycyanide (calvatic acid) has been investigated at pH 7.0 and 30.0 degrees C. Experiments performed at different calvatic acid/GST P1-1 molar ratios indicate that one mole of calvatic acid inactivates one mole of the homodimeric enzyme molecule, containing two catalytically equivalent active sites. The apparent second order rate constant for GST P1-1 inactivation is 2.4 +/- 0.3 M-1 s-1. The recovery of all the 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid)-titratable thiol groups as well as the original catalytic activity of GST P1-1 after treatment of the inhibited enzyme with dithiothreitol indicates that two disulfide bridges per dimer, likely between Cys47 and Cys101, have been formed during the reaction with calvatic acid. To the best of the authors knowledge, calvatic acid represents a unique case of enzyme inhibitor acting also throughout its reaction product(s). PMID:8069231

  15. A stable shuttle vector for Xylella fastidiosa based on an endogenous incP-1 plasmid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strain RIV11 harbors a 25 kbp plasmid (pXFRIV11) belonging to the incP1 incompatibility group. Replication and stability factors of pXFRIV11 were identified and used to construct plasmids able to propagate in both Xf and Escherichia coli. Sequences required for replication i...

  16. Phage display selection of P1 mutants of BPTI directed against five different serine proteinases.

    PubMed

    Kiczak, L; Koscielska, K; Otlewski, J; Czerwinski, M; Dadlez, M

    1999-01-01

    The P1 position of protein inhibitors and oligopeptide substrates determines, to a large extent, association energy with many serine proteinases. To test the agreement of phage display selection with the existing thermodynamic data, a small library of all 20 P1 mutants of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) was created, fused to protein III, and displayed on the surface of M13 phage. The wild type of displayed inhibitor monovalently and strongly inhibited trypsin with an association constant of Ka = 3 x 10(11) M(-1). The library was applied to select BPTI variants active against five serine proteinases of different specificity (bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin, human leukocyte and porcine pancreatic elastases, human azurocidin). The results of enrichment with four proteinases agreed well with the available thermodynamic data. In the case of azurocidin, the phage display selection allowed determination of the P1 specificity of this protein with the following frequencies for selected P1 variants: 43% Lys, 36% Leu, 7% Met, 7% Thr, 7% Gln. PMID:10064144

  17. Heterogeneity of Human Neutrophil CD177 Expression Results from CD177P1 Pseudogene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rong; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Cho, Vicky; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Gatenby, Paul A.; Perera, Chandima; Zhang, Yafei; Whittle, Belinda; Sinclair, Andrew; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Field, Matthew; Andrews, T. Daniel; Cook, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Most humans harbor both CD177neg and CD177pos neutrophils but 1–10% of people are CD177null, placing them at risk for formation of anti-neutrophil antibodies that can cause transfusion-related acute lung injury and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. By deep sequencing the CD177 locus, we catalogued CD177 single nucleotide variants and identified a novel stop codon in CD177null individuals arising from a single base substitution in exon 7. This is not a mutation in CD177 itself, rather the CD177null phenotype arises when exon 7 of CD177 is supplied entirely by the CD177 pseudogene (CD177P1), which appears to have resulted from allelic gene conversion. In CD177 expressing individuals the CD177 locus contains both CD177P1 and CD177 sequences. The proportion of CD177hi neutrophils in the blood is a heritable trait. Abundance of CD177hi neutrophils correlates with homozygosity for CD177 reference allele, while heterozygosity for ectopic CD177P1 gene conversion correlates with increased CD177neg neutrophils, in which both CD177P1 partially incorporated allele and paired intact CD177 allele are transcribed. Human neutrophil heterogeneity for CD177 expression arises by ectopic allelic conversion. Resolution of the genetic basis of CD177null phenotype identifies a method for screening for individuals at risk of CD177 isoimmunisation. PMID:27227454

  18. IGFBP-rP1 suppresses epithelial–mesenchymal transition and metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, S; Zhang, J; Xu, F; Xu, E; Ruan, W; Ma, Y; Huang, Q; Lai, M

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) was initially recognized during organogenesis and has recently been reported to be involved in promoting cancer invasion and metastasis. Cooperation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and other signaling pathways, such as Ras and Wnt, is essential to inducing EMT, but the molecular mechanisms remain to be fully determined. Here, we reported that insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (IGFBP-rP1), a potential tumor suppressor, controls EMT in colorectal cancer progression. We revealed the inhibitory role of IGFBP-rP1 through analyses of clinical colorectal cancer samples and various EMT and metastasis models in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that IGFBP-rP1 suppresses EMT and tumor metastasis by repressing TGF-β-mediated EMT through the Smad signaling cascade. These data establish that IGFBP-rP1 functions as a suppressor of EMT and metastasis in colorectal cancer. PMID:25789970

  19. Total syntheses of HMP-Y1, hibarimicinone, and HMP-P1.

    PubMed

    Liau, Brian B; Milgram, Benjamin C; Shair, Matthew D

    2012-10-10

    Total syntheses of HMP-Y1, atrop-HMP-Y1, hibarimicinone, atrop-hibarimicinone, and HMP-P1 are described using a two-directional synthesis strategy. A novel benzyl fluoride Michael-Claisen reaction sequence was developed to construct the complete carbon skeleton of HMP-Y1 and atrop-HMP-Y1 via a symmetrical, two-directional, double annulation. Through efforts to convert HMP-Y1 derivatives to hibarimicinone and HMP-P1, a biomimetic mono-oxidation to desymmetrize protected HMP-Y1 was realized. A two-directional unsymmetrical double annulation and biomimetic etherification was developed to construct the polycyclic and highly oxidized skeleton of hibarimicinone, atrop-hibarimicinone, and HMP-P1. The use of a racemic biaryl precursor allowed for the synthesis of both hibarimicinone atropisomers and provides the first confirmation of the structure of atrop-hibarimicinone. Additionally, this work documents the first reported full characterization of atrop-hibarimicinone, HMP-Y1, atrop-HMP-Y1, and HMP-P1. Last, a pH-dependent rotational barrier about the C2-C2' bond of hibarimicinone was discovered, which provides valuable information necessary to achieve syntheses of the glycosylated congeners of hibarimicinone. PMID:22970979

  20. Apker Award Talk: Atomic Beam Measurement of the Indium 6p1 / 2 Scalar Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenbraun, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first measurement of the scalar polarizability of the indium 6p1 / 2 -excited state using two-step laser spectroscopy in an atomic beam. This is one in a series of precise atomic structure measurements by the Majumder lab at Williams College, which serve as stringent tests of abinitio calculation methods for three-valence-electron systems. We stabilize a laser to the indium 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 410 nm transition and scan a second laser across the 6s1 / 2 --> 6p1 / 2 1343 nm transition. The two laser beams are overlapped and interact transversely with a collimated atomic beam of indium. Two-tone FM spectroscopy allows us to observe the small (< 1 part in 103) IR absorption, and characteristic sideband features in the RF-demodulated lineshape provide built-in frequency calibration. Application of DC electric fields up to 20 kV/cm give rise to Stark shifts of order 100 MHz. Because our group has previously measured the difference in polarizabilities within the 410 nm transition, we can determine the 6p1 / 2 polarizability with no loss of precision. Preliminary results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical calculations and can be used to infer accurate values for the indium 6 p - 5 d matrix elements.

  1. Requirement of E. coli DNA synthesis functions for the lytic replication of bacteriophage P1.

    PubMed

    Hay, N; Cohen, G

    1983-11-01

    P1 lytic growth was examined in a number of different temperature sensitive mutants of E. coli that affect chromosomal replication. Growth was analyzed by measurements of phage burst sizes and specific DNA synthesis. Efficient P1 growth required each of the bacterial elongation functions dnaE (polC), dnaZ (sub units of E. coli polymerase III holoenzyme), and dnaG (primase) but was not dependent on the elongation function dnaB (mobile promoter). Of two initiation functions tested the dnaA function was found to be dispensable for normal growth whereas the dnaC function was essential. Temperature shift experiments with different dnaC mutants showed that the initiation component of the dnaC function was needed continuously throughout at least the first half of the lytic cycle, while the dnaC elongation activity was probably required during the entire cycle for normal phage yields. In two respects the dependence of P1 lytic growth on E. coli DNA synthesis functions was significantly different from that reported for P1 plasmid replication (Scott and Vapnek, 1980). Thus, lytic replication was far more dependent on a functional polC gene product than was plasmid replication and did not require the bacterial dnaB product. PMID:6359668

  2. Novel S1P(1) receptor agonists--part 3: from thiophenes to pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Abele, Stefan; Birker, Magdalena; Bravo, Roberto; Bur, Daniel; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Grimont, Julien; Hess, Patrick; Lescop, Cyrille; Mathys, Boris; Müller, Claus; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Scherz, Michael; Schmidt, Gunther; Seifert, Jürgen; Steiner, Beat; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In preceding communications we summarized our medicinal chemistry efforts leading to the identification of potent, selective, and orally active S1P1 agonists such as the thiophene derivative 1. As a continuation of these efforts, we replaced the thiophene in 1 by a 2-, 3-, or 4-pyridine and obtained less lipophilic, potent, and selective S1P1 agonists (e.g., 2) efficiently reducing blood lymphocyte count in the rat. Structural features influencing the compounds' receptor affinity profile and pharmacokinetics are discussed. In addition, the ability to penetrate brain tissue has been studied for several compounds. As a typical example for these pyridine based S1P1 agonists, compound 53 showed EC50 values of 0.6 and 352 nM for the S1P1 and S1P3 receptor, respectively, displayed favorable PK properties, and penetrated well into brain tissue. In the rat, compound 53 maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral dosing of 3 mg/kg. PMID:24367923

  3. Heterogeneity of Human Neutrophil CD177 Expression Results from CD177P1 Pseudogene Conversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zuopeng; Liang, Rong; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Cho, Vicky; Lam, Wesley; Abhayaratna, Walter P; Gatenby, Paul A; Perera, Chandima; Zhang, Yafei; Whittle, Belinda; Sinclair, Andrew; Goodnow, Christopher C; Field, Matthew; Andrews, T Daniel; Cook, Matthew C

    2016-05-01

    Most humans harbor both CD177neg and CD177pos neutrophils but 1-10% of people are CD177null, placing them at risk for formation of anti-neutrophil antibodies that can cause transfusion-related acute lung injury and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. By deep sequencing the CD177 locus, we catalogued CD177 single nucleotide variants and identified a novel stop codon in CD177null individuals arising from a single base substitution in exon 7. This is not a mutation in CD177 itself, rather the CD177null phenotype arises when exon 7 of CD177 is supplied entirely by the CD177 pseudogene (CD177P1), which appears to have resulted from allelic gene conversion. In CD177 expressing individuals the CD177 locus contains both CD177P1 and CD177 sequences. The proportion of CD177hi neutrophils in the blood is a heritable trait. Abundance of CD177hi neutrophils correlates with homozygosity for CD177 reference allele, while heterozygosity for ectopic CD177P1 gene conversion correlates with increased CD177neg neutrophils, in which both CD177P1 partially incorporated allele and paired intact CD177 allele are transcribed. Human neutrophil heterogeneity for CD177 expression arises by ectopic allelic conversion. Resolution of the genetic basis of CD177null phenotype identifies a method for screening for individuals at risk of CD177 isoimmunisation. PMID:27227454

  4. Angular distributions of neutron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Lahiri, Joydev; Basu, D. N.

    2011-06-15

    We derive the total and the differential cross sections with respect to angle for neutron-induced reactions from an analytical model having a simple functional form to demonstrate the quantitative agreement with the measured cross sections. The energy dependence of the neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections are estimated successfully for energies ranging from 5 to 600 MeV. In this work, the effect of the imaginary part of the nuclear potential is treated more appropriately compared to our earlier work. The angular distributions for neutron scattering also agree reasonably well with the experimental data at forward angles.

  5. Linear and angular retroreflecting interferometric alignment target

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L. Curtis

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for measuring both the linear displacement and angular displacement of an object using a linear interferometer system and an optical target comprising a lens, a reflective surface and a retroreflector. The lens, reflecting surface and retroreflector are specifically aligned and fixed in optical connection with one another, creating a single optical target which moves as a unit that provides multi-axis displacement information for the object with which it is associated. This displacement information is useful in many applications including machine tool control systems and laser tracker systems, among others.

  6. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  7. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-01

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM.

  8. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-15

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM. PMID:27472113

  9. Analysis of Angular V-Cycle Multigrid Formulation for Three-Dimensional Discrete Ordinates Shielding Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Haghighat, Alireza

    2001-06-17

    New angular multigrid formulations have been developed, including the Simplified Angular Multigrid (SAM), Nested Iteration (NI), and V-Cycle schemes, which are compatible with the parallel environment and the adaptive differencing strategy of the PENTRAN three-dimensional parallel S{sub N} code. Through use of the Fourier analysis method for an infinite, homogeneous medium, the effectiveness of the V-Cycle scheme was investigated for different problem parameters including scattering ratio, spatial differencing weights, quadrature order, and mesh size. The theoretical analysis revealed that the V-Cycle scheme is effective for a large range of scattering ratios and is insensitive to mesh size. The effectiveness of the new schemes was also investigated for practical shielding applications such as the Kobayashi benchmark problem and the boiling water reactor core shroud problem.

  10. Free energy calculations on snake venom metalloproteinase BaP1.

    PubMed

    Lingott, Torsten; Merfort, Irmgard; Steinbrecher, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    BaP1 is a snake venom metalloproteinase from the venom of Bothrops asper, showing high structural homology with the catalytic domain of human adamalysins and matrix metalloproteinases. It induces the release of cytokines, like interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Recently, the high-resolution crystal structure of BaP1 with a bound inhibitor became available, representing an interesting model concerning inhibitor design for medicinally important metalloproteinases such as tumor necrosis factor alpha-converting enzyme and MMP13. We here use computational modeling to gain a better understanding about the binding properties of various ligands to BaP1, with a focus on computing ligand binding free energies. The obtained results should be of general significance for future research on medicinally important metalloproteinases. We have investigated the binding of the original inhibitor in detail and calculated its binding strength using MMP/GBSA free energy calculations. Additionally, the binding strengths of alternative ligands have been computed, and two of them are predicted and experimentally verified to strongly inhibit the enzyme. A suggestion for chemical modifications of BaP1 inhibitors could be made to guide future synthesis efforts. Furthermore, a contribution to the proteolytic reaction mechanism of metzincins is given. The pK value of the catalytically active glutamic acid residue 143 has been found to be significantly raised when compared with a free glutamate side chain. Calculations on other matrix metalloproteinases confirmed that this is not confined to BaP1, but seems to be a common feature of metzincins. PMID:22385614

  11. Characterization of a Cobalt-Specific P1B-ATPase†

    PubMed Central

    Zielazinski, Eliza L.; Cutsail, George E.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    The P1B-type ATPases are a ubiquitous family of P-type ATPases involved in the transport of transition metal ions. Divided into subclasses on the basis of sequence characteristics and substrate specificity, these integral membrane transporters play key roles in metal homeostasis, metal tolerance, and the biosynthesis of metalloproteins. The P1B-4-ATPases have the simplest architecture of the five P1B-ATPase families and have been suggested to play a role in Co2+ transport. A P1B-4-ATPase from Sulfitobacter sp. NAS-14.1, designated sCoaT, has been cloned, expressed, and purified. Activity assays indicate that sCoaT is specific for Co2+. A single Co2+ binding site is present, and optical, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopic data are consistent with tetrahedral coordination by oxygen and nitrogen ligands, including a histidine and likely a water. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for coordination by sulfur. Mutation of a conserved cysteine residue, Cys 327, in the signature transmembrane SPC metal binding motif does not abolish ATP hydrolysis activity or affect the spectroscopic analysis, establishing that this residue is not involved in the initial Co2+ binding by sCoaT. In contrast, replacements of conserved transmembrane residues Ser 325, His 657, Glu 658, and Thr 661 with alanine abolish ATP hydrolysis activity and Co2+ binding, indicating that these residues are necessary for Co2+ transport. These data represent the first in vitro characterization of a P1B-4-ATPase and its Co2+ binding site. PMID:22971227

  12. Phylogeny of replication initiator protein TrfA reveals a highly divergent clade of incompatibility group P1 plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incompatibility group P-1 (incP-1) includes broad host range plasmids of Gram negative bacteria and are classified into five subgroups (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon). The incP-1 replication module consists of the trfA gene, encoding the replication initiator protein TrfA, and the origin o...

  13. Axions and the galactic angular momentum distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, N.; Sikivie, P.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the behavior of axion dark matter before it falls into a galactic gravitational potential well. The axions thermalize sufficiently fast by gravitational self-interactions that almost all go to their lowest-energy state consistent with the total angular momentum acquired from tidal torquing. That state is a state of rigid rotation on the turnaround sphere. It predicts the occurrence and detailed properties of the caustic rings of dark matter for which observational evidence had been found earlier. We show that the vortices in the axion Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are attractive, unlike those in superfluid He4 and dilute gases. We expect that a large fraction of the vortices in the axion BEC join into a single big vortex along the rotation axis of the galaxy. The resulting enhancement of caustic rings explains the typical size of the rises in the Milky Way rotation curve attributed to caustic rings. We show that baryons and ordinary cold dark matter particles are entrained by the axion BEC and acquire the same velocity distribution. The resulting baryonic angular momentum distribution gives a good qualitative fit to the distributions observed in dwarf galaxies. We give estimates of the minimum fraction of dark matter that is composed of axions.

  14. Understanding GRETINA using angular correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Madeline

    2015-10-01

    The ability to trace the path of gamma rays through germanium is not only necessary for taking full advantage of GRETINA but also a promising possibility for homeland security defense against nuclear threats. This research tested the current tracking algorithm using the angular correlation method by comparing results from raw and tracked data to the theoretical model for Co-60. It was found that the current tracking method is unsuccessful in reproducing angular correlation. Variations to the tracking algorithm were made in the FM value, tracking angle, number of angles of separation observed, and window of coincidence in attempt to improve correlation results. From these variations it was observed that having a larger FM improved results, reducing the number of observational angles worsened correlation, and that overall larger tracking angles improved with larger windows of coincidence and vice-verse. Future research would be to refine the angle of measurement for raw data and to explore the possibility of an energy dependence by testing other elements. This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357

  15. Practical scaling law for photoelectron angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Dongsheng; Zhang Jingtao; Xu Zhizhan; Li Xiaofeng; Fu Panming; Freeman, R.R.

    2003-10-01

    A practical scaling law that predicts photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) is derived using angular distribution formulas which explicitly contain spontaneous emission. The scaling law is used to analyze recent PAD measurements in above-threshold ionization, and to predict results of future experiments. Our theoretical and numerical studies show that, in the non-relativistic regime and long-wavelength approximation, the shapes of PADs are determined by only three dimensionless numbers: (1) u{sub p}{identical_to}U{sub p}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}, the ponderomotive number (ponderomotive energy in units of laser photon energy); (2) {epsilon}{sub b}{identical_to}E{sub b}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}, the binding number (atomic binding energy in units of the laser photon energy); (3) j, the absorbed-photon number. The scaling law is shown to be useful in predictions of results from strong-field Kapitza-Dirac effect measurements; specifically, the application of this scaling law to recently reported Kapitza-Dirac diffraction is discussed. Possible experimental tests to verify the scaling law are suggested.

  16. Axial-conductances angular filter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, P. W.; Pedersen, J. F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes the concept, analysis, design, construction, and tests of an angular filter using an axial-conductance medium. The filter provides rejection that increases with incidence angle in the E plane. It is essentially invisible at broadside incidence, does not have critical tolerances on dimensions or materials, and operates over a wide frequency band. Analysis of an ideal homogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that the optimum value for the axial loss tangent is unity. With this value, the homogeneous medium provides approximately 8 dB of absorptive rejection per wavelength of filter thickness at a 45 E-plane incidence angle. Analysis of a practical inhomogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that some loss is introduced at broadside incidence, and that two types of waves can exist in the medium when only one wave is incident at an oblique angle. When the practical medium has dimensions that are properly chosen, its broadside loss can be negligible, and its rejection versus incidence angle can approximate that of the ideal medium. Tests of inhomogeneous samples in simulator wave guide confirm these analytical results. A screen printing method for depositing thick-film resistive ink on thin dielectric sheets has been investigated. With this method a 5x5 foot angular filter, designed for operation at 10 GHz, has been constructed containing over 70,000 axial-conductance elements.

  17. Adapting Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedman, John; Wedman, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The "Animals" program found on the Apple II and IIe system master disk can be adapted for use in the mathematics classroom. Instructions for making the necessary changes and suggestions for using it in lessons related to geometric shapes are provided. (JN)

  18. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  19. Adaptive homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-06-01

    Homeostasis is a central pillar of modern Physiology. The term homeostasis was invented by Walter Bradford Cannon in an attempt to extend and codify the principle of 'milieu intérieur,' or a constant interior bodily environment, that had previously been postulated by Claude Bernard. Clearly, 'milieu intérieur' and homeostasis have served us well for over a century. Nevertheless, research on signal transduction systems that regulate gene expression, or that cause biochemical alterations to existing enzymes, in response to external and internal stimuli, makes it clear that biological systems are continuously making short-term adaptations both to set-points, and to the range of 'normal' capacity. These transient adaptations typically occur in response to relatively mild changes in conditions, to programs of exercise training, or to sub-toxic, non-damaging levels of chemical agents; thus, the terms hormesis, heterostasis, and allostasis are not accurate descriptors. Therefore, an operational adjustment to our understanding of homeostasis suggests that the modified term, Adaptive Homeostasis, may be useful especially in studies of stress, toxicology, disease, and aging. Adaptive Homeostasis may be defined as follows: 'The transient expansion or contraction of the homeostatic range in response to exposure to sub-toxic, non-damaging, signaling molecules or events, or the removal or cessation of such molecules or events.' PMID:27112802

  20. Evidence that the potyvirus P1 proteinase functions in trans as an accessory factor for genome amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Verchot, J; Carrington, J C

    1995-01-01

    The tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV) polyprotein is proteolytically processed by three viral proteinases (NIa, HC-Pro, and P1). While the NIa and HC-Pro proteinases each provide multiple functions essential for viral infectivity, the role of the P1 proteinase beyond its autoproteolytic activity is understood poorly. To determine if P1 is necessary for genome amplification and/or virus movement from cell to cell, a mutant lacking the entire P1 coding region (delta P1 mutant) was produced with a modified TEV strain (TEV-GUS) expressing beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter, and its replication and movement phenotypes were assayed in tobacco protoplasts and plants. The delta P1 mutant accumulated in protoplasts to approximately 2 to 3% the level of parental TEV-GUS, indicating that the P1 protein may contribute to but is not strictly required for viral RNA amplification. The delta P1 mutant was capable of cell-to-cell and systemic (leaf-to-leaf) movement in plants but at reduced rates compared with parental virus. This is in contrast to the S256A mutant, which encodes a processing-defective P1 proteinase and which was nonviable in plants. Both delta P1 and S256A mutants were complemented by P1 proteinase expressed in a transgenic host. In transgenic protoplasts, genome amplification of the delta P1 mutant relative to parental virus was stimulated five- to sixfold. In transgenic plants, the level of accumulation of the delta P1 mutant was stimulated, although the rate of cell-to-cell movement was the same as in nontransgenic plants. Also, the S256A mutant was capable of replication and systemic infection in P1-expressing transgenic plants. These data suggest that, in addition to providing essential processing activity, the P1 proteinase functions in trans to stimulate genome amplification. PMID:7745715

  1. A New G-Quadruplex with Hairpin Loop Immediately Upstream of the Human BCL2 P1 Promoter Modulates Transcription.

    PubMed

    Onel, Buket; Carver, Megan; Wu, Guanhui; Timonina, Daria; Kalarn, Salil; Larriva, Marti; Yang, Danzhou

    2016-03-01

    The abnormal overexpression of the BCL2 gene is associated with many human tumors. We found a new 28-mer G-quadruplex-forming sequence, P1G4, immediately upstream of the human BCL2 gene P1 promoter. The P1G4 is shown to be a transcription repressor using a promoter-driven luciferase assay; its inhibitory effect can be markedly enhanced by the G-quadruplex-interactive compound TMPyP4. G-quadruplex can readily form in the P1G4 sequence under physiological salt condition as shown by DMS footprinting. P1G4 and previously identified Pu39 G-quadruplexes appear to form independently in adjacent regions in the BCL2 P1 promoter. In the extended BCL2 P1 promoter region containing both Pu39 and P1G4, P1G4 appears to play a more dominant role in repressing the transcriptional activity. Using NMR spectroscopy, the P1G4 G-quadruplex appears to be a novel dynamic equilibrium of two parallel structures, one regular with two 1-nt loops and a 12-nt middle loop and another broken-strand with three 1-nt loops and a 11-nt middle loop; both structures adopt a novel hairpin (stem-loop duplex) conformation in the long loop. The dynamic equilibrium of two closely related structures and the unique hairpin loop conformation are specific to the P1G4 sequence and distinguish the P1G4 quadruplex from other parallel structures. The presence of P1G4 and Pu39 in adjacent regions of the BCL2 P1 promoter suggests a mechanism for precise regulation of BCL2 gene transcription. The unique P1G4 G-quadruplex may provide a specific target for small molecules to modulate BCL2 gene transcription. PMID:26841249

  2. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, an overhead crane lifts the top of the canister containing the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station. The truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  3. Potent ketoamide inhibitors of HCV NS3 protease derived from quaternized P1 groups.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Srikanth; Velazquez, Francisco; Wu, Wanli; Blackman, Melissa; Madison, Vincent; Njoroge, F George

    2010-04-01

    Blood borne hepatitis C infections are the primary cause for liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV NS3 protease, a pivotal enzyme in the replication cycle of HCV virus has been the primary target for development of new drug candidates. Boceprevir and telaprevir are two novel ketoamide derived inhibitors that are currently undergoing phase-III clinical trials. These inhibitors include ketoamide functionality as serine trap and have an acidic alpha-ketoamide center that undergoes epimerization under physiological conditions. Our initial attempts to arrest this epimerization by introducing quaternary amino acids at P(1) had resulted in significantly diminished activity. In this manuscript we describe alpha quaternized P(1) group that result in potent inhibitors in the enzyme assay and demonstrate cellular activity comparable to boceprevir. PMID:20226659

  4. A spectral analysis of the earth's angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.; Callahan, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The exchange of angular momentum between the solid earth and the atmosphere from January 1976 through March 1982 is investigated using estimates of the earth's rotation from optical astrometry and lunar laser ranging and meteorological estimates of the atmospheric angular momentum M(atm). The physics of the earth's angular momentum budget is described, and earth rotation measurements are related to changes in the angular momentum of the fluid parts of the earth. The availability and reliability of earth rotation and M(atm) data are reported, and the possibility of estimating the exchange of angular momentum with the oceans and with the core is examined. Estimates of the power spectrum, cospectral coherence, and linear transfer functions and an analysis of the unmodeled part of the angular momentum budget are presented and discussed. The amplitude and phase of the semiannual, monthly, and fortnightly tidal variations in the length of day are estimated after removing observed atmospheric excitation.

  5. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus. PMID:20371254

  6. Beam propagation method using a [(p- 1)/ p] Padé approximant of the propagator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya Yan; Ho, Pui Lin

    2002-05-01

    A new beam propagation method (BPM) is developed based on a direct approximation to the propagator by its [(p-1)/p] Padé approximant. The approximant is simple to construct and has the desired damping effect for the evanescent modes. The method is applied to a tapered waveguide for TM-polarized waves, based on the energy-conserving improvement of the one-way Helmholtz equation. Numerical results are compared with those obtained with other variants of the BPM. PMID:18007898

  7. Expression of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 5 Pseudogene 1 (DUSP5P1) in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Staege, Martin S.; Müller, Katja; Kewitz, Stefanie; Volkmer, Ines; Mauz-Körholz, Christine; Bernig, Toralf; Körholz, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing of individual clones from a newly established cDNA library from the chemoresistant Hodgkin's lymphoma cell line L-1236 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone corresponding to a short sequence from chromosome 1. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated high expression of this sequence in Hodgkin's lymphoma derived cell lines but not in normal blood cells. Further characterization of this sequence and the surrounding genomic DNA revealed that this sequence is part of a human endogenous retrovirus locus. The sequence of this endogenous retrovirus is interrupted by a pseudogene of the dual specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed high expression of this pseudogene (DUSP5P1) in HL cell lines but not in normal blood cells or Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells. Cells from other tumor types (Burkitt's lymphoma, leukemia, neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma) also showed a higher DUSP5P1/DUSP5 ratio than normal cells. Furthermore, we observed that higher expression of DUSP5 in relation to DUSP5P1 correlated with the expression of the pro-apoptotic factor B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2-like 11 (BCL2L11) in peripheral blood cells and HL cells. Knock-down of DUSP5 in HL cells resulted in down-regulation of BCL2L11. Thus, the DUSP5/DUSP5P1 system could be responsible for regulation of BCL2L11 leading to inhibition of apoptosis in these tumor cells. PMID:24651368

  8. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  9. Cloning and functional analysis of human acyl coenzyme A: Cholesterol acyltransferase1 gene P1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing; Cheng, Bei; Qi, Benling; Peng, Wen; Wen, Hui; Bai, Lijuan; Liu, Yun; Zhai, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) catalyzes the conversion of free cholesterol (FC) to cholesterol ester. The human ACAT1 gene P1 promoter has been cloned. However, the activity and specificity of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter in diverse cell types remains unclear. The P1 promoter fragment was digested with KpnI/XhoI from a P1 promoter cloning vector, and was subcloned into the multiple cloning site of the Firefly luciferase vector pGL3‑Enhancer to obtain the construct P1E‑1. According to the analysis of biological information, the P1E‑1 plasmid was used to generate deletions of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter with varying 5' ends and an identical 3' end at +65 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the 5'‑deletion constructs of the P1 promoter were identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion mapping and DNA sequencing. The transcriptional activity of each construct was detected after transient transfection into THP‑1, HepG2, HEK293 and Hela cells using DEAE‑dextran and Lipofectamine 2000 liposome transfection reagent. Results showed that the transcriptional activity of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter and deletions of P1 promoter in THP‑1 and HepG2 cells was higher than that in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of P1E‑9 was higher compared with those of other deletions in THP‑1, HepG2, HEK293 and HeLa cells. These findings indicate that the transcriptional activity of the P1 promoter and the effects of deletions vary with different cell lines. Thus, the P1 promoter may drive ACAT1 gene expression with cell‑type specificity. In addition, the core sequence of ACAT1 gene P1 promoter was suggested to be between -125 and +65 bp. PMID:27220725

  10. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  11. Direct Band Gap Gallium Antimony Phosphide (GaSbxP1−x) Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Russell, H. B.; Andriotis, A. N.; Menon, M.; Jasinski, J. B.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Sunkara, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report direct band gap transition for Gallium Phosphide (GaP) when alloyed with just 1–2 at% antimony (Sb) utilizing both density functional theory based computations and experiments. First principles density functional theory calculations of GaSbxP1−x alloys in a 216 atom supercell configuration indicate that an indirect to direct band gap transition occurs at x = 0.0092 or higher Sb incorporation into GaSbxP1−x. Furthermore, these calculations indicate band edge straddling of the hydrogen evolution and oxygen evolution reactions for compositions ranging from x = 0.0092 Sb up to at least x = 0.065 Sb making it a candidate for use in a Schottky type photoelectrochemical water splitting device. GaSbxP1−x nanowires were synthesized by reactive transport utilizing a microwave plasma discharge with average compositions ranging from x = 0.06 to x = 0.12 Sb and direct band gaps between 2.21 eV and 1.33 eV. Photoelectrochemical experiments show that the material is photoactive with p-type conductivity. This study brings attention to a relatively uninvestigated, tunable band gap semiconductor system with tremendous potential in many fields. PMID:26860470

  12. PsoP1, a milk-clotting aspartic peptidase from the basidiomycete fungus Piptoporus soloniensis.

    PubMed

    El-Baky, Hassan Abd; Linke, Diana; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf Günter

    2011-09-28

    The first enzyme of the basidiomycete Piptoporus soloniensis, a peptidase (PsoP1), was characterized after isolation from submerged cultures, purification by fractional precipitation, and preparative native-polyarylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The native molecular mass of PsoP1 was 38 kDa with an isoelectric point of 3.9. Similar to chymosin from milk calves, PsoP1 showed a maximum milk-clotting activity (MCA) at 35-40 °C and was most stable at pH 6 and below 40 °C. The complete inhibition by pepstatin A identified this enzyme as an aspartic peptidase. Electrospray ionization-tandem MS showed an amino acid partial sequence that was more homologous to mammalian milk clotting peptidases than to the chymosin substitute from a fungal species, such as the Zygomycete Mucor miehei. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE patterns, the peptidase cleaved κ-casein in a way similar to chymosin and hydrolyzed β-casein slowly, as it would be expected from an efficient chymosin substitute. PMID:21888369

  13. Solar adaptive optics at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltau, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Schmidt, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2013-10-01

    Observing the Sun with high angular resolution is difficult because the turbulence in the atmosphere is strongest during day time. In this paper we describe the principles of solar adaptive optics exemplified by the two German solar telescopes VTT and GREGOR at the Observatorio del Teide. With theses systems we obtain near diffraction limited images of the Sun. Ways to overcome the limits of conventional AO by applying multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) are shown.

  14. Angular momenta creation in relativistic electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, T; Berezhiani, V I; Pekker, M; Mahajan, S M

    2003-07-01

    Creation of angular momentum in a relativistic electron-positron plasma is explored. It is shown that a chain of angular momentum carrying vortices is a robust asymptotic state sustained by the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation characteristic to the system. The results may suggest a possible electromagnetic origin of angular momenta when it is applied to the MeV epoch of the early Universe. PMID:12935260

  15. Peculiarities of Angular Distribution of Electrons at Si <100> Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Pivovarov, Yu L.; Takabayashi, Y.; Tukhfatullin, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    The properties of both angular and spatial distribution of 255 MeV electrons at <100> channeling in silicon crystal has been investigated experimentally at the linac injector of SAGA light source and by computer simulations. The simulation of trajectories, angular and spatial distributions of electrons on the screen monitor has been performed taking into account initial spatial as well as angular beam divergence of electron beam. Both experimental data and simulations show the brilliant effect of so-called "doughnut scattering".

  16. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Bobby L.; Aeby, Ian

    1982-01-01

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  17. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  18. Realization of optimized quantum controlled-logic gate based on the orbital angular momentum of light.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Li, Tao; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-18

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optimized setup to implement quantum controlled-NOT operation using polarization and orbital angular momentum qubits. This device is more adaptive to inputs with various polarizations, and can work both in classical and quantum single-photon regime. The logic operations performed by such a setup not only possess high stability and polarization-free character, they can also be easily extended to deal with multi-qubit input states. As an example, the experimental implementation of generalized three-qubit Toffoli gate has been presented. PMID:27137257

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High angular resolution spectroscopy of NGC 1277 (Walsh+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Gebhardt, K.; Yildirim, A.; Richstone, D. O.; Gultekin, K.; Husemann, B.

    2016-03-01

    We obtained high angular resolution spectroscopy of NGC 1277 using the Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) with the ALTtitude conjugate Adaptive optics for the InfraRed system on the Gemini North telescope. The observations were taken as part of program GN-2011B-Q-27 over the course of four nights, spanning from 2012 October 30 to 2012 December 27. We observed NGC 1277 using 600s object-sky-object exposures with the H+K filter and K grating centered on 2.2μm. (1 data file).

  20. Visual reaction times during prolonged angular acceleration parallel the subjective perception of rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of prolonged angular acceleration on choice reaction time to an accelerating visual stimulus was investigated, with 10 commercial airline pilots serving as subjects. The pattern of reaction times during and following acceleration was compared with the pattern of velocity estimates reported during identical trials. Both reaction times and velocity estimates increased at the onset of acceleration, declined prior to the termination of acceleration, and showed an aftereffect. These results are inconsistent with the torsion-pendulum theory of semicircular canal function and suggest that the vestibular adaptation is of central origin.

  1. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  2. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  3. Angular Clustering of Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Garcet, O.; Disseau, L.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Gueguen, A.; Alloin, D.; Chiappetti, L.; Gosset, E.; Maccagni, D.; Surdej, J.; Valtchanov, I.

    2006-09-01

    We describe the properties of X-ray point-like sources detected over 4.2 sq. degs. of the largest contiguous survey with XMM-Newton to date (the XMM-LSS survey) to fluxes of F2-10 keV 8x10-15 erg/s/cm2 and F0.5-2 keV 2x10-15 erg/s/cm2 respectively. For 1200 sources in the soft band, we find a two-point angular correlation function (ACF) signal similar to previous work, but no correlation for 400 sources in the hard band. A sample of 200 faint sources with hard X-ray spectra does show a 2-3 sigma positive signal with a power-law normalization theta0>40 arcsec. We discuss implications, including the fact that a large correlation length for obscured AGN is inconsistent with simple AGN Unification based on orientation only.

  4. Colliding particles carrying nonzero orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Igor P.

    2011-05-01

    Photons carrying nonzero orbital angular momentum (twisted photons) are well-known in optics. Recently, using Compton backscattering to boost optical twisted photons to high energies was suggested. Twisted electrons in the intermediate energy range have also been produced recently. Thus, collisions involving energetic twisted particles seem to be feasible and represent a new tool in high-energy physics. Here we discuss some generic features of scattering processes involving twisted particles in the initial and/or final state. In order to avoid additional complications arising from nontrivial polarization states, we focus here on scalar fields only. We show that processes involving twisted particles allow one to perform a Fourier analysis of the plane-wave cross section with respect to the azimuthal angles of the initial particles. In addition, using twisted states, one can probe the autocorrelation function of the amplitude, which is inaccessible in the plane-wave collisions. Finally, we discuss prospects for experimental study of these effects.

  5. Internal reflection sensors with high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavirin, I.; Strelkov, O.; Vetskous, A.; Norton-Wayne, L.; Harwood, R.

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the use of total internal reflection for the production of sensors with high angular resolution. These sensors are intended for measurement of the angle between a sensor's axis and the direction to a source of radiation or reflecting object. Sensors of this type are used in controlling the position of machine parts in robotics and industry, orienting space vehicles and astronomic devices in relation to the Sun, and as autocollimators for checking angles of deviation. This kind of sensor was used in the Apollo space vehicle some 20 years ago. Using photodetectors with linear and area CCD arrays has opened up new application possibilities for appropriately designed sensors. A generalized methodology is presented applicable to a wide range of tasks. Some modifications that can improve the performance of the basic design are described.

  6. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, C.; Rheault, F.; Boulay, R.; Tremblay, R.

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-Summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  7. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  8. Angular relation of axes in perceptual space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, Urs

    1992-01-01

    The geometry of perceptual space needs to be known to model spatial orientation constancy or to create virtual environments. To examine one main aspect of this geometry, the angular relation between the three spatial axes was measured. Experiments were performed consisting of a perceptual task in which subjects were asked to set independently their apparent vertical and horizontal plane. The visual background provided no other stimuli to serve as optical direction cues. The task was performed in a number of different body tilt positions with pitches and rolls varied in steps of 30 degs. The results clearly show the distortion of orthogonality of the perceptual space for nonupright body positions. Large interindividual differences were found. Deviations from orthogonality up to 25 deg were detected in the pitch as well as in the roll direction. Implications of this nonorthogonality on further studies of spatial perception and on the construction of virtual environments for human interaction is also discussed.

  9. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  10. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  11. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  12. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  13. Chiral symmetries associated with angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Kleinert, M.

    2014-03-01

    In quantum mechanics courses, symmetries of a physical system are usually introduced as operators which commute with the Hamiltonian. In this paper we will consider chiral symmetries which anticommute with the Hamiltonian. Typically, introductory courses at the (under)graduate level do not discuss these simple, useful and beautiful symmetries at all. The first time a student encounters them is when the Dirac equation is discussed in a course on relativistic quantum mechanics, or when particle-hole symmetry is studied in the context of superconductivity. In this paper, we will show how chiral symmetries can be simply elucidated using the theory of angular momentum, which is taught in virtually all introductory quantum mechanics courses.

  14. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Angular-momentum distributions sigma/sub L/ for the compound nucleus /sup 164/Yb were deduced from measurements of ..gamma..-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of /sup 64/Ni and /sup 100/Mo at and below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation functions can be reproduced with coupled-channels calculations only if additional coupling beyond the known inelastic strengths is included. Even with this augmented coupling, however, at the lowest bombarding energies the experimental sigma/sub L/ extend to higher L values than the predictions. Single-barrier penetration models for a potential with an energy-dependent depth and shape fitted to the excitation function likewise underestimate the role of high-L partial waves. Somewhat better success is achieved with models in which fission is allowed to occur at distances comparable with or even larger than the Coulomb barrier radius. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  16. Angular biasing in implicit Monte-Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1994-10-20

    Calculations of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion target experiments require an integrated approach in which laser irradiation and radiation transport in the hohlraum are solved simultaneously with the symmetry, implosion and burn of the fuel capsule. The Implicit Monte Carlo method has proved to be a valuable tool for the two dimensional radiation transport within the hohlraum, but the impact of statistical noise on the symmetric implosion of the small fuel capsule is difficult to overcome. We present an angular biasing technique in which an increased number of low weight photons are directed at the imploding capsule. For typical parameters this reduces the required computer time for an integrated calculation by a factor of 10. An additional factor of 5 can also be achieved by directing even smaller weight photons at the polar regions of the capsule where small mass zones are most sensitive to statistical noise.

  17. Angular Approach Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Andrew; Tokar, Sergiy; Gopal, Sahana; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Tarasov, Andrei I; Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Chiappini, Ciro; Rorsman, Patrik; Stevens, Molly M; Gorelik, Julia; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2016-05-24

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a super-resolution live imaging technique that uses a glass nanopipette as an imaging probe to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of cell surface. SICM can be used to analyze cell morphology at nanoscale, follow membrane dynamics, precisely position an imaging nanopipette close to a structure of interest, and use it to obtain ion channel recordings or locally apply stimuli or drugs. Practical implementations of these SICM advantages, however, are often complicated due to the limitations of currently available SICM systems that inherited their design from other scanning probe microscopes in which the scan assembly is placed right above the specimen. Such arrangement makes the setting of optimal illumination necessary for phase contrast or the use of high magnification upright optics difficult. Here, we describe the designs that allow mounting SICM scan head on a standard patch-clamp micromanipulator and imaging the sample at an adjustable approach angle. This angle could be as shallow as the approach angle of a patch-clamp pipette between a water immersion objective and the specimen. Using this angular approach SICM, we obtained topographical images of cells grown on nontransparent nanoneedle arrays, of islets of Langerhans, and of hippocampal neurons under upright optical microscope. We also imaged previously inaccessible areas of cells such as the side surfaces of the hair cell stereocilia and the intercalated disks of isolated cardiac myocytes, and performed targeted patch-clamp recordings from the latter. Thus, our new, to our knowledge, angular approach SICM allows imaging of living cells on nontransparent substrates and a seamless integration with most patch-clamp setups on either inverted or upright microscopes, which would facilitate research in cell biophysics and physiology. PMID:27224490

  18. Delocalized correlations in twin light beams with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Marino, A M; Boyer, V; Pooser, R C; Lett, P D; Lemons, K; Jones, K M

    2008-08-29

    We generate intensity-difference-squeezed Laguerre-Gauss twin beams of light carrying orbital angular momentum by using four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. The conservation of orbital angular momentum in the four-wave mixing process is studied as well as the spatial distribution of the quantum correlations obtained with different configurations of orbital angular momentum. Intensity-difference squeezing of up to -6.7 dB is demonstrated with beams carrying orbital angular momentum. Delocalized spatial correlations between the twin beams are observed. PMID:18851611

  19. The glycosylation pattern of common allergens: the recognition and uptake of Der p 1 by epithelial and dendritic cells is carbohydrate dependent.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouleh, Abeer; Johal, Ramneek; Sharquie, Inas K; Emara, Mohammed; Harrington, Helen; Shakib, Farouk; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2012-01-01

    Allergens are initiators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. They are recognised at the site of entry by epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs), both of which activate innate inflammatory circuits that can collectively induce Th2 immune responses. In an attempt to have a better understanding of the role of carbohydrates in the recognition and uptake of allergens by the innate immune system, we defined common glycosylation patterns in major allergens. This was done using labelled lectins and showed that allergens like Der p 1 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 1), Fel d 1 (Felis domisticus), Ara h 1 (Arachis hypogaea), Der p 2 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2), Bla g 2 (Blattella germanica) and Can f 1 (Canis familiaris) are glycosylated and that the main dominant sugars on these allergens are 1-2, 1-3 and 1-6 mannose. These observations are in line with recent reports implicating the mannose receptor (MR) in allergen recognition and uptake by DCs and suggesting a major link between glycosylation and allergen recognition. We then looked at TSLP (Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin) cytokine secretion by lung epithelia upon encountering natural Der p 1 allergen. TSLP is suggested to drive DC maturation in support of allergic hypersensitivity reactions. Our data showed an increase in TSLP secretion by lung epithelia upon stimulation with natural Der p 1 which was carbohydrate dependent. The deglycosylated preparation of Der p 1 exhibited minimal uptake by DCs compared to the natural and hyperglycosylated recombinant counterparts, with the latter being taken up more readily than the other preparations. Collectively, our data indicate that carbohydrate moieties on allergens play a vital role in their recognition by innate immune cells, implicating them in downstream deleterious Th2 cell activation and IgE production. PMID:22479478

  20. The Glycosylation Pattern of Common Allergens: The Recognition and Uptake of Der p 1 by Epithelial and Dendritic Cells Is Carbohydrate Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghouleh, Abeer; Johal, Ramneek; Sharquie, Inas K.; Emara, Mohammed; Harrington, Helen; Shakib, Farouk; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.

    2012-01-01

    Allergens are initiators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. They are recognised at the site of entry by epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs), both of which activate innate inflammatory circuits that can collectively induce Th2 immune responses. In an attempt to have a better understanding of the role of carbohydrates in the recognition and uptake of allergens by the innate immune system, we defined common glycosylation patterns in major allergens. This was done using labelled lectins and showed that allergens like Der p 1 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 1), Fel d 1 (Felis domisticus), Ara h 1 (Arachis hypogaea), Der p 2 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2), Bla g 2 (Blattella germanica) and Can f 1 (Canis familiaris) are glycosylated and that the main dominant sugars on these allergens are 1–2, 1–3 and 1–6 mannose. These observations are in line with recent reports implicating the mannose receptor (MR) in allergen recognition and uptake by DCs and suggesting a major link between glycosylation and allergen recognition. We then looked at TSLP (Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin) cytokine secretion by lung epithelia upon encountering natural Der p 1 allergen. TSLP is suggested to drive DC maturation in support of allergic hypersensitivity reactions. Our data showed an increase in TSLP secretion by lung epithelia upon stimulation with natural Der p 1 which was carbohydrate dependent. The deglycosylated preparation of Der p 1 exhibited minimal uptake by DCs compared to the natural and hyperglycosylated recombinant counterparts, with the latter being taken up more readily than the other preparations. Collectively, our data indicate that carbohydrate moieties on allergens play a vital role in their recognition by innate immune cells, implicating them in downstream deleterious Th2 cell activation and IgE production. PMID:22479478

  1. NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J C; Niemi, E C; Nakamura, M C; Seaman, W E

    1995-05-01

    NKR-P1A is a lectinlike surface molecule expressed on rat natural killer (NK) cells. NKR-P1A has structural and functional features of an activating NK cell receptor, but a requirement for NKR-P1A in target cell lysis has not been determined. To define the role of NKR-P1A in natural killing, we have generated a mutant of the rat NK cell line, RNK-16, lacking expression of all members of the NKR-P1 receptor family. Although these NKR-P1-deficient NK cells were able to kill many standard tumor targets, including YAC-1, they were selectively deficient in the lysis of IC-21 macrophage, B-16 melanoma, and C1498 lymphoma targets. Reexpression of a single member of the NKR-P1 family, NKR-P1A, on mutant cells restored lysis of IC-21, and killing of IC-21 targets through rat NKR-P1A was completely blocked by F(ab')2 anti-NKR-P1A. Reexpression of NKR-P1A also restored transmembrane signaling to IC-21, as assessed by the generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. The generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate was also restored in response to B-16 targets, but both B-16 and C1498 cells remained resistant to lysis, indicating that other NK cell molecules, perhaps within the NKR-P1 family, are required for the efficient killing of these tumors. These results are the first to demonstrate that NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killing. PMID:7722466

  2. NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killer cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    NKR-P1A is a lectinlike surface molecule expressed on rat natural killer (NK) cells. NKR-P1A has structural and functional features of an activating NK cell receptor, but a requirement for NKR-P1A in target cell lysis has not been determined. To define the role of NKR-P1A in natural killing, we have generated a mutant of the rat NK cell line, RNK-16, lacking expression of all members of the NKR-P1 receptor family. Although these NKR-P1-deficient NK cells were able to kill many standard tumor targets, including YAC-1, they were selectively deficient in the lysis of IC-21 macrophage, B-16 melanoma, and C1498 lymphoma targets. Reexpression of a single member of the NKR-P1 family, NKR-P1A, on mutant cells restored lysis of IC-21, and killing of IC-21 targets through rat NKR-P1A was completely blocked by F(ab')2 anti-NKR- P1A. Reexpression of NKR-P1A also restored transmembrane signaling to IC-21, as assessed by the generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. The generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate was also restored in response to B-16 targets, but both B-16 and C1498 cells remained resistant to lysis, indicating that other NK cell molecules, perhaps within the NKR-P1 family, are required for the efficient killing of these tumors. These results are the first to demonstrate that NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killing. PMID:7722466

  3. Quantum hyper-entanglement and angular spectrum decomposition applied to sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James F.

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-entanglement with an emphasis on mode type is used to extend a previously developed atmospheric imaging system. Angular spectrum expansions combined with second quantization formalism permits many different mode types to be considered using a common formalism. Fundamental Gaussian, standard Hermite-Gaussian, standard Laguerre- Gaussian, and Bessel modes are developed. Hyper-entanglement refers to entanglement in more than one degree of freedom, e.g. polarization, energy-time and orbital angular momentum. The system functions at optical or infrared frequencies. Only the signal photon propagates in the atmosphere, the ancilla photon is retained within the detector. This results in loss being essentially classical, giving rise to stronger forms of entanglement. A simple atomic physics based model of the scattering target is developed. This model permits the derivation in closed form of the loss coefficient for photons with a given mode type scattering from the target. Signal loss models for propagation, transmission, detection, and scattering are developed and applied. The probability of detection of photonic orbital angular momentum is considered in terms of random media theory. A model of generation and detection efficiencies for the different degrees of freedom is also considered. The implications of loss mechanisms for signal to noise ratio (SNR), and other quantum information theoretic quantities are discussed. Techniques for further enhancing the system's SNR and resolution through adaptive optics are examined. The formalism permits random noise and entangled or nonentangled sources of interference to be modeled.

  4. Optimization of a Potent, Orally Active S1P1 Agonist Containing a Quinolinone Core

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The optimization of a series of S1P1 agonists with limited activity against S1P3 is reported. A polar headgroup was used to improve the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters of lead quinolinone 6. When dosed orally at 1 and 3 mg/kg, the azahydroxymethyl analogue 22 achieved statistically significant lowering of circulating blood lymphocytes 24 h postdose. In rats, a dose-proportional increase in exposure was measured when 22 was dosed orally at 2 and 100 mg/kg. PMID:24900374

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the conduction band edge of GaNxP1-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngerich, M.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Weiser, G.; Geisz, J. F.; Harris, C.; Lindsay, A.; O'Reilly, E. P.

    2006-12-01

    We show that a two-level band-anticrossing (BAC) model fails to describe the evolution of N-related states in GaNxP1-x . Band structure calculations prove that a two-level model describes these states in ordered GaNP supercells. Photocurrent measurements support a BAC-related blueshift of the GaP-like direct band gap in disordered GaNP, but calculations and electromodulated absorption and pressure studies show that the wide energy distribution of the lower-lying N-related states leads to the anticrossing interaction involving many N levels in disordered GaNP.

  6. Structure of the conserved hypothetical protein MAL13P1.257 from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Margaret A.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mehlin, Christopher; Boni, Erica; Earnest, Thomas N.; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Lauricella, Angela; Anderson, Lori; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Zucker, Frank; Schoenfeld, Lori W.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, PlasmoDB sequence MAL13P1.257 from Plasmodium falciparum, Pfam sequence family PF05907, has been determined as part of the structural genomics effort of the Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa consortium. The structure was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion at 2.17 Å resolution. The structure is almost entirely β-sheet; it consists of 15 β-strands and one short 310-helix and represents a new protein fold. The packing of the two monomers in the asymmetric unit indicates that the biological unit may be a dimer. PMID:16511296

  7. Novel thrombin inhibitors incorporating non-basic partially saturated heterobicyclic P1-arginine mimetics.

    PubMed

    Peterlin-Masic, Lucija; Mlinsek, Gregor; Solmajer, Tomaz; Trampus-Bakija, Alenka; Stegnar, Mojca; Kikelj, Danijel

    2003-03-10

    The design, synthesis and biological activity of non-covalent thrombin inhibitors incorporating 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroindazole, 2-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydroindazole, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoindole, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazoline and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazolin-2-amine as novel, partially saturated, heterobicyclic P(1)-arginine side-chain mimetics is described. The binding mode of the most potent candidate in the series co-crystallized with human alpha-thrombin, which exhibited an in vitro K(i) of 140nM and more that 478-fold selectivity against trypsin, is discussed. PMID:12617892

  8. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  9. Spatial Angular Compounding for Elastography without the Incompressibility Assumption

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Min; Varghese, Tomy

    2007-01-01

    Spatial-angular compounding is a new technique that enables the reduction of noise artifacts in ultrasound elastography. Previous results using spatial angular compounding, however, were based on the use of the tissue incompressibility assumption. Compounded elastograms were obtained from a spatially-weighted average of local strain estimated from radiofrequency echo signals acquired at different insonification angles. In this paper, we present a new method for reducing the noise artifacts in the axial strain elastogram utilizing a least-squares approach on the angular displacement estimates that does not use the incompressibility assumption. This method produces axial strain elastograms with higher image quality, compared to noncompounded axial strain elastograms, and is referred to as the least-squares angular-compounding approach for elastography. To distinguish between these two angular compounding methods, the spatial-angular compounding with angular weighting based on the tissue incompressibility assumption is referred to as weighted compounding. In this paper, we compare the performance of the two angular-compounding techniques for elastography using beam steering on a linear-array transducer. Quantitative experimental results demonstrate that least-squares compounding provides comparable but smaller improvements in both the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio and the contrast-to-noise ratio, as compared to the weighted-compounding method. Ultrasound simulation results suggest that the least-squares compounding method performs better and provide accurate and robust results when compared to the weighted compounding method, in the case where the incompressibility assumption does not hold. PMID:16761786

  10. Quark and Gluon Orbital Angular Momentum: Where Are We?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorcé, Cédric; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2016-06-01

    The orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons contributes significantly to the proton spin budget and attracted a lot of attention in the recent years, both theoretically and experimentally. We summarize the various definitions of parton orbital angular momentum together with their relations with parton distributions functions. In particular, we highlight current theoretical puzzles and give some prospects.

  11. One particularity of energy-angular secondary electrons spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. S.; Zaitsev, S. I.

    2006-05-01

    In this work we discuss the problems of the energy-angular spectrum of backscattered and true secondary electrons simulation using the discrete (DLA) and the continuous (CLA) loss approximations. The presence of an angular spectrum artefact - the deviation from the sinusoidal distribution over the range of 177-18O° from the beam direction is shown.

  12. Angular distribution of light scattered from heavily doped silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, V V; Likhachev, M E; Bubnov, M M; Salganskii, M Yu; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2011-10-31

    This paper describes an experimental setup for precision measurements of the angular distribution of light scattered by optical fibres in a wide angular range and demonstrates that the models of anomalous scattering proposed to date need to be refined. We have found and interpreted a discrepancy between the Rayleigh scattering coefficients measured by different techniques.

  13. Location, location, location: the evolutionary history of CD1 genes and the NKR-P1/ligand systems.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sally L; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-08-01

    CD1 genes encode cell surface molecules that present lipid antigens to various kinds of T lymphocytes of the immune system. The structures of CD1 genes and molecules are like the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I system, the loading of antigen and the tissue distribution for CD1 molecules are like those in the class II system, and phylogenetic analyses place CD1 between class I and class II sequences, altogether leading to the notion that CD1 is a third ancient system of antigen presentation molecules. However, thus far, CD1 genes have only been described in mammals, birds and reptiles, leaving major questions as to their origin and evolution. In this review, we recount a little history of the field so far and then consider what has been learned about the structure and functional attributes of CD1 genes and molecules in marsupials, birds and reptiles. We describe the central conundrum of CD1 evolution, the genomic location of CD1 genes in the MHC and/or MHC paralogous regions in different animals, considering the three models of evolutionary history that have been proposed. We describe the natural killer (NK) receptors NKR-P1 and ligands, also found in different genomic locations for different animals. We discuss the consequence of these three models, one of which includes the repudiation of a guiding principle for the last 20 years, that two rounds of genome-wide duplication at the base of the vertebrates provided the extra MHC genes necessary for the emergence of adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates. PMID:27457887

  14. Methods for measuring and transporting angular momentum in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David; Flanagan, Eanna; Stein, Leo; Vines, Justin

    2016-03-01

    For an observer in a curved spacetime, elements of the dual space of the set of linearized Poincare transformations from the observer's tangent space to itself can naturally be interpreted as local linear and angular momenta. We give an operational procedure by which the observer can measure such local linear and angular momenta from the local spacetime geometry. These momenta can be interpreted as approximate versions of the linear and angular momenta of the spacetime about the observer's location. The measurement algorithm allows for a more accurate determination of the linear and angular momentum of stationary, asymptotically flat systems than previous proposals do. We also describe a prescription by which observers at different locations can compare values of their measured linear and angular momentum by using a specific transport equation, which refines previous proposals. These operational definitions may also prove useful for clarifying the physical interpretation of Bondi-Metzner-Sachs asymptotic charges in asymptotically flat spacetimes.

  15. High-dimensional quantum nature of ghost angular Young's diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; Leach, Jonathan; Jack, Barry; Padgett, Miles J.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; She Weilong

    2010-09-15

    We propose a technique to characterize the dimensionality of entangled sources affected by any environment, including phase and amplitude masks or atmospheric turbulence. We illustrate this technique on the example of angular ghost diffraction using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) spectrum generated by a nonlocal double slit. We realize a nonlocal angular double slit by placing single angular slits in the paths of the signal and idler modes of the entangled light field generated by parametric down-conversion. Based on the observed OAM spectrum and the measured Shannon dimensionality spectrum of the possible quantum channels that contribute to Young's ghost diffraction, we calculate the associated dimensionality D{sub total}. The measured D{sub total} ranges between 1 and 2.74 depending on the opening angle of the angular slits. The ability to quantify the nature of high-dimensional entanglement is vital when considering quantum information protocols.

  16. Cepheids at high angular resolution: circumstellar envelope and pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, Alexandre

    2011-12-01

    In 2005, interferometric observations with VLTI/VINCI and CHARA/FLUOR revealed the existence of a circumstellar envelope (CSE) around some Cepheids. This surrounding material is particularly interesting for two reasons: it could have an impact on the distance estimates and could be linked to a past or on-going mass loss. The use of Baade-Wesselink methods for independent distance determinations could be significantly biased by the presence of these envelopes. Although their observations are difficult because of the high contrast between the photosphere of the star and the CSE, several observation techniques have the potential to improve our knowledge about their physical properties. In this thesis, I discuss in particular high angular resolution techniques that I applied to the study of several bright Galactic Cepheids. First, I used adaptive optic observations with NACO of the Cepheid RS Puppis, in order to deduce the flux ratio between the CSE and the photosphere of the star. In addition, I could carry out a statistical study of the speckle noise and inspect a possible asymmetry. Secondly, I analysed VISIR data to study the spectral energy distribution of a sample of Cepheids. These diffraction-limited images enabled me to carry out an accurate photometry in the N band and to detect an IR excess linked to the presence of a circumstellar component. On the other hand, applying a Fourier analysis I showed that some components are resolved. I then explored the K' band with the recombination instrument FLUOR for some bright Cepheids. Thanks to new set of data of Y Oph, I improved the study of its circumstellar envelope, using a ring-like model for the CSE. For two other Cepheids, U Vul and S Sge, I applied the interferometric Baade-Wesselink method in order to estimate their distance.

  17. Replication-induced transcription of an autorepressed gene: The replication initiator gene of plasmid P1

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2000-01-01

    The replication origin of plasmid P1 contains an array of five repeats (iterons) that bind the plasmid-encoded initiator RepA. Within the array lies the repA promoter, which becomes largely repressed on RepA binding (autorepression). One might expect that extra iterons produced on plasmid replication would titrate RepA and release the repression. The promoter, however, is induced poorly by extra iterons. The P1 copy number is reduced by extra iterons in the presence of the autorepressed repA gene but not when additional RepA is provided from constitutive sources. It has been proposed that the iteron-bound RepA couples with the promoter-bound RepA and thereby maintains repression. Although not the product of replication, we find that the act of replication itself can renew RepA synthesis. Replication apparently cleans the promoter of bound RepA and provides a window of opportunity for repA transcription. We propose that replication-induced transcription is required to ensure initiator availability in a system that is induced poorly when challenged with additional initiator binding sites. PMID:10840063

  18. Further Constraints on the Optical Transmission Spectrum of HAT-P-1b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Iro, N.; Santos, N. C.; Desidera, S.; Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Alonso, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on novel observations of HAT-P-1 aimed at constraining the optical transmission spectrum of the atmosphere of its transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanet. Ground-based differential spectrophotometry was performed over two transit windows using the DOLORES spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Our measurements imply an average planet to star radius ratio equal to Rp/R* = (0.1159 ± 0.0005). This result is consistent with the value obtained from recent near-infrared measurements of this object, but differs from previously reported optical measurements, being lower by around 4.4 exoplanet scale heights. Analyzing the data over five different spectral bins of ∼600 Å wide, we observed a single peaked spectrum (3.7 σ level) with a blue cutoff corresponding to the blue edge of the broad absorption wing of sodium and an increased absorption in the region in-between 6180 and 7400 Å. We also infer that the width of the broad absorption wings due to alkali metals is likely narrower than the one implied by solar abundance clear atmospheric models. We interpret the result as evidence that HAT-P-1b has a partially clear atmosphere at optical wavelengths with a more modest contribution from an optical absorber than previously reported.

  19. Zinc Resistance Mechanisms of P1B-type ATPases in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingmei; Li, Zhefei; Liang, Jianqiang; Wei, Yibing; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti (S. meliloti) strain CCNWSX0020 displayed tolerance to high levels exposures of multiple metals and growth promotion of legume plants grown in metal-contaminated soil. However, the mechanism of metal-resistant strain remains unknown. We used five P1B-ATPases deletions by designating as ∆copA1b, ∆fixI1, ∆copA3, ∆zntA and ∆nia, respectively to investigate the role of P1B-ATPases in heavy metal resistance of S. meliloti. The ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants were sensitive to zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in different degree, whereas the other mutants had no significant influence on the metal resistance. Moreover, the expression of zntA was induced by Zn, Cd and Pb whereas copA1b was induced by copper (Cu) and silver (Ag). This two deletions could led to the increased intracellular concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd, but not of Cu. Complementation of ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants showed a restoration of tolerance to Zn, Cd and Pb to a certain extent. Taken together, the results suggest an important role of copA1b and zntA in Zn homeostasis and Cd and Pb detoxification in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020. PMID:27378600

  20. The Local Gromov-Witten Theory of {{C}{P}^1} and Integrable Hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brini, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we begin the study of the relationship between the local Gromov-Witten theory of Calabi-Yau rank two bundles over the projective line and the theory of integrable hierarchies. We first of all construct explicitly, in a large number of cases, the Hamiltonian dispersionless hierarchies that govern the full-descendent genus zero theory. Our main tool is the application of Dubrovin's formalism, based on associativity equations, to the known results on the genus zero theory from local mirror symmetry and localization. The hierarchies we find are apparently new, with the exception of the resolved conifold {{{O}_{{P}^1}(-1) bigoplus {O}_{{P}^1}(-1)}} in the equivariantly Calabi-Yau case. For this example the relevant dispersionless system turns out to be related to the long-wave limit of the Ablowitz-Ladik lattice. This identification provides us with a complete procedure to reconstruct the dispersive hierarchy which should conjecturally be related to the higher genus theory of the resolved conifold. We give a complete proof of this conjecture for genus g ≤ 1; our methods are based on establishing, analogously to the case of KdV, a "quasi-triviality" property for the Ablowitz-Ladik hierarchy at the leading order of the dispersive expansion. We furthermore provide compelling evidence in favour of the resolved conifold/Ablowitz-Ladik correspondence at higher genus by testing it successfully in the primary sector for g = 2.

  1. En1 directs superior olivary complex neuron positioning, survival, and expression of FoxP1.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Stefanie C; Jalabi, Walid; Zhao, Tianna; Romito-DiGiacomo, Rita R; Maricich, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the genetic pathways and transcription factors that control development and maturation of central auditory neurons. En1, a gene expressed by a subset of developing and mature superior olivary complex (SOC) cells, encodes a homeodomain transcription factor important for neuronal development in the midbrain, cerebellum, hindbrain and spinal cord. Using genetic fate-mapping techniques, we show that all En1-lineal cells in the SOC are neurons and that these neurons are glycinergic, cholinergic and GABAergic in neurotransmitter phenotype. En1 deletion does not interfere with specification or neural fate of these cells, but does cause aberrant positioning and subsequent death of all En1-lineal SOC neurons by early postnatal ages. En1-null cells also fail to express the transcription factor FoxP1, suggesting that FoxP1 lies downstream of En1. Our data define important roles for En1 in the development and maturation of a diverse group of brainstem auditory neurons. PMID:26542008

  2. Zinc Resistance Mechanisms of P1B-type ATPases in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingmei; Li, Zhefei; Liang, Jianqiang; Wei, Yibing; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti (S. meliloti) strain CCNWSX0020 displayed tolerance to high levels exposures of multiple metals and growth promotion of legume plants grown in metal-contaminated soil. However, the mechanism of metal-resistant strain remains unknown. We used five P1B-ATPases deletions by designating as ∆copA1b, ∆fixI1, ∆copA3, ∆zntA and ∆nia, respectively to investigate the role of P1B-ATPases in heavy metal resistance of S. meliloti. The ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants were sensitive to zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in different degree, whereas the other mutants had no significant influence on the metal resistance. Moreover, the expression of zntA was induced by Zn, Cd and Pb whereas copA1b was induced by copper (Cu) and silver (Ag). This two deletions could led to the increased intracellular concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd, but not of Cu. Complementation of ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants showed a restoration of tolerance to Zn, Cd and Pb to a certain extent. Taken together, the results suggest an important role of copA1b and zntA in Zn homeostasis and Cd and Pb detoxification in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020. PMID:27378600

  3. Novel S1P1 receptor agonists - Part 5: From amino-to alkoxy-pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Lescop, Cyrille; Birker, Magdalena; de Kanter, Ruben; Hess, Patrick; Kohl, Christopher; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Sieber, Patrick; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas; Steiner, Beat

    2016-06-10

    In a previous communication we reported on the discovery of aminopyridine 1 as a potent, selective and orally active S1P1 receptor agonist. More detailed studies revealed that this compound is phototoxic in vitro. As a result of efforts aiming at eliminating this undesired property, a series of alkoxy substituted pyridine derivatives was discovered. The photo irritancy factor (PIF) of these alkoxy pyridines was significantly lower than the one of aminopyridine 1 and most compounds were not phototoxic. Focused SAR studies showed, that 2-, 3-, and 4-pyridine derivatives delivered highly potent S1P1 receptor agonists. While the 2-pyridines were clearly more selective against S1PR3, the corresponding 3- or 4-pyridine analogues showed significantly longer oral half-lives and as a consequence longer pharmacological duration of action after oral administration. One of the best compounds, cyclopentoxy-pyridine 45b lacked phototoxicity, showed EC50 values of 0.7 and 140 nM on S1PR1 and S1PR3, respectively, and maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral administration of 10 mg/kg to Wistar rats. PMID:27027817

  4. Structure and transport mechanism of the sodium/proton antiporter MjNhaP1

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Cristina; Wöhlert, David; Kapotova, Ekaterina; Yildiz, Özkan; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Sodium/proton antiporters are essential for sodium and pH homeostasis and play a major role in human health and disease. We determined the structures of the archaeal sodium/proton antiporter MjNhaP1 in two complementary states. The inward-open state was obtained by x-ray crystallography in the presence of sodium at pH 8, where the transporter is highly active. The outward-open state was obtained by electron crystallography without sodium at pH 4, where MjNhaP1 is inactive. Comparison of both structures reveals a 7° tilt of the 6 helix bundle. 22Na+ uptake measurements indicate non-cooperative transport with an activity maximum at pH 7.5. We conclude that binding of a Na+ ion from the outside induces helix movements that close the extracellular cavity, open the cytoplasmic funnel, and result in a ∼5 Å vertical relocation of the ion binding site to release the substrate ion into the cytoplasm. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03583.001 PMID:25426803

  5. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  6. Semiclassical model for attosecond angular streaking.

    PubMed

    Smolarski, M; Eckle, P; Keller, U; Dörner, R

    2010-08-16

    Attosecond angular streaking is a new technique to achieve unsurpassed time accuracy of only a few attoseconds. Recently this has been successfully used to set an upper limit on the electron tunneling delay time in strong laser field ionization. The measurement technique can be modeled with either the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) or a more simple semiclassical approach that describes the process in two steps in analogy to the three-step model in high harmonic generation (HHG): step one is the tunnel ionization and step two is the classical motion in the strong laser field. Here we describe in detail a semiclassical model which is based on the ADK theory for the tunneling step, with subsequent classical propagation of the electron in the laser field. We take into account different ellipticities of the laser field and a possible wavelength-dependent ellipticity that is typically observed for pulses in the two-optical-cycle regime. This semiclassical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental result. PMID:20721150

  7. Angular Synchronization by Eigenvectors and Semidefinite Programming

    PubMed Central

    Singer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The angular synchronization problem is to obtain an accurate estimation (up to a constant additive phase) for a set of unknown angles θ1, …, θn from m noisy measurements of their offsets θi − θj mod 2π. Of particular interest is angle recovery in the presence of many outlier measurements that are uniformly distributed in [0, 2π) and carry no information on the true offsets. We introduce an efficient recovery algorithm for the unknown angles from the top eigenvector of a specially designed Hermitian matrix. The eigenvector method is extremely stable and succeeds even when the number of outliers is exceedingly large. For example, we successfully estimate n = 400 angles from a full set of m=(4002) offset measurements of which 90% are outliers in less than a second on a commercial laptop. The performance of the method is analyzed using random matrix theory and information theory. We discuss the relation of the synchronization problem to the combinatorial optimization problem Max-2-Lin mod L and present a semidefinite relaxation for angle recovery, drawing similarities with the Goemans-Williamson algorithm for finding the maximum cut in a weighted graph. We present extensions of the eigenvector method to other synchronization problems that involve different group structures and their applications, such as the time synchronization problem in distributed networks and the surface reconstruction problems in computer vision and optics. PMID:21179593

  8. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  9. Interannual variation of global atmospheric angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Tribbia, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    The relative atmospheric angular momentum (RAM) integrated over the globe is an explicit variable representing the state of the atmospheric general circulation. After removing the annual, semiannual, and higher-frequency components, the filtered global RAM time series for the past 14 years (1979-92) is highly correlated with both the Southern Oscillation index and the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature averaged over Area NINO-3 (5{degrees}S-5{degrees}N, 150{degrees}W-90{degrees}W). The interannual variation of global RAM is coherent with the poleward propagation of RAM anomalies. The global RAM anomalies reach their minimum values when westerly anomalies emerge in the Tropics and higher latitudes during a cold El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event. On the other hand, global RAM anomalies attain their maximum values when westerly anomalies arrive at the subtropics of both hemispheres during a warm ENSO event. It is demonstrated that the poleward propagation of RAM anomalies results from the flip-flop oscillation of the anomalous circulation between cold and warm ENSO events. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  10. The missing angular momentum of superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J E

    2008-06-11

    We point out that the Meissner effect, the process by which a superconductor expels magnetic field from its interior, represents an unsolved puzzle within the London-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theoretical framework used to describe the physics of conventional superconductors, because it appears to give rise to non-conservation of angular momentum. Possible ways to avoid this inconsistency within the conventional theory of superconductivity are argued to be far-fetched. Consequently, we argue that unless/until a consistent explanation is put forth, the existence of the Meissner effect represents an anomaly that casts doubt on the validity of the conventional framework. Instead, we point out that three elements of the unconventional theory of hole superconductivity (that are not part of the conventional theory) allow for a consistent explanation of the Meissner effect, namely: (i) that the charge distribution in superconductors is macroscopically inhomogeneous, (ii) that superconducting electrons reside in mesoscopic orbits of radius 2λ(L) (λ(L) = London penetration depth), and (iii) that spin-orbit coupling plays an essential role in superconductivity. PMID:21694324

  11. Angular velocity and centripetal acceleration relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, the growing boom of smartphones has given rise to a considerable number of applications exploiting the functionality of the sensors incorporated in these devices. A sector that has unexpectedly taken advantage of the power of these tools is physics teaching, as reflected in several recent papers. In effect, the use of smartphones has been proposed in several physics experiments spanning mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, oscillations, and waves, among other subjects. Although mechanical experiments have received considerable attention, most of them are based on the use of the accelerometer. An aspect that has received less attention is the use of rotation sensors or gyroscopes. An additional advance in the use of these devices is given by the possibility of obtaining data using the accelerometer and the gyroscope simultaneously. The aim of this paper is to consider the relation between the centripetal acceleration and the angular velocity. Instead of using a formal laboratory setup, in this experiment a smartphone is attached to the floor of a merry-go-round, found in many playgrounds. Several experiments were performed with the roundabout rotating in both directions and with the smart-phone at different distances from the center. The coherence of the measurements is shown.

  12. Cyclic transformation of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlederer, Florian; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Malik, Mehul; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states.

  13. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  14. The lost p1 allele in sh2 sweet corn: Quantitative effects of p1 and a1 genes on the concentrations of maysin, apimaysin, methoxymaysin, and chlorogenic acid in maize silk, and the antibiotic activity against corn earworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flavor of sh2 super-sweet corn is preferred by consumers. Unfortunately, sh2 sweet corn has very little genetic variation for resistance to insects. This presentation will review and summarize the studies of the functions of two loci, p1 and a1. The P1 allele can have a major role in the resista...

  15. Angular Distribution and Angular Dispersion in Collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Dong, Yu-Chuan; Li, Song-Lin; Duan, Li-Min; Xu, Hu-Shan; Xu, Hua-Gen; Chen, Ruo-Fu; Wu, He-Yu; Han, Jian-Long; Li, Zhi-Chang; Lu, Xiu-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Liu, Jian-Cheng; Sergey, Yu-Kun

    2004-10-01

    Angular distributions of fragments B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg and Al induced by the collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV have been measured. Angular dispersion parameters are extracted from the experimental data and compared with the theoretical ones. The dynamic dispersions for dissipative products depend strongly on the charge number Z of the fragments.

  16. Immunochemical and biological characterization of monoclonal antibodies against BaP1, a metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, I; Assumpção, G G; Silveira, C R F; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Tanjoni, I; Carmona, A K; Alves, M F M; Takehara, H A; Rucavado, A; Ramos, O H P; Moura-da-Silva, A M; Gutiérrez, J M

    2010-11-01

    BaP1 is a P-I class of Snake Venom Metalloproteinase (SVMP) relevant in the local tissue damage associated with envenomations by Bothrops asper, a medically-important species in Central America and parts of South America. Six monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against BaP1 (MABaP1) were produced and characterized regarding their isotype, dissociation constant (K(d)), specificity and ability to neutralize BaP1-induced hemorrhagic and proteolytic activity. Two MABaP1 are IgM, three are IgG1 and one is IgG2b. The K(d)s of IgG MoAbs were in the nM range. All IgG MoAbs recognized conformational epitopes of BaP1 and B. asper venom components but failed to recognize venoms from 27 species of Viperidae, Colubridae and Elapidae families. Clone 7 cross-reacted with three P-I SVMPs tested (moojeni protease, insularinase and neuwiedase). BaP1-induced hemorrhage was totally neutralized by clones 3, 6 and 8 but not by clone 7. Inhibition of BaP1 enzymatic activity on a synthetic substrate by MABaP1 was totally achieved by clones 3 and 6, and partially by clone 8, but not by clone 7. In conclusion, these neutralizing MoAbs against BaP1 may become important tools to understand structure-function relationships of BaP1 and the role of P-I class SVMP in snakebite envenomation. PMID:20674587

  17. Applications of minimum redundancy arrays in adaptive beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattouche, M.; Nichols, S. T.; Jorgenson, M. B.

    1991-10-01

    It is shown, through analysis and simulation, that the use of a minimum redundancy array (MRA) in conjunction with an adaptive beamformer results in performance superior to that attained by a comparable system based on an array with uniformly spaced elements, or uniform array (UA) in terms of rejecting interferences located in close angular proximity to the look direction. Further, it is demonstrated that choosing the adaptive elements of a thinned adaptive array (TAA) based on a minimum spatial redundancy criterion, rather than spacing them uniformly, results in improved rejection of main lobe interferences, with negligible degradation in sidelobe interference rejection capabilities.

  18. Transformation mapping of the regulatory elements of the ecdysone-inducible P1 gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Maschat, F.; Dubertret, M.L.; Lepesant, J.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The transcription of the P1 gene is induced by 20-hydroxyecdysone in fat bodies of third-instar larvae. Germ line transformation showed that sequences between {minus}138 to +276 contain elements required for a qualitatively correct developmental and hormonal regulation of P1 transcription. Sequences from {minus}138 to {minus}68 are essential for this expression.

  19. MUTATION SPECTRA OF GLU-P-1 IN SALMONELLA: INDUCTION OF HOTSPOT FRAMESHIFTS AND SITE-SPECIFIC BASE SUBSTITUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutations induced in approximately 2,000 mutants of Salmonella by the heterocyclic@ amine Glu-P-1 were determined by colony probe hybridization and PCR/DNA sequence analysis. ll of the mutations were at sites containing guanine, which is the base at which Glu-P-1 forms DNA ad...

  20. DNA vaccine (P1-2A-3C-pCDNA) co-administered with Bovine IL-18 gives protective immune response against Foot and Mouth Disease in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Sanghratna Vishanath, Bahire; H J, Dechamma; K, Ganesh; V V S, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G R

    2016-09-25

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals causing considerable economic loss in the affected countries. Presently used tissue culture inactivated vaccine protects the vaccinated animals for a short duration. DNA vaccines along with appropriate adjutants is one of the approach for the development of alternative vaccine. In the present study, we constructed P1-2A-3CpCDNA (containing P1-2A-3C coding sequences of FMDV Asia-1 Ind 63/72) and bovine IL-18 pCDNA plasmids and evaluated in cattle. Four groups of calves each group containing six calves were vaccinated with 200μg of plasmid DNA vaccine P1-2A-3CpCDNA, P1-2A-3CpCDNA+ bIL-18pCDNA and inactivated vaccine respectively where as fourth group was unvaccinated. P1-2A-3CpCDNA+bIL-18pCDNA vaccinated animals have shown higher levels of neutralizing antibodies and specific T-cell proliferation responses. Higher levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were observed in these animals. Similarly, IL-18 adjuvanted group has shown increased Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses. All the vaccinated animals were challenged with cattle adapted FMD homologous Asia1 virus two weeks after the booster dose. IL18 co administered DNA vaccine construct has protected four out of six animals challenged with homologous virus. PMID:27599937

  1. NhaP1 is a K+(Na+)/H+ antiporter required for growth and internal pH homeostasis of Vibrio cholerae at low extracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Matthew J.; Resch, Craig T.; Sun, Jonathan; Lind, Erin J.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae has adapted to a wide range of salinity, pH and osmotic conditions, enabling it to survive passage through the host and persist in the environment. Among the many proteins responsible for bacterial survival under these diverse conditions, we have identified Vc-NhaP1 as a K+(Na+)/H+ antiporter essential for V. cholerae growth at low environmental pH. Deletion of the V. cholerae nhaP1 gene caused growth inhibition when external potassium was either limited (100 mM and below) or in excess (400 mM and above). This growth defect was most apparent at mid-exponential phase, after 4–6 h of culture. Using a pH-sensitive GFP, cytosolic pH was shown to be dependent on K+ in acidic external conditions in a Vc-NhaP1-dependent manner. When functionally expressed in an antiporterless Escherichia coli strain and assayed in everted membrane vesicles, Vc-NhaP1 operated as an electroneutral alkali cation/proton antiporter, exchanging K+ or Na+ ions for H+ within a broad pH range (7.25–9.0). These data establish the putative V. cholerae NhaP1 protein as a functional K+(Na+)/H+ antiporter of the CPA1 family that is required for bacterial pH homeostasis and growth in an acidic environment. PMID:22241048

  2. Use of Labelled tLyP-1 as a Novel Ligand Targeting the NRP Receptor to Image Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hu-bing; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Quan-shi; Han, Yan-jian; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wen-lan; Li, Hong-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuropilin (NRP) receptors are overexpressed in glioma tumor tissue, and therefore may be a potential target for imaging markers. We investigated whether labelled tLyP-1, an NRP targeting peptide, could be used as the targeting ligand for developing reagents for imaging glioma tumors. Methods The tLyP-1 peptide (CGNKRTR) was labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) or 18F-fluoride. A control peptide (MAQKTSH) was also labeled with FAM. The in vitro binding between FAM-tLyP-1 and U87MG cells and in vivo biodistribution of FAM-tLyP-1 in a U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model (nude mouse) were determined. The in vivo biodistribution of 18F-tLyP-1 was also determined by microPET/CT. Results In vitro, FAM-tLyP-1 was strongly taken up by U87MG cells at very low concentrations (1μM). In vivo, FAM-tLyP-1 accumulated in glioma (U87MG) tumors, but uptake was minimal in the normal brain tissue 1 h after administration. The distribution of FAM-tLyP-1 in the tumor tissue was consistent with expression of NRP1. The tumor/brain fluorescence intensity ratio in mice treated with FAM-tLyP-1 was significantly higher than the control FAM-labeled peptide 1 h after administration (3.44 ± 0.83 vs. 1.32 ± 0.15; t = 5.547, P = 0.001). Uptake of FAM-tLyP-1 in glioma tumors could be blocked by administering an excess of non-conjugated tLyP-1 peptide. [Lys4] tLyP-1 was labeled with 18F to synthesis a PET (18F-tLyP-1). MicroPET/CT imaging showed the tumor was visualized clearly with a high tumor/brain radiolabel ratio at 60 min (2.69 ± 0.52) and 120 min (3.11±0.25). Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that tLyP-1 could be developed as a novel fluorescent or radio labelled tracer for imaging glioma. PMID:26398657

  3. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in endothelial cells by S1P1 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Tölle, M; Klöckl, L; Wiedon, A; Zidek, W; van der Giet, M; Schuchardt, M

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Lysophospholipid interaction with sphingosine 1-phosphat (S1P) receptors results in eNOS activation in different cells. In endothelial cells, eNOS activation via S1P1 or S1P3 was shown controversially. The aim of this study is to investigate the meaning of both S1P receptors for eNOS activation in human endothelial cells. Therefore, several S1P1 and S1P3 agonists in combination with antagonists and specific RNAi approach were used. eNOS activation was measured in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) via DAF2-DA-based fluorescence microscopy. For investigation of the signaling pathway, agonists/antagonist studies, RNAi approach, Luminex™ multiplex, and Western Blot were used. In HUVEC, both the S1P1 agonist AUY954 as well as the S1P1,3 agonist FTY720P induced eNOS activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Other S1P1 agonists activated eNOS to a lesser extent. The AUY954-induced eNOS activation was blocked by the S1P1 antagonist W146, the combination of W146 and the S1P3 antagonist CAY10444 and the S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by CAY10444 indicating the meaning of S1P1 for the AUY954-induced eNOS activation. The FTY720P-induced eNOS activation was blocked only by the combination of W146 and CAY10444 and the combined S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by W146 or CAY10444 indicating the importance of both S1P1 and S1P3 for FTY720-induced eNOS activation. These results were confirmed using specific siRNA against S1P1 and S1P3. The S1P1,3 activation results in Akt phosphorylation and subsequent activation of eNOS via phosphorylation at serine(1177) and dephosphorylation at threonine(495). Beside former investigations with rather unspecific S1P receptor activation these data show potent selective S1P1 activation by using AUY954 and with selective S1P receptor inhibition evidence was provided that both S1P1 and S1P3 lead to downstream activation of eNOS in

  4. Angular dependent light emission from planar waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Jaison; Prabhu, Radhakrishna; Radhakrishnan, P.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-01-07

    We have investigated the angular dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and laser emission from an asymmetric and free-standing polymer thin films doped with rhodamine 6G, which is transversely pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A semi-leaky waveguide or quasi-waveguide structure has been developed by spin coating technique. In these waveguides, the light was confined by the film/air-film/glass substrate interfaces. At the film/substrate interface, a portion of light will reflect back into the film (guided mode) and the remaining refracted to the substrate resulting in cutoff modes. A blue-shift in ASE has been observed when the pump power was increased from 8 to 20 mW allowing a limited range of tuning of emission wavelength. To study the directionality of the ASE from the waveguide, we have measured the output intensity and FWHM of emission spectra as a function of viewing angle (θ) from the plane parallel to film. From the detailed examination of the output emission spectra, as +θ increases from 0° there has been an initial decrease in output intensity, but at a particular angle ≈10° an increase in output intensity was observed. This additional peak in output intensity as +θ is a clear indication of coexistence of the cutoff mode. We also present a compact solid-state laser based on leaky mode propagation from the dye-doped polymer free-standing film (∼50 μm thickness) waveguide. The partial reflections from the broad lateral surfaces of the free-standing films provided the optical feedback for the laser emission with high directionality. For a pump power of 22 mW, an intense line with FWHM <0.2 nm was observed at 578 nm.

  5. Anomalous photoluminescence in InP1‑xBix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiren; Pan, Wenwu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Liyao; Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Kai; Shao, Jun; Wang, Shumin

    2016-06-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from InP1‑xBix thin films with Bi concentrations in the 0–2.49% range reveals anomalous spectral features with strong and very broad (linewidth of 700 nm) PL signals compared to other bismide alloys. Multiple transitions are observed and their energy levels are found much smaller than the band-gap measured from absorption measurements. These transitions are related to deep levels confirmed by deep level transient spectroscopy, which effectively trap free holes and enhance radiative recombination. The broad luminescence feature is beneficial for making super-luminescence diodes, which can theoretically enhance spatial resolution beyond 1 μm in optical coherent tomography (OCT).

  6. The P1-RKDG method for two-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1991-01-01

    A class of nonlinearly stable Runge-Kutta local projection discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) finite element methods for conservation laws is investigated. Two dimensional Euler equations for gas dynamics are solved using P1 elements. The generalization of the local projections, which for scalar nonlinear conservation laws was designed to satisfy a local maximum principle, to systems of conservation laws such as the Euler equations of gas dynamics using local characteristic decompositions is discussed. Numerical examples include the standard regular shock reflection problem, the forward facing step problem, and the double Mach reflection problem. These preliminary numerical examples are chosen to show the capacity of the approach to obtain nonlinearly stable results comparable with the modern nonoscillatory finite difference methods.

  7. Structural characterization of P1′-diversified urea-based inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II

    PubMed Central

    Pavlicek, Jiri; Ptacek, Jakub; Cerny, Jiri; Byun, Youngjoo; Skultetyova, Lubica; Pomper, Martin G.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Barinka, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Urea-based inhibitors of human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) have advanced into clinical trials for imaging metastatic prostate cancer. In parallel efforts, agents with increased lipophilicity have been designed and evaluated for targeting GCPII residing within the neuraxis. Here we report the structural and computational characterization of six complexes between GCPII and P1′-diversified urea-based inhibitors that have the C-terminal glutamate replaced by more hydrophobic moieties. The X-ray structures are complemented by quantum mechanics calculations that provide a quantitative insight into the GCPII/inhibitor interactions. These data can be used for the rational design of novel glutamate-free GCPII inhibitors with tailored physicochemical properties. PMID:24731280

  8. P1 plasmid replication: measurement of initiator protein concentration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Swack, J A; Pal, S K; Mason, R J; Abeles, A L; Chattoraj, D K

    1987-01-01

    To study the functions of the mini-P1 replication initiation protein RepA quantitatively, we have developed a method to measure RepA concentration by using immunoblotting. In vivo, there are about 20 RepA dimers per unit-copy plasmid DNA. RepA was deduced to be a dimer from gel filtration of the purified protein. Since there are 14 binding sites of the protein per replicon, the physiological concentration of the protein appears to be sufficiently low to be a rate-limiting factor for replication. Autoregulation is apparently responsible for the low protein level; at the physiological concentration of the protein, the repA promoter retains only 0.1% of its full activity as determined by gene fusions to lacZ. When the concentration is further decreased by a factor of 3 or increased by a factor of 40, replication is no longer detectable. Images PMID:3611028

  9. MicroRNA Regulating Glutathione S-Transferase P1 in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Savita; Shukla, Girish C; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), an enzyme involved in detoxification process, is frequently inactivated in prostate cancer due to epigenetic modifications. Through in silico analysis we identified a subset of miRNAs that are putative targets in regulating GSTP1. miRNAs are small endogenous non-coding RNA that are critical regulators of various physiologic and pathologic processes and their level of expression may play a precise role in early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. These small molecules have been detected in a wide variety of human biological specimens including blood, serum, urine, ejaculate and tissues, which could be utilized as clinically useful biomarker in early detection and prognosis of prostate cancer. The chapter summarizes the current knowledge about miRNA involved in GSTP1 regulation in prostate cancer and their potential as useful biomarkers of disease for early detection and prognosis, along with challenges and limitations in this development. PMID:25774339

  10. Anomalous photoluminescence in InP1−xBix

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiren; Pan, Wenwu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Liyao; Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Kai; Shao, Jun; Wang, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from InP1−xBix thin films with Bi concentrations in the 0–2.49% range reveals anomalous spectral features with strong and very broad (linewidth of 700 nm) PL signals compared to other bismide alloys. Multiple transitions are observed and their energy levels are found much smaller than the band-gap measured from absorption measurements. These transitions are related to deep levels confirmed by deep level transient spectroscopy, which effectively trap free holes and enhance radiative recombination. The broad luminescence feature is beneficial for making super-luminescence diodes, which can theoretically enhance spatial resolution beyond 1 μm in optical coherent tomography (OCT). PMID:27291823

  11. Progress towards measuring the 2S1 / 2 to 2P1 / 2 interval in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, A. C.; Bezginov, N.; Ferchichi, I.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-05-01

    There is a large discrepancy between the CODATA value for the proton charge radius, and its determinations from muonic hydrogen measurements. This discrepancy is referred to as the proton radius puzzle. Improved measurements on atomic hydrogen can elucidate the origins of this discrepancy. We have constructed an experiment to measure the Lamb shift (n = 2 ,S1 / 2 -->P1 / 2) in a fast beam of atomic hydrogen. Using a novel separated-oscillatory-fields method and high signal-to-noise ratio detection, we can measure the center of this transition with a statistical uncertainty approaching 10-5 of its natural linewidth. We report on our studies of systematic effects, and on our progress towards a new measurement of the proton charge radius. We acknowledge funding from NSERC, CFI, CRC, ORF, and NIST.

  12. As-built design specification for P1A software system modified display subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, C. L.; Story, A. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    This document contains the design of the proportional estimate processor which was written to satisfy the software requirement of Part A of the P1A experiment. The purposes of the project are: (1) to select the dots to be labelled; (2) to create tables of green numbers and brightness values for all selected dots per acquisition; (3) to create scatter plots of green numbers vs brightness for each acquisition for all selected dots. If labels have been provided then scatter plots of only categories of interest can be optionally produced; and (4) to produce trajectory plots of green number vs brightness at differing acquisition times for each dot. These plots need to be in the same order as the list of selected dots. When labels are provided only plots of dots of categories of interest are to be produced.

  13. Final report on pilot comparison of low intensity shock APMP.AUV.V-P1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Hu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    This is the final report for pilot comparison APMP.AUV.V-P1 in the area of low-intensity 'shock', which in this case means monopole and dipole shock acceleration. The aim of this comparison was to measure the shock voltage sensitivity of one Accelerometer Chain with primary means under monopole shock excitation in the acceleration range from 500 m/s2 to 5 000 m/s2, and under dipole shock excitation with the reference acceleration of 1000 m/s2 and pulse duration from 0.03 ms to 2.0 ms. Four laboratories with primary shock calibration capability have participated in the comparison with National Institute of Metrology, P R China as pilot lab. One standard accelerometer of back-to-back type with a charge amplifier (Accelerometer Chain) was circulated among the participants. The pilot comparison reference values have been calculated using the weighted mean value of the results. The degrees of equivalence calculated from the data submitted by the four laboratories, support the uncertainty of measurement reported by them for the calibration of the shock sensitivities of accelerometer. At the reference acceleration of 1 000 m/s2 and pulse duration of 2 ms (specified in ISO 16063-13:2001), the participating laboratories calibrated the Accelerometer Chain with their claimed relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2), the smallest of which equal to 0.5%, i.e. smaller than the limit specified by the ISO standard. The completion of APMP.AUV.V-P1 can serve as part of the basis for a planned key comparison targeted at low intensity shock range at CC level. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV.

  14. SPITZER IRAC SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF THE TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANET HAT-P-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen; Deming, Drake; Harrington, Jospeph; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bowman, William C.; Nymeyer, Sarah; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Bakos, Gaspar A.

    2010-01-01

    We report Spitzer/IRAC photometry of the transiting giant exoplanet HAT-P-1b during its secondary eclipse. This planet lies near the postulated boundary between the pM and pL-class of hot Jupiters, and is important as a test of models for temperature inversions in hot Jupiter atmospheres. We derive eclipse depths for HAT-P-1b, in units of the stellar flux, that are: 0.080% +- 0.008% [3.6 mum], 0.135% +- 0.022% [4.5 mum], 0.203% +- 0.031% [5.8 mum], and 0.238% +- 0.040% [8.0 mum]. These values are best fit using an atmosphere with a modest temperature inversion, intermediate between the archetype inverted atmosphere (HD 209458b) and a model without an inversion. The observations also suggest that this planet is radiating a large fraction of the available stellar irradiance on its dayside, with little available for redistribution by circulation. This planet has sometimes been speculated to be inflated by tidal dissipation, based on its large radius in discovery observations, and on a non-zero orbital eccentricity allowed by the radial velocity data. The timing of the secondary eclipse is very sensitive to orbital eccentricity, and we find that the central phase of the eclipse is 0.4999 +- 0.0005. The difference between the expected and observed phase indicates that the orbit is close to circular, with a 3sigma limit of |e cos omega| < 0.002.

  15. Structural analysis of Der p 1-antibody complexes and comparison with complexes of proteins or peptides with monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Osinski, Tomasz; Pomés, Anna; Majorek, Karolina A.; Glesner, Jill; Offermann, Lesa R.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Chapman, Martin D.; Minor, Wladek; Chruszcz, Maksymilian

    2015-01-01

    Der p 1 is a major allergen from the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus that belongs to the papain-like cysteine protease family. To investigate the antigenic determinants of Der p 1, we determined two crystal structures of Der p 1 in complex with the Fab fragments of mAbs 5H8 or 10B9. Epitopes for these two Der p 1-specific antibodies are located in different, non-overlapping parts of the Der p 1 molecule. Nevertheless, surface area and identity of the amino acid residues involved in hydrogen bonds between allergen and antibody are similar. The epitope for mAb 10B9 only, showed a partial overlap with the previously reported epitope for mAb 4C1, a cross-reactive mAb that binds Der p 1 and its homolog Der f 1 from D. farinae. Upon binding to Der p 1, the Fab fragment of mAb 10B9 was found to form a very rare alpha-helix in its third CDR of the heavy chain. In order to provide an overview of the surface properties of the interfaces formed by the complexes of Der p 1-10B9 and Der p 1-5H8, along with the complexes of 4C1 with Der p 1 and Der f 1, a broad analysis of the surfaces and hydrogen bonds of all complexes of Fab-protein or Fab-peptide was performed. This work provides detailed insight into the cross-reactive and specific allergen-antibody interactions in Group 1 mite allergens. The surface data of Fab-protein and Fab-peptide interfaces can be used in the design of less potent conformational epitopes for immunotherapy. PMID:26026055

  16. Angular magnetoresistance in semiconducting undoped amorphous carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, Rizwan Ur Rehman; Saleemi, Awais Siddique; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of undoped amorphous carbon thin film were fabricated by using Chemical Vapor Deposition and their structure was investigated by using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Angular magnetoresistance (MR) has been observed for the first time in these undoped amorphous carbon thin films in temperature range of 2 ˜ 40 K. The maximum magnitude of angular MR was in the range of 9.5% ˜ 1.5% in 2 ˜ 40 K. The origin of this angular MR was also discussed.

  17. How orbital angular momentum affects beam shifts in optical reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Merano, M.; Hermosa, N.; Woerdman, J. P.; Aiello, A.

    2010-08-15

    It is well known that reflection of a Gaussian light beam (TEM{sub 00}) by a planar dielectric interface leads to four beam shifts when compared to the geometrical-optics prediction. These are the spatial Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift, the angular GH shift, the spatial Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shift, and the angular IF shift. We report here, theoretically and experimentally, that endowing the beam with orbital angular momentum leads to coupling of these four shifts; this is described by a 4x4 mixing matrix.

  18. Angular momentum evolution during star and planetary system formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Claire L.; Greaves, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    We focused on analysing the role played by protoplanetary disks in the evolution of angular momentum during star formation. If all the angular momentum contained within collapsing pre-stellar cores was conserved during their formation, proto-stars would reach rotation rates exceeding their break-up velocities before they reached the main sequence (Bodenheimer 1995). In order to avoid this occuring, methods by which proto-stars can lose angular momentum must exist. Angular momentum can be transferred from star to disk via stellar magnetic field lines through a process called magnetic braking (Camenzind 1990; Königl 1991). Alternatively, the stellar angular momentum can be lost from the star-disk system entirely via stellar- or disk-winds (e.g. Pelletier & Pudritz 1992; Matt & Pudritz 2005). The proportion of lost stellar angular momentum retained within the protoplanetary disk is important to studies of planetary system formation. If the bulk motion within the disk remains Keplerian, any increase of angular momentum in the disk causes an outward migration of disk material and an expansion of the disk. Therefore, an increase in disk angular momentum may cause a reduction in the disk surface density, often used to indicate the disk's ability to form planets. We made use of multi-wavelength data available in the literature to directly calculate the stellar and disk angular momenta for two nearby regions of star formation. Namely, these were the densely populated and highly irradiated Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the comparitively sparse Taurus-Auriga region. Due to the limited size of the ONC dataset, we produced an average surface density profile for the region. We modelled the stars as solid body rotators due to their fully convective nature (Krishnamurthi et al. 1997) and assumed the disks are flat and undergo Keplerian rotation about the same rotation axis as the star. We observed the older disks within each of the two star forming regions to be preferentially

  19. Angular vibrations of cryogenically cooled double-crystal monochromators.

    PubMed

    Sergueev, I; Döhrmann, R; Horbach, J; Heuer, J

    2016-09-01

    The effect of angular vibrations of the crystals in cryogenically cooled monochromators on the beam performance has been studied theoretically and experimentally. A simple relation between amplitude of the vibrations and size of the focused beam is developed. It is shown that the double-crystal monochromator vibrations affect not only the image size but also the image position along the optical axis. Several methods to measure vibrations with the X-ray beam are explained and analyzed. The methods have been applied to systematically study angular crystal vibrations at monochromators installed at the PETRA III light source. Characteristic values of the amplitudes of angular vibrations for different monochromators are presented. PMID:27577762

  20. Electro-optic analyzer of angular momentum hyperentanglement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziwen; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing a high-dimensional entanglement is fundamental in quantum information applications. Here, we propose a theoretical scheme to analyze and characterize the angular momentum hyperentanglement that two photons are entangled simultaneously in spin and orbital angular momentum. Based on the electro-optic sampling with a proposed hyper-entanglement analyzer and the simple matrix operation using Cramer rule, our simulations show that it is possible to retrieve effectively both the information about the degree of polarization entanglement and the spiral spectrum of high-dimensional orbital angular momentum entanglement. PMID:26911530

  1. Angular magnetoresistance in semiconducting undoped amorphous carbon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Rizwan Ur Rehman; Saleemi, Awais Siddique; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-05-07

    Thin films of undoped amorphous carbon thin film were fabricated by using Chemical Vapor Deposition and their structure was investigated by using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Angular magnetoresistance (MR) has been observed for the first time in these undoped amorphous carbon thin films in temperature range of 2 ∼ 40 K. The maximum magnitude of angular MR was in the range of 9.5% ∼ 1.5% in 2 ∼ 40 K. The origin of this angular MR was also discussed.

  2. Electro-optic analyzer of angular momentum hyperentanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziwen; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-02-01

    Characterizing a high-dimensional entanglement is fundamental in quantum information applications. Here, we propose a theoretical scheme to analyze and characterize the angular momentum hyperentanglement that two photons are entangled simultaneously in spin and orbital angular momentum. Based on the electro-optic sampling with a proposed hyper-entanglement analyzer and the simple matrix operation using Cramer rule, our simulations show that it is possible to retrieve effectively both the information about the degree of polarization entanglement and the spiral spectrum of high-dimensional orbital angular momentum entanglement.

  3. Detection of a spinning object using light's orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Martin P J; Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M; Padgett, Miles J

    2013-08-01

    The linear Doppler shift is widely used to infer the velocity of approaching objects, but this shift does not detect rotation. By analyzing the orbital angular momentum of the light scattered from a spinning object, we observed a frequency shift proportional to product of the rotation frequency of the object and the orbital angular momentum of the light. This rotational frequency shift was still present when the angular momentum vector was parallel to the observation direction. The multiplicative enhancement of the frequency shift may have applications for the remote detection of rotating bodies in both terrestrial and astronomical settings. PMID:23908234

  4. Electro-optic analyzer of angular momentum hyperentanglement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziwen; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing a high-dimensional entanglement is fundamental in quantum information applications. Here, we propose a theoretical scheme to analyze and characterize the angular momentum hyperentanglement that two photons are entangled simultaneously in spin and orbital angular momentum. Based on the electro-optic sampling with a proposed hyper-entanglement analyzer and the simple matrix operation using Cramer rule, our simulations show that it is possible to retrieve effectively both the information about the degree of polarization entanglement and the spiral spectrum of high-dimensional orbital angular momentum entanglement. PMID:26911530

  5. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  6. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  7. Scanning Twyman interferometer for measuring small angular displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Tong, Yue

    2011-05-01

    We present a simple but effective method for measuring small angular displacement based on a scanning Twyman interferometer ,in which, one of the two mirrors is mounted on the piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) droved by saw-tooth voltage, the status of interference fringes changes from static to dynamic. A photoelectric detector detects this dynamic photo-signal and changes into electronic signal. The signal is inputted into an oscillograph. The oscillogram will present interference crests. The method for measuring small angular displacement is based on the linear relation between the angular displacement and the crest shift on the oscillogram.

  8. Generation and detection of orbital angular momentum via metasurface.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinjin; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Hui; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Beams carrying orbital angular momentum possess a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. In this paper, we theoretically design and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact array of elliptical nanoholes, which could convert the circularly polarized light into the cross-polarized vortex beam. To measure the topological charges of orbital angular momentum in a simple manner, another elliptical nanoholes array is designed to generate reference beam as a reference light. This approach may provide a new way for the generation and detection of orbital angular momentum in a compact device. PMID:27052796

  9. Generation and detection of orbital angular momentum via metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jinjin; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Hui; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-04-01

    Beams carrying orbital angular momentum possess a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. In this paper, we theoretically design and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact array of elliptical nanoholes, which could convert the circularly polarized light into the cross-polarized vortex beam. To measure the topological charges of orbital angular momentum in a simple manner, another elliptical nanoholes array is designed to generate reference beam as a reference light. This approach may provide a new way for the generation and detection of orbital angular momentum in a compact device.

  10. Turbulent equipartition and homogenization of plasma angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gürcan, O D; Diamond, P H; Hahm, T S

    2008-04-01

    A physical model of turbulent equipartition (TEP) of plasma angular momentum is developed. We show that using a simple, model insensitive ansatz of conservation of total angular momentum, a TEP pinch of angular momentum can be obtained. We note that this term corresponds to a part of the pinch velocity previously calculated using quasilinear gyrokinetic theory. We observe that the nondiffusive TEP flux is inward, and therefore may explain the peakedness of the rotation profiles observed in certain experiments. Similar expressions for linear toroidal momentum and flow are computed and it is noted that there is an additional effect due the radial profile of moment of inertia density. PMID:18517961

  11. Angular resolution of air-shower array-telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A fundamental limit on the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes is set by the finite number of shower particles coupled with the finite thickness of the particle swarm. Consequently the angular resolution which can be achieved in practice depends in a determinant manner on the size and number of detectors in an array-telescope, as well as on the detector separation and the timing resolution. It is also necessary to examine the meaning of particle density in whatever type of detector is used. Results are given which can be used to predict the angular resolution of a given instrument for showers of various sizes, and to compare different instruments.

  12. Indirect precise angular control using four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Yun-Kun

    2014-04-28

    Here, we show indirect precise angular control using a four-wave mixing (FWM) process. This was performed with a superposition of light with orbital angular momentum in an M-Type configuration of a hot {sup 85}Rb atomic ensemble. A gear-shaped interference pattern is observed at FWM light with a donut-shaped input signal. The gear could be rotated and is controlled through the change of the polarization of the pump laser. Our experimental results that are based on nonlinear coherent interactions have applications in image processing and precise angular control.

  13. Generation and detection of orbital angular momentum via metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jinjin; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Hui; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Beams carrying orbital angular momentum possess a significant potential for modern optical technologies ranging from classical and quantum communication to optical manipulation. In this paper, we theoretically design and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact array of elliptical nanoholes, which could convert the circularly polarized light into the cross-polarized vortex beam. To measure the topological charges of orbital angular momentum in a simple manner, another elliptical nanoholes array is designed to generate reference beam as a reference light. This approach may provide a new way for the generation and detection of orbital angular momentum in a compact device. PMID:27052796

  14. 64Cu-Labeled LyP-1-Dendrimer for PET-CT Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to detect and quantify macrophage accumulation can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information for atherosclerotic plaque. We have previously shown that LyP-1, a cyclic 9-amino acid peptide, binds to p32 proteins on activated macrophages, facilitating the visualization of atherosclerotic plaque with PET. Yet, the in vivo plaque accumulation of monomeric [18F]FBA-LyP-1 was low (0.31 ± 0.05%ID/g). To increase the avidity of LyP-1 constructs to p32, we synthesized a dendritic form of LyP-1 on solid phase using lysine as the core structural element. Imaging probes (FAM or 6-BAT) were conjugated to a lysine or cysteine on the dendrimer for optical and PET studies. The N-terminus of the dendrimer was further modified with an aminooxy group in order to conjugate LyP-1 and ARAL peptides bearing a ketone. Oxime ligation of peptides to both dendrimers resulted in (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimers with optical (FAM) and PET probes (6-BAT). For PET-CT studies, (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimer-6-BAT were labeled with 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 h) and intravenously injected into the atherosclerotic (ApoE–/–) mice. After two hours of circulation, PET-CT coregistered images demonstrated greater uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu in the aortic root and descending aorta. Ex vivo images and the biodistribution acquired at three hours after injection also demonstrated a significantly higher uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu (1.1 ± 0.26%ID/g) than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu (0.22 ± 0.05%ID/g) in the aorta. Similarly, subcutaneous injection of the LyP-1-dendrimeric carriers resulted in preferential accumulation in plaque-containing regions over 24 h. In the same model system, ex vivo fluorescence images within aortic plaque depict an increased accumulation and penetration of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-FAM as compared to the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-FAM. Taken together, the results suggest that the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer can be applied for in

  15. FoxP1 marks medium spiny neurons from precursors to maturity and is required for their differentiation.

    PubMed

    Precious, S V; Kelly, C M; Reddington, A E; Vinh, N N; Stickland, R C; Pekarik, V; Scherf, C; Jeyasingham, R; Glasbey, J; Holeiter, M; Jones, L; Taylor, M V; Rosser, A E

    2016-08-01

    Identifying the steps involved in striatal development is important both for understanding the striatum in health and disease, and for generating protocols to differentiate striatal neurons for regenerative medicine. The most prominent neuronal subtype in the adult striatum is the medium spiny projection neuron (MSN), which constitutes more than 85% of all striatal neurons and classically expresses DARPP-32. Through a microarray study of genes expressed in the whole ganglionic eminence (WGE: the developing striatum) in the mouse, we identified the gene encoding the transcription factor Forkhead box protein P1 (FoxP1) as the most highly up-regulated gene, thus providing unbiased evidence for the association of FoxP1 with MSN development. We also describe the expression of FoxP1 in the human fetal brain over equivalent gestational stages. FoxP1 expression persisted through into adulthood in the mouse brain, where it co-localised with all striatal DARPP-32 positive projection neurons and a small population of DARPP-32 negative cells. There was no co-localisation of FoxP1 with any interneuron markers. FoxP1 was detectable in primary fetal striatal cells following dissection, culture, and transplantation into the adult lesioned striatum, demonstrating its utility as an MSN marker for transplantation studies. Furthermore, DARPP-32 expression was absent from FoxP1 knock-out mouse WGE differentiated in vitro, suggesting that FoxP1 is important for the development of DARPP-32-positive MSNs. In summary, we show that FoxP1 labels MSN precursors prior to the expression of DARPP-32 during normal development, and in addition suggest that FoxP1 labels a sub-population of MSNs that are not co-labelled by DARPP-32. We demonstrate the utility of FoxP1 to label MSNs in vitro and following neural transplantation, and show that FoxP1 is required for DARPP-32 positive MSN differentiation in vitro. PMID:27154297

  16. Mini-PEG spacering of VAP-1-targeting 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 peptide improves PET imaging of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an adhesion molecule that plays a key role in recruiting leucocytes into sites of inflammation. We have previously shown that 68Gallium-labelled VAP-1-targeting peptide (68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1) is a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent, capable of visualising inflammation in rats, but disadvantaged by its short metabolic half-life and rapid clearance. We hypothesised that prolonging the metabolic half-life of 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 could further improve its imaging characteristics. In this study, we evaluated a new analogue of 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 modified with a mini-polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer (68Ga-DOTAVAP-PEG-P1) for in vivo imaging of inflammation. Methods Whole-body distribution kinetics and visualisation of inflammation in a rat model by the peptides 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 and 68Ga-DOTAVAP-PEG-P1 were evaluated in vivo by dynamic PET imaging and ex vivo by measuring the radioactivity of excised tissues. In addition, plasma samples were analysed by radio-HPLC for the in vivo stability of the peptides. Results The peptide with the mini-PEG spacer showed slower renal excretion but similar liver uptake as the original peptide. At 60 min after injection, the standardised uptake value of the inflammation site was 0.33 ± 0.07 for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 and 0.53 ± 0.01 for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-PEG-P1 by PET. In addition, inflammation-to-muscle ratios were 6.7 ± 1.3 and 7.3 ± 2.1 for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 and 68Ga-DOTAVAP-PEG-P1, respectively. The proportion of unchanged peptide in circulation at 60 min after injection was significantly higher for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-PEG-P1 (76%) than for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 (19%). Conclusion The eight-carbon mini-PEG spacer prolonged the metabolic half-life of the 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 peptide, leading to higher target-to-background ratios and improved in vivo PET imaging of inflammation. PMID:22214508

  17. Thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR: automatable amplification and sequencing of insert end fragments from P1 and YAC clones for chromosome walking

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yao-Guang; Whittier, R.F.

    1995-02-10

    Isolation of DNA segments adjacent to known sequences is a tedious task in genome-related research. We have developed an efficient PCR strategy that overcomes the shortcomings of existing methods and can be automated. This strategy, thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR, utilizes nested sequence-specific primers together with a shorter arbitrary degenerate primer so that the relative amplification efficiencies of specific and nonspecific products can be thermally controlled. One low-stringency PCR cycle is carried out to create annealing site(s) adapted for the arbitrary primer within the unknown target sequence bordering the known segment. This sequence is then preferentially and geometrically amplified over nontarget ones by interspersion of high-stringency PCR cycles with reduced-stringency PCR cycles. We have exploited the efficiency of this method to expedite amplification and sequencing of insert end segments from P1 and YAC clones for chromosome walking. In this study we present protocols that are amenable to automation of amplification and sequencing of insert end sequences directly from cells of P1 and YAC clones. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Micrococcin P1, a naturally occurring macrocyclic peptide inhibiting hepatitis C virus entry in a pan-genotypic manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungeun; Yang, Jaewon; Park, Sanghyun; Jo, Eunji; Kim, Hee-Young; Bae, Yong-Soo; Windisch, Marc P

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health concern worldwide. Despite recent advances in curing chronic hepatitis C, unmet medical needs still remain, especially due to the high economic burden of therapies. Accordingly, our study aimed to identify affordable novel HCV inhibitors by screening of natural product compound libraries. We identified micrococcin P1, a macrocyclic peptide antibiotic, inhibiting HCV entry in a pan-genotypic manner with an EC50 range of 0.1-0.5 μM. Micrococcin P1 interfered with HCV entry at an attachment step. Furthermore, micrococcin P1 efficiently inhibited HCV spread by blocking cell-free infection as well as cell-to-cell transmission, without affecting the secretion of infectious virions. Interestingly, the putative molecular target of micrococcin P1 is glycoprotein E2 (IIe-630-Thr), as revealed by selection for viral drug resistance. In addition, micrococcin P1 inhibited sofosbuvir-resistant HCV strains and showed synergy in combination with selected HCV drugs, suggesting an alternative treatment paradigm for patients. In conclusion, we identified micrococcin P1 as specifically inhibiting entry of all HCV genotypes and demonstrated that micrococcin P1 potentially could add value to therapies in combination with current HCV interventions. PMID:27387825

  19. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  20. Lateral Magnification-Angular Magnification Relationship for a Simple Magnifier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Michael P.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the lateral magnification-angular magnification relationship in the case of a simple magnifying lens. This discussion intends to show how the relationship can be treated in undergraduate optics courses as well as in many general physics courses. (HM)

  1. Two-color ghost imaging with enhanced angular resolving power

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Sanjit; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-03-15

    This article reports an experimental demonstration on nondegenerate, two-color, biphoton ghost imaging which reproduced a ghost image with enhanced angular resolving power by means of a greater field of view compared with that of classical imaging. With the same imaging magnification, the enhanced angular resolving power and field of view compared with those of classical imaging are 1.25:1 and 1.16:1, respectively. The enhancement of angular resolving power depends on the ratio between the idler and the signal photon frequencies, and the enhancement of the field of view depends mainly on the same ratio and also on the distances of the object plane and the imaging lens from the two-photon source. This article also reports the possibility of reproducing a ghost image with the enhancement of the angular resolving power by means of a greater imaging amplification compared with that of classical imaging.

  2. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-09-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics classrooms, the direction of an angular velocity vector is taught by the right-hand rule, a mnemonic tool intended to aid memory. A setup constructed for instructional purposes may provide students with a more easily understood and concrete method to observe the direction of the angular velocity. This article attempts to demonstrate the angular velocity vector using the observable motion of a screw mounted to a remotely operated toy car.

  3. Angular Momentum Evolution of Young Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amard, Louis; Palacios, Ana; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    We present stellar evolution models of young solar-type stars including self consistent treatment of rotational mixing and extraction of angular momentum (AM) by magnetized wind including the most up-to-date physic of AM transport.

  4. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  5. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; McElwaine, J. N.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

  6. Grating angle magnification enhanced angular sensor and scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ke-Xun (Inventor); Byer, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An angular magnification effect of diffraction is exploited to provide improved sensing and scanning. This effect is most pronounced for a normal or near-normal incidence angle in combination with a grazing diffraction angle, so such configurations are preferred. Angular sensitivity can be further enhanced because the width of the diffracted beam can be substantially less than the width of the incident beam. Normal incidence configurations with two symmetric diffracted beams are preferred, since rotation and vertical displacement can be readily distinguished. Increased sensitivity to vertical displacement can be provided by incorporating an interferometer into the measurement system. Quad cell detectors can be employed to provide sensitivity to rotation about the grating surface normal. A 2-D grating can be employed to provide sensitivity to angular displacements in two different planes (e.g., pitch and yaw). Combined systems can provide sensitivity to vertical displacement and to all three angular degrees of freedom.

  7. Differential reflective fiber-optic angular displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Mingguang; Min, Rui; Zhong, Zhi; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yabin

    2015-05-01

    Using the characteristic that the distance apart between the emitting fiber and receiving fiber only shifts the angular-power curve, a differential reflective fiber-optic sensor for angular displacement measurement is presented through subtraction of two power signals from two receiving fibers placed on both sides of one emitting fiber. A theoretical model is established to characterize the performance of the differential reflective fiber-optic angular displacement sensor. The measurements made indicate that the general behavior of the experimental results agrees with that of the theoretical results, and the sensor can improve sensitivity by about 120%, resulting in the significant improvement of anti-interference capability, which will be more suitable for high accuracy bipolar absolute angular displacement measurement. Design guidelines are also suggested to achieve desired sensor performances.

  8. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  9. Comparison of Ramsauer and Optical Model Neutron Angular Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    McNabb, D P; Anderson, J D; Bauer, R W; Dietrich, F S; Grimes, S M; Hagmann, C A

    2004-04-20

    In a recent paper it has been shown that the nuclear Ramsauer model does not do well in representing details of the angular distribution of neutron elastic scattering for incident energies of less than 60 MeV for {sup 208}Pb. We show that the default angular bin dispersion most widely used in Monte Carlo transport codes is such that the observed differences in angular shapes are on too fine a scale to affect transport calculations. The effect of increasing the number of Monte Carlo angle bins is studied to determine the dispersion necessary for calculations to be sensitive to the observed discrepancies in angular distributions. We also show that transport calculations are sensitive to differences in the elastic scattering cross section given by recent fits of {sup 208}Pb data compared with older fits.

  10. Effect of angular momentum conservation on hydrodynamic simulations of colloids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Theers, Mario; Hu, Jinglei; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G; Ripoll, Marisol

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to most real fluids, angular momentum is not a locally conserved quantity in some mesoscopic simulation methods. Here we quantify the importance of this conservation in the flow fields associated with different colloidal systems. The flow field is analytically calculated with and without angular momentum conservation for the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method, and simulations are performed to verify the predictions. The flow field generated around a colloidal particle moving under an external force with slip boundary conditions depends on the conservation of angular momentum, and the amplitude of the friction force is substantially affected. Interestingly, no dependence on the angular momentum conservation is found for the flow fields generated around colloids under the influence of phoretic forces. Moreover, circular Couette flow between a no-slip and a slip cylinder is investigated, which allows us to validate one of the two existing expressions for the MPC stress tensor. PMID:26274301

  11. Design and Implementation of a Digital Angular Rate Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Feng; Peng, Zhen; Zhang, Fu-Xue

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of detecting the attitude of a rotating carrier, the paper presents a novel, digital angular rate sensor. The sensor consists of micro-sensing elements (gyroscope and accelerometer), signal processing circuit and micro-processor (DSP2812). The sensor has the feature of detecting three angular rates of a rotating carrier at the same time. The key techniques of the sensor, including sensing construction, sensing principles, and signal processing circuit design are presented. The test results show that the sensor can sense rolling, pitch and yaw angular rate at the same time and the measurement error of yaw (or pitch) angular rate and rolling rate of the rotating carrier is less than 0.5%. PMID:22163427

  12. Fabrication of the planar angular rotator using the CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ching-Liang; Chang, Chien-Liu; Chen, Hung-Lin; Chang, Pei-Zen

    2002-05-01

    In this investigation we propose a novel planar angular rotator fabricated by the conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. Following the 0.6 μm single poly triple metal (SPTM) CMOS process, the device is completed by a simple maskless, post-process etching step. The rotor of the planar angular rotator rotates around its geometric center with electrostatic actuation. The proposed design adopts an intelligent mechanism including the slider-crank system to permit simultaneous motion. The CMOS planar angular rotator could be driven with driving voltages of around 40 V. The design proposed here has a shorter response time and longer life, without problems of friction and wear, compared to the more common planar angular micromotor.

  13. The angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sobtka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.; Dines, E.L.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Schmitt, R.P.; Majka, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Griffin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Large fragment (A > 4) production at high angular momentum is studied via the reaction, 200 MeV /sup 45/Sc + /sup 65/Cu. Comparisons of the fragment yields from this reaction (high angular momentum) to those from /sup 93/Nb + Be (low angular momentum) are used to verify the strong angular momentum dependence of large fragment production predicted by equilibrium models. Details of the coincident ..gamma..-ray distributions not only confirm a rigidly rotating intermediate but also indicate that the widths of the primary L-wave distributions decrease with increasing symmetry in the decay channel. These data are used to test the asymmetry and L-wave dependence of emission barriers calculated from a rotating, finite range corrected, liquid drop model. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Coherent angular momentum states for the two-dimensional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, A. J.; McAnally, D. S.; Ódúndún, O. A.

    1987-02-01

    Coherent angular momentum states are defined for the two-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator. They share many attractive properties with the familiar (Cartesian) coherent states, but are in general distinct from those states. The probabilities of obtaining particular values for the radial and angular momentum quantum numbers follow independent Poisson distributions in the new states, but not in the old. In a quasiclassical description of the oscillator, corresponding to a given classical trajectory, the uncertainty in the angular momentum of the system is smaller if the new states are used rather than the old. The new states are the natural analogs of the coherent angular momentum states introduced for the three-dimensional oscillator by Bracken and Leemon [A. J. Bracken and H. I. Leemon, J. Math. Phys. 22, 719 (1981)].

  15. Neisseria meningitidis C:2b:P1.2,5 with Intermediate Resistance to Penicillin, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo; Ferreira, Eugénia

    2004-01-01

    For 1 year, serogroup, serotype, serosubtype, and penicillin susceptibility of meningococci circulating in various regions in Portugal were evaluated. Most frequent phenotypes were B:4:P1.15 (13.4%) and C:2b:P1.2,5 (75.9%), which are also common in Spain. Overall, 27.5% of C:2b:P1.2,5 strains showed intermediate resistance to penicillin. Laboratory-based surveillance of meningococcal infection in Portugal provides important information to assess the adequacy of public health measures. PMID:15109429

  16. Toroidal angular momentum transport with non-axisymmetric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, J.; Park, B. H.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we calculate the radial transport of the toroidal angular momentum in the presence of non-axisymmetric magnetic fields. It is shown that the radial transport of the toroidal angular momentum, R 2 ∇ ζ . V , is proportional to the first order of gyro-radius. This implies that the neoclassical toroidal viscosity caused by asymmetric magnetic fields can change the toroidal rotation significantly.

  17. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-01

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  18. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum and Exclusive Processes at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Ellinghaus, F.

    2006-11-17

    A first attempt for a model-dependent extraction of the orbital angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon has been made, based on HERMES data on exclusive processes and their description in terms of generalized parton distributions. An overview of the HERMES data on hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons (Deeply-Virtual Compton Scattering) and mesons is given, focusing on the measurements relevant to the extraction of quark orbital angular momentum.

  19. Alignment of angular velocity sensors for a vestibular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Digiovanna, Jack; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Micera, Silvestro; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular prosthetics transmit angular velocities to the nervous system via electrical stimulation. Head-fixed gyroscopes measure angular motion, but the gyroscope coordinate system will not be coincident with the sensory organs the prosthetic replaces. Here we show a simple calibration method to align gyroscope measurements with the anatomical coordinate system. We benchmarked the method with simulated movements and obtain proof-of-concept with one healthy subject. The method was robust to misalignment, required little data, and minimal processing. PMID:22329908

  20. Alignment of angular velocity sensors for a vestibular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular prosthetics transmit angular velocities to the nervous system via electrical stimulation. Head-fixed gyroscopes measure angular motion, but the gyroscope coordinate system will not be coincident with the sensory organs the prosthetic replaces. Here we show a simple calibration method to align gyroscope measurements with the anatomical coordinate system. We benchmarked the method with simulated movements and obtain proof-of-concept with one healthy subject. The method was robust to misalignment, required little data, and minimal processing. PMID:22329908

  1. Analysis of Flow Angularity Repeatability Tests in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive data base of flow angularity repeatability measurements from four NTF check standard model tests is analyzed for statistical consistency and to characterize the results for prediction of angle-of-attack uncertainty for customer tests. A procedure for quality assurance for flow angularity measurements during customer tests is also presented. The efficacy of the procedure is tested using results from a customer test.

  2. Duality between spatial and angular shift in optical reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, A.; Merano, M.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2009-12-15

    We report a unified representation of the spatial and angular Goos-Haenchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts that occur when a light beam reflects from a plane interface. We thus reveal the dual nature of spatial and angular shifts in optical beam reflection. In the Goos-Haenchen case we show theoretically and experimentally that this unification naturally arises in the context of reflection from a lossy surface (e.g., a metal).

  3. Adaptive spark control with knock detection

    SciTech Connect

    Boccadoro, V.; Kizer, T.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1981 RENIX has produced for RENAULT a digital ignition system with knock detection and advance correction capabilities. The knock detection uses the signal from a wide bank accelerometre mounted on the cylinder head. Good signal to noise ratio is obtained primarily through angular discrimination. RENIX's module technology leads to high performance to cost radio. The anti knock capability has now been included in RENAULT's latest engine control system to appear in the USA on MY 85. The presence of a powerful microprocessor allowed the development of an advanced control strategy which includes individual cylinder corrections and adaptive control. This is described together with the vehicle application at AMC.

  4. Angular Impulse and Balance Regulation During the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Travis J; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to determine how skilled players regulate linear and angular impulse while maintaining balance during the golf swing. Eleven highly-skilled golf players performed swings with a 6-iron and driver. Components contributing to linear and angular impulse generated by the rear and target legs (resultant horizontal reaction force [RFh], RFh-angle, and moment arm) were quantified and compared across the group and within a player (α = .05). Net angular impulse generated by both the rear and target legs was greater for the driver than the 6-iron. Mechanisms used to regulate angular impulse generation between clubs varied across players and required coordination between the legs. Increases in net angular impulse with a driver involved increases in target leg RFh. Rear leg RFh-angle was maintained between clubs whereas target leg RFh became more aligned with the target line. Net linear impulse perpendicular to the target line remained near zero, preserving balance, while net linear impulse along the target line decreased in magnitude. These results indicate that the net angular impulse was regulated between clubs by coordinating force generation of the rear and target legs while sustaining balance throughout the task. PMID:26958870

  5. The Evolution of the Angular Momentum Distribution during Star Formation.

    PubMed

    Tomisaka

    2000-01-01

    If the angular momentum of the molecular cloud core were conserved during the star formation process, a newborn star would rotate much faster than its fission speed. This constitutes the angular momentum problem of newborn stars. In this Letter, the angular momentum transfer in the contraction of a rotating magnetized cloud is studied with axisymmetric MHD simulations. Because of the large dynamic range covered by the nested-grid method, the structure of the cloud in the range from 10 AU to 0.1 pc is explored. First, the cloud experiences a runaway collapse, and a disk forms perpendicularly to the magnetic field, in which the central density increases greatly in a finite timescale. In this phase, the specific angular momentum j of the disk decreases to about one-third of the initial cloud. After the central density of the disk exceeds approximately 1010 cm-3, the infall on to the central object develops. In this accretion stage, the rotation motion and thus the toroidal magnetic field drive the outflow. The angular momentum of the central object is transferred efficiently by the outflow as well as by the effect of the magnetic stress. In 7000 yr from the core formation, the specific angular momentum of the central 0.17 M middle dot in circle decreases a factor of 10-4 from the initial value (i.e., from 1020 to 1016 cm2 s-1). PMID:10587491

  6. Effects of angular confinement and concentration to realistic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Höhn, O. Kraus, T.; Bläsi, B.; Schwarz, U. T.

    2015-01-21

    In standard solar cells, light impinges under a very small angular range, whereas the solar cell emits light into the whole half space. Due to this expansion of etendué, entropy is generated, which limits the maximal efficiency of solar cells. This limit can be overcome by either increasing the angle of incidence by concentration or by decreasing the angle of emission by an angularly confining element or by a combination of both. In an ideal solar cell with radiative recombination as the only loss mechanism, angular confinement and concentration are thermodynamically equivalent. It is shown that concentration in a device, where non-radiative losses such as Shockley-Read-Hall and Auger recombination are considered, is not equivalent to angular confinement. As soon as non-radiative losses are considered, the gain in efficiency due to angular confinement drops significantly in contrast to the gain caused by concentration. With the help of detailed balance calculations, it is furthermore shown that angular confinement can help to increase the efficiency of solar cells under concentrated sunlight even if no measurable gain is expected for the solar cell under 1-sun-illumination. Our analysis predicts a relative gain of 3.14% relative in efficiency for a realistic solar cell with a concentration factor of 500.

  7. Two methods for examining angular response of personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Leib, R.; Miklos, J.

    1988-06-01

    The American National Standard ANSI N13.11-1983 is used to test the accuracy (bias plus precision) of dosimetry processors as part of the dosimetry accreditation program of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard requires that a study of the angular response of a dosimeter be carried out once, although no pass/fail criterion is given for angular response. The NVLAP accreditation program excluded Section 3.8, and thus no angular response data have been generated in an organized fashion. The objective of this project is to examine the feasibility of two alternative methods to test the angular response of personnel dosimeters. The first alternative involves static irradiations with the dosimeters at fixed angles to a radiation source. The second alternative involves dynamic irradiations with the dosimeters mounted on a rotating phantom. A Panasonic UD-802 personnel dosimetry system** was used to generate data to examine both alternatives. The results lead to two major conclusions. Firstly, Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard should be amended to require a pass/fail test for angular response. Secondly, a comparison between angular response data generated with a fixed or a rotating phantom shows that the rotating phantom is the more cost-effective method.

  8. Angular-velocity control approach for stance-control orthoses.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward D; Goudreau, Louis; Yakimovich, Terris; Kofman, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Currently, stance-control knee orthoses require external control mechanisms to control knee flexion during stance and allow free knee motion during the swing phase of gait. A new angular-velocity control approach that uses a rotary-hydraulic device to resist knee flexion when the knee angular velocity passes a preset threshold is presented. This angular-velocity approach for orthotic stance control is based on the premise that knee-flexion angular velocity during a knee-collapse event, such as a stumble or fall, is greater than that during walking. The new hydraulic knee-flexion control device does not require an external control mechanism to switch from free motion to stance control mode. Functional test results demonstrated that the hydraulic angular-velocity activated knee joint provided free knee motion during walking, engaged upon knee collapse, and supported body weight while the end-user recovered to a safe body position. The joint was tested to 51.6 Nm in single loading tests and passed 200,000 repeated loading cycles with a peak load of 88 Nm per cycle. The hydraulic, angular velocity activation approach has potential to improve safety and security for people with lower extremity weakness or when recovering from joint trauma. PMID:19497821

  9. Generation of angular momentum in cold gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaiem, D.; Joyce, M.; Sylos Labini, F.; Worrakitpoonpon, T.

    2016-01-01

    During the violent relaxation of a self-gravitating system, a significant fraction of its mass may be ejected. If the time-varying gravitational field also breaks spherical symmetry, this mass can potentially carry angular momentum. Thus, starting initial configurations with zero angular momentum can, in principle, lead to a bound virialised system with non-zero angular momentum. Using numerical simulations we explore here how much angular momentum can be generated in a virialised structure in this way, starting from configurations of cold particles that are very close to spherically symmetric. For the initial configurations in which spherical symmetry is broken only by the Poissonian fluctuations associated with the finite particle number N, with N in range 103 to 105, we find that the relaxed structures have standard "spin" parameters λ ~ 10-3, and decreasing slowly with N. For slightly ellipsoidal initial conditions, in which the finite-N fluctuations break the residual reflection symmetries, we observe values λ ~ 10-2, i.e. of the same order of magnitude as those reported for elliptical galaxies. The net angular momentum vector is typically aligned close to normal to the major semi-axis of the triaxial relaxed structure and of the ejected mass. This simple mechanism may provide an alternative, or complement, to the so-called tidal torque theory for understanding the origin of angular momentum in astrophysical structures.

  10. REVIEW ARTICLE: Angular selective window coatings: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbise, G. W.; LeBellac, D.; Niklasson, G. A.; Granqvist, C. G.

    1997-08-01

    This review is devoted to the angular selectivity that can be obtained in thin films prepared under conditions such that they contain inclined absorbing regions of sizes much smaller than the wavelength of visible light. The films are of considerable interest as window coatings for energy-conscious architecture and, potentially, in the automotive sector. The theoretical basis for modelling the optical properties is presented, comprising rigorous bounds on the dielectric function, effective medium theories pertinent to different microgeometries and equations for treating the optics of anisotropic thin films. Experimental data are reported for films made by oblique-angle evaporation of Cr and for reactive and non-reactive oblique-angle sputtering of Cr, Al, Ti and W. The highest angular selectivity was obtained with evaporated Cr, whereas the highest luminous transmittance, combined with some angular selectivity, was found with reactively sputtered Al. Films made from Ti showed angular selectivity mainly in the infrared, whereas films made from W could display angular selective electrochromism. Samples of several types were subjected to elaborate theoretical analysis using effective-medium theories and it was seen that theory and experiment could be reconciled using plausible parameters to specify the microstructures of the films. Thus it appears that the angular, spectral and polarization dependences of obliquely deposited films can be understood, at least approximately, in terms of conceptually simple theoretical models.

  11. Selective inhibitors of glutathione transferase P1 with trioxane structure as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Maria; Teusch, Nicole; Schenk, Tobias; Sheikh, Miriam; Aricioglu, Rocky Z; Borowski, Swantje H; Neudörfl, Jörg-Martin; Baumann, Ulrich; Griesbeck, Axel G; Pietsch, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The response to chemotherapy in cancer patients is frequently compromised by drug resistance. Although chemoresistance is a multifactorial phenomenon, many studies have demonstrated that altered drug metabolism through the expression of phase II conjugating enzymes, including glutathione transferases (GSTs), in tumor cells can be directly correlated with resistance against a wide range of marketed anticancer drugs. In particular, overexpression of glutathione transferase P1 (GSTP1) appears to be a factor for poor prognosis during cancer therapy. Former and ongoing clinical trials have confirmed GSTP1 inhibition as a principle for antitumor therapy. A new series of 1,2,4-trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors were designed via a type II photooxygenation route of allylic alcohols followed by acid-catalyzed peroxyacetalization with aldehydes. A set of novel inhibitors exhibit low micromolar to high nanomolar inhibition of GSTP1, revealing preliminary SAR for further lead optimization. Importantly, high selectivity over another two human GST classes (GSTA1 and GSTM2) has been achieved. The trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors may therefore serve as a basis for the development of novel drug candidates in overcoming chemoresistance. PMID:25694385

  12. Branching ratios of autoionization from Eu 476p1/26d [J] autoionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun-Gang; Shen, Li; Liang, Hong-Rui; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2015-08-01

    The autoionization branching ratios from Eu 4f76p1/26d [J] autoionizing states to its 4f76s+ (9So), 4f76s+ (7So), and 4f75d+ (9Do) final ionic states are investigated with the combination of the three-step laser excitation and the velocity-map imaging technique. These different autoionizing states are excited via 4f76s6d 8DJ [J = 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2] intermediate states, respectively. The experimental photoelectron images are obtained, from which energy distributions of ejected electrons are achieved with the mathematical transformation. Furthermore, the energy dependence of the branching ratio is investigated within the autoionization resonance, by which population inversion is observed as an important characteristic. The J-dependence is also studied systematically. The validity of the well-known isolated core excitation technique used for obtaining the autoionization spectrum is also studied. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  13. Spin-orbit relaxation kinetics of Br(4 2P1/2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ray O.; Perram, Glen P.; Roh, Won B.

    1996-05-01

    Pulsed and steady-state photolysis techniques have been employed to measure the rate coefficients for collisional deactivation of the spin-orbit excited state of atomic bromine, Br(4 2P1/2). Pulsed lifetime studies for quenching by Br2 and CO2 yielded absolute rate coefficients at room temperature of kBr2=1.2±0.1×10-12 and kCO2=1.5±0.3×10-11 cm3/molecule s. The rate coefficients for quenching by rare gases, N2, O2, NO, NO2, N2O, CO, CO2, COS, SO2, SF6, CF4, CH4, H2S, H2, D2, HBr, HCl, and HI, relative to that for Br2 were determined in a steady-state photolysis experiment. Correlation of the deactivation probabilities with energy defect for the case of electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer is demonstrated.

  14. Origin pairing ('handcuffing') and unpairing in the control of P1 plasmid replication.

    PubMed

    Das, Nilangshu; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2004-11-01

    The P1 plasmid origin has an array of five binding sites (iterons) for the plasmid-encoded initiator protein RepA. Saturation of these sites is required for initiation. Iterons can also pair via their bound RepAs. The reaction, called handcuffing, is believed to be the key to control initiation negatively. Here we have determined some of the mechanistic details of the reaction. We show that handcuffed RepA-iteron complexes dissociate when they are diluted or challenged with cold competitor iterons, suggesting spontaneous reversibility of the handcuffing reaction. The complex formation increases with increased RepA binding, but decreases upon saturation of binding. Complex formation also decreases in the presence of molecular chaperones (DnaK and DnaJ) that convert RepA dimers to monomers. This indicates that dimers participate in handcuffing, and that chaperones are involved in reversing handcuffing. They could play a direct role by reducing dimers and an indirect role by increasing monomers that would compete out the weaker binding dimers from the origin. We propose that an increased monomer to dimer ratio is the key to reverse handcuffing. PMID:15491371

  15. Precision frequency measurement of 1S0-3P1 intercombination lines of Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Feng; Ye-Bing, Wang; Xiao, Tian; Jie, Ren; Ben-Quan, Lu; Qin-Fang, Xu; Yu-Lin, Xie; Hong, Chang

    2015-01-01

    We report on frequency measurement of the intercombination (5s2)1S0-(5s5p)3P1 transition of the four natural isotopes of strontium, including 88Sr (82.58%), 87Sr (7.0%), 86Sr (9.86%), and 84Sr (0.56%). A narrow-linewidth laser that is locked to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) optical cavity with a finesse of 12000 is evaluated at a linewidth of 200 Hz with a fractional frequency drift of 2.8×10-13 at an integration time of 1 s. The fluorescence collector and detector are specially designed, based on a thermal atomic beam. Using a double-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) combined with a fiber and laser power stabilization configuration to detune the laser frequency enables high signal-to-noise ratios and precision saturated spectra to be obtained for the six transition lines, which allows us to determine the transition frequency precisely. The optical frequency is measured using an optical frequency synthesizer referenced to an H maser. Both the statistical values and the final values, including the corrections and uncertainties, are derived for a comparison with the values given in other works. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61127901) and the Key Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-W02).

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the Mercury 6 3P1 state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, J. A.; Reeves, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence was observed from the Hg 6 3P1 state under the influence of the earth's magnetic field and with applied fields of up to 14 G. Modulation of the fluorescence decay signal was observed as a function of both time and space and can be interpreted in terms of a classical precession of the excited atom about the magnetic field or as quantum beats resulting from interference between coherently populated Zeeman sublevels. This modulation was studied for each of the five resolvable components of the hyperfine structure separately. The fluorescence from the even isotopes was determined to be almost completely modulated while the fluorescence from the odd isotopes was only partially modulated. The frequency of modulation of the fluorescence from the mercury-202 isotope was observed as a function of the applied magnetic field and a value for the Lande factor of 1.46 + or - 0.03 was obtained. This is within experimental error of the accepted value of 1.486. In addition, the frequency of modulation as a function of applied magnetic field was determined for each of the three resolvable components with more than one contributing isotopic hyperfine line. An investigation of the effect of radiation trapping on the degree modulation was also made.

  17. Isolation of a P1 phagemid encompassing the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Schneider, M.C.; Reeders, S.T.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated a P1 phagemid using primers for the 3 prime end of the tuberin gene (TSC2) on chromosome 16p13, which encompasses a large gene (KG8) which shows PKD1-specific mutations. The approximately 90-100 kilobase phagemid encompasses at least 4 genes (KG8, Nik7, KG3, and KM17). The CA repeats SM6 (upstream of the KG8 gene) and KG8 localized to the gene itself (3 prime untranslated) are found in the phagemid, as well as a number of trinucleotide repeat elements. One, a CCT-hybridizing fragment maps internal to the KG8 cDNA and appears to make the cosmid corresponding to the region (cGGG10) unstable. None of the previously published cosmids from the region completely encompasses the KG8 gene. A detailed R1 map of the region has been prepared and compared to the cosmid maps. Sequence of the regional genes will be presented. The phagemid will provide an alternative genomic source for evaluating the genomic sequence/map. In addition, this phagemid will potentially be useful as a vector for transfection of the entire PKD1 gene and its regulatory sequences.

  18. On the quadrilateral Q2-P1 element for the Stokes problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Daniele; Gastaldi, Lucia

    2002-08-01

    The Q2 - P1 approximation is one of the most popular Stokes elements. Two possible choices are given for the definition of the pressure space: one can either use a global pressure approximation (that is on each quadrilateral the finite element space is spanned by 1 and by the global co-ordinates x and y) or a local approach (consisting in generating the local space by means of the constants and the local curvilinear co-ordinates on each quadrilateral and ). The former choice is known to provide optimal error estimates on general meshes. This has been shown, as it is standard, by proving a discrete inf-sup condition. In the present paper we check that the latter approach satisfies the inf-sup condition as well. However, recent results on quadrilateral finite elements bring to light a lack in the approximation properties for the space coming out from the local pressure approach. Numerical results actually show that the second choice (local or mapped pressure approximation) is suboptimally convergent. Copyright

  19. Purification and Characterization of Three Chitosanase Activities from Bacillus megaterium P1

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, A.; Sygusch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium P1, a bacterial strain capable of hydrolyzing chitosan, was isolated from soil samples. Chitosan-degrading activity was induced by chitosan but not by its constituent d-glucosamine. Extracellular secretion of chitosanase reached levels corresponding to 1 U/ml under optimal conditions. Three chitosan-degrading proteins (chitosanases A, B, and C) were purified to homogeneity. Chitosanase A (43 kilodaltons) was highly specific for chitosan and represented the major chitosan-hydrolyzing species. Chitosanases B (39.5 kilodaltons) and C (22 kilodaltons) corresponded to minor activities and possessed comparable specific activities toward chitosan, chitin, and cellulose. Chitosanase A was active from pH 4.5 to 6.5 and was stable on the basis of activity up to 45°C. The optimum temperature for enzymatic chitosan hydrolysis was 50°C. Kinetic studies on chitosanase A suggest that the enzyme is substrate inhibited. The apparent Km and Vmax determined at 22°C and pH 5.6 were 0.8 mg/ml and 280 U/mg, respectively. End products of chitosan hydrolysis by each of the three chitosanases were identified as glucosamine oligomers, similar to those obtained for previously reported chitosanase digestions. Images PMID:16348170

  20. The evolving activity of the dynamically young comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd)

    SciTech Connect

    Bodewits, D.; Farnham, T. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feaga, L. M.; Sunshine, J. M.; McKay, A.; Schleicher, D. G.

    2014-05-01

    We used the Ultraviolet-Optical Telescope on board Swift to observe the dynamically young comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) from a heliocentric distance of 3.5 AU pre-perihelion until 4.0 AU outbound. At 3.5 AU pre-perihelion, comet Garradd had one of the highest dust-to-gas ratios ever observed, matched only by comet Hale-Bopp. The evolving morphology of the dust in its coma suggests an outburst that ended around 2.2 AU pre-perihelion. Comparing slit-based measurements and observations acquired with larger fields of view indicated that between 3 AU and 2 AU pre-perihelion a significant extended source started producing water in the coma. We demonstrate that this source, which could be due to icy grains, disappeared quickly around perihelion. Water production by the nucleus may be attributed to a constantly active source of at least 75 km{sup 2}, estimated to be >20% of the surface. Based on our measurements, the comet lost 4 × 10{sup 11} kg of ice and dust during this apparition, corresponding to at most a few meters of its surface. Even though this was likely not the comet's first passage through the inner solar system, the activity of Garradd was complex and changed significantly during the time it was observed.

  1. Emotion and hypervigilance: negative affect predicts increased P1 responses to non-negative pictorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Schomberg, Jessica; Schöne, Benjamin; Gruber, Thomas; Quirin, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that negative affect influences attentional processes. Here, we investigate whether pre-experimental negative affect predicts a hypervigilant neural response as indicated by increased event-related potential amplitudes in response to neutral and positive visual stimuli. In our study, seventeen male participants filled out the German version of the positive and negative affect schedule (Watson et al. in J Pers Soc Psychol 54:1063-1070, 1988; Krohne et al. in Diagnostica 42:139-156, 1996) and subsequently watched positive (erotica, extreme sports, beautiful women) and neutral (daily activities) photographs while electroencephalogram was recorded. In line with our hypothesis, low state negative affect but not (reduced) positive affect predicted an increase in the first positive event-related potential amplitude P1 as a typical marker of increased selective attention. As this effect occurred in response to non-threatening picture conditions, negative affect may foster an individual's general hypervigilance, a state that has formerly been associated with psychopathology only. PMID:26749180

  2. Preliminary Altitude Operational Characteristics of a J57-P1 Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallner, Lewis E.; Saari, Martin J.

    1954-01-01

    The operational characteristics of a J57-P1 turbojet engine have been investigated at altitudes between 15,000 and 66,000 feet in the Lewis altitude wind tunnel. Included in this study is a discussion of fuel nozzle coking, the altitude operating limits with and without the standard engine control, the compressor surge characteristics, and the engine starting and windmilling characteristics. Severe circumferential turbine outlet temperature gradients which occurred at high altitude as a result of fuel nozzle coking were alleviated by the manufacturer's change in the fuel flow divider schedule and in a nozzle gasket material. Compressor air bleed is required to prevent surge of the outboard compressor in the low engine speed region. The maximum altitude at which the engine was operated without the control was about 66,000 feet at 0.8 flight Mach number and at a reduced engine speed to avoid compressor surge; with the engine control in operation, the altitude operating limit is reduced to approximately 59,000 feet. The maximum altitude at which the engine was started was about 40,000 feet.

  3. Novel S1P1 receptor agonists - Part 4: Alkylaminomethyl substituted aryl head groups.

    PubMed

    Lescop, Cyrille; Müller, Claus; Mathys, Boris; Birker, Magdalena; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Hess, Patrick; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Sieber, Patrick; Steiner, Beat; Weller, Thomas; Bolli, Martin H

    2016-06-30

    In a previous communication we reported on the discovery of alkylamino pyridine derivatives (e.g. 1) as a new class of potent, selective and efficacious S1P1 receptor (S1PR1) agonists. However, more detailed profiling revealed that this compound class is phototoxic in vitro. Here we describe a new class of potent S1PR1 agonists wherein the exocyclic nitrogen was moved away from the pyridine ring (e.g. 11c). Further structural modifications led to the identification of novel alkylaminomethyl substituted phenyl and thienyl derivatives as potent S1PR1 agonists. These new alkylaminomethyl aryl compounds showed no phototoxic potential. Based on their in vivo efficacy and ability to penetrate the brain, the 5-alkyl-aminomethyl thiophenes appeared to be the most interesting class. Potent and selective S1PR1 agonist 20e, for instance, maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count (LC) for 24 h after oral administration of 10 mg/kg to rat and its brain concentrations reached >500 ng/g over 24 h. PMID:27061986

  4. Noncommutative Tachyon Kinks as D(p-1)-branes from Unstable Dp-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kim, Yoonbai; Kwon, O.-Kab

    2005-01-01

    We study noncommutative (NC) field theory of a real NC tachyon and NC U(1) gauge field, describing the dynamics of an unstable Dp-brane. For every given set of diagonal component of open string metric G 0 , NC parameter θ0 , and interpolating electric field hat E, we find all possible static NC kinks as exact solutions, in spite of complicated NC terms, which are classified by an array of NC kink-antikink and topological NC kinks. By computing their tensions and charges, those configurations are identified as an array of D0bar D0 and single stable D0 from the unstable D1, respectively. When the interpolating electric field has critical value as G 0 2 = hat E2 , the obtained topological kink becomes a BPS object with nonzero thickness and is identified as BPS D0 in the fluid of fundamental strings. Particularly in the scaling limit of infinite θ0 and vanishing G 0 and hat E, while keeping G 0θ0 = hat Eθ0 = 1, finiteness of the tension of NC kink corresponds to tensionless kink in ordinary effective field theory. An extension to stable D(p-1) from unstable Dp is straightforward for pure electric cases with parallel NC parameter and interpolating two-form field.

  5. Probing dynamics of a spin ensemble of P1 centers in diamond using a superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, Gijs; Ranjan, Vishal; Schutjens, Ron; Debelhoir, Thibault; Groen, Joost; Szombati, Daniel; Thoen, David; Klapwijk, Teun; Hanson, Ronald; Dicarlo, Leonardo

    2013-03-01

    Solid-state spin ensembles are promising candidates for realizing a quantum memory for superconducting circuits. Understanding the dynamics of such ensembles is a necessary step towards achieving this goal. Here, we investigate the dynamics of an ensemble of nitrogen impurities (P1 centers) in diamond using magnetic-field controlled coupling to the first two modes of a superconducting (NbTiN) coplanar waveguide resonator. Three hyperfine-split spin sub-ensembles are clearly resolved in the 0.25-1.2 K temperature range, with a collective coupling strength extrapolating to 23 MHz at full polarization. The coupling to multiple modes allows us to distinguish the contributions of dipolar broadening and magnetic field inhomogeneity to the spin linewidth. We find the spin polarization recovery rate to be temperature independent below 1 K and conclude that spin out-diffusion across the resonator mode volume provides the mechanism for spin relaxation of the ensemble. Furthermore, by pumping spins in one sub-ensemble and probing the spins in the other sub-ensembles, we observe fast steady-state cross-relaxation (compared to spin repolarization) across the hyperfine transitions. These observations have important implications for using the three sub-ensembles as independent quantum memories. Research supported by NWO, FOM, and EU Project SOLID

  6. The Properties of Sintered Calcium Phosphate with [Ca]/[P] = 1.50

    PubMed Central

    Hung, I-Ming; Shih, Wei-Jen; Hon, Min-Hsiung; Wang, Moo-Chin

    2012-01-01

    In order to obtain the properties of the sintered as-dried calcium phosphate with [Ca]/[P] = 1.50, the characteristics of sintered pellets have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, Vickers hardness indentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the pellet samples were sintered between 700 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, the hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HA) still maintained the major phase, accompanied with the rhenanite (NaCaPO4) as the secondary phase and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-Ca3(PO4)2, β-TCP) as the minor phases. In addition, the HA partially transformed to α-tricalcium phosphate (α-Ca3(PO4)2, α-TCP) and tetracalcium phosphate (Ca4(PO4)2O, TTCP), when the pellet samples were sintered at 1300 °C and 1400 °C, respectively, for 4 h. The maximum density and Vickers Hardness (HV) of sintered pellet samples were 2.85 g/cm3 (90.18% theoretical density (T.D.)) and 407, which appeared at 1200 °C and 900 °C, respectively. PMID:23202968

  7. Biochemical characterization of three distinct polygalacturonases from Neosartorya fischeri P1.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xia; Li, Ke; Ma, Rui; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Polygalacturonase is one of the most important industrial pectinases. To enrich the genetic resources and develop new enzyme candidates, three polygalacturonase genes (Nfpg I-III) of glycosyl hydrolase family 28 were cloned from Neosartorya fischeri P1 and functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins exhibited some distinguished properties. In comparison with other counterparts, NfPG I showed the highest specific activity (40, 123 U/mg), NfPG II had the highest temperature optimum (65 °C), and the pH optimum of NfPG III was the lowest (3.5). The orders of their thermostability and resistance to chemicals tested were NfPG II>NfPG III>NfPG I and NfPG II>NfPG I>NfPG III, respectively. Combinations of these enzymes showed better performance than individuals in the processing and clarification of apple and strawberry juice. These results suggest that N. fischeri polygalacturonases have great application potentials in the food industry for juice production. PMID:26041232

  8. Mycobacterial P1-Type ATPases Mediate Resistance to Zinc Poisoning in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Botella, Hélène; Peyron, Pascale; Levillain, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Poquet, Yannick; Brandli, Irène; Wang, Chuan; Tailleux, Ludovic; Tilleul, Sylvain; Charrière, Guillaume M.; Waddell, Simon J.; Foti, Maria; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Gao, Qian; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Butcher, Philip D.; Castagnoli, Paola Ricciardi; Gicquel, Brigitte; de Chastellier, Chantal; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis thrives within macrophages by residing in phagosomes and preventing them from maturing and fusing with lysosomes. A parallel transcriptional survey of intracellular mycobacteria and their host macrophages revealed signatures of heavy metal poisoning. In particular, mycobacterial genes encoding heavy metal efflux P-type ATPases CtpC, CtpG, and CtpV, and host cell metallothioneins and zinc exporter ZnT1, were induced during infection. Consistent with this pattern of gene modulation, we observed a burst of free zinc inside macrophages, and intraphagosomal zinc accumulation within a few hours postinfection. Zinc exposure led to rapid CtpC induction, and ctpC deficiency caused zinc retention within the mycobacterial cytoplasm, leading to impaired intracellular growth of the bacilli. Thus, the use of P1-type ATPases represents a M. tuberculosis strategy to neutralize the toxic effects of zinc in macrophages. We propose that heavy metal toxicity and its counteraction might represent yet another chapter in the host-microbe arms race. PMID:21925112

  9. ADAPTATION AND ADAPTABILITY, THE BELLEFAIRE FOLLOWUP STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALLERHAND, MELVIN E.; AND OTHERS

    A RESEARCH TEAM STUDIED INFLUENCES, ADAPTATION, AND ADAPTABILITY IN 50 POORLY ADAPTING BOYS AT BELLEFAIRE, A REGIONAL CHILD CARE CENTER FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN. THE TEAM ATTEMPTED TO GAUGE THE SUCCESS OF THE RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT CENTER IN TERMS OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL PATTERNS AND ROLE PERFORMANCES OF THE BOYS DURING INDIVIDUAL CASEWORK…

  10. 17 CFR 240.13p-1 - Requirement of report regarding disclosure of registrant's supply chain information regarding...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regarding disclosure of registrant's supply chain information regarding conflict minerals. 240.13p-1 Section...'s supply chain information regarding conflict minerals. Every registrant that files reports with the... that Form (17 CFR 249b.400)....

  11. 17 CFR 240.13p-1 - Requirement of report regarding disclosure of registrant's supply chain information regarding...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regarding disclosure of registrant's supply chain information regarding conflict minerals. 240.13p-1 Section...'s supply chain information regarding conflict minerals. Every registrant that files reports with the... that Form (17 CFR 249b.400)....

  12. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutations in the substrate of HIV-1 protease, especially changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site, can directly contribute to protease inhibitor (PI) resistance and also compensate for defects in viral replicative capacity (RC) due to a drug resistant protease. These NC/p1 changes are known to enhance processing of the Gag protein. To investigate the capacity of HIV-1 to modulate Gag cleavage and its consequences for PI resistance and RC, we performed a detailed enzymatic and virological analysis using a set of PI resistant NC/p1 variants (HXB2431V, HXB2436E+437T, HXB2437T and HXB2437V). Results Here, we demonstrate that single NC/p1 mutants, which displayed only a slight increase in PI resistance did not show an obvious change in RC. In contrast, the double NC/p1 mutant, which displayed a clear increase in processing efficiency and PI resistance, demonstrated a clear reduction in RC. Cleavage analysis showed that a tridecameric NC/p1 peptide representing the double NC/p1 mutant was cleaved in two specific ways instead of one. The observed decrease in RC for the double NC/p1 mutant (HXB2436E+437T) could (partially) be restored by either reversion of the 436E change or by acquisition of additional changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site at codon 435 or 438 as was revealed during in vitro evolution experiments. These changes not only restored RC but also reduced PI resistance levels. Furthermore these changes normalized Gag processing efficiency and obstructed the novel secondary cleavage site observed for the double NC/p1 mutant. Conclusions The results of this study clearly demonstrate that HIV-1 can modulate Gag processing and thereby PI resistance. Distinct increases in Gag cleavage and PI resistance result in a reduced RC that can only be restored by amino acid changes in NC/p1 which reduce Gag processing to an optimal rate. PMID:22462820

  13. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M.; Howard Berg, R.; Sue Loesch-Fries, L.

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  14. Defective sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) phosphorylation exacerbates TH17-mediated autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Garris, Christopher S; Wu, Linfeng; Acharya, Swati; Arac, Ahmet; Blaho, Victoria A; Huang, Yingxiang; Moon, Byoung San; Axtell, Robert C; Ho, Peggy P; Steinberg, Gary K; Lewis, David B; Sobel, Raymond A; Han, David K; Steinman, Lawrence; Snyder, Michael P; Hla, Timothy; Han, May H

    2013-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling regulates lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs into systemic circulation. The sphingosine phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) agonist FTY-720 (Gilenya) arrests immune trafficking and prevents multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. However, alternative mechanisms of S1P-S1P1 signaling have been reported. Phosphoproteomic analysis of MS brain lesions revealed S1P1 phosphorylation on S351, a residue crucial for receptor internalization. Mutant mice harboring an S1pr1 gene encoding phosphorylation-deficient receptors (S1P1(S5A)) developed severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) due to autoimmunity mediated by interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) in the peripheral immune and nervous system. S1P1 directly activated the Jak-STAT3 signal-transduction pathway via IL-6. Impaired S1P1 phosphorylation enhances TH17 polarization and exacerbates autoimmune neuroinflammation. These mechanisms may be pathogenic in MS. PMID:24076635

  15. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M; Berg, R Howard; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast. PMID:22999257

  16. Immunochemical characterization of alkaline-soluble polysaccharide, P-1, from the kernels of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.

    PubMed

    Dogasaki, C; Nishijima, M; Ohno, N; Yadomae, T; Miyazaki, T

    1996-07-01

    Polyclonal antibodies against P-1, a pectic polysaccharide fraction extracted with 0.5 M NaOH from the kernels of Prunus mume and consisted of arabino-galacturonan, and I-3, the partial acid (0.1 M trifluoroacetic acid) hydrolysate of P-1, were prepared in Japanese white rabbits. Competitive ELISA experiments strongly suggested that anti P-1 and anti I-3 antibodies were different but P-1 and I-3 cross-reacted with each other to recognize a partly similar epitope structure. The reactivities of polysaccharide fractions from the raw flesh of P. mume, and the kernels of apricot and peach extracted with either water or sodium hydroxide were examined using both antisera by the indirect competitive ELISA method. The polysaccharide fractions extracted with sodium hydroxide solutions had the reactivities but not those extracted with cold and hot water. These facts suggested that the similar structure of polysaccharides to P-1 was present in the flesh of P. mume and the kernels of apricot and peach. However, neither pectin of apple nor citrus had reactivity with each antiserum. P-1 would be different in chemical structure from a commercially available pectin, a water-soluble polysaccharide from apple and citrus. PMID:8782409

  17. E. coli RNA polymerase, deleted in the C-terminal part of its alpha-subunit, interacts differently with the cAMP-CRP complex at the lacP1 and at the galP1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, A; Igarashi, K; Ishihama, A; Lavigne, M; Buckle, M; Buc, H

    1993-01-01

    A deletion of the C-terminal part of the alpha-subunit of RNA polymerase is known to affect differently promoters activated by CRP depending on the location of the CRP binding site at the promoter. When the CRP binding site is located at -61.5, as at lacP1 (a type I promoter), activation is strongly impaired while it is not significantly affected at galP1 where CRP binds 41.5 bp upstream of the start of the message (type II promoter). We have investigated the differences in the architecture of the corresponding open complexes by comparing the positioning of holoenzymes reconstituted respectively with native or with truncated alpha-subunits (containing the first 235 or 256 residues of a) at two 'up' promoter mutants of the lacP1 and galP1 promoters (respectively lacUV5 and gal9A16C). First, the affinity of wild-type RNA polymerase for both promoters is increased by the presence of CRP and cAMP. By contrast, holoenzymes reconstituted with truncated alpha-subunits, show cooperative binding at the galP1 promoter only. Second, footprinting data confirm these observations and indicate that the truncated holoenzymes are unable to recognize regions of the promoter upstream from position -40. The absence of contacts between the truncated enzymes and CRP at the lacP1 promoter can explain the deficiency in activation. At the galP1 promoter, where the CRP site is closer to the initiation site, protein-protein contacts can still occur with the truncated polymerases, showing that the C-terminal part of the alpha-subunit is not involved in activation. Images PMID:8382795

  18. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27416593

  19. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Kathrin Fedosov, Dmitry A. Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  20. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kathrin; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier-Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor-Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.