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1

Animal Ecosystem Engineers in Streams  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer reviewed article from BioScience is about animal ecosystem engineers in streams. An impressive array of animals function as ecosystem engineers in streams through a variety of activities, ranging from nest digging by anadromous salmon to benthic foraging by South American fishes, from the burrowing of aquatic insects to the trampling of hippos. These ecosystem engineers have local impacts on benthic habitat and also strongly affect downstream fluxes of nutrients and other resources. The impacts of ecosystem engineers are most likely some function of their behavior, size, and population density, modulated by the abiotic conditions of the stream. In streams, subsidies often control the body size and density of ecosystem engineers, while hydrologic energy controls their distribution, density, and life-history attributes, the habitats they create, and the resources and organisms they affect. Because ecosystem engineers can profoundly affect stream ecosystems, and because they themselves can be significantly affected positively or negatively by human activities, understanding ecosystem engineering in streams is increasingly important for the management of these ecosystems.

JONATHAN W. MOORE (;)

2006-03-01

2

Animals and Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the classification of animals and animal interactions. Students also learn why engineers need to know about animals and how they use that knowledge to design technologies that help other animals and/or humans. This lesson is part of a series of six lessons in which students use their growing understanding of various environments and the engineering design process, to design and create their own model biodome ecosystems.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

3

Engineering Ecosystems and Synthetic Ecologies#  

PubMed Central

Microbial ecosystems play an important role in nature. Engineering these systems for industrial, medical, or biotechnological purposes are important pursuits for synthetic biologists and biological engineers moving forward. Here, we provide a review of recent progress in engineering natural and synthetic microbial ecosystems. We highlight important forward engineering design principles, theoretical and quantitative models, new experimental and manipulation tools, and possible applications of microbial ecosystem engineering. We argue that simply engineering individual microbes will lead to fragile homogenous populations that are difficult to sustain, especially in highly heterogeneous and unpredictable environments. Instead, engineered microbial ecosystems are likely to be more robust and able to achieve complex tasks at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for truly programmable biology. PMID:22722235

Mee, Michael T; Wang, Harris H

2012-01-01

4

ANIMAL INTEGRITY, ANIMAL DIGNITY, AND GENETIC ENGINEERING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bernard Rollin argues that it is permissible to change an animal’s telos through genetic engineering, if it doesn’t harm the animal’s welfare. Recent attempts to undermine his argument rely either on the claim that diminishing certain capacities always harms an animal’s welfare or on the claim that it always violates an animal’s integrity. I argue that these fail. However, respect

SARA ELIZABETH; GAVRELL ORTIZ

2004-01-01

5

Deep Time Ecosystem Engineers: The Correlation between Palaeozoic Vegetation, Evolution of Physical Riverine Habitats, and Plant and Animal Terrestrialization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evidence from the deep time geological record attests to the fundamental importance of plant life to the construction of physical habitats within fluvial environments. Data from an extensive literature review and original fieldwork has demonstrated that many landforms and geomorphic features present in modern river systems do not appear in the deep time stratigraphic record until terrestrial vegetation had adopted certain evolutionary advances that enabled them: for example, stable point bars are associated with the development of deep rooting in the Siluro-Devonian and avulsive anabranching fluvial systems appear at the same time as extensive arborescent vegetation in the Carboniferous. In this presentation, we demonstrate a correlation between the diversification of physical fluvial sedimentary environments and the expansion of terrestrial fauna and flora throughout the Cambrian to Carboniferous, and offer an explanation for this observation that considers plants as ecosystem engineers on an evolutionary timescale. Many extrinsic factors have been considered when attempting to identify controls on the evolutionary timelines of terrestrialization for various different organisms. Factors such as O2 and CO2 levels in the atmosphere, climatic events, global tectonic organisation, sea-level changes, extinction events, weathering rates and nutrient supply are all known to have played a role. However, another factor is likely to have been a fundamental prerequisite for achieving terrestrial biodiversity: the variety of physical habitats available for newly evolved organisms. In fluvial environments, this is a function of the diversity of hydrodynamic regimes (both temporal and spatial) within the world's river systems. In a world where only sheet-like ephemeral braided rivers existed, such as appears to be the case in pre-vegetation settings, both the geographic extent of riparian margins and the diversity of hydrodynamic regimes would be minimal. However, as fluvial corridors narrowed throughout the Ordovician and Silurian, the potential importance of riparian zones as a global biome would have increased as they became more extensive in continental environments. Furthermore, the move towards climatic controls on the ephemeral or perennial nature of streams would have boosted the diversity of temporally diverse hydrodynamic regimes. As single-thread meandering channels and extensive muddy floodplains, stabilised by vegetation, became significant components of the global suite of alluvial geomorphic components throughout the Siluro-Devonian, further diversification of the extent and diversity of physical habitats within the global riparian biome occurred. Into the Carboniferous, the evolution of the anabranching habit within alluvial systems created further new physical landforms for colonization and would have promoted increasingly complex hyporheic flow regimes. Furthermore the associated advent of arborescent vegetation and, specifically, the large woody debris supplied by this, would have created a wealth of new microhabitats for continental organisms. The expanding extent and diversity of physical alluvial niches during the Palaeozoic can be argued to be an underappreciated driver of the terrestrialization of early continental life. The study of the deep time fossil and stratigraphic record also illustrates that vegetation is a fundamental prerequisite for the creation of biogeomorphic alluvial landforms and physical habitats and microhabitats.

Davies, N. S.; Gibling, M. R.

2012-04-01

6

Engineering approaches to ecosystem restoration  

SciTech Connect

This proceedings CD ROM contains 127 papers on developing and evaluating engineering approaches to wetlands and river restoration. The latest engineering developments are discussed, providing valuable insights to successful approaches for river restoration, wetlands restoration, watershed management, and constructed wetlands for stormwater and wastewater treatment. Potential solutions to a wide variety of ecosystem concerns in urban, suburban, and coastal environments are presented.

Hayes, D.F. [ed.

1998-07-01

7

Using ecosystem engineers to restore ecological systems  

E-print Network

Using ecosystem engineers to restore ecological systems James E. Byers1 , Kim Cuddington2 , Clive G of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA 3 Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA Ecosystem engineers affect other organisms by creating

8

Mammoth ecosystem: Climatic areal, animal's density and cause of extinctions  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last glaciations Mammoth Ecosystem (ME) occupied territory from present-day France to Canada and from the Arctic islands to China. This ecosystem played major role in global carbon cycle and human settling around the planet. Causes of extinction of this ecosystem are debatable. Analyses of hundreds of radiocarbon dates of ME animal fossil remains showed that warming and moistening

S. Zimov; N. Zimov; G. Zimova; S. F. Chapin

2008-01-01

9

Avian ecosystem functions are influenced by small mammal ecosystem engineering  

PubMed Central

Background Birds are important mobile link species that contribute to landscape-scale patterns by means of pollination, seed dispersal, and predation. Birds are often associated with habitats modified by small mammal ecosystem engineers. We investigated whether birds prefer to forage on degu (Octodon degus) runways by comparing their foraging effort across sites with a range of runway densities, including sites without runways. We measured granivory by granivorous and omnivorous birds at Rinconada de Maipú, central Chile. As a measure of potential bird foraging on insects, we sampled invertebrate prey richness and abundance across the same sites. We then quantified an index of plot-scale functional diversity due to avian foraging at the patch scale. Results We recorded that birds found food sources sooner and ate more at sites with higher densities of degu runways, cururo mounds, trees, and fewer shrubs. These sites also had higher invertebrate prey richness but lower invertebrate prey abundance. This implies that omnivorous birds, and possibly insectivorous birds, forage for invertebrates in the same plots with high degu runway densities where granivory takes place. In an exploratory analysis we also found that plot-scale functional diversity for four avian ecosystem functions were moderately to weakly correllated to expected ecosystem function outcomes at the plot scale. Conclusions Degu ecosystem engineering affects the behavior of avian mobile link species and is thus correlated with ecosystem functioning at relatively small spatial scales. PMID:24359802

2013-01-01

10

VISUAL SIMULATIONS, ARTIFICIAL ANIMALS AND VIRTUAL ECOSYSTEMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review is about a field that does not traditionally belong to biological sciences. A branch of computer animation has its mission to create active self-powered objects living artificial lives in the theoretical biology zone. Selected work, of particular interest to biologists, is presented here. These works include animated simulations of legged locomotion, flexible-bodied animals swimming and crawling, artificial fish

J. E. I. HOKKANEN

1999-01-01

11

Does competition among ecosystem engineering species result in tradeoffs in the production of ecosystem services?  

EPA Science Inventory

Production of ecosystem services depends on the ecological community structure at a given location. Ecosystem engineering species (EES) can strongly determine community structure, but do they consequently determine the production of ecosystem services? We explore this question ...

12

Animals as indicators of ecosystem responses to air emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With existing and proposed air-quality regulations, ecological disasters resulting from air emissions such as those observed at Copperhill, Tennessee, and Sudbury, Ontario, are unlikely. Current air-quality standards, however, may not protect ecosystems from subacute and chronic exposure to air emissions. The encouragement of the use of coal for energy production and the development of the fossil-fuel industries, including oil shales, tar sands, and coal liquification, point to an increase and spread of fossil-fuel emissions and the potential to influence a number of natural ecosystems. This paper reviews the reported responses of ecosystems to air-borne pollutants and discusses the use of animals as indicators of ecosystem responses to these pollutants. Animal species and populations can act as important indicators of biotic and abiotic responses of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. These responses can indicate long-term trends in ecosystem health and productivity, chemical cycling, genetics, and regulation. For short-term trends, fish and wildlife also serve as monitors of changes in community structure, signaling food-web contamination, as well as providing a measure of ecosystem vitality. Information is presented to show not only the importance of animals as indicators of ecosystem responses to air-quality degradation, but also their value as air-pollution indices, that is, as air-quality-related values (AQRV), required in current air-pollution regulation.

Newman, James R.; Schreiber, R. Kent

1984-07-01

13

Context dependence of marine ecosystem engineer invasion impacts on benthic ecosystem functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduced ecosystem engineers can severely modify the functioning on invaded systems. Species-level effects on ecosystem\\u000a functioning (EF) are context dependent, but the effects of introduced ecosystem engineers are frequently assessed through\\u000a single-location studies. The present work aimed to identify sources of context-dependence that can regulate the impacts of\\u000a invasive ecosystem engineers on ecosystem functioning. As model systems, four locations where

Ana de Moura Queirós; Jan Geert Hiddink; Gareth Johnson; Henrique Nogueira Cabral; Michel Joseph Kaiser

2011-01-01

14

Mangrove crabs as ecosystem engineers; with emphasis on sediment processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The benthic fauna in mangrove forests is usually dominated by burrowing sesarmid (Grapsidae) and fiddler crabs (Ocypodidae). They are herbivores that retain, bury, macerate and ingest litter and microalgal mats. Most species within these two groups actively dig and maintain burrows in the sediment as a refuge from predation and environmental extremes. Based on the current knowledge on the biology and ecology of these crabs, it seems obvious that their activities have considerable impact on ecosystem functioning. However, no convincing conceptual framework has yet been defined into which the role of these crabs can be identified and characterized. The attributes by which these abundant animals affect the microbial and biogeochemical functional diversity fit well into the concept of ecosystem engineering. The conceptualization of mangrove benthic communities within this framework is distinguished and documented by examples provided from the most recent literature on mangrove ecosystem functioning. It appears that the features and processes driving the engineering effects on distribution and activity of associated organisms operate differently for sesarmid and fiddler crabs. The most obvious and well-documented difference between engineering effects of the two types of crab seems to be associated with foraging. More attention must be devoted in the future to elucidate engineering aspects related to crab burrows in mangrove environments. Particularly comparative work on the burrow-dwelling life styles of the two types of crab is needed.

Kristensen, Erik

2008-02-01

15

Ecosystems, Sustainability, and Animal Agriculture 1,2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The long-term sustainability of animal agriculture is examined in an ecological context. As an aid to defining agriculture, animal agriculture, and sustainable agriculture, a broad overview of the structural and functional aspects of ecosystems is presented. Energy output\\/cultural energy input ratios were then calculated for 11 beef cattle management systems as relative measures of their long-term sustainability. Energy output was

R. K. Heitschmidt; R. E. Short; E. E. Grings

2010-01-01

16

Ecosystem Engineering across Environmental Gradients: Implications for Conservation and Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer reviewed article from Bioscience is about the implications for conservation and management of ecosystem engineering. Ecosystem engineers are organisms whose presence or activity alters their physical surroundings or changes the flow of resources, thereby creating or modifying habitats. Because ecosystem engineers affect communities through environmentally mediated interactions, their impact and importance are likely to shift across environmental stress gradients. We hypothesize that in extreme physical environments, ecosystem engineers that ameliorate physical stress are essential for ecosystem function, whereas in physically benign environments where competitor and consumer pressure is typically high, engineers support ecosystem processes by providing competitor- or predator-free space. Important ecosystem engineers alleviate limiting abiotic and biotic stresses, expanding distributional limits for numerous species, and often form the foundation for community development. Because managing important engineers can protect numerous associated species and functions, we advocate using these organisms as conservation targets, harnessing the benefits of ecosystem engineers in various environments. Developing a predictive understanding of engineering across environmental gradients is important for furthering our conceptual understanding of ecosystem structure and function, and could aid in directing limited management resources to critical ecosystem engineers.

CAITLIN MULLAN CRAIN and MARK D. BERTNESS (;)

2006-03-01

17

Mammoth ecosystem: Climatic areal, animal's density and cause of extinctions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last glaciations Mammoth Ecosystem (ME) occupied territory from present-day France to Canada and from the Arctic islands to China. This ecosystem played major role in global carbon cycle and human settling around the planet. Causes of extinction of this ecosystem are debatable. Analyses of hundreds of radiocarbon dates of ME animal fossil remains showed that warming and moistening of climate wasn't accompanied by animal extinction. On the opposite, on the north right after the warming rise of herbivore population was observed. Reconstruction of ME climatic areal showed that its climatic optimum lies within range of annual precipitation of 200-350 mm and average summer temperatures of +8-+12oC which corresponds with modern climate of Northern Siberia. Analyses of bones and skeletons concentrations in permafrost of Northern Siberia showed that animal density in ME was similar to African savannah. That was a high productive ecosystem that could sustain in wide variety of climates because numerous herbivores maintained there pastures themselves.

Zimov, S.; Zimov, N.; Zimova, G.; Chapin, S. F.

2008-12-01

18

Genetic Engineering and the Integrity of Animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic engineering evokes a number of objections that are not directed at the negative effects the technique might have on the health and welfare of the modified animals. The concept of animal integrity is often invoked to articulate these kind of objections. Moreover, in reaction to the advent of genetic engineering, the concept has been extended from the level of

Rob De Vries

2006-01-01

19

Biodiversity's Response to Ecosystem Productivity Depends on Historical Plant and Animal Relationships  

NSF Publications Database

... Ecosystem Productivity Depends on Historical Plant and Animal Relationships The experiment using ... NSF), have discovered part of the answer: how plant and animal communities originally assembled is a ...

20

Obstructive nephropathy: Insights from genetically engineered animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obstructive nephropathy: Insights from genetically engineered animals. Congenital obstructive nephropathy is the primary cause for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children. An increasingly used animal model of obstructive nephropathy is unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). This model mimics, in an accelerated manner, the different stages of obstructive nephropathy leading to tubulointerstitial fibrosis: cellular infiltration, tubular proliferation and apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT),

JEAN-LOUP BASCANDS; Joost P. Schanstra

2005-01-01

21

Emerging fungal threats to animal, plant and ecosystem health.  

PubMed

The past two decades have seen an increasing number of virulent infectious diseases in natural populations and managed landscapes. In both animals and plants, an unprecedented number of fungal and fungal-like diseases have recently caused some of the most severe die-offs and extinctions ever witnessed in wild species, and are jeopardizing food security. Human activity is intensifying fungal disease dispersal by modifying natural environments and thus creating new opportunities for evolution. We argue that nascent fungal infections will cause increasing attrition of biodiversity, with wider implications for human and ecosystem health, unless steps are taken to tighten biosecurity worldwide. PMID:22498624

Fisher, Matthew C; Henk, Daniel A; Briggs, Cheryl J; Brownstein, John S; Madoff, Lawrence C; McCraw, Sarah L; Gurr, Sarah J

2012-04-12

22

Organisms as cooperative ecosystem engineers in intertidal flats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The importance of facilitative interactions and organismal ecosystem engineering for establishing the structure of communities is increasingly being recognised for many different ecosystems. For example, soft-bottom tidal flats host a wide range of ecosystem engineers, probably because the harsh physico-chemical environmental conditions render these species of particular importance for community structure and function. These environments are therefore interesting when focusing on how ecosystem engineers interact and the consequences of these interactions on community dynamics. In this review, we initially detail the influence on benthic systems of two kinds of ecosystem engineers that are particularly common in tidal flats. Firstly, we examine species providing biogenic structures, which are often the only source of habitat complexity in these environments. Secondly, we focus on species whose activities alter sediment stability, which is a crucial feature structuring the dynamics of communities in tidal flats. The impacts of these engineers on both environment and communities were assessed but in addition the interaction between ecosystem engineers was examined. Habitat cascades occur when one engineer favours the development of another, which in turn creates or modifies and improves habitat for other species. Non-hierarchical interactions have often been shown to display non-additive effects, so that the effects of the association cannot be predicted from the effects of individual organisms. Here we propose the term of “cooperative ecosystem engineering” when two species interact in a way which enhances habitat suitability as a result of a combined engineering effect. Finally, we conclude by describing the potential threats for ecosystem engineers in intertidal areas, potential effects on their interactions and their influence on communities and ecosystem function.

Passarelli, Claire; Olivier, Frédéric; Paterson, David M.; Meziane, Tarik; Hubas, Cédric

2014-09-01

23

Genetic engineering applications in animal breeding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abbreviations: ES: embryonic stem cells ESR: estrogen receptor locus IGF-I: insulin-like growth factor I MAS: Marker-assisted selection QTL: quantitative trait loci This paper discusses the use of genetic engineering applications in animal breeding, including a description of the methods, their potential and current uses and ethical issues. Genetic engineering is the name of a group of techniques used to identify,

Hugo H. Montaldo

2006-01-01

24

Spontaneous and genetically engineered animal models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The preclinical development of anticancer drugs has been based primarily on the transplantation of murine or human cancers into mice. Alternatives to these transplantation models are animals that naturally develop cancers with features relevant to the human disease. The first group of these models arises in mice that are genetically engineered to develop cancer. The second group includes pet dogs

K Hansen; C Khanna

2004-01-01

25

Habitat creation and biodiversity maintenance in mangrove forests: teredinid bivalves as ecosystem engineers  

PubMed Central

Substantial amounts of dead wood in the intertidal zone of mature mangrove forests are tunnelled by teredinid bivalves. When the tunnels are exposed, animals are able to use tunnels as refuges. In this study, the effect of teredinid tunnelling upon mangrove forest faunal diversity was investigated. Mangrove forests exposed to long emersion times had fewer teredinid tunnels in wood and wood not containing teredinid tunnels had very few species and abundance of animals. However, with a greater cross-sectional percentage surface area of teredinid tunnels, the numbers of species and abundance of animals was significantly higher. Temperatures within teredinid-attacked wood were significantly cooler compared with air temperatures, and animal abundance was greater in wood with cooler temperatures. Animals inside the tunnels within the wood may avoid desiccation by escaping the higher temperatures. Animals co-existing in teredinid tunnelled wood ranged from animals found in terrestrial ecosystems including centipedes, crickets and spiders, and animals found in subtidal marine ecosystems such as fish, octopods and polychaetes. There was also evidence of breeding within teredinid-attacked wood, as many juvenile individuals were found, and they may also benefit from the cooler wood temperatures. Teredinid tunnelled wood is a key low-tide refuge for cryptic animals, which would otherwise be exposed to fishes and birds, and higher external temperatures. This study provides evidence that teredinids are ecosystem engineers and also provides an example of a mechanism whereby mangrove forests support intertidal biodiversity and nurseries through the wood-boring activity of teredinids.

Michie, Laura; Taylor, Ben W.

2014-01-01

26

Ecosystem engineering facilitates invasions by exotic plants in high-Andean ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1 Ecosystem engineers are organisms that change abiotic conditions in ways that affect the performance and distribution of other species, including exotics. Several mechanisms have been proposed for the successful establishment of exotic plants in natural communities, but the positive effects that native engineer species may have on the distribution and performance of exotic plants remain unknown. 2 In

ERNESTO I. BADANO; ELISA VILLARROEL; RAMIRO O. BUSTAMANTE; PABLO A. MARQUET; LOHENGRIN A. CAVIERES

2007-01-01

27

Animal Models for Bone Tissue Engineering Purposes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the efficacy of engineered tissues, it is necessary to have (1) appropriate large animal models that mimic the clinical\\u000a setting and (2) relevant methods of monitoring the biofuntionality of these tissues. However, developing these tissue constructs\\u000a is a step-by-step process in which numerous variables such as scaffold design, source of stem cells and mode of growth factor\\u000a application

Véronique Viateau; Delphine Logeart-Avramoglou; Geneviève Guillemin; Hervé Petite

28

Non-indigenous invasive bivalves as ecosystem engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several non-indigenous bivalve species have been colonising aquatic ecosystems worldwide, in some cases with great ecological\\u000a and economic impacts. In this paper, we focus on the ecosystem engineering attributes of non-indigenous invasive bivalves\\u000a (i.e., the capacities of these organisms to directly or indirectly affect the availability of resources to other species by\\u000a physically modifying the environment). By reviewing the ecology

Ronaldo Sousa; Jorge L. Gutiérrez; David C. Aldridge

2009-01-01

29

Physical Ecosystem Engineers as Agents of Biogeochemical Heterogeneity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed article form BioScience is about organisms that act as agents of biogeochemical heterogeneity. Physical ecosystem engineers are organisms that physically modify the abiotic environment. They can affect biogeochemical processing by changing the availability of resources for microbes (e.g., carbon, nutrients) or by changing abiotic conditions affecting microbial process rates (e.g., soil moisture or temperature). Physical ecosystem engineers can therefore create biogeochemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments. They do so via general mechanisms influencing the flows of materials (i.e., modification of fluid dynamic properties, fluid pumping, and material transport) or the transfer of heat (i.e., modification of heat transfer properties, direct heat transfer, and convective forcing). The consequences of physical ecosystem engineering for biogeochemical processes can be predicted by considering the resources or abiotic conditions that limit or promote a reaction, and the effect of physical ecosystem engineering on these resources or abiotic conditions via the control they exert on material flows and heat transfer.

JORGE L. GUTIÃÂÃÂRREZ and CLIVE G. JONES (;)

2006-03-01

30

Industrial Food Animal Production and Global Health Risks: Exploring the Ecosystems and Economics of Avian Influenza  

E-print Network

Industrial Food Animal Production and Global Health Risks: Exploring the Ecosystems and Economics of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 2 Animal are associated with zoonotic origins. Attention has often focused on wild animal reservoirs, but most zoonotic

Kammen, Daniel M.

31

Molecular profiling of soil animal diversity in natural ecosystems: Incongruence of molecular and morphological results  

E-print Network

-Pelletier and Newton,1999; Wardle, 2002). For example, up to 89 nematode species were found in soil fromMolecular profiling of soil animal diversity in natural ecosystems: Incongruence of molecular Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA c Soil and Ecosystem Ecology

Wall, Diana

32

Trait selection and welfare of genetically engineered animals in agriculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The release of the Final Guidance from the US Food and Drug Administration on the com- mercialization of genetically engineered animals has sparked renewed discussion over the ethical, consumer, and regulatory implications of transgenesis in animal agriculture. Animal welfare critiques have focused on unexpected phenotypic effects in animals used in trans- genic research, rather than on the health and welfare

M. Greger

2010-01-01

33

Effects of mud sedimentation on lugworm ecosystem engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Benthic ecosystem engineering organisms attenuate hydrodynamic or biogeochemical stress to ameliorate living conditions. Bioturbating infauna, like the lugworm Arenicola marina, determine intertidal process dynamics by maintaining the sediment oxygenated and sandy. Maintaining the permeability of the surrounding sediment enables them to pump water through the interstitial spaces, greatly increasing the oxygen availability. In a field experiment, both lugworm presence and siltation regime were manipulated to investigate to what extent lugworms are able to cope with sedimentation of increasing mud percentage and how this would affect its ecosystem engineering. Fluorescent tracers were added to experimentally deposited mud to visualise bioturbation effects on fine sediment fractions. Lugworm densities were not affected by an increasing mud percentage in experimentally deposited sediment. Negative effects are expected to occur under deposition with significantly higher mud percentages. Surface chlorophyll a content was a function of experimental mud percentage, with no effect of lugworm bioturbation. Surface roughness and sediment permeability clearly increased by lugworm presence, whereas sediment erosion threshold was not significantly affected by lugworms. The general idea that A. marina removes fine sediment fractions from the bed could not be confirmed. Rather, the main ecosystem engineering effect of A. marina is hydraulic destabilisation of the sediment matrix.

Montserrat, F.; Suykerbuyk, W.; Al-Busaidi, R.; Bouma, T. J.; van der Wal, D.; Herman, P. M. J.

2011-01-01

34

A perfect storm: two ecosystem engineers interact to degrade deciduous forests of New Jersey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecosystem engineers play a large role in physically structuring the ecosystem in which they are embedded. The focus of much\\u000a of the research surrounding these species is to document the impacts of a single engineer on community composition and ecosystem\\u000a processes. However, most ecosystems harbor multiple engineering species that interact in complex ways and rarely have the\\u000a dynamics of such

Benjamin Baiser; Julie L. Lockwood; David La Puma; Myla F. J. Aronson

2008-01-01

35

Complex Effects of Ecosystem Engineer Loss on Benthic Ecosystem Response to Detrital Macroalgae  

PubMed Central

Ecosystem engineers change abiotic conditions, community assembly and ecosystem functioning. Consequently, their loss may modify thresholds of ecosystem response to disturbance and undermine ecosystem stability. This study investigates how loss of the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina modifies the response to macroalgal detrital enrichment of sediment biogeochemical properties, microphytobenthos and macrofauna assemblages. A field manipulative experiment was done on an intertidal sandflat (Oosterschelde estuary, The Netherlands). Lugworms were deliberately excluded from 1× m sediment plots and different amounts of detrital Ulva (0, 200 or 600 g Wet Weight) were added twice. Sediment biogeochemistry changes were evaluated through benthic respiration, sediment organic carbon content and porewater inorganic carbon as well as detrital macroalgae remaining in the sediment one month after enrichment. Microalgal biomass and macrofauna composition were measured at the same time. Macroalgal carbon mineralization and transfer to the benthic consumers were also investigated during decomposition at low enrichment level (200 g WW). The interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment did not modify sediment organic carbon or benthic respiration. Weak but significant changes were instead found for porewater inorganic carbon and microalgal biomass. Lugworm exclusion caused an increase of porewater carbon and a decrease of microalgal biomass, while detrital enrichment drove these values back to values typical of lugworm-dominated sediments. Lugworm exclusion also decreased the amount of macroalgae remaining into the sediment and accelerated detrital carbon mineralization and CO2 release to the water column. Eventually, the interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment affected macrofauna abundance and diversity, which collapsed at high level of enrichment only when the lugworms were present. This study reveals that in nature the role of this ecosystem engineer may be variable and sometimes have no or even negative effects on stability, conversely to what it should be expected based on current research knowledge. PMID:23805256

Rossi, Francesca; Gribsholt, Britta; Gazeau, Frederic; Di Santo, Valentina; Middelburg, Jack J.

2013-01-01

36

EMBR - A Realtime Animation Engine for Interactive Embodied Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Embodied agents are a powerful paradigm for current and future multimodal interfaces, yet require high eort and expertise for their creation, assembly and animation control. Therefore, open anima- tion engines and high-level control languages are required to make em- bodied agents accessible to researchers and developers. In this paper, we present EMBR, a new realtime character animation engine that of-

Alexis Heloir; Michael Kipp

2009-01-01

37

Genetic Engineering of Animals for Medical Research: Students' Views.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on the results of a survey meant to ascertain the views of 16- to 18-year-old students (n=778) on using animals in medical research. Suggests that students have no greater objection to the use of genetically engineered animals over naturally bred animals in medical research. Contains 16 references. (Author/WRM)

Hill, Ruaraidh; Stanisstreet, Martin; O'Sullivan, Helen; Boyes, Edward

1999-01-01

38

Abstract Ecosystem engineering the physical modifi-cation of habitats by organisms has been proposed as  

E-print Network

-building beaver (Castor canadensis) are clear examples of ecosystem engineers that are abundant throughout by increasing habitat heterogeneity. Dams built by beaver (Castor canaden- sis) dramatically alter riparian

39

Animal Models for Vascular Tissue-Engineering  

PubMed Central

Due to rise in cardiovascular disease throughout the world, there is increasing demand for small diameter blood vessels as replacement grafts. The present review focuses on the animal models that have been used to test small-diameter TEVs with emphasis on the attributes of each model. Small animal models are used to test short-term patency and address mechanistic hypotheses; and large, pre-clinical animal models are employed to test long-term patency, remodeling and function in an environment mimicking human physiology. We also discuss recent clinical trials that employed laboratory fabricated TEVs and showed very promising results. Ultimately, animal models provide a testing platform for optimizing vascular grafts before clinical use in patients without suitable autologous vessels. PMID:23769861

Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

2013-01-01

40

Tabizi Pythons and Clendro Hawks: Using Imaginary Animals to Achieve Real Knowledge about Ecosystems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author describes how he used to teach a unit on food webs and ecosystems using actual food webs as models. However, the models used by the author tend to be either too simplistic or too complicated for his students. A few years ago, he solved these problems by making up his own food web, complete with invented plants and animals. The model has…

Rockow, Michael

2007-01-01

41

Summertime CO2 fluxes and ecosystem respiration from marine animal colony tundra in maritime Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and ecosystem respiration (ER) were investigated at penguin, seal and skua colony tundra and the adjacent animal-lacking tundra sites in maritime Antarctica. Net CO2 fluxes showed a large difference between marine animal colonies and animal-lacking tundra sites. The mean NEE from penguin, seal and skua colony tundra sites ranged from -37.2 to 5.2 mg CO2 m-2 h-1, whereas animal-lacking tundra sites experienced a larger net gain of CO2 with the mean flux range from -85.6 to -23.9 mg CO2 m-2 h-1. Ecosystem respiration rates at penguin colony tundra sites (mean 201.3 ± 31.4 mg CO2 m-2 h-1) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those at penguin-lacking tundra sites (64.0-87.1 mg CO2 m-2 h-1). The gross photosynthesis (Pg) showed a consistent trend to ER with the highest mean Pg (219.7 ± 34.5 mg CO2 m-2 h-1) at penguin colony tundra sites. When all the data were combined from different types of tundra ecosystems, summertime tundra NEE showed a weak or strong positive correlation with air temperature, 0-10 cm soil temperature or precipitation. The NEE from marine animal colony and animal-lacking tundra was significantly positively correlated (P < 0.001) with soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) contents and C:N ratios. The ER showed a significant exponential correlation (P < 0.01) with mean 0-15 cm soil temperature, and much higher Q10 value (9.97) was obtained compared with other terrestrial ecosystems, indicating greater temperature sensitivity of tundra ecosystem respiration. Our results indicate that marine animals and the deposition of their excreta might have an important effect on tundra CO2 exchanges and ecosystem respiration, and current climate warming will further decrease tundra CO2 sink in maritime Antarctica.

Zhu, Renbin; Bao, Tao; Wang, Qing; Xu, Hua; Liu, Yashu

2014-12-01

42

‘Ethical concepts regarding the genetic engineering of laboratory animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intrinsic value and animal integrity are two key concepts in the debate on the ethics of the genetic engineering of laboratory\\u000a animals. These concepts have, on the one hand, a theoretical origin and are, on the other hand, based on the moral beliefs\\u000a of people not directly involved in the genetic modification of animals. This ‘external’ origin raises the question

R. B. M. de Vries

2006-01-01

43

Standard Review Genetic engineering, ecosystem change, and agriculture: an update  

E-print Network

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), alternatively called biotech crops, dominate soybean and cotton production and are rapidly increasing their fraction of market share for maize and rice in the U.S. Engineered canola is important in Canada, soybeans are dominant in Argentina and Brazil, and cotton is prominent in China and India. Adoption is much slower elsewhere, in large part due to concerns for potential ecosystem effects that may occur through development of weedy plants, by selection of herbicide resistant weeds and by effects of insecticidal proteins on nontarget insects. The precautionary principle is invoked by critics concerned that one must know in advance the effects of GMOs before releasing them. Alteration of weed species composition of agricultural fields is well documented to occur under herbicide selection pressure. Gene flow to wild relatives of crop plants can be shown under herbicide selection, and one instance (sunflower) is provided for insect resistance transfer leading to increased seed production by a weedy relative. Detailed stewardship programs have been developed by seed producers to minimize risks of gene flow. Although herbicides and insecticides are known to have major effects on agroecosystems, the ecosystem impacts of GMOs per se, thus far appear to be small.

Lawrence C. Davis

2006-01-01

44

Animal Models for the Evaluation of Tissue Engineering Constructs  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the last decade, tissue engineering has attracted a considerable amount of attention in medical research. Obviously, tissue-engineered\\u000a constructs need to be tested for their safety and efficacy before they can be used in the daily clinic. At present, animal\\u000a models offer the best possibility to do so. Each medical specialty favors its own specific model to test tissue-engineered\\u000a constructs.

Daniel A. W. Oortgiesen; Gert J. Meijer; Rob B. M. Vries; X. Frank Walboomers; John A. Jansen

45

Host-plant genotypic diversity mediates the distribution of an ecosystem engineer.  

PubMed

Ecosystem engineers affect ecological communities by physically modifying the environment. Understanding the factors determining the distribution of engineers offers a powerful predictive tool for community ecology. In this study, we examine whether the goldenrod bunch gall midge (Rhopalomyia solidaginis) functions as an ecosystem engineer in an old-field ecosystem by altering the composition of arthropod species associated with a dominant host plant, Solidago altissima. We also examine the suite of factors that could affect the distribution and abundance of this ecosystem engineer. The presence of bunch galls increased species richness and altered the structure of associated arthropod communities. The best predictors of gall abundance were host-plant genotype and plot-level genotypic diversity. We found positive, nonadditive effects of genotypic diversity on gall abundance. Our results indicate that incorporating a genetic component in studies of ecosystem engineers can help predict their distribution and abundance, and ultimately their effects on biodiversity. PMID:17824442

Crawford, Kerri M; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Sanders, Nathan J

2007-08-01

46

Ecosystem engineering by invasive exotic beavers reduces in-stream diversity and enhances ecosystem function in Cape Horn, Chile.  

PubMed

Species invasions are of global significance, but predicting their impacts can be difficult. Introduced ecosystem engineers, however, provide an opportunity to test the underlying mechanisms that may be common to all invasive engineers and link relationships between changes in diversity and ecosystem function, thereby providing explanatory power for observed ecological patterns. Here we test specific predictions for an invasive ecosystem engineer by quantifying the impacts of habitat and resource modifications caused by North American beavers (Castor canadensis) on aquatic macroinvertebrate community structure and stream ecosystem function in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Chile. We compared responses to beavers in three habitat types: (1) forested (unimpacted) stream reaches, (2) beaver ponds, and (3) sites immediately downstream of beaver dams in four streams. We found that beaver engineering in ponds created taxonomically simplified, but more productive, benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Specifically, macroinvertebrate richness, diversity and number of functional feeding groups were reduced by half, while abundance, biomass and secondary production increased three- to fivefold in beaver ponds compared to forested sites. Reaches downstream of beaver ponds were very similar to natural forested sections. Beaver invasion effects on both community and ecosystem parameters occurred predominantly via increased retention of fine particulate organic matter, which was associated with reduced macroinvertebrate richness and diversity (via homogenization of benthic microhabitat) and increased macroinvertebrate biomass and production (via greater food availability). Beaver modifications to macroinvertebrate community structure were largely confined to ponds, but increased benthic production in beaver-modified habitats adds to energy retention and flow for the entire stream ecosystem. Furthermore, the effects of beavers on taxa richness (negative) and measures of macroinvertebrate biomass (positive) were inversely related. Thus, while a generally positive relationship between diversity and ecosystem function has been found in a variety of systems, this work shows how they can be decoupled by responding to alterative mechanisms. PMID:17587063

Anderson, Christopher B; Rosemond, Amy D

2007-11-01

47

Ammonia Emissions and Animal Agriculture Susan W. Gay, Extension Engineer, Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech  

E-print Network

Engineering, Virginia Tech Katharine F. Knowlton, Assistant Professor, Dairy Science, Virginia Tech on the environment. Although most environmental concerns related to animal agriculture have focused on water quality by-product of animal waste due to the often inefficient conversion of feed nitrogen into animal

Liskiewicz, Maciej

48

The Concept of Organisms as Ecosystem Engineers Ten Years On: Progress, Limitations, and Challenges  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer- reviewed article from Bioscience is about the arguments surrounding the concept of ecosystem engineers. The modification of the physical environment by organisms is a critical interaction in most ecosystems. The concept of ecosystem engineering acknowledges this fact and allows ecologists to develop the conceptual tools for uncovering general patterns and building broadly applicable models. Although the concept has occasioned some controversy during its development, it is quickly gaining acceptance among ecologists. We outline the nature of some of these controversies and describe some of the major insights gained by viewing ecological systems through the lens of ecosystem engineering. We close by discussing areas of research where we believe the concept of organisms as ecosystem engineers will be most likely to lead to significant insights into the structure and function of ecological systems.

JUSTIN P. WRIGHT and CLIVE G. JONES (;)

2006-03-01

49

Climate change impacts on potential recruitment in an ecosystem engineer  

PubMed Central

Climate variability and the rapid warming of seas undoubtedly have huge ramifications for biological processes such as reproduction. As such, gametogenesis and spawning were investigated at two sites over 200 km apart on the south coast of Ireland in an ecosystem engineer, the common cockle, Cerastoderma edule. Both sites are classed as Special Areas of Conservation (SACs), but are of different water quality. Cerastoderma edule plays a significant biological role by recycling nutrients and affecting sediment structure, with impacts upon assemblage biomass and functional diversity. It plays a key role in food webs, being a common foodstuff for a number of marine birds including the oystercatcher. Both before and during the study (early 2010–mid 2011), Ireland experienced its two coldest winters for 50 years. As the research demonstrated only slight variation in the spawning period between sites, despite site differences in water and environmental quality, temperature and variable climatic conditions were the dominant factor controlling gametogenesis. The most significant finding was that the spawning period in the cockle extended over a greater number of months compared with previous studies and that gametogenesis commenced over winter rather than in spring. Extremely cold winters may impact on the cockle by accelerating and extending the onset and development of gametogenesis. Whether this impact is positive or negative would depend on the associated events occurring on which the cockle depends, that is, presence of primary producers and spring blooms, which would facilitate conversion of this extended gametogenesis into successful recruitment. PMID:23532482

Morgan, Emer; O' Riordan, Ruth M; Culloty, Sarah C

2013-01-01

50

Meta-ecosystem engineering: nutrient fluxes reveal intraspecific and interspecific feedbacks in fragmented mussel beds.  

PubMed

Ecologists still have to elucidate the complex feedback interactions operating among biodiversity and ecosystem processes in engineered systems. To address this, a field experiment was conducted to mimic natural mussel bed meta-ecosystems (Mytilus spp.) of the lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Quebec, Canada) and partition the effects of their biotic and abiotic properties and spatial structure on ecosystem processes and community dynamics of associated macro-invertebrates. We found positive intraspecific feedbacks between mussels and their recruits, and negative interspecific feedbacks between mussels and their associated ecosystem. These feedbacks were associated with mussel bed ecosystem processes (fluxes of ammonium and oxygen). In addition, we showed that proximity between mussel patches increased within-patch nutrient fluxes. Our study revealed the potential for meta-ecosystem engineering to drive feedback interactions between community and ecosystem functioning in marine fragmented systems. It also shows the relevance of meta-ecosystem theories as a conceptual framework to elucidate biotic and abiotic processes controlling ecosystem and community structure. Such framework could contribute to ecosystem-based management of spatially structured systems such as reserve networks and fragmented ecosystems. PMID:22624314

Largaespada, César; Guichard, Frédéric; Archambault, Philippe

2012-02-01

51

Building a Research University Ecosystem: the Case of Software Engineering Education at Sofia University  

E-print Network

it is the largest and most prestigious educational and scientific centre in the country ­ with over 35,000 students the concept of building research university ecosystem. Section 5 presents the educational model used in Sofia1 Building a Research University Ecosystem: the Case of Software Engineering Education at Sofia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp  

E-print Network

Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural selenium (Se), occurring as oxidized inorganic selenate from hypersalinized agricultural drainage water, bioaccumulated the highest Se concentrations of all organisms tested. INTRODUCTION Selenium is a naturally

53

Phosphorus-mobilization ecosystem engineering: the roles of cluster roots and carboxylate exudation in young P-limited ecosystems  

PubMed Central

Background Carboxylate-releasing cluster roots of Proteaceae play a key role in acquiring phosphorus (P) from ancient nutrient-impoverished soils in Australia. However, cluster roots are also found in Proteaceae on young, P-rich soils in Chile where they allow P acquisition from soils that strongly sorb P. Scope Unlike Proteaceae in Australia that tend to proficiently remobilize P from senescent leaves, Chilean Proteaceae produce leaf litter rich in P. Consequently, they may act as ecosystem engineers, providing P for plants without specialized roots to access sorbed P. We propose a similar ecosystem-engineering role for species that release large amounts of carboxylates in other relatively young, strongly P-sorbing substrates, e.g. young acidic volcanic deposits and calcareous dunes. Many of these species also fix atmospheric nitrogen and release nutrient-rich litter, but their role as ecosystem engineers is commonly ascribed only to their diazotrophic nature. Conclusions We propose that the P-mobilizing capacity of Proteaceae on young soils, which contain an abundance of P, but where P is poorly available, in combination with inefficient nutrient remobilization from senescing leaves allows these species to function as ecosystem engineers. We suggest that diazotrophic species that colonize young soils with strong P-sorption potential should be considered for their positive effect on P availability, as well as their widely accepted role in nitrogen fixation. Their P-mobilizing activity possibly also enhances their nitrogen-fixing capacity. These diazotrophic species may therefore facilitate the establishment and growth of species with less-efficient P-uptake strategies on more-developed soils with low P availability through similar mechanisms. We argue that the significance of cluster roots and high carboxylate exudation in the development of young ecosystems is probably far more important than has been envisaged thus far. PMID:22700940

Lambers, Hans; Bishop, John G.; Hopper, Stephen D.; Laliberte, Etienne; Zuniga-Feest, Alejandra

2012-01-01

54

Genetically engineered mice as animal models for NIDDM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetically engineered animals carrying defined alterations in their genome can represent invaluable tools for better understanding complex polygenic diseases such as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) at the molecular level. The structure or expression of a number of genes potentially involved in insulin action or pancreatic ?-cell function have recently been altered in the mouse using transgenic or gene-targeting approaches. The

Rajiv L Joshi; Betty Lamothe; Danielle Bucchini; Jacques Jami

1997-01-01

55

Interactive disturbance effects of two disparate ecosystem engineers in North American shortgrass steppe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disturbances such as fire, grazing, and soil mixing by animals interact to shape vegetation in grassland ecosystems. Animal-generated\\u000a disturbances are unique in that they arise from a suite of behaviors that are themselves subject to modification by external\\u000a factors. The manner in which co-occurring animal taxa interact to alter vegetation is a function of their respective behaviors,\\u000a which shape the

Christina Alba-Lynn; James K. Detling

2008-01-01

56

Exotic Ecosystem Engineers Change the Emergence of Plants from the  

E-print Network

profoundly impacts native ecosystems. Exotic earthworms were shown to alter plant community composition of the understory of deciduous forests previously devoid of earthworms. We investigated the effect of two exotic earthworm species (Lumbricus terrestris L. and Octolasion tyrtae- um Savigny) belonging to different

Johnson, Edward A.

57

Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on ecosystems includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Science, Houghton M.

58

Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight from a cross-site study.  

PubMed

Climate change will result in reduced soil water availability in much of the world either due to changes in precipitation or increased temperature and evapotranspiration. How communities of mites and nematodes may respond to changes in moisture availability is not well known, yet these organisms play important roles in decomposition and nutrient cycling processes. We determined how communities of these organisms respond to changes in moisture availability and whether common patterns occur along fine-scale gradients of soil moisture within four individual ecosystem types (mesic, xeric and arid grasslands and a polar desert) located in the western United States and Antarctica, as well as across a cross-ecosystem moisture gradient (CEMG) of all four ecosystems considered together. An elevation transect of three sampling plots was monitored within each ecosystem and soil samples were collected from these plots and from existing experimental precipitation manipulations within each ecosystem once in fall of 2009 and three times each in 2010 and 2011. Mites and nematodes were sorted to trophic groups and analyzed to determine community responses to changes in soil moisture availability. We found that while both mites and nematodes increased with available soil moisture across the CEMG, within individual ecosystems, increases in soil moisture resulted in decreases to nematode communities at all but the arid grassland ecosystem; mites showed no responses at any ecosystem. In addition, we found changes in proportional abundances of mite and nematode trophic groups as soil moisture increased within individual ecosystems, which may result in shifts within soil food webs with important consequences for ecosystem functioning. We suggest that communities of soil animals at local scales may respond predictably to changes in moisture availability regardless of ecosystem type but that additional factors, such as climate variability, vegetation composition, and soil properties may influence this relationship over larger scales. PMID:24399762

Sylvain, Zachary A; Wall, Diana H; Cherwin, Karie L; Peters, Debra P C; Reichmann, Lara G; Sala, Osvaldo E

2014-08-01

59

[Approaches to evaluate the effects of hydraulic engineering on river ecosystem services].  

PubMed

To evaluate the effects of hydraulic engineering on river ecosystem services, a set of indicator system and quantitative methods, which included the appraisal principles, classification of river services and indicator selection were established. The river ecosystem services could be classified into four types: water supply and related services (e.g., transportation and hydroelectric generation), ecological supporting functions, regulation and control, and aesthetic and cultural services. Based on relative studies, the quantitative approaches were established to measure the indices reflecting the ecological effects of hydraulic engineering involving the change of biodiversity and purification services. The methods mainly contained exponent methods and BOD-DO model. These approaches will be helpful for further analysis and assessment on the effects of hydraulic engineering impact on river ecosystem services. PMID:12924145

Lu, Chunxia; Xie, Gaodi; Cheng, Shengkui; Yu, Guirui

2003-05-01

60

Forest Fragmentation and Selective Logging Have Inconsistent Effects on Multiple Animal-Mediated Ecosystem Processes in a Tropical Forest  

PubMed Central

Forest fragmentation and selective logging are two main drivers of global environmental change and modify biodiversity and environmental conditions in many tropical forests. The consequences of these changes for the functioning of tropical forest ecosystems have rarely been explored in a comprehensive approach. In a Kenyan rainforest, we studied six animal-mediated ecosystem processes and recorded species richness and community composition of all animal taxa involved in these processes. We used linear models and a formal meta-analysis to test whether forest fragmentation and selective logging affected ecosystem processes and biodiversity and used structural equation models to disentangle direct from biodiversity-related indirect effects of human disturbance on multiple ecosystem processes. Fragmentation increased decomposition and reduced antbird predation, while selective logging consistently increased pollination, seed dispersal and army-ant raiding. Fragmentation modified species richness or community composition of five taxa, whereas selective logging did not affect any component of biodiversity. Changes in the abundance of functionally important species were related to lower predation by antbirds and higher decomposition rates in small forest fragments. The positive effects of selective logging on bee pollination, bird seed dispersal and army-ant raiding were direct, i.e. not related to changes in biodiversity, and were probably due to behavioural changes of these highly mobile animal taxa. We conclude that animal-mediated ecosystem processes respond in distinct ways to different types of human disturbance in Kakamega Forest. Our findings suggest that forest fragmentation affects ecosystem processes indirectly by changes in biodiversity, whereas selective logging influences processes directly by modifying local environmental conditions and resource distributions. The positive to neutral effects of selective logging on ecosystem processes show that the functionality of tropical forests can be maintained in moderately disturbed forest fragments. Conservation concepts for tropical forests should thus include not only remaining pristine forests but also functionally viable forest remnants. PMID:22114695

Schleuning, Matthias; Farwig, Nina; Peters, Marcell K.; Bergsdorf, Thomas; Bleher, Barbel; Brandl, Roland; Dalitz, Helmut; Fischer, Georg; Freund, Wolfram; Gikungu, Mary W.; Hagen, Melanie; Garcia, Francisco Hita; Kagezi, Godfrey H.; Kaib, Manfred; Kraemer, Manfred; Lung, Tobias; Schaab, Gertrud; Templin, Mathias; Uster, Dana; Wagele, J. Wolfgang; Bohning-Gaese, Katrin

2011-01-01

61

Measuring the contribution of benthic ecosystem engineering species to the ecosystem services of an estuary: A case study of burrowing shrimps in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon  

EPA Science Inventory

Burrowing shrimps are regarded as ecosystem engineering species in many coastal ecosystems worldwide, including numerous estuaries of the west coast of North America (Baja California to British Columbia). In estuaries of the U.S. Pacific Northwest, two species of large burrowing...

62

Measuring the contribution of benthic ecosystem engineering species to the ecosystem services of an estuary: A case study of burrowing shrimps in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon - April 2009  

EPA Science Inventory

Burrowing shrimps are regarded as ecosystem engineering species in many coastal ecosystems worldwide, including numerous estuaries of the west coast of North America (Baja California to British Columbia). In estuaries of the U.S. Pacific Northwest, two species of large burrowing...

63

Measuring Animal Movements in a Natural Ecosystem: A Mark-Recapture Investigation Using Stream-Dwelling Snails  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this investigation, students measure and describe movements of animals in a natural ecosystem. Students mark stream-dwelling snails with nail polish, then search for these snails 1-7 days later. Distances and directions moved by recaptured snails are recorded. Simple statistical techniques are used to answer specific research questions and…

Stewart, Timothy W.

2007-01-01

64

Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This "Ecosystems" module has four units of instruction. The units include: natural selection, population balance, exchange cycles, and environmental protection. Each module has a "Hazards" link that leads to a menu of study units on various environmental hazards (such as oil spills, farm runoff, insecticides, and so on).

Klemm, W. R.

2002-01-01

65

Fish, Floods, and Ecosystem Engineers: Aquatic Conservation in the Okavango Delta, Botswana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Okavango Delta, Botswana, is a major wetland surrounded by the Kalahari Desert. The delta supports a diverse fish fauna that depends on highly seasonal flooding from inflowing rivers, and on the actions of ecosystem engineers (hippopotamuses, elephants, and termites), for creation and maintenance of their habitats. Conflicts in resource use, especially water, are likely to affect fish populations and the Okavango ecosystem in the near future. We present conceptual models of this remarkable aquatic ecosystem in relation to fish and fisheries as the basis for future research and conservation efforts. Developing understanding of the environmental flow requirements of the delta is key to the management of the Okavango Delta as an ecosystem supporting diverse and abundant fish and wildlife. Once developed, this understanding can be used to allocate water within the Okavango watershed.

Peter Moyle (University of California at Davis;Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology)

2009-01-01

66

Balkanized research in ecological engineering revealed by a bibliometric analysis of earthworms and ecosystem services.  

E-print Network

1 Balkanized research in ecological engineering revealed by a bibliometric analysis of earthworms are characterized by the use of organisms rather than energy-consuming technologies. Although earthworms of the association of ,,earthworms and other terms such as ecosystem services (primary production, nutrient cycling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Is earthworms' dispersal facilitated by the ecosystem engineering activities of conspecifics?1 Gal Caro1*  

E-print Network

1 Is earthworms' dispersal facilitated by the ecosystem engineering activities of conspecifics?1 2 of earthworm's galleries on their speed of25 movements during dispersal events in the soil. We quantified, by using X-rays, the dispersal26 behaviour of earthworms in the soil. The observations were conducted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

Dwarf eelgrass, Zostera japonica: a malevolent, benevolent, or benign invasive ecosystem engineer?  

EPA Science Inventory

Dwarf eelgrass, Zostera japonica, is an introduced ecosystem engineering species first reported on the US west coast in 1957. In some US Pacific Northwest estuaries its areal coverage now exceeds that of the native eelgrass species, Zostera marina. Natural resource management?s...

69

Native and Introduced Ecosystem Engineers Produce Contrasting Effects on Estuarine Infaunal Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cordgrasses in the genus Spartina are good examples of ecosystem engineers that modify habitat structure in estuaries throughout the world. In San Francisco\\u000a Bay, California, USA, marshes containing native California cordgrass (Spartina foliosa) are being invaded by a hybrid (S. alterniflora × S. foliosa) formed after introduction of S. alterniflora. This study compared vegetation, sediment structure, and infaunal invertebrates in

Elizabeth D. Brusati; Edwin D. Grosholz

2006-01-01

70

Predictability of ecosystem engineering effects on species richness across environmental variability and spatial scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1 The effect of physical ecosystem engineering - structurally mediated modification of the abiotic environment by organisms - on species richness and composition probably depends on the area of observation and environmental context. 2 We develop specific hypotheses to evaluate how such effects will vary with spatial scale and environmental variability, and test these hypotheses by examining the effects

JUSTIN P. WRIGHT; CLIVE G. JONES; BERTRAND BOEKEN; MOSHE SHACHAK

2006-01-01

71

Pre-Columbian agricultural landscapes, ecosystem engineers, and self-organized patchiness in Amazonia  

PubMed Central

The scale and nature of pre-Columbian human impacts in Amazonia are currently hotly debated. Whereas pre-Columbian people dramatically changed the distribution and abundance of species and habitats in some parts of Amazonia, their impact in other parts is less clear. Pioneer research asked whether their effects reached even further, changing how ecosystems function, but few in-depth studies have examined mechanisms underpinning the resilience of these modifications. Combining archeology, archeobotany, paleoecology, soil science, ecology, and aerial imagery, we show that pre-Columbian farmers of the Guianas coast constructed large raised-field complexes, growing on them crops including maize, manioc, and squash. Farmers created physical and biogeochemical heterogeneity in flat, marshy environments by constructing raised fields. When these fields were later abandoned, the mosaic of well-drained islands in the flooded matrix set in motion self-organizing processes driven by ecosystem engineers (ants, termites, earthworms, and woody plants) that occur preferentially on abandoned raised fields. Today, feedbacks generated by these ecosystem engineers maintain the human-initiated concentration of resources in these structures. Engineer organisms transport materials to abandoned raised fields and modify the structure and composition of their soils, reducing erodibility. The profound alteration of ecosystem functioning in these landscapes coconstructed by humans and nature has important implications for understanding Amazonian history and biodiversity. Furthermore, these landscapes show how sustainability of food-production systems can be enhanced by engineering into them fallows that maintain ecosystem services and biodiversity. Like anthropogenic dark earths in forested Amazonia, these self-organizing ecosystems illustrate the ecological complexity of the legacy of pre-Columbian land use. PMID:20385814

McKey, Doyle; Rostain, Stephen; Iriarte, Jose; Glaser, Bruno; Birk, Jago Jonathan; Holst, Irene; Renard, Delphine

2010-01-01

72

Roadmap: Engineering Technology Computer Design Animation and Game Design Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Engineering Technology ­ Computer Design Animation and Game Design ­ Bachelor of Science: [14 Credit Hours] CDAG 34001 Computer Animation III 3 CDAG 34004 Technology of Light, Color, Design 3 See Kent Core Summary on page 2 #12;Roadmap: Engineering Technology ­ Computer Design Animation

Khan, Javed I.

73

Knowledge translation in rehabilitation engineering research and development: a knowledge ecosystem framework.  

PubMed

Rehabilitation engineering is concerned with technology innovations and technology-mediated treatments for the improvement of quality of care and quality of life of individuals with disability. Unlike many other fields of health research, the knowledge translation (KT) cycle of rehabilitation engineering research and development (R&D) is often considered incomplete until a technology product or technology-facilitated therapy is available to target clientele. As such, the KT journey of rehabilitation engineering R&D is extremely challenging, necessarily involving knowledge exchange among numerous players across multiple sectors. In this article, we draw on recent literature about the knowledge trichotomy in technology-based rehabilitation R&D and propose a knowledge ecosystem to frame the rehabilitation engineering KT process from need to product. Identifying the principal process of the ecosystem as one of knowledge flow, we elucidate the roles of repository and networked knowledge, identify key consumers and producers in a trinity of communities of practice, and draw on knowledge management literature to describe different knowledge flows. The article concludes with instantiations of this knowledge ecosystem for 2 local rehabilitation engineering research-development-commercialization endeavors. PMID:23260777

Chau, Tom; Moghimi, Saba; Popovic, Milos R

2013-01-01

74

Reducing the number of laboratory animals used in tissue engineering research by restricting the variety of animal models. Articular cartilage tissue engineering as a case study.  

PubMed

The use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research is an important underexposed ethical issue. Several ethical questions may be raised about this use of animals. This article focuses on the possibilities of reducing the number of animals used. Given that there is considerable debate about the adequacy of the current animal models in tissue engineering research, we investigate whether it is possible to reduce the number of laboratory animals by selecting and using only those models that have greatest predictive value for future clinical application of the tissue engineered product. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering is used as a case study. Based on a study of the scientific literature and interviews with leading experts in the field, an overview is provided of the animal models used and the advantages and disadvantages of each model, particularly in terms of extrapolation to the human situation. Starting from this overview, it is shown that, by skipping the small models and using only one large preclinical model, it is indeed possible to restrict the number of animal models, thereby reducing the number of laboratory animals used. Moreover, it is argued that the selection of animal models should become more evidence based and that researchers should seize more opportunities to choose or create characteristics in the animal models that increase their predictive value. PMID:22571623

de Vries, Rob B M; Buma, Pieter; Leenaars, Marlies; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Gordijn, Bert

2012-12-01

75

The net return from animal activity in agro-ecosystems: trading off benefits from ecosystem services against costs from crop damage.  

PubMed

Animals provide benefits to agriculture through the provision of ecosystem services, but also inflict costs such as damaging crops. These benefits and costs are mostly examined independently, rather than comparing the trade-offs of animal activity in the same system and quantifying the net return from beneficial minus detrimental activities. Here, I examine the net return associated with the activity of seed-eating birds in almond orchards by quantifying the economic costs and benefits of bird consumption of almonds. Pre-harvest, the consumption of harvestable almonds by birds cost growers AUD$57.50 ha (-1) when averaged across the entire plantation. Post-harvest, the same bird species provide an ecosystem service by removing mummified nuts from trees that growers otherwise need to remove to reduce threats from fungal infection or insect pest infestations. The value of this ecosystem service ranged from AUD$82.50 ha (-1)-$332.50 ha (-1) based on the replacement costs of mechanical or manual removal of mummified nuts, respectively. Hence, bird consumption of almonds yielded a positive net return of AUD$25-$275 ha (-1) averaged across the entire plantation. However, bird activity varied spatially resulting in positive net returns occurring primarily at the edges of crops where activity was higher, compared to negative net returns in crop interiors. Moreover, partial mummy nut removal by birds meant that bird activity may only reduce costs to growers rather than replace these costs completely. Similar cost-benefit trade-offs exist across nature, and quantifying net returns can better inform land management decisions such as when to control pests or promote ecosystem service provision. PMID:25285202

Luck, Gary W

2013-01-01

76

The net return from animal activity in agro-ecosystems: trading off benefits from ecosystem services against costs from crop damage  

PubMed Central

Animals provide benefits to agriculture through the provision of ecosystem services, but also inflict costs such as damaging crops. These benefits and costs are mostly examined independently, rather than comparing the trade-offs of animal activity in the same system and quantifying the net return from beneficial minus detrimental activities. Here, I examine the net return associated with the activity of seed-eating birds in almond orchards by quantifying the economic costs and benefits of bird consumption of almonds. Pre-harvest, the consumption of harvestable almonds by birds cost growers AUD$57.50 ha -1 when averaged across the entire plantation. Post-harvest, the same bird species provide an ecosystem service by removing mummified nuts from trees that growers otherwise need to remove to reduce threats from fungal infection or insect pest infestations. The value of this ecosystem service ranged from AUD$82.50 ha -1–$332.50 ha -1 based on the replacement costs of mechanical or manual removal of mummified nuts, respectively. Hence, bird consumption of almonds yielded a positive net return of AUD$25–$275 ha -1 averaged across the entire plantation. However, bird activity varied spatially resulting in positive net returns occurring primarily at the edges of crops where activity was higher, compared to negative net returns in crop interiors. Moreover, partial mummy nut removal by birds meant that bird activity may only reduce costs to growers rather than replace these costs completely. Similar cost-benefit trade-offs exist across nature, and quantifying net returns can better inform land management decisions such as when to control pests or promote ecosystem service provision. PMID:25285202

Luck, Gary W

2014-01-01

77

Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on biodiversity within ecosystems and within species. Students visit a local area and collect leaves to demonstrate how diverse life can exist within a small area. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, an audio-enhanced vocabulary list, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

2007-12-12

78

Roadmap: Engineering Technology -Computer Design, Animation and Game Design -Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

Animation Theory 3 EERT 22018 PC/Network Engineering and Troubleshooting or TECH 33016 PC/Network Engineering and Troubleshooting 3 MATH 11022 Trigonometry 3 KMC Kent Core Requirement 3 Semester Six [13

Khan, Javed I.

79

Earthworms, as ecosystem engineers, influence multiple aspects of a salamander’s ecology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecosystem engineers create habitat that can be used by other species in multiple ways, such as refuges from predators, places\\u000a to breed, or areas with increased prey resources. I conducted a series of enclosure experiments to: (1) determine if salamanders\\u000a use earthworm burrows, and (2) examine the potential influence of earthworm burrow use and indirect effects on salamander\\u000a intra- and

Tami S. Ransom

2011-01-01

80

Evidence for and geomorphologic consequences of a reptilian ecosystem engineer: The burrowing cascade initiated by the Gopher Tortoise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physical ecosystem engineers often make major, durable physical constructs that can provide living space for other species and can structure local animal communities over evolutionary time. In Florida, a medium sized chelonian, the Gopher Tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) will excavate extensive subterranean chambers that can endure for long periods of time. The tortoise starts a 'burrowing cascade', by first excavating a larger burrow that may extend 10 m, which is then re-engineered by Florida Mice (Podomys floridanus) and other rodents that dig smaller side-burrows and pockets. This sequence is often followed by an invertebrate, the camel cricket (Ceuthophilus labibuli) which is reported to excavate even smaller chambers. Our first aim was to quantify the zoogeomorphic impact of this burrowing cascade by measuring the amount of soil excavated in a large sample of burrows in two communities. Secondly, we hypothesized that the high biodiversity reported for these structures might be related to the quasi-fractal nature of the geometry, following the work of Frontier (1987). To visualize this underground geometry, we used high-resolution 3D Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), which provided images and insights previously unobtainable using excavations or 2D GPR. Our images verified that the active tortoise burrow had a spiraling shape, but also showed splits in the larger burrow apparently dug by tortoises. For the first time, the smaller Florida Mouse burrows were imaged, showing side loops that exit and re-renter the tortoise burrow. This study also presents new information by making the discovery of numerous remnants of past tortoise burrows underground in the sampling grid surrounding the active burrow. Our third aim was to interpret our field results with previous ecological field studies to evaluate the strength of evidence that this species ranks as an ecosystem engineer.

Kinlaw, A.; Grasmueck, M.

2012-07-01

81

Habitat-Mediated Variation in the Importance of Ecosystem Engineers for Secondary Cavity Nesters in a Nest Web  

PubMed Central

Through physical state changes in biotic or abiotic materials, ecosystem engineers modulate resource availability to other organisms and are major drivers of evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Understanding whether and how ecosystem engineers are interchangeable for resource users in different habitats is a largely neglected topic in ecosystem engineering research that can improve our understanding of the structure of communities. We addressed this issue in a cavity-nest web (1999–2011). In aspen groves, the presence of mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides) and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolour) nests was positively related to the density of cavities supplied by northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), which provided the most abundant cavities (1.61 cavities/ha). Flickers in aspen groves provided numerous nesting cavities to bluebirds (66%) and swallows (46%), despite previous research showing that flicker cavities are avoided by swallows. In continuous mixed forests, however, the presence of nesting swallows was mainly related to cavity density of red-naped sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis), which provided the most abundant cavities (0.52 cavities/ha), and to cavity density of hairy woodpeckers (Picoides villosus), which provided few (0.14 cavities/ha) but high-quality cavities. Overall, sapsuckers and hairy woodpeckers provided 86% of nesting cavities to swallows in continuous forests. In contrast, the presence of nesting bluebirds in continuous forests was associated with the density of cavities supplied by all the ecosystem engineers. These results suggest that (i) habitat type may mediate the associations between ecosystem engineers and resource users, and (ii) different ecosystem engineers may be interchangeable for resource users depending on the quantity and quality of resources that each engineer supplies in each habitat type. We, therefore, urge the incorporation of the variation in the quantity and quality of resources provided by ecosystem engineers across habitats into models that assess community dynamics to improve our understanding of the importance of ecosystem engineers in shaping ecological communities. PMID:24587211

Robles, Hugo; Martin, Kathy

2014-01-01

82

Habitat-mediated variation in the importance of ecosystem engineers for secondary cavity nesters in a nest web.  

PubMed

Through physical state changes in biotic or abiotic materials, ecosystem engineers modulate resource availability to other organisms and are major drivers of evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Understanding whether and how ecosystem engineers are interchangeable for resource users in different habitats is a largely neglected topic in ecosystem engineering research that can improve our understanding of the structure of communities. We addressed this issue in a cavity-nest web (1999-2011). In aspen groves, the presence of mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides) and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolour) nests was positively related to the density of cavities supplied by northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), which provided the most abundant cavities (1.61 cavities/ha). Flickers in aspen groves provided numerous nesting cavities to bluebirds (66%) and swallows (46%), despite previous research showing that flicker cavities are avoided by swallows. In continuous mixed forests, however, the presence of nesting swallows was mainly related to cavity density of red-naped sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis), which provided the most abundant cavities (0.52 cavities/ha), and to cavity density of hairy woodpeckers (Picoides villosus), which provided few (0.14 cavities/ha) but high-quality cavities. Overall, sapsuckers and hairy woodpeckers provided 86% of nesting cavities to swallows in continuous forests. In contrast, the presence of nesting bluebirds in continuous forests was associated with the density of cavities supplied by all the ecosystem engineers. These results suggest that (i) habitat type may mediate the associations between ecosystem engineers and resource users, and (ii) different ecosystem engineers may be interchangeable for resource users depending on the quantity and quality of resources that each engineer supplies in each habitat type. We, therefore, urge the incorporation of the variation in the quantity and quality of resources provided by ecosystem engineers across habitats into models that assess community dynamics to improve our understanding of the importance of ecosystem engineers in shaping ecological communities. PMID:24587211

Robles, Hugo; Martin, Kathy

2014-01-01

83

Obstructive Nephropathy: Insights from Genetically Engineered Animals Jean-Loup Bascands and Joost P Schanstra*  

E-print Network

1 Obstructive Nephropathy: Insights from Genetically Engineered Animals Jean-Loup Bascands Genetically Engineered Animals. Congenital obstructive nephropathy is the primary cause for end stage renal.1111/j.1523-1755.2005.00486.x #12;2 Short title Obstructive Nephropathy: Insights from Genetically

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

ABE Agricultural and Biological Engineering F9 ADDL Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab G10  

E-print Network

ABE Agricultural and Biological Engineering F9 ADDL Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab G10 AERO Aerospace Science Laboratory C11 AGAD Agricultural Administration Building G8 AHF Animal Holding Facility G10 AQUA Boilermaker Aquatic Center D6 AR Armory G6 ARMS Armstrong (Neil) Hall of Engineering G5 ASTL

85

FIELD CALIBRATION OF SOIL-CORE MICROCOSMS FOR EVALUATING FATE AND EFFECTS OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MICROORGANISMS IN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Pacific Northwest Laboratory compared intact soil-core microcosms and the field for ecosystem structural and functional properties after the introduction of a model genetically engineered microorganism (GEM). This project used two distinct microbial types as model GEMs, Gram nega...

86

Balkanized research in ecological engineering revealed by a bibliometric analysis of earthworms and ecosystem services.  

PubMed

Energy crisis, climate changes, and biodiversity losses have reinforced the drive for more ecologically-based approaches for environmental management. Such approaches are characterized by the use of organisms rather than energy-consuming technologies. Although earthworms are believed to be potentially useful organisms for managing ecosystem services, there is actually no quantification of such a trend in literature. This bibliometric analysis aimed to measure the evolution of the association of "earthworms" and other terms such as ecosystem services (primary production, nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, soil structure, and pollution remediation), "ecological engineering" or "biodiversity," to assess their convergence or divergence through time. In this aim, we calculated the similarity index, an indicator of the paradigmatic proximity defined in applied epistemology, for each year between 1900 and 2009. We documented the scientific fields and the geographical origins of the studies, as well as the land uses, and compare these characteristics with a 25 years old review on earthworm management. The association of earthworm related keywords with ecosystem services related keywords was increasing with time, reflecting the growing interest in earthworm use in biodiversity and ecosystem services management. Conversely, no significant increase in the association between earthworms and disciplines such as ecological engineering or restoration ecology was observed. This demonstrated that general ecologically-based approaches have yet to emerge and that there is little exchange of knowledge, methods or concepts among balkanized application realms. Nevertheless, there is a strong need for crossing the frontiers between fields of application and for developing an umbrella discipline to provide a framework for the use of organisms to manage ecosystem services. PMID:23716007

Blouin, Manuel; Sery, Nicolas; Cluzeau, Daniel; Brun, Jean-Jacques; Bédécarrats, Alain

2013-08-01

87

Balkanized Research in Ecological Engineering Revealed by a Bibliometric Analysis of Earthworms and Ecosystem Services  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energy crisis, climate changes, and biodiversity losses have reinforced the drive for more ecologically-based approaches for environmental management. Such approaches are characterized by the use of organisms rather than energy-consuming technologies. Although earthworms are believed to be potentially useful organisms for managing ecosystem services, there is actually no quantification of such a trend in literature. This bibliometric analysis aimed to measure the evolution of the association of "earthworms" and other terms such as ecosystem services (primary production, nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, soil structure, and pollution remediation), "ecological engineering" or "biodiversity," to assess their convergence or divergence through time. In this aim, we calculated the similarity index, an indicator of the paradigmatic proximity defined in applied epistemology, for each year between 1900 and 2009. We documented the scientific fields and the geographical origins of the studies, as well as the land uses, and compare these characteristics with a 25 years old review on earthworm management. The association of earthworm related keywords with ecosystem services related keywords was increasing with time, reflecting the growing interest in earthworm use in biodiversity and ecosystem services management. Conversely, no significant increase in the association between earthworms and disciplines such as ecological engineering or restoration ecology was observed. This demonstrated that general ecologically-based approaches have yet to emerge and that there is little exchange of knowledge, methods or concepts among balkanized application realms. Nevertheless, there is a strong need for crossing the frontiers between fields of application and for developing an umbrella discipline to provide a framework for the use of organisms to manage ecosystem services.

Blouin, Manuel; Sery, Nicolas; Cluzeau, Daniel; Brun, Jean-Jacques; Bédécarrats, Alain

2013-08-01

88

Animated agents in K-12 engineering outreach: Preferred agent characteristics across age levels  

E-print Network

for animated agents and their individual characteristics, or how those preferences change accord- ingAnimated agents in K-12 engineering outreach: Preferred agent characteristics across age levels Amy 30 March 2013 Keywords: Age levels Agent characteristics Animated agent K-12 outreach a b s t r a c

Reisslein, Martin

89

Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Explore the wonderful world of animals Listen to the animal sound. See if you can identify the animal.Animal sounds. Explore and find out about different animals.Kids Planet Create a animal report using one of the animals found in the web site.Kids Planet,SeaWorld/animals Create a picture of your animal examples are found...Your big backyard ...

Unsworth, Mrs.

2005-03-31

90

Industrialized Animal Production—A Major Source of Nutrient and Microbial Pollution to Aquatic Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Livestock production has undergone massive industrialization in recent decades. Nationwide, millions of swine, poultry, and cattle are raised and fed in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) owned by large, vertically integrated producer corporations. The amount of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) in animal manure produced by CAFOs is enormous. For example, on the North Carolina Coastal Plain alone an estimated 124,000

Michael A. Mallin; Lawrence B. Cahoon

2003-01-01

91

Disturbance regimes, resilience, and recovery of animal communities and habitats in lotic ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disturbance regime is a critical organizing feature of stream communities and ecosystems. The position of a given reach in\\u000a the river basin and the sediment type within that reach are two key determinants of the frequency and intensity of flow-induced\\u000a disturbances. We distinguish between predictable and unpredictable events and suggest that predictable discharge events are\\u000a not disturbances.\\u000a \\u000a We relate the

Seth R. Reice; Robert C. Wissmar; Robert J. Naiman

1990-01-01

92

Ecosystem engineering varies spatially: a test of the vegetation modification paradigm for prairie dogs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Colonial, burrowing herbivores can be engineers of grassland and shrubland ecosystems worldwide. Spatial variation in landscapes suggests caution when extrapolating single-place studies of single species, but lack of data and the need to generalize often leads to ‘model system’ thinking and application of results beyond appropriate statistical inference. Generalizations about the engineering effects of prairie dogs (Cynomys sp.) developed largely from intensive study at a single complex of black-tailed prairie dogs C. ludovicianus in northern mixed prairie, but have been extrapolated to other ecoregions and prairie dog species in North America, and other colonial, burrowing herbivores. We tested the paradigm that prairie dogs decrease vegetation volume and the cover of grasses and tall shrubs, and increase bare ground and forb cover. We sampled vegetation on and off 279 colonies at 13 complexes of 3 prairie dog species widely distributed across 5 ecoregions in North America. The paradigm was generally supported at 7 black-tailed prairie dog complexes in northern mixed prairie, where vegetation volume, grass cover, and tall shrub cover were lower, and bare ground and forb cover were higher, on colonies than at paired off-colony sites. Outside the northern mixed prairie, all 3 prairie dog species consistently reduced vegetation volume, but their effects on cover of plant functional groups varied with prairie dog species and the grazing tolerance of dominant perennial grasses. White-tailed prairie dogs C. leucurus in sagebrush steppe did not reduce shrub cover, whereas black-tailed prairie dogs suppressed shrub cover at all complexes with tall shrubs in the surrounding habitat matrix. Black-tailed prairie dogs in shortgrass steppe and Gunnison's prairie dogs C. gunnisoni in Colorado Plateau grassland both had relatively minor effects on grass cover, which may reflect the dominance of grazing-tolerant shortgrasses at both complexes. Variation in modification of vegetation structure may be understood in terms of the responses of different dominant perennial grasses to intense defoliation and differences in foraging behavior among prairie dog species. Spatial variation in the engineering role of prairie dogs suggests spatial variation in their keystone role, and spatial variation in the roles of other ecosystem engineers. Thus, ecosystem engineering can have a spatial component not evident from single-place studies.

Baker, Bruce W.; Augustine, David J.; Sedgwick, James A.; Lubow, Bruce C.

2013-01-01

93

Local and latitudinal variation in abundance: the mechanisms shaping the distribution of an ecosystem engineer  

PubMed Central

Ecological processes that determine the abundance of species within ecological communities vary across space and time. These scale-dependent processes are especially important when they affect key members of a community, such as ecosystem engineers that create shelter and food resources for other species. Yet, few studies have examined the suite of processes that shape the abundance of ecosystem engineers. Here, we evaluated the relative influence of temporal variation, local processes, and latitude on the abundance of an engineering insect—a rosette-galling midge, Rhopalomyia solidaginis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Over a period of 3–5 years, we studied the density and size of galls across a suite of local experiments that manipulated genetic variation, soil nutrient availability, and the removal of other insects from the host plant, Solidago altissima (tall goldenrod). We also surveyed gall density within a single growing season across a 2,300 km latitudinal transect of goldenrod populations in the eastern United States. At the local scale, we found that host-plant genotypic variation was the best predictor of rosette gall density and size within a single year. We found that the removal of other insect herbivores resulted in an increase in gall density and size. The amendment of soil nutrients for four years had no effect on gall density, but galls were smaller in carbon-added plots compared to control and nitrogen additions. Finally, we observed that gall density varied several fold across years. At the biogeographic scale, we observed that the density of rosette gallers peaked at mid-latitudes. Using meta-analytic approaches, we found that the effect size of time, followed by host-plant genetic variation and latitude were the best predictors of gall density. Taken together, our study provides a unique comparison of multiple factors across different spatial and temporal scales that govern engineering insect herbivore density. PMID:23862102

Gonzalez, Angelica L.; Crawford, Kerri M.; Sanders, Nathan J.

2013-01-01

94

Local and latitudinal variation in abundance: the mechanisms shaping the distribution of an ecosystem engineer.  

PubMed

Ecological processes that determine the abundance of species within ecological communities vary across space and time. These scale-dependent processes are especially important when they affect key members of a community, such as ecosystem engineers that create shelter and food resources for other species. Yet, few studies have examined the suite of processes that shape the abundance of ecosystem engineers. Here, we evaluated the relative influence of temporal variation, local processes, and latitude on the abundance of an engineering insect-a rosette-galling midge, Rhopalomyia solidaginis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Over a period of 3-5 years, we studied the density and size of galls across a suite of local experiments that manipulated genetic variation, soil nutrient availability, and the removal of other insects from the host plant, Solidago altissima (tall goldenrod). We also surveyed gall density within a single growing season across a 2,300 km latitudinal transect of goldenrod populations in the eastern United States. At the local scale, we found that host-plant genotypic variation was the best predictor of rosette gall density and size within a single year. We found that the removal of other insect herbivores resulted in an increase in gall density and size. The amendment of soil nutrients for four years had no effect on gall density, but galls were smaller in carbon-added plots compared to control and nitrogen additions. Finally, we observed that gall density varied several fold across years. At the biogeographic scale, we observed that the density of rosette gallers peaked at mid-latitudes. Using meta-analytic approaches, we found that the effect size of time, followed by host-plant genetic variation and latitude were the best predictors of gall density. Taken together, our study provides a unique comparison of multiple factors across different spatial and temporal scales that govern engineering insect herbivore density. PMID:23862102

Crutsinger, Gregory M; Gonzalez, Angélica L; Crawford, Kerri M; Sanders, Nathan J

2013-01-01

95

The potential of tissue engineering for developing alternatives to animal experiments: a systematic review.  

PubMed

An underexposed ethical issue raised by tissue engineering is the use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research. Even though this research results in suffering and loss of life in animals, tissue engineering also has great potential for the development of alternatives to animal experiments. With the objective of promoting a joint effort of tissue engineers and alternative experts to fully realise this potential, this study provides the first comprehensive overview of the possibilities of using tissue-engineered constructs as a replacement of laboratory animals. Through searches in two large biomedical databases (PubMed, Embase) and several specialised 3R databases, 244 relevant primary scientific articles, published between 1991 and 2011, were identified. By far most articles reviewed related to the use of tissue-engineered skin/epidermis for toxicological applications such as testing for skin irritation. This review article demonstrates, however, that the potential for the development of alternatives also extends to other tissues such as other epithelia and the liver, as well as to other fields of application such as drug screening and basic physiology. This review discusses which impediments need to be overcome to maximise the contributions that the field of tissue engineering can make, through the development of alternative methods, to the reduction of the use and suffering of laboratory animals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23554402

de Vries, Rob B M; Leenaars, Marlies; Tra, Joppe; Huijbregtse, Robbertjan; Bongers, Erik; Jansen, John A; Gordijn, Bert; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

2013-04-01

96

Animated Engineering Tutors: Middle School Students' Preferences and Rationales on Multiple  

E-print Network

tutor such as gender, age, personality, and clothing. Results showed that for teaching engineering perceptions of the learning experience. An animated pedagogical agent (APA) is a human-like or otherwise animated on-screen character appearing in a computer-based instructional module [1][2][3]. Common

Reisslein, Martin

97

Impact Assessment of a Microprocessor Animation on Student Learning and Motivation in Computer Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the impact of using custom animation software to teach second\\/third year computer\\/electrical engineering students in the microprocessing systems course at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Over the span of 13 years' experience with teaching the course, the difficulties and limitations with conventional lectures and visual aids led to the development of custom animation of

Ken Ferens; Marcia Friesen; Sandra Ingram

2007-01-01

98

Intelligent Computing in Engineering -ICE08 Resolving Incorrect Occlusion in Augmented Reality Animations  

E-print Network

Intelligent Computing in Engineering - ICE08 24 Resolving Incorrect Occlusion in Augmented Reality Animations of Simulated Construction Operations A H Behzadan 1 , V R Kamat 1 1 University of Michigan, Ann convincing representations of the mod- eled processes. As a tradeoff, however, an AR animation must be able

Kamat, Vineet R.

99

Bad Ethics, Good Ethics and the Genetic Engineering of Animals in Agriculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic engineers have been remiss in addressing ethical and social issues emerging from this powerful new technology, a technology whose implications for agriculture are profound. As a conse- quence of this failure, society has been uneasy about genetic engineering of animals and has had difficulty distinguishing between genuine and spurious ethical issues the technology occasions. Many of the most prominent

Bernard E. Rollin

2010-01-01

100

Comparison of direct, indirect, and ecosystem engineering effects of an earthworm on the red-backed salamander.  

PubMed

In addition to creating or modifying habitat, ecosystem engineers interact with other species as predators, prey, or competitors. The earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, interacts with the common woodland salamander, Plethodon cinereus, via: (1) ecosystem engineering, by providing burrows that are used as a refuge, (2) direct effects as a prey item, and (3) indirectly, by competing with microinvertebrates, another prey item for P. cinereus. Using enclosures in the forest, I examined the relative strengths of these component pathways between seasons and salamander age classes. I found that the relative strength (partial eta2) of the positive direct (trophic) effect of L. terrestris on the change in mass of P. cineresus was greater than that of the negative indirect effect, but only in summer. Positive effects of ecosystem engineering were only evident over the winter as increased adult survival. This research has implications for how habitat provisioning complements more well-studied species interactions, such as competition and predation, within communities. PMID:23185881

Ransom, Tami S

2012-10-01

101

Impacts of light shading and nutrient enrichment geo-engineering approaches on the productivity of a stratified, oligotrophic ocean ecosystem.  

PubMed

Geo-engineering proposals to mitigate global warming have focused either on methods of carbon dioxide removal, particularly nutrient fertilization of plant growth, or on cooling the Earth's surface by reducing incoming solar radiation (shading). Marine phytoplankton contribute half the Earth's biological carbon fixation and carbon export in the ocean is modulated by the actions of microbes and grazing communities in recycling nutrients. Both nutrients and light are essential for photosynthesis, so understanding the relative influence of both these geo-engineering approaches on ocean ecosystem production and processes is critical to the evaluation of their effectiveness. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between light and nutrient availability on productivity in a stratified, oligotrophic subtropical ocean ecosystem using a one-dimensional water column model coupled to a multi-plankton ecosystem model, with the goal of elucidating potential impacts of these geo-engineering approaches on ecosystem production. We find that solar shading approaches can redistribute productivity in the water column but do not change total production. Macronutrient enrichment is able to enhance the export of carbon, although heterotrophic recycling reduces the efficiency of carbon export substantially over time. Our results highlight the requirement for a fuller consideration of marine ecosystem interactions and feedbacks, beyond simply the stimulation of surface blooms, in the evaluation of putative geo-engineering approaches. PMID:24132201

Hardman-Mountford, Nick J; Polimene, Luca; Hirata, Takafumi; Brewin, Robert J W; Aiken, Jim

2013-12-01

102

Reactor Engineering in Large Scale Animal Cell Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article mainly addresses the issues associated with the engineering of large-scale free suspension culture in agitated\\u000a bioreactors >10,000 L because they have become the system of choice industrially. It is particularly concerned with problems\\u000a that become increasingly important as the scale increases. However, very few papers have been written that are actually based\\u000a on such large-scale studies and the few

Alvin W. Nienow

2006-01-01

103

Brucellosis at the animal\\/ecosystem\\/human interface at the beginning of the 21st century  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the recent discovery of new Brucella strains from different animal species and from the environment, ten Brucella species are nowadays included in the genus Brucella. Although the intracellular trafficking of Brucella is well described, the strategies developed by Brucella to survive and multiply in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells, particularly to access nutriments during its intracellular journey, are still largely

J. Godfroid; H. C. Scholz; T. Barbier; C. Nicolas; P. Wattiau; D. Fretin; A. M. Whatmore; A. Cloeckaert; J. M. Blasco; I. Moriyon; C. Saegerman; J. B. Muma; S. Al Dahouk; H. Neubauer; J.-J. Letesson

2011-01-01

104

Molecular profiling of soil animal diversity in natural ecosystems: Incongruence of molecular and morphological results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major problem facing ecologists is obtaining a complete picture of the highly complex soil community. While DNA-based methods are routinely used to assess prokaryote community structure and diversity in soil, approaches for measuring the total faunal community are not yet available. This is due to difficulties such as designing primers specific to a range of soil animals while excluding

Tiehang Wu; Edward Ayres; Grace Li; Richard D. Bardgett; Diana H. Wall; James R. Garey

2009-01-01

105

Trichinella spiralis in an agricultural ecosystem. III. Epidemiological investigations of Trichinella spiralis in resident wild and feral animals.  

PubMed

As part of a larger epidemiological study examining the transmission of Trichinella spiralis in an agricultural ecosystem, resident wild and feral animals were trapped to determine the extent of their involvement in the natural, on-farm cycling of the parasite among swine. During a 21-mo-study, seven of 15 skunks (Mephitis mephitis), one of three opossums (Didelphis virginiana), two of two feral domestic cats and a raccoon (Procyon lotor) were found to be infected, while five shrews (Blarina brevicauda) and 18 deer mice (Peromyscus spp.) were uninfected. Most of the former hosts probably became infected by scavenging dead infected swine or rats (Rattus norvegicus). However, infections obtained through predation of living rats, particularly with regard to the cats, cannot be excluded. Our observations do not suggest that there was transmission of T. spiralis from the wild animals to swine. Therefore, transmission of T. spiralis appeared to occur only from the farm's swine and rats to the associated wild and feral animals. PMID:3193554

Leiby, D A; Schad, G A; Duffy, C H; Murrell, K D

1988-10-01

106

Genetic variation changes the interactions between the parasitic plant-ecosystem engineer Rhinanthus and its hosts  

PubMed Central

Within-species genetic variation is a potent factor influencing between-species interactions and community-level structure. Species of the hemi-parasitic plant genus Rhinanthus act as ecosystem engineers, significantly altering above- and below-ground community structure in grasslands. Here, we show the importance of genotypic variation within a single host species (barley—Hordeum vulgare), and population-level variation among two species of parasite (Rhinanthus minor and Rhinanthus angustifolius) on the outcome of parasite infection for both partners. We measured host fitness (number of seeds) and calculated parasite virulence as the difference in seed set between infected and uninfected hosts (the inverse of host tolerance). Virulence was determined by genetic variation within the host species and among the parasite species, but R. angustifolius was consistently more virulent than R. minor. The most tolerant host had the lowest inherent fitness and did not gain a fitness advantage over other infected hosts. We measured parasite size as a proxy for transmission ability (ability to infect further hosts) and host resistance. Parasite size depended on the specific combination of host genotype, parasite species and parasite population, and no species was consistently larger. We demonstrate that the outcome of infection by Rhinanthus depends not only on the host species, but also on the underlying genetics of both host and parasite. Thus, genetic variations within host and parasite are probably essential components of the ecosystem-altering effects of Rhinanthus. PMID:21444312

Rowntree, Jennifer K.; Cameron, Duncan D.; Preziosi, Richard F.

2011-01-01

107

Transfer parameters for ICRP reference animals and plants collected from a forest ecosystem.  

PubMed

The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have suggested the identification of a series of terrestrial, marine and freshwater sites from which samples of each Reference animal and plant (RAP) could be systematically collected and analysed. We describe the first such study in which six of the eight terrestrial RAPs, and associated soil samples, were collected from a site located in a managed coniferous forestry plantation in north-west England. Adult life stages of species representing six of the terrestrial RAPs (Wild grass, Pine tree, Deer, Rat, Earthworm and Bee) were sampled and analysed to determine concentrations of 60 elements and gamma-emitting radionuclides. The resultant data have been used to derive concentration ratios (CR(wo-soil)) relating element/radionuclide concentrations in the RAPs to those in soil. This paper presents the first-reported transfer parameters for a number of the RAP-element combinations. Where possible, the derived CR(wo-soil) values are compared with the ICRPs-recommended values and any appreciable differences discussed. PMID:24173444

Barnett, C L; Beresford, N A; Walker, L A; Baxter, M; Wells, C; Copplestone, D

2014-03-01

108

DO GENETICALLY ENGINEERED (GE) CROPS IMPACT ANIMAL HEALTH AND FOOD PRODUCTS?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The release of genetically engineered (GE) varieties of alfalfa, a major livestock feedstuff, raises questions about the effects of feeding this product to food-producing animals. There is a wealth of peer-reviewed studies examining the effects of feeding GE crops to livestock. Hundreds of scientific studies have found no difference in the productive performance or health of livestock that have been

Alison Van Eenennaam

109

Ecosystem engineering and predation: the multi-trophic impact of two ant species.  

PubMed

1. Ants are ubiquitous ecosystem engineers and generalist predators and are able to affect ecological communities via both pathways. They are likely to influence any other terrestrial arthropod group either directly or indirectly caused by their high abundance and territoriality. 2. We studied the impact of two ant species common in Central Europe, Myrmica rubra and Lasius niger, on an arthropod community. Colony presence and density of these two ant species were manipulated in a field experiment from the start of ant activity in spring to late summer. 3. The experiment revealed a positive influence of the presence of one ant colony on densities of decomposers, herbivores and parasitoids. However, in the case of herbivores and parasitoids, this effect was reversed in the presence of two colonies. 4. Generally, effects of the two ant species were similar with the exception of their effect on Braconidae parasitoid densities that responded positively to one colony of M. rubra but not of L. niger. 5. Spider density was not affected by ant colony manipulation, but species richness of spiders responded positively to ant presence. This effect was independent of ant colony density, but where two colonies were present, spider richness was significantly greater in plots with two M. rubra colonies than in plots with one colony of each ant species. 6. To test whether the positive ecosystem engineering effects were purely caused by modified properties of the soil, we added in an additional experiment (i) the soil from ant nests (without ants) or (ii) unmodified soil or (iii) ant nests (including ants) to experimental plots. Ant nest soil on its own did not have a significant impact on densities of decomposers, herbivores or predators, which were significantly, and positively, affected by the addition of an intact nest. 7. The results suggest an important role of both ant species in the grassland food web, strongly affecting the densities of decomposers, herbivores and higher trophic levels. We discuss how the relative impact via bottom-up and top-down effects of ants depends on nest density, with a relatively greater top-down predatory impact at higher densities. PMID:21244419

Sanders, Dirk; van Veen, F J Frank

2011-05-01

110

Fe-oxidizing microbes are hydrothermal vent ecosystem engineers at the Loihi Seamount (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms (FeOM) colonize gradients of Fe(II) and oxygen, taking advantage of the available chemical energy. Vast communities of FeOM proliferate at deep sea hydrothermal vents, forming mineralized mats that range from centimeters to meters thick. Because these mats structure the environment for both FeOM and the entire microbial community, the Fe-oxidizers are acting as ecosystem engineers. What organisms are responsible for initiating these mats, and how does the physical structure and community composition develop as the mats mature? By connecting structure, function, and ecology, we can better interpret modern mat structures, as well as ancient fossilized mats. We have been studying Fe microbial mats at Loihi Seamount in Hawaii, a long-term study site that has become a model for Fe oxidation in marine hydrothermal systems. Recent improvements in ROV imaging systems allow us to see a great range of mat textures and colors, which may represent diverse habitats and/or different stages of mat development. With improved imaging and sampling techniques, we have been able to obtain discrete, intact samples of these delicate microbial mats. Previous bulk sampling methods showed that mats consist of a mixture of Fe-mineralized morphologies. Our analyses of intact mats show that mats are initiated by one type of structure-former (either a stalk-former like Mariprofundus ferrooxydans or a Zetaproteobacterial sheath-former). These microbes may be the vanguard organisms that stabilize chemical gradients in this dynamic environment, allowing colonization by other organisms (evidenced by branching tubes, fibrillar nests, and other morphologies). We will show evidence of the composition and development of these mats, and discuss parallels between these marine Fe mats and their freshwater counterparts, supporting the idea that FeOM engineer environments favorable for growth.

Chan, C. S.; McAllister, S.; Leavitt, A.; Emerson, D.; Moyer, C. L.; Glazer, B. T.

2013-12-01

111

Are fiddler crabs potentially useful ecosystem engineers in mangrove wastewater wetlands?  

PubMed

The effect of different organic-rich sewage concentration (0%, 20% and 60% diluted in seawater) and absence or presence of mangrove trees on the survival, bioturbation activities and burrow morphology of fiddler crabs species was assessed. After 6 months, males of both species always showed higher survival ( approximately 80%) when compared to females ( approximately 20%). Crabs inhabiting pristine conditions achieved higher survival (67-87%) than those living in sewage-exposed mesocosms (40-71%). At 60% sewage loading, fiddler crabs processed less sediment (34-46%) during feeding and excavated slightly more sediment (45-80%) than at pristine conditions. While percent volume of the burrow chambers increased (13-66%) at contaminated mesocosms for both vegetation conditions, burrows were shallower (approximately 33%) in bare cells loaded with sewage. The results show that fiddler crabs presented moderate mortality levels in these artificial mangrove wetlands, but mainly in sewage impacted cells. However, they still function as ecosystem engineers through bioturbation activities and burrow construction. PMID:19643448

Penha-Lopes, Gil; Bartolini, Fabrizio; Limbu, Samwel; Cannicci, Stefano; Kristensen, Erik; Paula, José

2009-11-01

112

Earthworms, as ecosystem engineers, influence multiple aspects of a salamander's ecology.  

PubMed

Ecosystem engineers create habitat that can be used by other species in multiple ways, such as refugees from predators, places to breed, or areas with increased prey resources. I conducted a series of enclosure experiments to: (1) determine if salamanders use earthworm burrows, and (2) examine the potential influence of earthworm burrow use and indirect effects on salamander intra- and interspecific competition, predator avoidance, and seasonal performance. I found that one species of woodland salamander, Plethodon cinereus, used earthworm burrows 50% of the time when burrows were present. Neither adults nor juveniles of the congeneric P. glutinosus used earthworm burrows. Intraspecific, but not interspecific, competition by P. cinereus affected salamander behavior when earthworms were absent, with P. cinereus found under cover objects >70% of the time when alone or with a P. glutinosus, but only 40% of the time when with another P. cinereus. When earthworms were present, the behavior of P. cinereus was similar across salamander treatments. Earthworms decreased the amount of leaf litter and microinvertebrates, although this did not affect salamander mass. In subsequent experiments using only P. cinereus, the refuge provided by earthworm burrows increased the survival of P. cinereus over the winter and allowed P. cinereus to avoid being consumed by the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis). Because earthworm burrows provide a refuge for P. cinereus during intraspecific encounters, in the presence of a predator and over the winter, they may serve as an important belowground-aboveground linkage in eastern forests where salamanders are common. PMID:20848134

Ransom, Tami S

2011-03-01

113

Engineered ecosystem for on-site wastewater treatment in tropical areas.  

PubMed

There is a worldwide demand for decentralized wastewater treatment options. An on-site engineered ecosystem (EE) treatment plant was designed with a multistage approach for small wastewater generators in tropical areas. The array of treatment units included a septic tank, a submersed aerated filter, and a secondary decanter followed by three vegetated tanks containing aquatic macrophytes intercalated with one tank of algae. During 11 months of operation with a flow rate of 52 L h(-1), the system removed on average 93.2% and 92.9% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and volatile suspended solids (VSS) reaching final concentrations of 36.3 ± 12.7 and 13.7 ± 4.2 mg L(-1), respectively. Regarding ammonia-N (NH(4)-N) and total phosphorus (TP), the system removed on average 69.8% and 54.5% with final concentrations of 18.8 ± 9.3 and 14.0 ± 2.5 mg L(-1), respectively. The tanks with algae and macrophytes together contributed to the overall nutrient removal with 33.6% for NH(4)-N and 26.4% for TP. The final concentrations for all parameters except TP met the discharge threshold limits established by Brazilian and EU legislation. The EE was considered appropriate for the purpose for which it was created. PMID:22949243

de Sá Salomão, André Luis; Marques, Marcia; Severo, Raul Gonçalves; da Cruz Roque, Odir Clécio

2012-01-01

114

In order to build up a system of international cooperative research in the field of animal biotechnology, animal stem cell engineering and healthcare biotechnology, the Graduate School  

E-print Network

biotechnology, animal stem cell engineering and healthcare biotechnology, the Graduate School of BioagriculturalPurpose In order to build up a system of international cooperative research in the field of animal in the research and development units of companies, including those affiliated to established research institutes

Takahashi, Ryo

115

Remediation of ecosystems damaged by environmental contamination: Applications of ecological engineering and ecosystem restoration in Central and Eastern Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the applicability of ecological engineering to pollution problems prevalent in present-day Central and Eastern Europe, a SCOPE-UNEP sponsored workshop was held in Estonia in November 1995. The workshop was undertaken specifically to obtain information from and to train planners, managers and scientists in the region. These `countries in transition' face, in many respects, unique environmental problems as a

W. J Mitsch; Ü Mander

1997-01-01

116

Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection contains animations of a nuclear chain reaction, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion. It also showcases interactive models of the first atomic bombs and simulation of the "Nuclear Winter" effect.

Griffith, Christopher

117

Practical Training in Microalgae Utilization with Key Industry Engineering Group Key Industry Engineering Group s.r.o. has developed a biotechnology for the production of an animal  

E-print Network

Engineering Group s.r.o. has developed a biotechnology for the production of an animal feed product based medium which is then applied directly to the animals during feeding. The use of this suspension has shown effective in improving the health and immune system of animals, thus reducing mortality, as well as showing

118

Facilitation of an international approach for data sharing and acquisition in relation to genetically-engineered animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1997, the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) published CCAC guidelines on: transgenic animals. Because this was recognized to be a rapidly evolving field, a commitment was made to revise the guidelines within a few years. CCAC is now working on draft guidelines on: genetically-engineered animals. This paper outlines some of the changes that are being proposed in the

Gilly Griffin; Clément Gauthier

119

Before the Endless Forms: Embodied Model of Transition from Single Cells to Aggregates to Ecosystem Engineering  

PubMed Central

The emergence of complex multicellular systems and their associated developmental programs is one of the major problems of evolutionary biology. The advantages of cooperation over individuality seem well known but it is not clear yet how such increase of complexity emerged from unicellular life forms. Current multicellular systems display a complex cell-cell communication machinery, often tied to large-scale controls of body size or tissue homeostasis. Some unicellular life forms are simpler and involve groups of cells cooperating in a tissue-like fashion, as it occurs with biofilms. However, before true gene regulatory interactions were widespread and allowed for controlled changes in cell phenotypes, simple cellular colonies displaying adhesion and interacting with their environments were in place. In this context, models often ignore the physical embedding of evolving cells, thus leaving aside a key component. The potential for evolving pre-developmental patterns is a relevant issue: how far a colony of evolving cells can go? Here we study these pre-conditions for morphogenesis by using CHIMERA, a physically embodied computational model of evolving virtual organisms in a pre-Mendelian world. Starting from a population of identical, independent cells moving in a fluid, the system undergoes a series of changes, from spatial segregation, increased adhesion and the development of generalism. Eventually, a major transition occurs where a change in the flow of nutrients is triggered by a sub-population. This ecosystem engineering phenomenon leads to a subsequent separation of the ecological network into two well defined compartments. The relevance of these results for evodevo and its potential ecological triggers is discussed. PMID:23596506

Sole, Ricard V.; Valverde, Sergi

2013-01-01

120

Resource Quantity and Quality Determine the Inter-Specific Associations between Ecosystem Engineers and Resource Users in a Cavity-Nest Web  

PubMed Central

While ecosystem engineering is a widespread structural force of ecological communities, the mechanisms underlying the inter-specific associations between ecosystem engineers and resource users are poorly understood. A proper knowledge of these mechanisms is, however, essential to understand how communities are structured. Previous studies suggest that increasing the quantity of resources provided by ecosystem engineers enhances populations of resource users. In a long-term study (1995-2011), we show that the quality of the resources (i.e. tree cavities) provided by ecosystem engineers is also a key feature that explains the inter-specific associations in a tree cavity-nest web. Red-naped sapsuckers (Sphyrapicusnuchalis) provided the most abundant cavities (52% of cavities, 0.49 cavities/ha). These cavities were less likely to be used than other cavity types by mountain bluebirds (Sialiacurrucoides), but provided numerous nest-sites (41% of nesting cavities) to tree swallows (Tachycinetabicolour). Swallows experienced low reproductive outputs in northern flicker (Colaptesauratus) cavities compared to those in sapsucker cavities (1.1 vs. 2.1 fledglings/nest), but the highly abundant flickers (33% of cavities, 0.25 cavities/ha) provided numerous suitable nest-sites for bluebirds (58%). The relative shortage of cavities supplied by hairy woodpeckers (Picoidesvillosus) and fungal/insect decay (<10% of cavities each, <0.09 cavities/ha) provided fewer breeding opportunities (<15% of nests), but represented high quality nest-sites for both bluebirds and swallows. Because both the quantity and quality of resources supplied by different ecosystem engineers may explain the amount of resources used by each resource user, conservation strategies may require different management actions to be implemented for the key ecosystem engineer of each resource user. We, therefore, urge the incorporation of both resource quantity and quality into models that assess community dynamics to improve conservation actions and our understanding of ecological communities based on ecosystem engineering. PMID:24040324

Robles, Hugo; Martin, Kathy

2013-01-01

121

Artificial Animals for Computer Animation  

E-print Network

animation. Animals in their natural habitats have presented a long­standing and difficult challenge in certain natural ecosystems, with minimal animator intervention. Our approach is to construct artificial the animator plays the role of a nature cinematographer, rather than the more conventional role of a graphical

Toronto, University of

122

Artificial Animals for Computer Animation  

E-print Network

animation. Animals in their natural habitats have presented a long-standing and difficult challenge in certain natural ecosystems, with minimal animator intervention. Our approach is to construct artificial the animator plays the role of a nature cinematographer, rather than the more conventional role of a graphical

Toronto, University of

123

Hemigrapsus sanguineus in Long Island salt marshes: experimental evaluation of the interactions between an invasive crab and resident ecosystem engineers  

PubMed Central

The invasive Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, has recently been observed occupying salt marshes, a novel environment for this crab species. As it invades this new habitat, it is likely to interact with a number of important salt marsh species. To understand the potential effects of H. sanguineus on this ecosystem, interactions between this invasive crab and important salt marsh ecosystem engineers were examined. Laboratory experiments demonstrated competition for burrows between H. sanguineus and the native fiddler crab, Uca pugilator. Results indicate that H. sanguineus is able to displace an established fiddler crab from its burrow. Feeding experiments revealed that the presence of H. sanguineus has a significantly negative impact on the number as well as the biomass of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) consumed by the green crab, Carcinus maenas, although this only occurred at high predator densities. In addition, when both crabs foraged together, there was a significant shift in the size of mussels consumed. These interactions suggests that H. sanguineus may have long-term impacts and wide-ranging negative effects on the saltmarsh ecosystem. PMID:25071995

Fournier, Alexa M.; Furman, Bradley T.; Carroll, John M.

2014-01-01

124

Hemigrapsus sanguineus in Long Island salt marshes: experimental evaluation of the interactions between an invasive crab and resident ecosystem engineers.  

PubMed

The invasive Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, has recently been observed occupying salt marshes, a novel environment for this crab species. As it invades this new habitat, it is likely to interact with a number of important salt marsh species. To understand the potential effects of H. sanguineus on this ecosystem, interactions between this invasive crab and important salt marsh ecosystem engineers were examined. Laboratory experiments demonstrated competition for burrows between H. sanguineus and the native fiddler crab, Uca pugilator. Results indicate that H. sanguineus is able to displace an established fiddler crab from its burrow. Feeding experiments revealed that the presence of H. sanguineus has a significantly negative impact on the number as well as the biomass of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) consumed by the green crab, Carcinus maenas, although this only occurred at high predator densities. In addition, when both crabs foraged together, there was a significant shift in the size of mussels consumed. These interactions suggests that H. sanguineus may have long-term impacts and wide-ranging negative effects on the saltmarsh ecosystem. PMID:25071995

Peterson, Bradley J; Fournier, Alexa M; Furman, Bradley T; Carroll, John M

2014-01-01

125

Ecological Engineering of the City: The Urban Ecosystem. Urban Ecology Series, No. 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The cities of the world are great engineering feats. From the earliest dwellings of man constructed out of the raw materials of the environment, man has used his ingenuity to work engineering wonders that improve the circumstances of human life. By engineering technological skills, human beings have altered the environment to suit varied…

Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

126

Validation of a randomization procedure to assess animal habitat preferences: microhabitat use of tiger sharks in a seagrass ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. Tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier are important predators in a variety of nearshore communities, including the seagrass ecosystem of Shark Bay, Western Australia. Because tiger sharks are known to influence spatial distributions of multiple prey species, it is important to understand how they use habitats at a variety of spatial scales. We used a combination of catch rates and

MICHAEL R. HEITHAUS; IAN M. HAMILTON; AARON J. WIRSING; LAWRENCE M. DILL

2006-01-01

127

Abstract Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers that  

E-print Network

ecosystem en- gineers. We investigated the effects of patch disturbances created by D. spectabilis mounds on ant assemblages in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland in southern New Mexico by using pitfall traps in a paired design (mound vs. ma- trix). Although the disturbances did not alter species richness or harbor

Kelly, Jeff

128

Impacts by heavy-oil spill from the Russian tanker Nakhodka on intertidal ecosystems: recovery of animal community.  

PubMed

The impact of a heavy-oil spill from the Nakhodka on an intertidal animal community, and the recovery process of animals from the damage were surveyed from the autumn of 1997 to the spring of 2001. The field study was carried out in the rocky coast of Imago-Ura Cove, located along the Sea of Japan, where clean-up operations for oil pollution had been conducted less intensely than in other polluted areas. We have examined individual number of each animal taxon by continuously placing a quadrat of 5 m width along the entire intertidal zone of the cove. A total of 76 invertebrate taxa including 57 species of mollusks, 10 species of crustaceans were observed during the survey. The number of taxa increased from 1998 to 1999 in areas where the initial oil pollution was intense. Total individual number of benthic animals continued to increase from 1998 to 2000 in the polluted areas. The impact of oil on benthic animals was different from species to species. Some species such as Cellana toreuma and Monodonta labio confusa increased rapidly after the oil spill, whereas other species such as Patelloida saccharina lanx and Septifer virgatus did not show any apparent temporal tendencies. Population size structure of P. saccharina lanx varied greatly among years, however that of M. labio confusa did not. For P. saccharina lanx, recruitment was unsuccessful in 1997, possibly due to the effect of oil pollution. These differences in responses to oil pollution among benthic animals are considered to be caused by the differences in habitat use, susceptibility to heavy-oil, life history and migration ability. The findings suggest that it took at least 2-3 years for the intertidal animal community to recover to its original level after the oil spill. PMID:12787603

Yamamoto, Tomoko; Nakaoka, Masahiro; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Kawai, Hiroshi; Ohwada, Kouichi

2003-01-01

129

Field calibration of soil-core microcosms for evaluating fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory compared intact soil-core microcosms and the field for ecosystem structural and functional properties after the introduction of a model genetically engineered microorganism (GEM). This project used two distinct microbial types as model GEMs, Gram-negative Pseudomonas sp. RC1, which was an aggressive root colonizer, and Gram-positive Streptomyces lividans TK24. The model GEMs were added to surface soil in separate studies, with RC1 studied throughout the growth of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), while TK24 was studied throughout a ten month period. Also, RC1 was used in studies conducted during two consecutive field seasons (1988 to 1990) to determine how year-to-year field variability influenced the calibration of microcosms with the field. The main conclusions of this research were that intact soil-core microcosms can be useful to simulate the field for studies of microbial fate and effects on ecosystem structural and functional properties. In general, microcosms in the growth chamber, which simulated average field variations, were similar to the field for most parameters or differences could be attributed to the great extremes in temperature that occurred in the field compared to the microcosms. Better controls of environmental variables including temperature and moisture will be necessary to more closely simulate the field for future use of microcosms for risk assessment. 126 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

Bolton, H Jr; Fredrickson, J K; Bentjen, S A; Workman, D J; Li, S W; Thomas, J M

1991-04-01

130

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction  

E-print Network

of plant, animal and micro-organism communities and the nonliving environment interacting as a functional for Ecosystems & ES "An ecosystem is a dynamic complex of human, plant, animal and micro-organism communities point for ecosystems ­ Because we can or feel we need to. · Ecosystems Structure ­ Healthy ecosystems

131

Designing an accompanying ecosystem for entrepreneurship students of agronomic and forestry engineering. Opinion and commitment of the faculty  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current context has called attention to the need of training engineers with new skills beyond the purely technical. Among others, fostering the entrepreneurial spirit has gained special prominence. In the Higher School of Agronomic and Forestry Engineering of the University of Cordoba, a 12-year-experience of an entrepreneurship program for undergraduate students concluded that, for an adequate consolidation and evolution of the program, is important to establish a robust network with active participation of all actors involved. With this antecedent, a collective project conceived as an "ecosystem of support and accompaniment for entrepreneurs" is the approach proposed. The objective is to perform an evaluation of this model in terms of viability, usefulness, actions to be taken and degree of commitment. The key actors identified (undergraduate students, faculty, alumni, local and regional entrepreneurs, enterprises, public administration) have been involved in the evaluation process. This study focuses on the academic staff. For that aim, a survey to the entire faculty (N=128, response rate = 45%) and semi-structured interviews to 20 members have been performed. Data have been treated by means of univariate and multivariate analysis. Results suggest that there exists an agreement concerning the appropriateness of a collective project; there is a critical mass of teachers willing to be engaged; guidelines need to be incorporated in order to facilitate taking on tasks; main restrictions concern the existing asymmetry between formal requirements and those necessary for establishing the ecosystem. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: This research work has been developed in the framework of the ALFA III programme financed by the European Union.

Ortiz, Leovigilda; Fernández-Ahumada, Elvira; Lara-Vélez, Pablo; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gallardo-Cobos, Rosa; Campillo, M. Carmen; Guerrero-Ginel, José E.

2014-05-01

132

Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight from a cross-site  

E-print Network

Abstract Climate change will result in reduced soil water availability in much of the world either due suggest that communities of soil animals at local scales may respond predictably to changes in moisture composition, and soil properties may influence this relationship over larger scales. Keywords: climate change

Wall, Diana

133

Will the balance of power shift among native eastern Pacific estuary ecosystem engineers with the introduced bopyrid isopod parasite orthione griffenis?  

EPA Science Inventory

The blue mud shrimp, Upogebia pugettensis, the bay ghost shrimp, Neotrypaea californiensis, and eelgrass, Zostera marina are endemic ecosystem engineers that define the ecological structure and function of estuaries along the Pacific coast of the US as significantly as do marshes...

134

Ecosystem Engineers: From Pattern Formation to Habitat Creation E. Gilad,1,2  

E-print Network

to the interactions among the many species they contain, the food-web connections across trophic levels and food-web interconnec- tions have been studied extensively [4], the roles of symmetry-breaking landscape engineers commonly found in drylands: plants forming vegetation patterns and cyanobacteria forming soil

Meron, Ehud

135

A comparative study of three different biomaterials in the engineering of skeletal muscle using a rat animal model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Defects caused by traumatic or postsurgical loss of muscle mass may result in severe impairments of the functionality of skeletal muscle. Tissue engineering represents a possible approach to replace the lost or defective muscle. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for rat myoblasts, using a new animal model. PKH26-fluorescent-stained cultured

F. S Kamelger; R Marksteiner; E Margreiter; G Klima; G Wechselberger; S Hering; H Piza

2004-01-01

136

The emergence of the genetically engineered animal models in carcinogenic risk assessment of pharmaceuticals: a case study of process innovation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we explain the emergence of new short-term tests for carcinogenicity involving genetically engineered animals for the purposes of pharmaceutical regulation. Drawing on some long-standing theories of technological innovation, we argue that the alteration of carcinogenic risk assessment of pharmaceuticals, which occurred from 1998, did not result solely, or perhaps even mainly, from internal logical and technical developments

John Abraham; Rachel Ballinger

2012-01-01

137

Engineering Macaca fascicularis cytochrome P450 2C20 to reduce animal testing for new drugs.  

PubMed

In order to develop in vitro methods as an alternative to P450 animal testing in the drug discovery process, two main requisites are necessary: 1) gathering of data on animal homologues of the human P450 enzymes, currently very limited, and 2) bypassing the requirement for both the P450 reductase and the expensive cofactor NADPH. In this work, P450 2C20 from Macaca fascicularis, homologue of the human P450 2C8 has been taken as a model system to develop such an alternative in vitro method by two different approaches. In the first approach called "molecular Lego", a soluble self-sufficient chimera was generated by fusing the P450 2C20 domain with the reductase domain of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium (P450 2C20/BMR). In the second approach, the need for the redox partner and also NADPH were both obviated by the direct immobilization of the P450 2C20 on glassy carbon and gold electrodes. Both systems were then compared to those obtained from the reconstituted P450 2C20 monooxygenase in presence of the human P450 reductase and NADPH using paclitaxel and amodiaquine, two typical drug substrates of the human P450 2C8. The K(M) values calculated for the 2C20 and 2C20/BMR in solution and for 2C20 immobilized on electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles were 1.9 ± 0.2, 5.9 ± 2.3, 3.0 ± 0.5 ?M for paclitaxel and 1.2 ± 0.2, 1.6±0.2 and 1.4 ± 0.2 ?M for amodiaquine, respectively. The data obtained not only show that the engineering of M. fascicularis did not affect its catalytic properties but also are consistent with K(M) values measured for the microsomal human P450 2C8 and therefore show the feasibility of developing alternative in vitro animal tests. PMID:22819650

Rua, Francesco; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Castrignanò, Silvia; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

2012-12-01

138

Genetic Engineering and Other Factors That Might Affect Human-Animal Interactions in the Research Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence exists, particularly in the welfare literature of nonhuman animals on the farm, that the interaction between nonhuman animals and the personnel who care for them can have a strong effect on the animals' behavior, productivity, and welfare. Among species commonly used for biomedical research, mice appear to be the least-preferred species in animal care facilities. A review of the

Julie Comber; Gilly Griffin

2007-01-01

139

Exploitation and destabilization of a warm, freshwater ecosystem through engineered hydrological change.  

PubMed

Exploitation of freshwater resources is having catastrophic effects on the ecological dynamics, stability, and quality of those water resources on a global scale, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Lake Kinneret, Israel (the Biblical Sea of Galilee), the only major natural freshwater lake in the Middle East, has been transformed functionally into a reservoir over the course of approximately 70 years of hydrological alterations aimed mostly at producing electrical power and increasing domestic and agricultural water supply. Historical changes in lake chemistry and biology were reconstructed using analysis of sedimentary nutrient content, stable and radioisotope composition, biochemical and morphological fossils from algae, remains of aquatic invertebrates, and chemical indices of past light regimes. Together, these paleolimnological analyses of the lake's bottom sediments revealed that this transformation has been accompanied by acceleration in the rate of eutrophication, as indicated by increased accumulation rates of phosphorus, nitrogen, organic matter, phytoplankton and bacterial pigments, and remains of phytoplankton and zooplankton. Substantial increases in these indices of eutrophication coincide with periods of increased water-level fluctuations and drainage of a major upstream wetland in the early to middle 20th century and suggest that management of the lake for increased water supply has degraded water quality to the point that ecosystem stability and sustainability are threatened. Such destabilization may be a model for eutrophication of freshwater lakes in other arid regions of the world in which management emphasizes water quantity over quality. PMID:18839756

Hambright, K David; Zohary, Tamar; Eckert, Werner; Schwartz, Steven S; Schelske, Claire L; Laird, Kathleen R; Leavitt, Peter R

2008-10-01

140

Stable hydrogen isotopic compositions in plants and animals can provide ecosystem-hydrology connections: Santeelah Creek watershed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Connecting a watershed to its ecosystem can be accomplished with stable isotope tracers of hydrogen and oxygen at the natural abundance level. We have concentrated our study on a watershed with a significant altitudinal gradient in North Carolina. The Santeelah Creek watershed extends from 700 to 1600 m and is host to a robust population of black-throated blue warblers (Setophaga caerulescens; BTBW), which feed almost exclusively on caterpillars and small insects during their breeding and molting periods in June and July. The forests in this watershed are composed of a rich flora, including Betula, Rhododendron, Acer, Quercus, along with shrubs, ferns, and mosses. The ?D of plants and insects along with creek and spring water samples provided us with background information that we extrapolated to the landscape scale. In addition, we have 13 years of ?D data of feathers collected from over 500 specimens of BTBW that were collected from specific territories throughout the watershed. Variations in ?D of plants within the watershed was not correlated with altitude, however, specific plant species (e.g. Betula vs. ferns) provide a direct link to the within watershed hydrology, because the ?D values of plants are dependent not only on the ?D of source water, but also growth temperature and the amount of evaporative transpiration. The ?D values of BTBW feathers also do not vary with altitude, but vary annually and correlate with the amount of growing season and annual precipitation from the previous year when feathers were grown. While the ?D of avian feathers has become a proven technique for tracing the natal origins of birds, our dataset allows us to delve further into the connections between water-primary producers-consumers-predators that will provide insight into how these analyses are truly linked to the hydrology of their environment.

Fogel, M. L.; Newsome, S.; Graves, G.

2013-12-01

141

Animals, Animals, Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Third grade students may use this page for additional resources for their animal research. Use these links as part of your animal research: Desert Biome What Swims Beneath: Creatures of the Sea Scaly Surprises (ScienceWorld) Manatees AnimalPlanet.com: Mammal Guide Endangered Species Picture Book MIKIDS!: Mammals ZOOM MAMMALS - EnchantedLearning.com Smithsonian National Zoological Park Enchanted Learning: Zoom Sharks Shark School Sharks: Did You Know? Sharks: Myth and Mystery The Secret World of Sharks and Rays ...

Laz, Mrs.

2006-12-16

142

Tissue engineered bone using select growth factors: A comprehensive review of animal studies and clinical translation studies in man.  

PubMed

There is a growing socio-economic need for effective strategies to repair damaged bone resulting from disease, trauma and surgical intervention. Bone tissue engineering has received substantial investment over the last few decades as a result. A multitude of studies have sought to examine the efficacy of multiple growth factors, delivery systems and biomaterials within in vivo animal models for the repair of critical-sized bone defects. Defect repair requires recapitulation of in vivo signalling cascades, including osteogenesis, chondrogenesis and angiogenesis, in an orchestrated spatiotemporal manner. Strategies to drive parallel, synergistic and consecutive signalling of factors including BMP-2, BMP-7/OP-1, FGF, PDGF, PTH, PTHrP, TGF-?3, VEGF and Wnts have demonstrated improved bone healing within animal models. Enhanced bone repair has also been demonstrated in the clinic following European Medicines Agency and Food and Drug Administration approval of BMP-2, BMP-7/OP-1, PDGF, PTH and PTHrP. The current review assesses the in vivo and clinical data surrounding the application of growth factors for bone regeneration. This review has examined data published between 1965 and 2013. All bone tissue engineering studies investigating in vivo response of the growth factors listed above, or combinations thereof, utilising animal models or human trials were included. All studies were compiled from PubMed-NCBI using search terms including 'growth factor name', 'in vivo', 'model/animal', 'human', and 'bone tissue engineering'. Focus is drawn to the in vivo success of osteoinductive growth factors incorporated within material implants both in animals and humans, and identifies the unmet challenges within the skeletal regenerative area. PMID:25284140

Gothard, D; Smith, E L; Kanczler, J M; Rashidi, H; Qutachi, O; Henstock, J; Rotherham, M; El Haj, A; Shakesheff, K M; Oreffo, R O C

2014-01-01

143

Animations as a tool for enhancing teaching and learning outcomes in Civil Engineering courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many students today are visual learners and little inclined to study printed materials or text-based online courses. Animations can serve as effective multimedia tools to engage these students while facilitating and enhancing the student learning experience by explaining difficult concepts through visual means instead of the traditional way of heavy textual based presentation. The importance of animations would further be

Vasantha Aravinthan; John Worden

2010-01-01

144

Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Invertebrate animals that live at the bottom of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., benthic macrofauna) are important mediators between nutrients in the water column and microbes in the benthos. The presence of benthic macrofauna stimulates microbial nutrient dynamics through different types of animal-microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal-microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosystems: (i) ecosystem engineering, (ii) grazing, and (iii) symbiosis. Their specific contributions to the turnover of fixed nitrogen (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and the emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide are evaluated. Published data indicate that ecosystem engineering by sediment-burrowing macrofauna stimulates benthic nitrification and denitrification, which together allows fixed nitrogen removal. However, the release of ammonium from sediments is enhanced more strongly than the sedimentary uptake of nitrate. Ecosystem engineering by reef-building macrofauna increases nitrogen retention and ammonium concentrations in shallow aquatic ecosystems, but allows organic nitrogen removal through harvesting. Grazing by macrofauna on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies reveal that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly enhance nitrous oxide emission from shallow aquatic ecosystems. The beneficial effect of benthic macrofauna on fixed nitrogen removal through coupled nitrification-denitrification can thus be offset by the concurrent release of (i) ammonium that stimulates aquatic primary production and (ii) nitrous oxide that contributes to global warming. Overall, benthic macrofauna intensifies the coupling between benthos, pelagial, and atmosphere through enhanced turnover and transport of nitrogen.

Stief, P.

2013-12-01

145

Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Invertebrate animals that live at the bottom of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., benthic macrofauna) are important mediators between nutrients in the water column and microbes in the benthos. The presence of benthic macrofauna stimulates microbial nutrient dynamics through different types of animal-microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal-microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosystems: (i) ecosystem engineering, (ii) grazing, and (iii) symbiosis. Their specific contributions to the turnover of fixed nitrogen (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and the emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide are evaluated. Published data indicate that ecosystem engineering by sediment-burrowing macrofauna stimulates benthic nitrification and denitrification, which together allows fixed nitrogen removal. However, the release of ammonium from sediments often is enhanced even more than the sedimentary uptake of nitrate. Ecosystem engineering by reef-building macrofauna increases nitrogen retention and ammonium concentrations in shallow aquatic ecosystems, but allows organic nitrogen removal through harvesting. Grazing by macrofauna on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies revealed that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly enhance nitrous oxide emission from shallow aquatic ecosystems. The beneficial effect of benthic macrofauna on fixed nitrogen removal through coupled nitrification-denitrification can thus be offset by the concurrent release of (i) ammonium that stimulates aquatic primary production and (ii) nitrous oxide that contributes to global warming. Overall, benthic macrofauna intensifies the coupling between benthos, pelagial, and atmosphere through enhanced turnover and transport of nitrogen.

Stief, P.

2013-07-01

146

Zinc-finger nucleases: a powerful tool for genetic engineering of animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The generation of genetically modified animals or plants with gene-targeted deletions or modifications is a powerful tool\\u000a to analyze gene function, study disease and produce organisms of economical interest. Until recently, the generation of animals\\u000a with gene targeted manipulations has been accomplished by homologous recombination (HR) in embryonic stem (ES) cells or cloning\\u000a through nuclear transfer and has been limited

Séverine Rémy; Laurent Tesson; Séverine Ménoret; Claire Usal; Andrew M. Scharenberg; Ignacio Anegon

2010-01-01

147

Stems to GEMs: impact of stem cell technology on engineered animal models.  

PubMed

Collectively, these presentations introduced the audience to the roles of ES cells in generating phenotypes of transgenic animals,and they provided examples where the GEMs were used to define molecular mechanisms of disease or where ES cells were used as a therapeutic modality. Points of discussion among audience members reinforced the importance of strain-associated background lesions in animal models, technological advances in imaging functional biology, opportunities for stem cell therapies, and ubiquitination in regulation of cell proliferation. The 2012 American College of Veterinary Pathologists symposium ‘‘Evolutionary Aspects of Animal Models’’ will focus on the proper selection of a relevant animal model in biomedical research as critical to investigative success. Recent work characterizing rapid evolutionary changes and differences in physiology between species questions the validity of some comparative models. Dr. Robert Hamlin will be speaking on cardiovascular disease in ‘‘Animals as Models of Human Cardiovascular Disease: Or the Search to Overcome Outdated Evolutionary Homeostatic Mechanisms.’’ Dr. Stefan Niewiesk will discuss evolutionary factors that affect modeling the human immune system in ‘‘Of Mice and Men: Evolutionarily, What Are the Best Rodent Models of the Human Immune System for Infectious Disease Research?’’ Dr. Steven Austad will consider evolution in ‘‘Evolutionary Aspects of Animal Models of Aging.’’Finally, Dr. Elizabeth Uhl will conclude the session with ‘‘Modeling Disease Phenotypes: How an Evolutionary Perspective Enhances the Questions.’’ PMID:21865606

Halpern, Wendy; McArthur, Mark; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Uhl, Elizabeth; Buck, Wayne; Whitley, Elizabeth

2011-09-01

148

Engineering the global ecosystem  

E-print Network

to surface waters, eutrophication, and low oxygen areas inchange and eutrophication of coastal waters. ICES J Marineeutrophication as part of a low dissolved oxygen total maximum daily load implementation. Water

Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

2010-01-01

149

Frank Mitloehner is an expert for agricultural air quality, animal-environmental interactions, and agricultural engineering. He is a Professor and Air Quality  

E-print Network

Frank Mitloehner is an expert for agricultural air quality, animal-environmental interactions, and agricultural engineering. He is a Professor and Air Quality Specialist in Cooperative Extension. Since he

Delany, Mary E.

150

Investigating Ecosystems in a Biobottle  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biobottles are miniature ecosystems made from 2-liter plastic soda bottles. They allow students to explore how organisms in an ecosystem are connected to each other, examine how biotic and abiotic factors influence plant and animal growth and development, and discover how important biodiversity is to an ecosystem. This activity was inspired by an…

Breene, Arnica; Gilewski, Donna

2008-01-01

151

Coral Reef Ecosystems: Interdependence  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack. It explores the interdependent relationships between species in the coral reef ecosystem. All populations in the reef ecosystem are a part of and depend on a global food web (a connected set of food chains) through which energy flows in one direction, from the sun into organism and eventually dissipating into the environment as heat. This food web includes ocean plants, the animals that feed on them, and the animals that feed on those animals. Energy is transferred between organisms and their environment along the way. Energy concentration diminishes at each step. The cycles of life continue indefinitely because organisms decompose after death and return food materials to the environment. Learning Outcomes:� Identify and label key components of food chains and food webs in a coral reef ecosystem.� Describe key relationships among plants and animals in the coral reef ecosystem: predator and prey relationships, producer and consumer relationships, and symbiotic relationships (mutualism, commensalisms, parasitism).� Recognize the direction that energy travels through food chains and food webs.� Explain that materials (chemical elements) and natural resources are recycled in coral reef ecosystems and reappear in different forms.� Describe the primary ecological succession events within a typical coral reef ecosystem.

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

2006-11-01

152

Automated Generation of Dynamic Walk-Through Animations of Simulated Engineering Operations in Augmented Reality Environments  

E-print Network

in Augmented Reality Environments Amir H. Behzadan Department of Construction Management and Civil Engineering lifecycle. This paper presents ARVISCOPE, an Augmented Reality (AR) visualization tool capable of creating in recent years is Augmented Reality (AR). The main difference between an AR-based and a VR

Kamat, Vineet R.

153

Evaluating learning and attitudes on tissue engineering: a study of children viewing animated digital dome shows detailing the biomedicine of tissue engineering.  

PubMed

Informal science education creates opportunities for the general public to learn about complex health and science topics. Tissue engineering is a fast-growing field of medical science that combines advanced chemistries to create synthetic scaffolds, stem cells, and growth factors that individually or in combination can support the bodies own healing powers to remedy a range of maladies. Health literacy about this topic is increasingly important as our population ages and as treatments become more technologically advanced. We are using a science center planetarium as a projection space to engage and educate the public about the science and biomedical research that supports tissue engineering. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of the films that we have produced for part of the science center planetarium demographic, specifically children ranging in age from 7 to 16 years. A two-group pre- and post-test design was used to compare children's learning and attitude changes in response to the two versions of the film. One version uses traditional voice-over narration; the other version uses dialog between two animated characters. The results of this study indicate that children demonstrated increases in knowledge of the topic with either film format, but preferred the animated character version. The percentage change in children's scores on the knowledge questions given before and after viewing the show exhibited an improvement from 23% correct to 61% correct on average. In addition, many of the things that the children reported liking were part of the design process of the art-science collaboration. Other results indicated that before viewing the shows 77% of the children had not even heard about tissue engineering and only 17% indicated that they were very interested in it, whereas after viewing the shows, 95% indicated that tissue engineering was a good idea. We also find that after viewing the show, 71% of the children reported that the show made them think, 75% enjoyed it, and 89% felt that they learned something. We discuss the potential impact the films might have on public knowledge, health literacy, and attitudes toward the science of tissue engineering. PMID:21943030

Wilson, Anna C; Gonzalez, Laura L; Pollock, John A

2012-03-01

154

Designing an Action Selection Engine for Behavioral Animation of Intelligent Virtual Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper presents a new action selection scheme for behavioral animation in computer graphics. This scheme provides a powerful\\u000a mechanism for the determination of the sequence of actions to be performed by the virtual agents emulating real world’s life.\\u000a In particular, the present contribution focuses on the description of the system architecture and some implementation issues.\\u000a Then, the performance of

Francisco Luengo; Andrés Iglesias

2005-01-01

155

A FIELD STUDY WITH GENETICALLY ENGINEERED ALFALFA INOCULATED WITH RECOMBINANT SINORHIZOBIUM MELILOTI: EFFECTS ON THE SOIL ECOSYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

The agricultural use of genetically engineered plants and microorganisms has become increasingly common. Because genetically engineered plants and microorganisms can produce compounds foreign to their environment, there is concern that they may become established outside of thei...

156

Ecosystem Explorations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ecosystem Explorations curriculum includes eleven classroom lessons. The lessons are divided into two sections--Understanding Ecosystems and Human Connections to Ecosystems. The curriculum incorporates scientific inquiry skills, cooperative l

Gunckel, Kristen L.

1999-09-01

157

Animal Biotechnology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biotechnology has taken two directions in efforts to speed up animal production above the rates achievable by selective breeding. Recombinant DNA methods have been used to engineer protein gene products for direct administration to livestock, as in recombinant growth hormone to stimulate lactation in dairy cows or yield faster-growing, leaner carcasses in meat animals. Cloned cellulolytic genes have been inserted

B. A. Cross

1989-01-01

158

Traditional Animation Keyframe Animation  

E-print Network

Animation Traditional Animation Keyframe Animation Interpolating Rotation Forward/Inverse Kinematics Traditional Animation Keyframe Animation Interpolating Rotation Forward/Inverse Kinematics #12;Overview · Animation techniques ­Performance-based (motion capture) ­Traditional animation (frame

Treuille, Adrien

159

A comparative study of three different biomaterials in the engineering of skeletal muscle using a rat animal model.  

PubMed

Defects caused by traumatic or postsurgical loss of muscle mass may result in severe impairments of the functionality of skeletal muscle. Tissue engineering represents a possible approach to replace the lost or defective muscle. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for rat myoblasts, using a new animal model. PKH26-fluorescent-stained cultured rat myoblasts were either seeded onto polyglycolic acid meshes or, alternatively, suspended in alginate or in hyaluronic acid-hydrogels. In each of the eight Fisher CDF-344 rats, four capsule pouches were induced by subcutaneous implantation of four silicone sheets. After two weeks the silicone sheets were removed and myoblast-biomaterial-constructs were implanted in the preformed capsules. Specimens were harvested after four weeks and examined histologically by H&E-staining and fluorescence microscopy. All capsules were well-vascularized. Implanted myoblasts fused by forming multinucleated myotubes. This study demonstrates that myoblasts seeded onto different biomaterials can be successfully transplanted into preformed highly vascularized capsule pouches. Our animal model has paved the way for studies of myoblast-biomaterial transplantations into an ectopic non-muscular environment. PMID:14697866

Kamelger, F S; Marksteiner, R; Margreiter, E; Klima, G; Wechselberger, G; Hering, S; Piza, H

2004-04-01

160

Coral Reef Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack explores the unique and diverse ecosystem of the coral reef. The focus is on Standards and Benchmarks related to populations and ecosystems using coral reefs and their immediate environment as an example. Because the Standards and Benchmarks present the concepts of populations and ecosystems generically, without reference to a specific ecosystem or the organisms in the system, coral reefs are used to provide the context through which concepts in a marine ecosystem are explored.In addition to comprehensive inquiry-based learning materials tied to Science Education Standards and Benchmarks, the SciPack includes the following additional components:� Pedagogical Implications section addressing common misconceptions, teaching resources and strand maps linking grade band appropriate content to standards. � Access to one-on-one support via e-mail to content "Wizards".� Final Assessment which can be used to certify mastery of the concepts.Learning Outcomes:Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Living Reef� Identify coral polyp structures and describe their functions.� Describe photosynthesis in the coral environment.� Describe the evolution of a typical reef system.� Use the shape of an individual coral to identify its common name, and classify entire coral reef ecosystems based on shape and location. � Describe the process of coral polyp reproduction and growth.� Identify how the features and/or behavioral strategies of coral reef inhabitants enable them to survive in coral reef environments.Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Abiotic Setting� Identify the characteristics of an ecosystem, and describe the interdependence between biotic and abiotic features in an ecosystem.� Describe how the following abiotic factors provide coral with the energy needed to survive and grow within their ecosystem: sunlight, water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide.� Describe the optimal environmental conditions for coral reef growth, and explain the process of coral reef development (including the role of available sunlight and calcium).� Explain how the following environmental factors might affect coral ecosystems: increase in dissolved CO2, changes in global temperatures, increase in ocean water turbidity through water pollution.Coral Reef Ecosystems: Interdependence� Identify and label key components of food chains and food webs in a coral reef ecosystem.� Describe key relationships among plants and animals in the coral reef ecosystem: predator and prey relationships, producer and consumer relationships, and symbiotic relationships (mutualism, commensalisms, parasitism).� Recognize the direction that energy travels through food chains and food webs.� Explain that materials (chemical elements) and natural resources are recycled in coral reef ecosystems and reappear in different forms.� Describe the primary ecological succession events within a typical coral reef ecosystem.Coral Reef Ecosystems: Ecosystems in Crisis� Describe ways in which human activities directly impact coral reef ecosystems (resource and recreational uses).� Describe ways in which human activities indirectly impact coral reef ecosystems (by changing the physical conditions, pollution, changes in the water chemistry, etc.).� Explain how human activity may decrease the reefs ability to recover from natural occurrences. � Explain the effects of increased predation or disease on a reef ecosystem.� Describe the effect of habitat loss on the reef ecosystem.� Describe the effects of weather and climate change on a healthy and weakened reef ecosystem.

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

2007-03-28

161

I Will Survive! - An Engineering Design Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help fifth grade students apply the concept of how changes in an ecosystem can affect the survival of an animal species. Some suggested background building lessons are included, but it is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Faulkner, Elizabeth

2012-07-31

162

Abundance and fragmentation patterns of the ecosystem engineer Lithophyllum byssoides (Lamarck) Foslie along the Iberian Peninsula Atlantic coast. Conservation and management implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crustose calcareous red macroalgae Lithophyllum byssoides (Lamarck) Foslie is a common ecosystem engineer along the Atlantic and Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula. This species is threatened by several anthropogenic impacts acting at different spatial scales, such as pollution or global warming. The aim of this study is to identify scales of spatial variation in the abundance and fragmentation patterns of L. byssoides along the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula. For this aim we used a hierarchical sampling design considering four spatial scales (from metres to 100s of kilometres). Results of the present study indicated no significant variability among regions investigated whereas significant variability was found at the scales of shore and site in spatial patterns of abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides. Variance components were higher at the spatial scale of shore for abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides with the only exception of percentage cover and thus, processes acting at the scale of 10s of kilometres seem to be more relevant in shaping the spatial variability both in abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides. These results provided quantitative estimates of abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides at the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula establishing the observational basis for future assessment, monitoring and experimental investigations to identify the processes and anthropogenic impacts affecting L. byssoides populations. Finally we have also identified percentage cover and patch density as the best variables for long-term monitoring programs aimed to detect future anthropogenic impacts on L. byssoides. Therefore, our results have important implications for conservation and management of this valuable ecosystem engineer along the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

Veiga, Puri; Rubal, Marcos; Cacabelos, Eva; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

2013-10-01

163

ECOSYSTEM SERVICES: Benefits Supplied to Human Societies by Natural Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Human societies derive many essential goods from natural ecosystems, including seafood, game animals, fodder, fuelwood, timber, and pharmaceutical products. These goods represent important and familiar parts of the economy. What has been less appreciated until recently is that natural ecosystems also perform fundamental life-support services without which human civilizations would cease to thrive. These include the purification of air

Gretchen C. Daily; Susan Alexander; Paul R. Ehrlich; Larry Goulder; Jane Lubchenco; Pamela A. Matson; Harold A. Mooney; Sandra Postel; Stephen H. Schneider; David Tilman; George M. Woodwell

1997-01-01

164

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Pacific salmon effects on stream ecosystems: a quantitative  

E-print Network

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Pacific salmon effects on stream ecosystems: a quantitative during their annual spawning runs, leading researchers to classify these fish as ecosystem engineers-analysis to evaluate potential sources of variability among studies in stream ecosystem responses to salmon. Results

Tiegs, Scott

165

Ecosystem Consequences of Biological Invasions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exotic species affect the biogeochemical pools and fluxes of materials and energy, thereby altering the fundamental structure and function of their ecosystems. Rapidly accumulating evidence from many species of both animal and plant invaders suggests that invasive species often increase pool sizes, particularly of biomass, and promote accelerated flux rates, but many exceptions can be found. Ecosystem dynamics are altered

Joan G. Ehrenfeld

2010-01-01

166

Ecosystem Consequences of Biological Invasions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exotic species affect the biogeochemical pools and fluxes of materials and energy, thereby altering the fundamental structure and function of their ecosystems. Rapidly accumulating evidence from many species of both animal and plant invaders suggests that invasive species often increase pool sizes, particularly of biomass, and promote accelerated flux rates, but many exceptions can be found. Ecosystem dynamics are altered

Joan G. Ehrenfeld

167

Florida Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by FICUS (the Florida Internet Center for Understanding Sustainability) and the University of South Florida, this gem of a site covers Florida's native upland, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Streamlined in organization but solid in content, Florida Ecosystems offers introductory information and photographic images of a dozen ecosystems, ranging from Pine Flatwoods and Dry Prairies to Mangrove Swamps and Coral Reefs. For students and educators interested in subtropical ecosystems, this is a nice place to start.

168

Ecosystem Jenga!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To give students a tangible model of an ecosystem and have them experience what could happen if a component of that ecosystem were removed; the authors developed a hands-on, inquiry-based activity that visually demonstrates the concept of a delicately balanced ecosystem through a modification of the popular game Jenga. This activity can be…

Umphlett, Natalie; Brosius, Tierney; Laungani, Ramesh; Rousseau, Joe; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra L.

2009-01-01

169

Ecosystem Journalism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If the organisms in a prairie ecosystem created a newspaper, what would it look like? What important news topics of the ecosystem would the organisms want to discuss? Imaginative and enthusiastic third-grade students were busy pondering these questions as they tried their hands at "ecosystem journalism." The class had recently completed a study of…

Robertson, Amy; Mahlin, Kathryn

2005-01-01

170

Soil fauna, soil properties and geo-ecosystem functioning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of soil fauna on soil processes is of utmost importance, as the activity of soil fauna directly affects soil quality. This is expressed by the direct effects of soil fauna on soil physical and soil chemical properties that not only have great importance to food production and ecosystems services, but also on weathering and hydrological and geomorphological processes. Soil animals can be perceived as ecosystem engineers that directly affect the flow of water, sediments and nutrients through terrestrial ecosystems. The biodiversity of animals living in the soil is huge and shows a huge range in size, functions and effects. Most work has been focused on only a few species such as earthworms and termites, but in general the knowledge on the effect of soil biota on soil ecosystem functioning is limited as it is for their impact on processes in the soil and on the soil surface. In this presentation we would like to review some of the impacts of soil fauna on soil properties that have implications for geo-ecosystem functioning and soil formation processes.

Cammeraat, L. H.

2012-04-01

171

PhD studentship: Indirect impacts of ecosystem  

E-print Network

PhD studentship: Indirect impacts of ecosystem engineering by invasive crayfish Supervised by Dr J primarily because of their direct impacts on aquatic biota but their `ecosystem engineering' impacts. Keywords: invasion ecology, crayfish, biogeochemistry, ecosystem engineering, mesocosms #12;Location Queen

Chittka, Lars

172

Impact of elevated levels of CO2 on animal mediated ecosystem function: the modification of sediment nutrient fluxes by burrowing urchins.  

PubMed

A mesocosm experiment was conducted to quantify the relationships between the presence and body size of two burrowing heart urchins (Brissopsis lyrifera and Echinocardium cordatum) and rates of sediment nutrient flux. Furthermore, the impact of seawater acidification on these relationships was determined during this 40-day exposure experiment. Using carbon dioxide (CO2) gas, seawater was acidified to pHNBS 7.6, 7.2 or 6.8. Control treatments were maintained in natural seawater (pH?8.0). Under normocapnic conditions, burrowing urchins were seen to reduce the sediment uptake of nitrite or nitrate whilst enhancing the release of silicate and phosphate. In acidified (hypercapnic) treatments, the biological control of biogeochemical cycles by urchins was significantly affected, probably through the combined impacts of high CO2 on nitrifying bacteria, benthic algae and urchin behaviour. This study highlights the importance of considering biological interactions when predicting the consequences of seawater acidification on ecosystem function. PMID:23218873

Widdicombe, S; Beesley, A; Berge, J A; Dashfield, S L; McNeill, C L; Needham, H R; Øxnevad, S

2013-08-30

173

Conservation Medicine: Human Health: Ecosystem Sustainability  

E-print Network

of biodiversity in a human altered ecosystem can trigger the opposite of the ``dilution effect,'' whereby animal1 23 EcoHealth Conservation Medicine: Human Health: Ecosystem Sustainability Official journal human population growth and broad ecosystem changes, emerging infectious diseases (EID) that affect

McKenzie, Valerie

174

Impact of typhoon disturbance on the diversity of key ecosystem engineers in a monoculture mangrove forest plantation, Can Gio Biosphere Reserve, Vietnam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mangrove crabs as key ecosystem engineers may play an important role in the recovery process of storm-damaged forests. Yet, their response to storm disturbance is largely unknown. Here we compare the ground-dwelling brachyuran crab community of intact mangrove stands with that of typhoon gaps having experienced 100% tree mortality. Field work was conducted in two adjacent areas in Can Gio Biosphere Reserve, southern Vietnam. In each area, an 18-20 yr old monoculture Rhizophora apiculata stand served as control and was compared with typhoon gaps where downed stems had been removed or left on-site. The gaps were 14 and 20 months old when studied in the dry and rainy season 2008, respectively. Time-based sampling of ground-dwelling crabs with hand or shovel was conducted by 4 persons inside 100 m2 plots for 30 min (7 replicate plots per area, treatment and month). Abiotic (sediment pH, salinity, temperature, grain size, water content, carbon and nitrogen content), and biotic measures (e.g. canopy coverage, woody debris, number of trees, leaf litter) were also taken. Despite complete canopy loss, total crab abundance has not changed significantly (in contrast to biomass) and all 12 species found in the forest were also found in the gaps, demonstrating their robustness. Another 9 gap-exclusive species were recorded and average species number and Shannon diversity were thus higher in the gaps. Perisesarma eumolpe was the most abundant species, both in the forest and in the gaps, and a shift from sesarmids (typical forest species) to ocypodids (generally more prominent in open areas) has not occurred. The persistence of litter-feeding sesarmid crabs prior to the re-establishment of a mangrove canopy is likely to depend on the availability of woody debris on the ground of the gaps, fuelling a mangrove detritus based food web, rather than one based on microphytobenthos and deposit-feeding ocypodids. The presence of burrowing crabs in the gaps suggests that important ecosystem engineering activities are still performed. However, bioturbation may be reduced as crab biomass and body size were smaller in the gaps. Follow-up assessments and field experiments are needed to understand the crabs' role in processing the woody debris, their long-term community dynamics and possible feed-backs between species shifts and gap regeneration.

Diele, K.; Tran Ngoc, D. M.; Geist, S. J.; Meyer, F. W.; Pham, Q. H.; Saint-Paul, U.; Tran, T.; Berger, U.

2013-11-01

175

Freshwater Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners create a freshwater ecosystem in a large plastic bottle. Learners cut and prepare bottles, then fill with water, aquatic plants, snails and fish. Learners observe their mini-ecosystem over time to see what changes--such as the color of the water, the water temperature, plant growth, and behavior and/or population of the snails or fish. The activity serves as a model for larger freshwater ecosystems such as ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, wetlands, reservoirs and groundwater.

Jersey, New; Center, Liberty S.; Coalition, New J.

2006-01-01

176

Coral Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Why study coral ecosystems? Having survived millions of years, coral reefs are among the oldest and most diverse ecosystems on earth. Learning about coral ecosystems encompasses many of the 9-12 grade science curriculum standards. Life cycles of organisms, biological structure and function of organisms, and the behaviors and adaptations of organisms to their environment are all topics easily studied through a focus on coral reefs. All populations in this ecosystem are interdependent and part of a global food web. Healthy coral ecosystems are important to the humans, plants, fish, and other organisms that depend on them. However, the increasing impact of climate changes and human activities is endangering the very survival of these ecosystems. Pollution, habitat loss, invasive species, and diseases are all threats to the survival of coral ecosystems around the globe. Learning about them- "their fragility and value"- will help students understand what is needed to protect them. This SciGuide highlights outstanding NOAA resources, such as online tutorials and complete, hands-on, inquiry based lesson plans from the National Ocean Services. These resources address three areas. First, students can study the biology of the coral organism, learning about types of coral and where they are found. Next, resources focus on the populations, habitat, and dynamics of coral ecosystems. Finally, teachers and students, through online data sources and activities, learn about conservation of our coral ecosystems. Natural threats, human disturbances, and the benefits of coral protection focus students on the real world importance of science learning.

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

2006-06-01

177

Animals in Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The following books relate to the issues surrounding the use of animals for both food and clothing. Farmers may appreciate the increased productivity of factory farming, but the view of animals as production units and the sometimes questionable treatment of animals in some factory farms raises ethical concerns for those interested in animal welfare issues. Genetic engineering, of both plants

Beth Roberts

2004-01-01

178

Soil food web changes during spontaneous succession at post mining sites: a possible ecosystem engineering effect on food web organization?  

PubMed

Parameters characterizing the structure of the decomposer food web, biomass of the soil microflora (bacteria and fungi) and soil micro-, meso- and macrofauna were studied at 14 non-reclaimed 1- 41-year-old post-mining sites near the town of Sokolov (Czech Republic). These observations on the decomposer food webs were compared with knowledge of vegetation and soil microstructure development from previous studies. The amount of carbon entering the food web increased with succession age in a similar way as the total amount of C in food web biomass and the number of functional groups in the food web. Connectance did not show any significant changes with succession age, however. In early stages of the succession, the bacterial channel dominated the food web. Later on, in shrub-dominated stands, the fungal channel took over. Even later, in the forest stage, the bacterial channel prevailed again. The best predictor of fungal bacterial ratio is thickness of fermentation layer. We argue that these changes correspond with changes in topsoil microstructure driven by a combination of plant organic matter input and engineering effects of earthworms. In early stages, soil is alkaline, and a discontinuous litter layer on the soil surface promotes bacterial biomass growth, so the bacterial food web channel can dominate. Litter accumulation on the soil surface supports the development of the fungal channel. In older stages, earthworms arrive, mix litter into the mineral soil and form an organo-mineral topsoil, which is beneficial for bacteria and enhances the bacterial food web channel. PMID:24260281

Frouz, Jan; Thébault, Elisa; Pižl, Václav; Adl, Sina; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrián, Petr; Hán?l, Ladislav; Starý, Josef; Tajovský, Karel; Materna, Jan; Nováková, Alena; de Ruiter, Peter C

2013-01-01

179

AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS,  

EPA Science Inventory

Aquatic ecosystems are a vital part of the urban water cycle (and of urban areas more broadly), and, if healthy, provide a range of goods and services valued by humans (Meyer 1997). For example, aquatic ecosystems (e.g., rivers, lakes, wetlands) provide potable water, food resou...

180

Prairie dog engineering indirectly affects beetle movement behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have shown that landscape structure influences animal movement and population structure. In this study, we show an indirect interaction between beetles and prairie dogs due to prairie dog ecosystem engineering. Gunnison's prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni Hollister) towns have more bare ground and are structurally less complex than adjacent unmodified grasslands. This results in bare ground facilitating beetle movement.

R. K. Bangert; C. N. Slobodchikoff

2004-01-01

181

Sea ice ecosystems.  

PubMed

Polar sea ice is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth. The liquid brine fraction of the ice matrix is home to a diverse array of organisms, ranging from tiny archaea to larger fish and invertebrates. These organisms can tolerate high brine salinity and low temperature but do best when conditions are milder. Thriving ice algal communities, generally dominated by diatoms, live at the ice/water interface and in recently flooded surface and interior layers, especially during spring, when temperatures begin to rise. Although protists dominate the sea ice biomass, heterotrophic bacteria are also abundant. The sea ice ecosystem provides food for a host of animals, with crustaceans being the most conspicuous. Uneaten organic matter from the ice sinks through the water column and feeds benthic ecosystems. As sea ice extent declines, ice algae likely contribute a shrinking fraction of the total amount of organic matter produced in polar waters. PMID:24015900

Arrigo, Kevin R

2014-01-01

182

Animal Cell Mitosis Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animation demonstrates the stages of mitosis in an animal cell. Use the control buttons in the upper left to run the complete animation. Click on any intermediate stage (for example, Anaphase), and see a representative still frame.

2010-01-01

183

[Vaginal ecosystem].  

PubMed

The vagina is original biotype with its own ecosystem, according to medical ecology science. This ecosystem has dynamic, but very unstable equilibrium. Disturb equilibrium is known as a disbiosys. It was discussed different components of this ecosystem: morphology of vaginal walls, vaginal liquidity, lacto-acid and residental flora, "invader" microorganisms, vaginal acidity, immune processes. It was shared our own experience with medicine Polygynax, remedy of Laboratoire Innotech International (Paris, France). Polygynax has such an advantage - rapidly restore disturbed ecological equlibrium in case of bacterial vulvovaginitis, caused mainly of intestine pathogenic flora. PMID:15673027

Karag'ozov, I; Shopova, E; Andreeva, P

2004-01-01

184

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-print Network

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar Robert J. Hannemann The Gordon Institute and the Department of Mechanical Engineering Tufts University Retooling Our Energy Ecosystem: challenges and Chair of the Tufts Department of Mechanical Engineering. His technical and academic interests

185

468 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT, VOL. 56, NO. 3, AUGUST 2009 The Effects of Moving Animation on Recall, Hedonic  

E-print Network

of communi- cation yet devised for quick mass appreciation. --Walt Disney ANIMATION is prevalent advertising campaigns [1], and Web sites of- ten exhibit featured products using computer-generated movie

Hui, Kai-Lung

186

Ecosystem Valuation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed as a collaborative project of the US Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service, US Department of Commerce, NOAA-Sea Grant Office, and University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science, this new Website examines how economists attempt to assign values to ecosystem services. The site is well organized and outlines general and specific topics under the following sections: The Big Picture, Essentials of Ecosystem Valuation, Dollar-based Ecosystem Valuation Methods, Ecosystem Benefit Indicators, and Links. Topics are explained in terms that laypersons will understand (a glossary is also provided) but without compromising the quality of information. Anyone interested in learning more about this controversial but increasingly important area will find this site an excellent starting point.

187

ECOSYSTEM HEALTH: ENERGY INDICATORS  

EPA Science Inventory

1. Ecosystem Health and Ecological Integrity 2. Historical Background on Ecosystem Health 3. Energy Systems Analysis, Health and Emergy 4. Energy and Ecosystems 5. Direct Measures of Ecosystem Health 6. Indirect Measures of Ecosystem Health...

188

Engineering rodents create key habitat for lizards A.D. Davidson , D.C. Lightfoot, J.L. McIntyre  

E-print Network

: Banner-tailed kangaroo rats Ecosystem engineers Gunnison's prairie dogs Keystone species Rodent mounds rodents, Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) and banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys, engineer dams, which create important riparian habitat for plants and other animals, and elephants

Davidson, Ana

189

Carcinogenicity studies of diesel engine exhausts in laboratory animals: a review of past studies and a discussion of future research needs.  

PubMed

Diesel engines play a vital role in world economy, especially in transportation. Exhaust from traditional diesel engines using high-sulfur fuel contains high concentrations of respirable carbonaceous particles with absorbed organic compounds. Recognition that some of these compounds are mutagenic has raised concern for the cancer-causing potential of diesel exhaust exposure. Extensive research addressing this issue has been conducted during the last three decades. This critical review is offered to facilitate an updated assessment of the carcinogenicity of diesel exhaust and to provide a rationale for future animal research of new diesel technology. Life-span bioassays in rats, mice, and Syrian hamsters demonstrated that chronic inhalation of high concentrations of diesel exhaust caused lung tumors in rats but not in mice or Syrian hamsters. In 1989, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) characterized the rat findings as "sufficient evidence of animal carcinogenicity," and, with "limited" evidence from epidemiological studies, classified diesel exhaust Category 2A, a "probable human carcinogen." Subsequent research has shown that similar chronic high concentration exposure to particulate matter generally considered innocuous (such as carbon black and titanium dioxide) also caused lung tumors in rats. Thus, in 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concluded that the findings in the rats should not be used to characterize the cancer hazard or quantify the cancer risk of diesel exhaust. Concurrent with the conduct of the health effects studies, progressively more stringent standards have been promulgated for diesel exhaust particles and NOx. Engine manufacturers have responded with new technology diesel (improved engines, fuel injection, fuels, lubricants, and exhaust treatments) to meet the standards. This review concludes with an outline of research to evaluate the health effects of the new technology, research that is consistent with recommendations included in the U.S. EPA 2002 health assessment document. When this research has been completed, it will be appropriate for IARC to evaluate the potential cancer hazard of the new technology diesel. PMID:16097136

Hesterberg, Thomas W; Bunn, William B; McClellan, Roger O; Hart, Georgia A; Lapin, Charles A

2005-06-01

190

Animal Algorithm Animation Tool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Guido RöÃÂling, who works for the Rechnerbetriebsgruppe (Computer Support Center) of the Department of Computer Science at the Darmstadt University of Technology, has created this website about ANIMAL. ANIMAL is a general-purpose animation tool with a current focus on algorithm animation. Posted on this website are the animations, including screenshots, classification and description, a user guide, other instructions, and research papers. A section with examples provides an overview and screen shots of the animations, such as one that shows how LZW compression (an algorithm created in 1984 by Lempel, Ziv and Welch) works.

191

Arctic Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientists predict that the climate in most parts of the world will warm dramatically in the next century, with change expected to occur earliest and be most pronounced in polar regions. In light of this, there is an urgent need to understand different aspects of the Earth's climate system, including the role that Arctic ecosystems play in regulating the Earth's climate and how food webs are affected by the changing climate. This module explores the Arctic Ocean ecosystem through interaction with a model that simulates how phytoplankton and zooplankton interact and respond to changes in season, sea ice, and nutrients.

Byrd, Greg

2010-01-01

192

Changing Ecosystem Service Values Following Technological Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on ecosystem services has focused mostly on natural areas or remote places, with less attention given to urban ecosystem services and their relationship with technological change. However, recent work by urban ecologists and urban designers has more closely examined and appreciated the opportunities associated with integrating natural and built infrastructures. Nevertheless, a perception remains in the literature on ecosystem services that technology may easily and irreversibly substitute for services previously obtained from ecosystems, especially when the superiority of the engineered system motivated replacement in the first place. We emphasize that the expected tradeoff between natural and manufactured capital is false. Rather, as argued in other contexts, the adoption of new technologies is complementary to ecosystem management. The complementarity of ecosystem services and technology is illustrated with a case study in Barcelona, Spain where the installation of sophisticated water treatment technology increased the value of the ecosystem services found there. Interestingly, the complementarity between natural and built infrastructures may remain even for the very ecosystems that are affected by the technological change. This finding suggests that we can expect the value of ecosystem services to co-evolve with new technologies. Technological innovation can generate new opportunities to harness value from ecosystems, and the engineered structures found in cities may generate more reliance on ecosystem processes, not less.

Honey-Rosés, Jordi; Schneider, Daniel W.; Brozovi?, Nicholas

2014-06-01

193

Changing ecosystem service values following technological change.  

PubMed

Research on ecosystem services has focused mostly on natural areas or remote places, with less attention given to urban ecosystem services and their relationship with technological change. However, recent work by urban ecologists and urban designers has more closely examined and appreciated the opportunities associated with integrating natural and built infrastructures. Nevertheless, a perception remains in the literature on ecosystem services that technology may easily and irreversibly substitute for services previously obtained from ecosystems, especially when the superiority of the engineered system motivated replacement in the first place. We emphasize that the expected tradeoff between natural and manufactured capital is false. Rather, as argued in other contexts, the adoption of new technologies is complementary to ecosystem management. The complementarity of ecosystem services and technology is illustrated with a case study in Barcelona, Spain where the installation of sophisticated water treatment technology increased the value of the ecosystem services found there. Interestingly, the complementarity between natural and built infrastructures may remain even for the very ecosystems that are affected by the technological change. This finding suggests that we can expect the value of ecosystem services to co-evolve with new technologies. Technological innovation can generate new opportunities to harness value from ecosystems, and the engineered structures found in cities may generate more reliance on ecosystem processes, not less. PMID:24752336

Honey-Rosés, Jordi; Schneider, Daniel W; Brozovi?, Nicholas

2014-06-01

194

The Ecosystem Functions Model: A Tool for Restoration Planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: The Ecosystem Functions Model (EFM) is a planning tool that analyzes ecosystem response to changes in flow regime. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) is developing the EFM and envisions environmental planners, biologists, and engineers using the model to help determine whether proposed alternatives (e.g., reservoir operations or levee alignments) would maintain, enhance, or diminish

John T. Hickey; Chris N. Dunn

195

Digital Ecosystems: Ecosystem-Oriented Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We view Digital Ecosystems to be the digital counterparts of biological ecosystems. Here, we are concerned with the creation\\u000a of these Digital Ecosystems, exploiting the self-organising properties of biological ecosystems to evolve high-level software\\u000a applications. Therefore, we created the Digital Ecosystem, a novel optimisation technique inspired by biological ecosystems,\\u000a where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration

Gerard Briscoe; Suzanne Sadedin; Philippe De Wilde

2011-01-01

196

Engineering and design of vessels for sea transport of animals: the Australian design regulations for livestock carriers.  

PubMed

The author outlines the principles underlying the standards employed by the Australian Marine Safety Authority to regulate live animal carriers, vessels used for sea transport of livestock, that operate from Australia. The standards are contained in regulations adopted by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority known as Marine Orders. The Cargo and Cargo Handling-Livestock Marine Order has evolved over time with subsequent 'issues' of the order as a consequence of operational experience and specific research. Recent changes have focused on the need to have adequate redundancy in systems and equipment of ships. A history of the development of these regulations is given and is followed by a description of the principles employed to develop the provisions contained in the regulations. PMID:20405430

Schultz-Altmann, Alexander G T

2008-01-01

197

Marine Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the wild, small crustaceans known as brine shrimp live in marine habitats such as saltwater lakes. In this activity, learners create a saltwater or marine ecosystem that becomes an experimental brine shrimp hatchery. Learners observe the brine shrimp life cycle and test the effect of salinity (salt content) on brine shrimp eggs and larvae, as well as consider the potential impact of other variables such as water temperature and pollution.

Jersey, New; Center, Liberty S.; Coalition, New J.

2006-01-01

198

Animal models.  

PubMed

Epilepsy accounts for a significant portion of the dis-ease burden worldwide. Research in this field is fundamental and mandatory. Animal models have played, and still play, a substantial role in understanding the patho-physiology and treatment of human epilepsies. A large number and variety of approaches are available, and they have been applied to many animals. In this chapter the in vitro and in vivo animal models are discussed,with major emphasis on the in vivo studies. Models have used phylogenetically different animals - from worms to monkeys. Our attention has been dedicated mainly to rodents.In clinical practice, developmental aspects of epilepsy often differ from those in adults. Animal models have often helped to clarify these differences. In this chapter, developmental aspects have been emphasized.Electrical stimulation and chemical-induced models of seizures have been described first, as they represent the oldest and most common models. Among these models, kindling raised great interest, especially for the study of the epileptogenesis. Acquired focal models mimic seizures and occasionally epilepsies secondary to abnormal cortical development, hypoxia, trauma, and hemorrhage.Better knowledge of epileptic syndromes will help to create new animal models. To date, absence epilepsy is one of the most common and (often) benign forms of epilepsy. There are several models, including acute pharmacological models (PTZ, penicillin, THIP, GBL) and chronic models (GAERS, WAG/Rij). Although atypical absence seizures are less benign, thus needing more investigation, only two models are so far available (AY-9944,MAM-AY). Infantile spasms are an early childhood encephalopathy that is usually associated with a poor out-come. The investigation of this syndrome in animal models is recent and fascinating. Different approaches have been used including genetic (Down syndrome,ARX mutation) and acquired (multiple hit, TTX, CRH,betamethasone-NMDA) models.An entire section has been dedicated to genetic models, from the older models obtained with spontaneous mutations (GEPRs) to the new engineered knockout, knocking, and transgenic models. Some of these models have been created based on recently recognized patho-genesis such as benign familial neonatal epilepsy, early infantile encephalopathy with suppression bursts, severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, the tuberous sclerosis model, and the progressive myoclonic epilepsy. The contribution of animal models to epilepsy re-search is unquestionable. The development of further strategies is necessary to find novel strategies to cure epileptic patients, and optimistically to allow scientists first and clinicians subsequently to prevent epilepsy and its consequences. PMID:22938964

Coppola, Antonietta; Moshé, Solomon L

2012-01-01

199

ANIMAL COGNITION Animal cognition  

E-print Network

·Social learning #12;Social learning ·Possibly associative at least in some aspects. ·ObservingCHAPTER 9 ANIMAL COGNITION #12;Animal cognition ·Basic concepts ·Case study: incentive learning ·Rule learning ·Social learning #12;Rule learning ·A cognitive form of learning. ·Initial learning based

Cooper, Brenton G.

200

Impacts of Climate Change Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site presents one of three animated films for schoolchildren, commissioned by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority. An emotive and visual animation conveys the effects climate change will have on marine ecosystems and suggests ways to minimize our impact.

2010-01-01

201

Animal Cell Meiosis Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Meiosis is important in assuring genetic diversity in sexual reproduction. Use this interactive animation to follow Meiosis I (reduction division) and Meiosis II in a continuous sequence or stop at any stage and review critical events.

2010-01-01

202

Disease-Driven Amphibian Declines Alter Ecosystem Processes  

E-print Network

deforestation), many result in losses of entire assemblages of animals (Pauly and others 1998; Barnosky not compensated for by other, functionally redundant consumers. Declining animal biodiversity has ecosystem such as the Neotropics. Key words: biodiversity-ecosystem function; extinction; ecological redundancy; nitrogen cycling

Dodds, Walter

203

Boost Converter Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animation, created by faculty at Dartmouth University, is a boost converter. The resource features other animations such as buck and discontinuous converters. They also add simple diode, bridge and half-wave rectifiers. Although simple in design, this can still be a useful resource for those interested in electrical engineering.

2009-11-06

204

Tracing anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to ecosystems  

E-print Network

and contamination by human and animal waste. The World Health Organization and the U.S. Environmental Protection of water, nutrients, and other materials from land to freshwater ecosystems. The development of effective of N from different anthropogenic sources (including fertilizer, sewage and animal waste

Elliott, Emily M.

205

Animal Hats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this arts and crafts activity about animals and animal characteristics, learners will design animal hats and role-play as animals. Through this dramatic play, learners will practice and develop problem solving, cooperation, symbolic thinking, language and personal expression skills. Use the suggested open-ended questions to encourage learner reflection about their animal hat and animals in general.

Omsi

2004-01-01

206

Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center (PIERC) is part of the Biological Division of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The mission of PIERC is to provide the scientific understanding and technologies needed to support the sound management and conservation of our Nation's biological resources occurring within the cultural, sociological, and political contexts of the State of Hawaii. The geographical isolation of the Hawaiian Islands has resulted in the evolution of a highly endemic biota, while human colonization has severely impacted native plant and animal populations. The PIERC website provides information and research studies about the Hawaiian Islands ecosystem, as well as staff projects that are currently in progress. Topics include birds, mammals, ecosystem diversity, genetics, wildlife health, plant ecology, and marine biology. There is an education section with outdoor activities, online activities, and a coloring book. Links are provided for further information.

207

Sciatic nerve repair with tissue engineered nerve: Olfactory ensheathing cells seeded poly(lactic-co-glygolic acid) conduit in an animal model  

PubMed Central

Background and Aim: Synthetic nerve conduits have been sought for repair of nerve defects as the autologous nerve grafts causes donor site morbidity and possess other drawbacks. Many strategies have been investigated to improve nerve regeneration through synthetic nerve guided conduits. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) that share both Schwann cell and astrocytic characteristics have been shown to promote axonal regeneration after transplantation. The present study was driven by the hypothesis that tissue-engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) seeded with OECs would improve peripheral nerve regeneration in a long sciatic nerve defect. Materials and Methods: Sciatic nerve gap of 15 mm was created in six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats and implanted with PLGA seeded with OECs. The nerve regeneration was assessed electrophysiologically at 2, 4 and 6 weeks following implantation. Histopathological examination, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination and immunohistochemical analysis were performed at the end of the study. Results: Nerve conduction studies revealed a significant improvement of nerve conduction velocities whereby the mean nerve conduction velocity increases from 4.2 ? 0.4 m/s at week 2 to 27.3 ? 5.7 m/s at week 6 post-implantation (P < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed presence of spindle-shaped cells. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated the expression of S100 protein in both cell nucleus and the cytoplasm in these cells, hence confirming their Schwann-cell-like property. Under SEM, these cells were found to be actively secreting extracellular matrix. Conclusion: Tissue-engineered PLGA conduit seeded with OECs provided a permissive environment to facilitate nerve regeneration in a small animal model. PMID:24379458

Tan, C W; Ng, M H; Ohnmar, H; Lokanathan, Y; Nur-Hidayah, H; Roohi, S A; Ruszymah, BHI; Nor-Hazla, M H; Shalimar, A; Naicker, A S

2013-01-01

208

Terrestrial Ecosystem Adaptation  

E-print Network

Terrestrial Ecosystem Adaptation Steven W. Running and L. Scott Mills RFF REPORT ............................... 16 Expected Future Ecosystem Trends ................................................................................................................................................................ 27 #12; RUNNING AND MILLS 1 Terrestrial Ecosystem Adaptation Steven W. Running and L. Scott

Mills, L. Scott

209

104 Department of Landscape Design and Ecosystem Management (LDEM) Graduate Catalogue 201314  

E-print Network

,soilsintheecosystem,soilconservation,water in the ecosystem, water conservation, principles of soil and water chemistry and microbiology, plant and animal. Theprogramcrossestraditionalboundariesbyapplyinganinterdisciplinaryapproachandmultiple resource knowledge to ecosystem studies, while also emphasizing human-nature interactions. Natural Program. Ecosystem Management Courses ENSC 630/ Natural Resource Management 3 cr. LDEM 630 Ecosystem

210

Animal Cloning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The past few years have seen many changes in the field of genetics, including the ability to genetically clone mammals, first achieved in 1997 with a sheep named Dolly. Still a relatively new phenomenon, news stories are continually detailing new advances in cloning, reasons why cloning is important, and concerns about the safety and ethics of cloning. This week's Topic In Depth highlights some recent news articles and Web sites that address the topic of animal cloning. The first site is a recent article from the Washington Post about the sheep named Dolly, the world's first cloned mammal, who has developed arthritis at a relatively young age and has caused some to question whether cloning can have adverse health effects. An ABC news.com article details the recent birth of five cloned piglets whose parent had been genetically engineered to remove a gene that causes human bodies to reject transplanted animal organs. An Associated Press article discusses some concerns raised by scientists and ethicists surrounding the idea of xenotransplantation (animal to human transplantation). For users who need a primer on what exactly cloning means and why it is done, check out the Cloning Fact Sheet. Developed by the Human Genome Project, it provides short, non-technical explanations of the different types of cloning and some links to other cloning related Web sites. Those users looking for more detailed information about cloning technology will find the next two sites interesting. PPL Therapeutics, which created the five piglets and collaborated with the Roslin Institute to clone Dolly, provides news articles and technical descriptions of cloning and related genetic technology. The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America's Web site provides links to a tremendous amount of information surrounding all aspects of cloning, including recent congressional activity, news, and general resources. Although focused more heavily on human cloning, The American Journal of Bioethics Online has a Web page with links to various articles relating to the ethical issues involved with cloning and genetics.

Lee, Amy.

2002-01-01

211

Engineering Engineering  

E-print Network

-solving skills engineers and engineering technologist need, but also the "people" skills (teamwork, communication" skills (teamwork, communication, and leadership) necessary for success in your future career. We look

Maroncelli, Mark

212

Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

Peters, E.C. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Richmond, R.H. [Univ. of Guam, Mangilao (Guam). Marine Lab.; Power, E.A. [EVS Environment Consultants, Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1997-01-01

213

Native and non-native pathogens, insects and animals continue to have serious negative impacts on forest ecosystems and planted forests worldwide. Climate change will alter host-pest relationships and may  

E-print Network

to combat the adverse impacts of pests. Resistance research programs, including resistance breeding international gathering of researchers and technical specialists on this topic in the past 30 years impacts on forest ecosystems and planted forests worldwide. Climate change will alter host-pest

Standiford, Richard B.

214

Astronomical Ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Just as quetzals and jaguars require specific ecological habitats to survive, so too must planets occupy a tightly constrained astronomical habitat to support life as we know it. With this theme in mind we relate the transferable features of our elementary astronomy course, "The Astronomical Basis of Life on Earth." Over the last five years, in a team-taught course that features a spring break field trip to Costa Rica, we have introduced astronomy through "astronomical ecosystems," emphasizing astronomical constraints on the prospects for life on Earth. Life requires energy, chemical elements, and long timescales, and we emphasize how cosmological, astrophysical, and geological realities, through stabilities and catastrophes, create and eliminate niches for biological life. The linkage between astronomy and biology gets immediate and personal: for example, studies in solar energy production are followed by hikes in the forest to examine the light-gathering strategies of photosynthetic organisms; a lesson on tides is conducted while standing up to our necks in one on a Pacific beach. Further linkages between astronomy and the human timescale concerns of biological diversity, cultural diversity, and environmental sustainability are natural and direct. Our experience of teaching "astronomy as habitat" strongly influences our "Astronomy 101" course in Oklahoma as well. This "inverted astrobiology" seems to transform our student's outlook, from the universe being something "out there" into something "we're in!" We thank the SNU Science Alumni support group "The Catalysts," and the SNU Quetzal Education and Research Center, San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, for their support.

Neuenschwander, D. E.; Finkenbinder, L. R.

2004-05-01

215

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Increasing donor ecosystem productivity decreases terrestrial  

E-print Network

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Increasing donor ecosystem productivity decreases terrestrial Abstract Because nutrient enrichment can increase ecosystem productivity, it may enhance resource flows to adjacent ecosystems as organisms cross ecosystem bound- aries and subsidize predators in recipient

Rosemond, Amy Daum

216

Parallel ecological networks in ecosystems  

PubMed Central

In ecosystems, species interact with other species directly and through abiotic factors in multiple ways, often forming complex networks of various types of ecological interaction. Out of this suite of interactions, predator–prey interactions have received most attention. The resulting food webs, however, will always operate simultaneously with networks based on other types of ecological interaction, such as through the activities of ecosystem engineers or mutualistic interactions. Little is known about how to classify, organize and quantify these other ecological networks and their mutual interplay. The aim of this paper is to provide new and testable ideas on how to understand and model ecosystems in which many different types of ecological interaction operate simultaneously. We approach this problem by first identifying six main types of interaction that operate within ecosystems, of which food web interactions are one. Then, we propose that food webs are structured among two main axes of organization: a vertical (classic) axis representing trophic position and a new horizontal ‘ecological stoichiometry’ axis representing decreasing palatability of plant parts and detritus for herbivores and detrivores and slower turnover times. The usefulness of these new ideas is then explored with three very different ecosystems as test cases: temperate intertidal mudflats; temperate short grass prairie; and tropical savannah. PMID:19451126

Olff, Han; Alonso, David; Berg, Matty P.; Eriksson, B. Klemens; Loreau, Michel; Piersma, Theunis; Rooney, Neil

2009-01-01

217

Glyphosate in northern ecosystems.  

PubMed

Glyphosate is the main nonselective, systemic herbicide used against a wide range of weeds. Its worldwide use has expanded because of extensive use of certain agricultural practices such as no-till cropping, and widespread application of glyphosate-resistant genetically modified crops. Glyphosate has a reputation of being nontoxic to animals and rapidly inactivated in soils. However, recent evidence has cast doubts on its safety. Glyphosate may be retained and transported in soils, and there may be cascading effects on nontarget organisms. These processes may be especially detrimental in northern ecosystems because they are characterized by long biologically inactive winters and short growing seasons. In this opinion article, we discuss the potential ecological, environmental and agricultural risks of intensive glyphosate use in boreal regions. PMID:22677798

Helander, Marjo; Saloniemi, Irma; Saikkonen, Kari

2012-10-01

218

Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME  

SciTech Connect

As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2013-01-01

219

Pleistocene Extinctions: The Death of an Ecosystem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The materials at this site discuss the interconnectedness of ecosystems including animals, vegetation and climate, and the impact of extinctions on human perception. The site includes: the End of Eden, a brief description of the extinction model results; the Case of the Aboricidal Megaherbivores, a detective story with Skylark Holmes and Dr. Janet Watson; The ecosystem extinctions model which you can get and run yourself; and the model's implications, including the invention of war and the rise of information technology.

Whitney-Smith, Elin

220

Landscape ecosystems of the University of Michigan Biological Station: Ecosystem diversity and ground-cover diversity  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research is to provide an understanding of the three-dimensional (air-earth-organism) units of the landscape of the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) that the author calls landscape ecosystem types, or simply ecosystems. Specifically, he has focused on the kinds, spatial location and patterns, and composition (physiography, soil, vegetation) of the local landscape ecosystem types of UMBS and Colonial Point. Future research on the functioning of these ecosystems together with inventories of their plant and animal life will add significantly to the landscape ecology research that has been initiated. A major reason for this research is to provide the conceptual basis and baseline data for understanding ecosystem change. Although it is popular to speak of climate change, entire ecosystems change; some components change faster than others.

Pearsall, D.R.

1995-12-31

221

PRELIMINARY TESTING, EVALUATION, AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR THE TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents an initial testing and sensitivity analysis of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Exposure Assessment Model (TEEAM). TEEAM calculates the exposure concentrations of contaminants in plants and animals in terrestrial ecosystems. he project was performed in two phases. ...

222

Ecosystem element cycling Introduction  

E-print Network

Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

223

Internet Geography: Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site about ecosystems and biomes contains a map of different ecosystems, and provides rainfall statistics for each biome. There are sections on tropical rainforest, taiga (or boreal forest), savanna, desert, and tundra ecosystems. Each section describes the biome and its origins, where it is found, and how humans impact it. In some cases, sustainable development of the ecosystem is explained.

224

Biology is the study of life. Its scope ranges from the molecular to the ecosystem. It deals with fundamental questions such as the origin and evolution of plants and animals, interactions  

E-print Network

with fundamental questions such as the origin and evolution of plants and animals, interactions between living. They may also enter careers in environmental protection, wildlife management, biotechnology and genetic, ecology, animal behaviour, developmental biology, neurobiology, Programs of Study in Biology Major Program

Barthelat, Francois

225

Forest ecosystems in the Alaskan taiga  

SciTech Connect

This volume in the series ''Ecological Studies'' provides an overview and synthesis of research on the structure and function of taiga forest ecosystems of interior Alaska. The first section discusses the nature of the taiga environment and covers climate, forest ecosystem distribution, natural regeneration of vegetation, and the role of fire. The second edition focuses on environmental controls over organism activity with discussions on growth and nutrient use, nitrogen fixation, physiological ecology of mosses, and microbial activity and element availability. The final section considers environmental controls over ecosystem processes with discussions of processes, plant-animal interactions, and a model of forest growth and yield.

Van Cleve, K.; Chapin, F.S. III; Flanagan, P.W.; Viereck, L.A.

1986-01-01

226

Exploring Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Each group will be given one of the following categories of animals to explore further and answer questions about. Mammals Invertebrates Fish Birds Amphibians Reptiles Explore your category of animals and answer these questions: 1. What makes an animal belong to this category? Do you think that an animal can only belong to one category? Why or why not? 2. Explain why these animals live where they do? 3. Does your category of animals have any interesting ...

Emily, Miss

2009-03-02

227

[Animal welfare aspects of biotechnology].  

PubMed

It's difficult to value the effects on animals caused by genetic engineering. Nowadays an enormous increase on animal tests is taken place. The detrimental alterations of small number of living born gene altered animals are in literature explained by deficiencies in method and the increased growth is described with deficient mechanisms on regulation. Not only the intention to increase productivity by genetic engineering but also the method to improve by fragments (genes) not facing the animals totality is against prevention of cruelty to animals. PMID:2351056

Idel, A

1990-04-01

228

Animal cloning applications in agriculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The scope of this article will be to outline the potential benefits of cloning technology to the animal agricultural industry and highlight some of the possibilities for combining the tools offered by nuclear transfer, animal genomics, and genetic engineering to make improved animal agricultural products.

RAYMOND L. PAGE; SAKTHIKUMAR AMBADY

2004-01-01

229

134 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL SYSTEMS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING, VOL. 20, NO. 2, MARCH 2012 Real-Time Animation Software for Customized  

E-print Network

Real-Time Animation Software for Customized Training to Use Motor Prosthetic Systems Rahman Davoodi greatly from software tools for creating precisely timed animation sequences of human movement. Despite their ability to create sophisticated ani- mation and high quality rendering, existing animation software

Loeb, Gerald E.

230

Comparison of Drug and Cell-Based Delivery: Engineered Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor II Prevent Arthritis in Mouse and Rat Animal Models  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with unknown etiology where tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF?) plays a critical role. Etanercept, a recombinant fusion protein of human soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (hsTNFR) linked to the Fc portion of human IgG1, is used to treat RA based on the rationale that sTNFR binds TNF? and blocks TNF?-mediated inflammation. We compared hsTNFR protein delivery from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with etanercept. Blocking TNF?-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on transduced hMSCs and inhibition of nitric oxide production from TNF?-treated bovine chondrocytes by conditioned culture media from transduced hMSCs demonstrated the functionality of the hsTNFR construction. Implanted hsTNFR-transduced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced mouse serum circulating TNF? generated from either implanted TNF?-expressing cells or lipopolysaccharide induction more effectively than etanercept (TNF?, 100%; interleukin [IL]-1?, 90%; and IL-6, 60% within 6 hours), suggesting faster clearance of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR)-TNF? complex from the animals. In vivo efficacy of sTNFR-transduced MSCs was illustrated in two (immune-deficient and immune-competent) arthritic rodent models. In the antibody-induced arthritis BalbC/SCID mouse model, intramuscular injection of hsTNFR-transduced hMSCs reduced joint inflammation by 90% compared with untransduced hMSCs; in the collagen-induced arthritis Fischer rat model, both sTNFR-transduced rat MSCs and etanercept inhibited joint inflammation by 30%. In vitro chondrogenesis assays showed the ability of TNF? and IL1?, but not interferon ?, to inhibit hMSC differentiation to chondrocytes, illustrating an additional negative role for inflammatory cytokines in joint repair. The data support the utility of hMSCs as therapeutic gene delivery vehicles and their potential to be used in alleviating inflammation within the arthritic joint. PMID:23592838

Liu, Linda N.; Wang, Gang; Hendricks, Kyle; Lee, Keunmyoung; Bohnlein, Ernst; Junker, Uwe

2013-01-01

231

The State of Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The recent Millennium Ecosystem Assessment has illustrated that human actions have significantly transformed many of Earths ecosystems. The main findings describe how: humans changed ecosystems dramatically over the past 50 years, changes to ecosystem services may get worse in the next 50 years, global action at all levels can reverse the degradation, and how ecosystem degradation increases risks of sudden changes and reduces benefits for future generations.

ChristiÃÂán Samper (National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution;)

2005-08-01

232

Character Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A general discussion of the creation and animation of characters in computer animation. This section includes principles of traditional character animation techniques, such as those developed by the Disney animators, and also human modelling. The section includes html pages, images and several videos.

2007-01-20

233

Animal Clues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online activity (found under "Activities"), young learners match animals with either their tracks or sounds. The animals are all common wild North American species: raccoon, duck, bear, fox, deer, frog and beaver. The tracks and sounds are animated, so learners can visualize how the animal walks and examine the shape of its foot. The activity is in both English and Spanish.

Omsi

2006-01-01

234

Animal Diversity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson from Science NetLinks exposes children to a wide range of animals and guides them through observation of animal similarities, differences, and environmental adaptations. This lesson can be used as part of a study of plants and animals. Before doing the lesson, students should know the meanings of the terms: plant, animal, and living.

Science Netlinks;

2004-02-05

235

Genetically Modified Animals Nicole Edgar and Etienne Sibille  

E-print Network

Synonyms Transgenic Animal; Mutant Animal; Genetically Engineered Animal; Genetically Modified Organism a wide variety of genetically modified organisms have been created to date for numerous research purposesGenetically Modified Animals Nicole Edgar and Etienne Sibille Center for Neuroscience, Department

Sibille, Etienne

236

Animal House  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of this activity is to design, build and test a house or toy for an animal. Learners will research a particular animal and design a house or toy that will encourage that animal's specific behaviors. Each house or toy must fit into the animal's cage, support the animal's size and weight, and be constructed of non-toxic materials. Safety note: adult supervision recommended for cutting cardboard boxes.

Museum Of Science, Boston

2005-01-01

237

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-print Network

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

238

Journal of Animal Ecology 2006  

E-print Network

Journal of Animal Ecology 2006 75, 1370­1378 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British and WALTER R. TSCHINKEL Florida State University, Department of Biological Science, Unit 1, Tallahassee, and that the low diversity and abun- dance of native ants in degraded ecosystems does not result from interaction

239

Lightning safety of animals.  

PubMed

This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed. PMID:22215021

Gomes, Chandima

2012-11-01

240

Valuation of rangeland ecosystem services  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Economic valuation lends itself well to the anthropocentric orientation of ecosystem services. An economic perspective on ecosystems portrays them as natural assets providing a flow of goods and services valuable to individuals and society collectively. A few examples include the purification of drinking water, reduced risk from flooding and other extreme events, pollination of agricultural crops, climate regulation, and recreation opportunities from plant and animal habitat maintenance, among many others. Once these goods and services are identified and quantified, they can be monetized to complete the valuation process. The monetization of ecosystem goods and services (in the form of dollars) provides a common metric that allows for cross-comparison of attributes and evaluation of differing ecological scenarios. Complicating the monetization process is the fact that most of these goods and services are public and non-market in nature; meaning they are non-rival and non-exclusive and are typically not sold in a traditional market setting where monetary values are revealed. Instead, one must employ non-market valuation techniques, with primary valuation methods typically being very time and resource consuming, intimidating to non-economists, and often impractical. For these reasons, benefit transfer methods have gained popularity. This methodology harnesses the primary collection results of existing studies to make inferences about the economic values of non-market goods and services at an alternative policy site (in place and/or in time). For instance, if a primary valuation study on oak reestablishment on rangelands in southern California yielded a value of $30 per-acre associated with water regulation, this result can be transferred, with some adjustments, to say something about the value of an acre of oaks on rangelands in northern portions of the state. The economic valuation of rangeland ecosystem services has many roles. Economic values may be used as input into analyzing the costs and benefits associated with policies being proposed, or possibly already implemented. For example, with monetized values acting as a common metric, one could compare the 'benefits' of converting a rangeland ecosystem for commercial development (perhaps estimated at the market value of the developed land) with the foregone ecosystem service values (in addition to any land income lost) resulting from that land conversion. Similarly, ecosystem service values can be used to determine the level of return on an investment. rhis is a primary objective for private land conservation organizations who typically have very limited resources. Ecosystem service valuation can also have a role in damage assessments from incidents that require compensation such as oil spills. Additionally, valuation can be very informative when investigating regulatory programs that trade ecological assets such as wetland mitigation programs. Typically these programs are based simply on an 'acre for acre' criterion, and do not take into consideration varying welfare values associated with that ecosystem. Lastly, and most fundamental, ecosystem service valuation serves as a recognition tool for people of all backgrounds. Identifying and valuing ecosystem goods and services on rangelands brings to light the value these natural assets have to human welfare that often remain hidden do to their public and non-market attributes. This type of recognition is vital to the preservation of rangeland ecosystems in the future and the many ecological benefits they provide.

Gascoigne, W. R.

2011-01-01

241

MOBILE PROXIMITY PAYMENT: ECOSYSTEM  

E-print Network

MOBILE PROXIMITY PAYMENT: ECOSYSTEM AND OVERVIEW OF NFC TECHNOLOGY 1. Introduction Handsets confirm and heterogeneous. The Mobile Payment ecosystem involves a number of partners, such as: · banks; · Mobile Network

Shamos, Michael I.

242

ACID PRECIPITATION AND ITS EFFECTS ON TERRESTRIAL AND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Man-induced change in the chemical climate of the earth has increased. Recent research has demonstrated that atmospheric deposition contains both beneficial nutrients and injurious substances; plants, animals, and ecosystems vary greatly in susceptibility; injury is most likely w...

243

Endangered animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are many animals that are in danger of becoming extinct. Humans are largely to blame for their endangerment. Over-hunting and habitat destruction are only a couple of ways that humans are endangering animals.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)

2008-05-26

244

Animal Calendar  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains links to 12 calendars (12 months). June contains seven activities that mix math with exploring animals. For instance, children conduct a survey about favorite animals, find an animal with paws bigger than their hands, and name as many spotted animals as they can in a minute. Works as a handout, take-home, or group activity. Available as a downloadable pdf and in Spanish.

Terc

2010-01-01

245

Ocean Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are many types of Ocean Animals, today we wil be going to identify several Ocean Anumals through specific body parts that makeOcean Animals different from one another. To begin examine the links below to see what different types of ocean animals there are and what makes those animals different from one another Beluga Whales- National Geographic Kids Dolphins- Who lives in the sea? Puffer fish- National Geographic Stingrays- National Geographic Kids ...

2011-12-05

246

Miller Indexes Examples Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 3-D animation is a visualization of the Miller indices (Miller indexes) showing approximately 24 various possible planes. The 3 intercepts are shown along with the plane notation. This would be useful for understanding reciprocal lattice vectors, specifically in crystallographic studies for electrical engineering.

2009-07-22

247

Genetic Engineering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

Phillips, John

1973-01-01

248

Ecosystem Health: Energy Indicators.  

EPA Science Inventory

Just as for human beings health is a concept that applies to the condition of the whole organism, the health of an ecosystem refers to the condition of the ecosystem as a whole. For this reason, the study and characterization of ecosystems is fundamental to establishing accurate ...

249

The polluted ecosystem game  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of optimal management of ecosystems by developing a dynamic model of strategic behavior by users\\/communities of an ecosystem such as a lake, which is subject to pollution resulting from the users. More specifically, it builds a model of two ecosystems that are spatially connected. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper

W. A. Brock; W. D. Dechert

2008-01-01

250

I Spy an Ecosystem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We hear the word ecosystems in the news and at school but just what are ecosystems? It turns out there are lots of ecosystems. You might even learn you have some inside you! Also in: Français | Español

Biology

2009-09-22

251

The Ecosystem Science Center  

E-print Network

The Ecosystem Science Center 2010-2011 Annual report Photo, by graduate student Alex of the Ecosystem Science Center for the period July 1, 2010 July 1, 2011 Introduction to ESC ­ A Message from .......................................... 40 1 #12;A Message from the ESC Director The Ecosystem Science Center has now completed its

252

The Ecosystem Science Center  

E-print Network

1 The Ecosystem Science Center 2011-2012 Annual report #12;2 Table of Contents This document summarizes the activities of the Ecosystem Science Center for the period from July 1, 2011 July 1, 2012 of the Ecosystem Science Center who supported this research project in Calumet watershed with a graduate research

253

Emergy and ecosystem complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question “What drives complexity?” is addressed in this paper. To answer this question, we explore the way energy and material resources of different quality flow through ecosystems and support, directly and indirectly, ecosystems growth and development. Processes of resource transformation throughout the ecosystem build order, cycle materials, generate and sustain information. Energy drives all these processes and energetic principles

Sergio Ulgiati; Mark T. Brown

2009-01-01

254

Computer Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A general discussion of computer animation. This section includes principles of camera animation, character animation and special effects such as particle systems. There is also a discussion of artificial life techniques such as the flocking algorithm and the graphical simulation of different types of life. This section includes html pages, images and several videos.

2007-01-20

255

Animal Behaviour  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is written by a veterinarian and has separate pages for various classes of animals such as domesticated, farm, and exotic animals. There is also an online book available to the user in which they can find more information on some of the same plus some additional animal behaviors.

Mcgreevey, Paul

2010-01-01

256

Animal Scent  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity (on page 3 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into animal behavior. Learners will create five or six scent blocks by rubbing wood blocks with different kitchen spices, foods, or animal scents. Then, learners let their pets investigate each block separately. Carefully observed behaviors are recorded for interpretation. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV GPS: Animal Scent.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2006-01-01

257

Astronomy Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation is an animation showing the Sun-Earth-Moon system. The sun is shown as a stationary body at the top of the screen, with a rotating Earth with a moon revolving around it. This representation includes a separate additional graphic in the animation that continuously shows the phase of the moon as they correspond to the revolving moon in the animation.

258

A synthetic Escherichia coli predatorprey ecosystem Frederick K Balagadde1,2,5  

E-print Network

and survival via engineered gene circuits. Our synthetic ecosystem resembles canonical predator­ prey systems Commons Attribution Licence, which permits distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided

Arnold, Frances H.

259

The Antarctic Ecosystem: Where Would It Be Without Krill?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan asks students to investigate the importance of krill to the Antarctic ecosystem by researching the animals that depend on it. Students will read and answer questions about krill; research Antarctic animals and take note of the place of each animal in the food chain; and draw an Antarctic food web, using the animals they have researched. They will conclude by writing paragraphs explaining the potential consequences of a decline in krill populations.

260

Mercury in the ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

This treatise on the environmental dispersion of mercury emphasizes the importance of ''mercury-consciousness'' in the present-day world, where rapidly expanding metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial developments are causing widespread contamination of the atmosphere, soil, and water by this metal and its toxic organic derivatives. Concepts concerning the mechanism of mercury dispersion and methyl-mercury formation in the physico-biological ecosystem are discussed in detail and a substantial body of data on the degree and nature of the mercury contamination of various plants, fish, and land animals by industrial and urban effluents is presented. Various analytical methods for the estimation of mercury in inorganic and organic samples are presented. These serve as a ready guide to the selection of the correct method for analyzing environmental samples. This book is reference work in mercury-related studies. It is written to influence industrial policies of governments in their formulation of control measures to avoid the recurrence of human tragedies such as the well-known Minamata case in Japan, and the lesser known cases in Iraq, Pakistan, and Guatamala.

Mitra, S.

1986-01-01

261

CalPhotos: Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the University of California-Berkeley Digital Library Project (first mentioned in the April 16, 1999 Scout Report), this CalPhotos website connects visitors to 17,812 images of different animals. Site visitors can locate animal photographs using a search engine with free text fields for Scientific or Common name, Location, and Picture's ID, and drop-down menu fields for Photographer, Country, US State, Collection, and more. Visitors can also peruse extensive, hyperlinked listings of animals grouped under the following categories: Amphibians, Birds, Fish, Invertebrates, Mammals, and Reptiles. Animals are listed by both common and scientific name. The photographs come from a variety of sources, and are accompanied by usage guidelines. CalPhotos collections are also available for Fungi, Plants, People & Culture, and Landscapes & Habitats.

262

Immunoassay Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Glasgow Department of Pathological Biochemistry has recently made available five immunoassay animations that draw on the interactivity of the FutureSplash plug-in (discussed in the December 20, 1996 issue of the Scout Report). The animations are "a learning resource for students, to show the wide application of the use of antibodies in a clinical biochemistry laboratory," and are "graphical representations of the immunoassay methodology used by a number of commercial manufacturers." Each immunoassay is presented as a series of animations, allowing the user to navigate forward and back in time. A key is provided, and animations can be viewed step by step (with explanations) and then replayed as a single continuous animation without explanations or navigation. Immunoassay Animations is a powerful visual teaching tool.

Chung, Kynwai.; Cowan, Bob.

1996-01-01

263

Animated statues  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a layered framework for the animation of high-resolution human geometry captured using active 3D sensing technology. Commercial scanning systems can now acquire highly accurate surface data across the whole-body. However, the result is a dense, irregular, surface mesh without any structure for animation. We introduce a model-based approach to animating a scanned data-set by matching

Jonathan Starck; Gordon Collins; Raymond Smith; Adrian Hilton; John Illingworth

2003-01-01

264

Ocean Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What characteristics do animals have that help them to survive in the ocean? We have enjoyed learning about lots of different ocean animals in class, but there is still so much more to learn! Here are some websites with fun pictures and videos to teach us about the characteristics that help animals survive in the ocean. Beluga whales have been one of our favorite topics ...

Cole, Ms.

2011-04-07

265

Astronomy Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

266

Astronomy Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

Barnbaum, Cecilia

2011-04-12

267

MEDLI Animation  

NASA Video Gallery

Animation of MEDLI, the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument, which contains multiple sophisticated temperature sensors to measure atmospheric conditions and performance o...

268

Animal Omnibus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Designed with children in mind, the Animal Omnibus site is "a list of web sources indexed by the name of the animal." Users search by animal name to get returns in the form of hyperlinked resource lists. The resource lists contain sites ranging from simple color photographs of individual species to sites steeped in scientific classification to publicly targeted zoo sites. Animal Omnibus may also be browsed by generic name within each taxonomic category (amphibians, arthropods, birds, dinosaurs, fish, mammals, mollusks, and reptiles). Although depth of content varies widely, this unique and diverse collection of information types is at once unpredictable and refreshing.

269

Physics Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you would like a taste of classical mechanics in an animated form, this website is right up your alley. This site from the physics department at the University of Toronto offers up over 100 helpful animations that cover quantum mechanics, vectors, waves, relativity, and optics. Visitors can scroll through the topical headings to look for items of interest and should note the entire website is searchable as well. There are some great topical animations here, such as one on fluid mechanics that involves a theoretical dropping of a ball from the CN Tower in Toronto. Animations have also been translated into Catalan, Spanish, and Basque.

270

Emergy and ecosystem complexity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The question "What drives complexity?" is addressed in this paper. To answer this question, we explore the way energy and material resources of different quality flow through ecosystems and support, directly and indirectly, ecosystems growth and development. Processes of resource transformation throughout the ecosystem build order, cycle materials, generate and sustain information. Energy drives all these processes and energetic principles explain much of what is observed, including energy degradation according to the laws of thermodynamics. Emergy, a quantitative measure of the global environmental work supporting ecosystem dynamics, is used here in order to provide a deeper understanding of complexity growth and decline in ecosystems. Ecosystem complexity is discussed in this paper in relation to changes in structure, organization and functional capacity, as explained by changes in emergy, empower, and transformity.

Ulgiati, Sergio; Brown, Mark T.

2009-01-01

271

Paper Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource contains ideas and brief instructions on how to build animals out of construction paper and other simple materials. Included are tips on how to roll, fold, and cut paper to make various animals parts. Learners may enjoy making a "frankenfish" that expands.

Minnesota, Science M.

2012-06-06

272

Immunoassay Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features animations showing the detailed steps involved in eight different immunoassay examples. The focus of the site is primarily on the biochemical aspects of the immunoassays, not on their analytical applications. The animations depict the following immunoassays: Dihydroxy Vitamin D, ACTH, Boneíspecific Alkaline Phosphatase, Cortisol, Deoxypyridinoline, Osteocalcin, Prolactin and Thyroxine.

Chung, Kyn W.

2011-05-24

273

Animal Allies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses young teenagers' adoption of animal personas in their creative writing classes, and the way these classroom activities follow Montessori principles. Considers both the role of imagination in the animal identification and the psychological and pedagogical significance of the underlying development of unconscious kinship with Earth and its…

Peterson, Brenda

1999-01-01

274

GPS Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features Flash animations that illustrate how the Global Positioning System (GPS) works. The animations depict how GPS signals are derived, compare geostationary and polar orbits, and explain satellites, ground control, and user segments, which comprise the three main GPS components. These resources are suitable for use in lectures, labs, or other teaching activities.

2008-09-12

275

Ecosystem Services - Water Purification  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, provided by Science NetLinks, teaches students the importance of healthy ecosystems by investigating the example of natural water purification. Students will learn how ecosystems remove pollution from the water and how much it costs humans to do this artificially once ecosystems are no longer healthy. The class will then create a "River Newspaper" reporting on the condition of the local environment.

Science Netlinks;

2002-06-30

276

Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management  

E-print Network

1 Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management �stersjöforskning för en hållbar förvaltning av havet #12;2 Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management, BEAM, är ett tvärvetenskapligt forskningsprogram med målet att vårt unika innanhav beror mycket på hur vi väljer att vårda det. Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management

277

Science Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The use of a well-placed animation in a lecture can help illuminate any number of important concepts in the sciences. Educators seeking high-quality animations need look no further than this very useful site created by staff members at North Harris Community College. The animations are divided into a number of topics, including plants, ecology, astronomy, geology, anatomy, and biology. Each section contains links to a host of fascinating and helpful animations from institutions like Florida State University, Cambridge University Press, the University of Nebraska, and the University of Alberta. As a note, the astronomy and physics areas are particularly strong, and visitors would do well to take a look at the lunar and planetary time-lapse animations offered up by AntÃÂónio CidadÃÂão.

278

Grant Patents on Animals? An Ethical and Legal Battle Looms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rulings on applications for animal patents being considered by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office could profoundly influence university patent and research income. Many animal-rights advocates have expressed philosophical objections to genetic engineering of animals. (MLW)

Wheeler, David L.

1987-01-01

279

Distribution of PCB congeners in aquatic ecosystems: A case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners were determined in water samples, sediments, and animal species in the frame of a survey of the River Arrone (Central Italy, near Rome) after a major contamination episode. Animal species were selected on the basis of their living and feeding habits and evaluated as candidate bioindicators of PCB pollution in this lotic ecosystem. Total PCB concentrations

S. Chiavarini; C. Cremisini; P. Soldati

1997-01-01

280

Determining impacts on marine ecosystems: the concept of key species  

Microsoft Academic Search

When one marine animal has a large influence on other parts of its ecosystem, we call it a key species. These animals can be very useful in monitoring programmes. One of the goals of marine ecology is to detect and assess the scale of human effects - such as scallop dredging, heavy metal contamination or increasing turbidity - on marine

Pip Nicholls

281

Australian Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will be researching Australian animals in order to prepare a presentation for the class. The children will be divided into groups to research and present about Tasmanian devils, koala bears, kangaroos, or platypi. This IA will provide links for the children to research their animal. Introduction You are a wildlife biologist embarking on an exciting journey to Australia. Hogle Zoo is sending you to discover the most unique animal on the whole continent of Australia. You will be assigned to a team that will research either Tasmanian devils, koala bears, kangaroos, or platypuses. ...

Rusch, Mrs.

2007-12-04

282

Genetic engineering: inserting new DNA into a plasmid vector, 3D animation with with basic narrationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animation shows how a gene can be cloned into a plasmid vector by cutting the DNA molecule using restriction enzymes or restriction endonucleases (in this case EcoRI), and then pasting the new piece of DNA into the plasmid at the sticky ends using an enzyme called ligase. This new recombinant DNA molecule can be cloned by being grown in bacteria cells. This is known as recombinant DNA technology.

2008-10-06

283

Camera Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A general discussion of the use of cameras in computer animation. This section includes principles of traditional film techniques and suggestions for the use of a camera during an architectural walkthrough. This section includes html pages, images and one video.

2011-01-30

284

Digital Animators  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Getting started in the world of digital animation isn't easy, and it can be useful to have a helpful resource to find out about the current trends in this dynamic field. Fortunately, there is the Digital Animators website which features career-development blogs, tutorials, new software releases, and opinion pieces. First-time visitors can get the flavor of the site by reading a few of the "Top Stories" on the homepage, and then move on to the "Tech News" or the "Company News" areas. Here they will find more detailed information on important developments that affect the business side of this type of animation. Most visitors will want to make a beeline for the "Tutorials" area. Here they will find video clips that talk about how to colorize black and white objects and how to manipulate animation layers with the Autodesk application.

285

Pulsar Animation  

NASA Video Gallery

Pulsars are thought to emit relatively narrow radio beams, shown as green in this animation. If these beams don't sweep toward Earth, astronomers cannot detect the radio signals. Pulsar gamma-ray e...

286

Making Animations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author provides simple instructions for making an animation using "PowerPoint". He describes the process by walking readers through it for a sample image. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

Robinson, James

2007-01-01

287

Ecosystems, Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Science Curriculum Improvement Study has developed this teacher's guide to "Ecosystems," the sixth part of a six unit life science curriculum sequence. The six basic units, emphasizing organism-environment interactions, are organisms, life cycles, populations, environments, communities, and ecosystems. They make use of scientific and…

California Univ., Berkeley. Science Curriculum Improvement Study.

288

Exploring virtual ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Browsing In Time & Space (BITS) is an interface designed to explore virtual ecosystems. A virtual ecosystem includes a three dimensional terrain model background, collections of man-made and natural objects, and behavior and interaction rules between the objects and the background. BITS is based on a virtual notepad and pen metaphor and is inspired in the concept of logging. Physical

Antão Vaz Almada; António Eduardo Dias; João Pedro Silva; Emanuel Marques dos Santos; Pedro José Pedrosa; António Sousa Câmara

1996-01-01

289

Graduate studies Ecosystem Science  

E-print Network

Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

290

Earth on Edge : Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information about the six ecosystems on which life on Earth most heavily depends: agricultural, forest, freshwater, grassland, coastal, and urban. It is part of a Public Broadcasting System (PBS) project, which includes a discussion guide. Ecosystems are described as communities of interacting organisms and the physical environment in which they live. The goods and services that ecosystems provide are said to form the foundation of human economies. Ecosystems purify air and water, help to control climate, and produce valuable soil-services. Site users may access a discussion guide to accompany the broadcast of the video/television program, which can be used in colleges, secondary schools, and in community groups. Case studies are taken from the companion book, World Resources 2000-2001: Ecosystems and People: The Fraying Web of Life, and from Pilot Analysis of Global Ecosystems: Agroecosystems (World Resources Institute). This online text includes profiles, case studies, and ecosystem assessments with references to ecosystems around the world. A list of additional resources includes links to environmental organizations, books, and periodicals.

Mock, Gregory; Vanasselt, Wendy

2000-01-01

291

The Library as Ecosystem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ecology is the study of interactions between organisms and their environment, and the academic library could be considered to be an ecosystem, i.e., a "biological organization" in which multiple species must interact, both with one another and with their environment. The metaphor of the library as ecosystem is flexible enough to be applied not…

Walter, Scott

2008-01-01

292

Ecosystems, externalities, and economies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper incorporates an ecosystem model into a model of a simple economy. The decisionmaking agents in the ecosystem are individual organisms aggregated to the species level. A species may provide utility directly to humans, or it may provide utility indirectly because it is used either as a raw material in goods fabrication or as sustenance for other species. We

Thomas D. Crocker; John Tschirhart

1992-01-01

293

Animating Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson challenges students to apply their knowledge of object motion by animating sequences of hand-rendered pictures that model a set of physical conditions. The challenges include animating the orbital motion of planets and satellites, the effects of gravity on a falling body, and motions of objects in inertial (moving) frames of reference. The lesson was created by a high school physics teacher to help learners build quantitative reasoning skills in preparation for understanding kinematics.

Latham, Ted

2004-07-16

294

Animal Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial introduces students to the concept of animal ecology. The first section explains the different ways animals use camouflage. There is also a discussion of how the process of decay breaks organic matter down into nutrients, and how simple aquatic organisms (algae, zooplankton) provide a food source for larger organisms. The concept of food chains is introduced, and land-based and aquatic examples are described. A quiz and glossary are included.

295

Nocturnal Animals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Over time, human beings have blazed their way into the night with fire and artificial light, but we are not true creatures of the night. This Topic in Depth explores the world of nocturnal animals. From Island Discovery & Training, the first site allows visitors to listen to the sounds of several nocturnal animals. After guessing who made the sound, visitors can link to information pages for all but one of the mystery animals (1). Next is an information sheet (2) from BioMedia that answers the question: How Do Animals See In the Dark? The third site, from Enchanted Learning, provides coloring sheets and brief profiles for many nocturnal animals including the Amur Tiger, Badger, Crocodile, and Kinkajou-just to name a few (3). From the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in Vermont, the fourth website contains a six-page lesson plan (for students in grades one to eight) emphasizing different senses; and the roles and adaptations of nocturnal species (4). The fifth site, from Science News Online, contains an article addressing research on the ecological impact of artificial nighttime light on nocturnal animals (5). From Wild Asia, the next site contains an article by travel writer and environmental educator David Bowden, that describes his experience watching a marine turtle lay her eggs on Malaysia's Turtle Island (6). The seventh site, from PBS-Nova Online, briefly describes the work of zoologists who study nocturnal and burrowing animals of the Kalahari (7). From this site visitors can also link to a section that discusses how several different animals see at night. The final site, from the University of Utah-John Moran Eye Center, contains information about the role of photoreceptors in vision (8). This Photoreceptors section is part of a comprehensive electronic tutorial regarding neural organization of the mammalian retina.

296

Screen Animals  

E-print Network

) and further elaborated by the ‘making of’ sequences featuring the expertise of scientific researchers. Mills contends that a reliance on scientific objectivity here recalls the ‘scientific racism’ (Stuart Hall) of ethnographic film – a logic... , 187. 16 Burt, Animals in Film, pp. 27, 29 (original emphasis). 17 Shukin, Animal Capital, p. 155. 18 Michael Renov, The Subject of Documentary (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004), p. 217; cited by Mills in this dossier. 19 Lawrence...

McMahon, Laura

2014-01-01

297

Coso geothermal environmental overview study ecosystem quality  

SciTech Connect

The Coso Known Geothermal Resource Area is located just east of the Sierra Nevada, in the broad transition zone between the Mohave and Great Basin desert ecosystems. The prospect of large-scale geothermal energy development here in the near future has led to concern for the protection of biological resources. Objectives here are the identification of ecosystem issues, evaluation of the existing data base, and recommendation of additional studies needed to resolve key issues. High-priority issues include the need for (1) site-specific data on the occurrence of plant and animal species of special concern, (2) accurate and detailed information on the nature and extent of the geothermal resource, and (3) implementation of a comprehensive plan for ecosystem protection.

Leitner, P.

1981-09-01

298

Ecosystem Viable Yields  

E-print Network

The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook to restore and exploit their stocks at maximum sustainable yield (MSY), a concept and practice without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model. Acknowledging this gap, we propose a definition of "ecosystem viable yields" (EVY) as yields compatible i) with biological viability levels for all time and ii) with an ecosystem dynamics. To the difference of MSY, this notion is not based on equilibrium, but on viability theory, which offers advantages for robustness. For a generic class of multispecies models with harvesting, we provide explicit expressions for the EVY. We apply our approach to the anchovy--hake couple in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem between the years 1971 and 1981.

De Lara, Michel; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Tam, Jorge

2011-01-01

299

Animal Transfer Agreement -1 ANIMAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

E-print Network

intellectual property rights in the animal(s), the Government retains these rights. Additionally, to the extent in the animal(s), these rights are not transferred to the recipient. · Provider is transferring the animal(sAnimal Transfer Agreement - 1 ANIMAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT This Animal Transfer Agreement has been

Bandettini, Peter A.

300

Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange  

E-print Network

Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange David M. Blersch dblersch Shade of Blue and You 21 September 2010 #12;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange UB's ERIE Program www

Sachs, Frederick

301

SEVEN PILLARS OF ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecosystem management is widely proposed in the popular and professional literature as the modern and preferred way of managing natural resources and ecosystems. Advocates glowingly describe ecosystem management as an approach that will protect the environment, maintain healthy ec...

302

Animal Tracks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For those of us living in Northern climates, when winter snow covers the landscape it provides great conditions to search for animal tracks. The following websites provide an abundance of information and resources about the ancient art of animal tracking.The first site(1 ), Beartracker's Animal Tracks Den, is an excellent comprehensive "online field guide to tracks and tracking." The site includes animal track images, photos, as well as information about mammals, reptiles, birds, insects, amphibians, and other tracking resources. The second site (2), is an article by Jon C. Boren, Extension Wildlife Specialist and Byron D. Wright, Agricultural Specialist both from the University of New Mexico entitled Identifying and Preserving Wildlife Tracks. The third site (3), on Tracking and Stalking Wildlife, comes from The Virtual Cub Scout Leader's Handbook and provides short information pages on a variety on animals including photos and images of tracks. The fourth site (4) is a well-organized lesson plan with activities on Animal Signs from Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center. The fifth site (5) is the Outdoor Action Guide to Animal Tracking by Rick Curtis of Princeton University. This website provides solid and detailed information on many aspects of animal tracking including parts of a track, pattern classification, aging tracks, and more. The sixth site (6) is an article by veteran tracker Jim Halfpenny, Ph.D. about how to determine the accurate track size for an animal. Site visitors can link from this article to the homepage for A Naturalist's World which has information about tracking classes offered in various North American locations. For anyone interested in developing their animal tracking skills, the final two websites also offer courses from very experienced trackers in different regions of North America. The seventh site (7), Tom Brown's Tracker School is the largest school of its kind with locations in New Jersey, California, and Florida. The eighth site, (8) Wilderness Awareness School is located in Washington but offers courses in other regions as well. This website also provides an extensive list of links for many other tracking resources.

303

Journal of Animal Ecology 2008, 77, 275284 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.01336.x 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 British Ecological Society  

E-print Network

communities, we examined how an eco- system engineer, sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka, influences seasonal-words: bioturbation, ecosystem engineer, marine-derived nutrients, Oncorhynchus nerka, succession. Introduction

304

Animal Magnetism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast looks at the mysterious way in which certain animals can travel vast distances around the planet, using the magnetic field of Earth to guide them. Migrating birds, fish, sea turtles, honey bees and even bacteria have all been found to navigate using the magnetic field of Earth, sometimes over quite enormous distances and reaching targets of only a few degrees in width. There is discussion about where magnetic receptors may be within animals and that particular cells in migratory creatures contain magnetite, a substance which humans used many hundreds of years ago to create the first compass. This radio broadcast discusses animal magnetism with researchers who have been working with sea turtles, to discover just how the turtles find their way back to the same beaches every year to lay their eggs. There is explanation of how the magnetic sense in animals has two components: acting as a compass to guide them and providing them with location; and how this seems to be possible since the magnetic field gets stronger in higher latitudes and inclination angle (the angle of the magnetic field to the surface of Earth) changes over different points on Earth. The broadcast also explains why creatures such as honey bees and even bacteria need to be in tune with the magnetic field of Earth, and how magnetic sense is prevalent in many animals with seemingly no need for it. The broadcast is 29 minutes in length.

305

Toward Understanding, Managing, and Protecting Microbial Ecosystems  

PubMed Central

Microbial communities are at the very basis of life on earth, catalyzing biogeochemical reactions driving global nutrient cycles. However, unlike for plants and animals, microbial diversity is not on the biodiversity–conservation agenda. The latter, however, would imply that microbial diversity is not under any threat by anthropogenic disturbance or climate change. This maybe a misconception caused by the rudimentary knowledge we have concerning microbial diversity and its role in ecosystem functioning. This perspective paper identifies major areas with knowledge gaps within the field of environmental microbiology that preclude a comprehension of microbial ecosystems on the level we have for plants and animals. Opportunities and challenges are pointed out to open the microbial black box and to go from descriptive to predictive microbial ecology. PMID:21747797

Bodelier, Paul L. E.

2011-01-01

306

Evolution Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Flash animation provides a tour of the history of the universe, the solar system, and Earth. Moving the slider allows viewers to progress from the Big Bang, almost 14 billion years ago, to the beginnings of life on Earth in the Proterozoic era, through the age of the dinosaurs and finally to the time of Homo sapiens. When the slider stops moving, animations and text appear, highlighting important events. Other animations accompany the time scale and show the movements of the continents, the advance and retreat of the polar ice caps, and changes in the oxygen content of the atmosphere. The length of the timeline helps reinforce the idea of the immense age of the universe. A French translation is available.

Kyrk, John

307

The parasite connection in ecosystems and macroevolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

In addition to their obvious negative effects (“pathogens”), endoparasites of various kinds play an important role in shaping\\u000a and maintaining modern animal communities. In the long-term, parasites including pathogens are indispensable entities of any\\u000a ecosystem. To understand this, it is essential that one changes the viewpoint from the host’s interests to that of the parasite.\\u000a Together with geographic isolation, trophic

Adolf Seilacher; Wolf-Ernst Reif; Peter Wenk

2007-01-01

308

National Geographic Education: Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Geographic Education website has a number of sections dedicated to different areas within the natural sciences. This particular section brings together all manner of educational resources related to ecosystems. On the site, visitors can dive in via the Latest Updates for Ecosystems. Here they can learn how to explore the profiled ecosystems via a range of GIS tools. Visitors can use the filters on the site to look over the resources by Type, Grades & Ages, Intended Audience, and Subjects. Visitors shouldn't miss looking over features like the Amazon Gold Mine, Back to the Bottom, and African Savanna.

2013-06-13

309

Animal Ears  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity (page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into animal behavior and communication. Groups of learners will fashion a headband with fake ears, similar in shape to those of the animal they are going to observe. Then, they record observations of the animalâs reactions when a learner, wearing the ears in different positions, brings it a snack. Learners develop categories of behavior to organize and evaluate the results. Safety Note: an adult handler must be present if working with a horse or even a large dog. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Horse Ears.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2006-01-01

310

Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?  

E-print Network

COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

Pace, Michael L.

311

Animal Reproduction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Dr. Michael Gregory of Clinton Community College, this site is a concise overview of animal reproduction. The site addresses important aspects of sexual and asexual reproduction, the male and female reproductive systems, fertilization, and the importance of hormones. Visitors to the site will find diagrams outlining biological processes especially helpful.

Gregory, Michael

2007-12-14

312

Animation aerodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods based on aerodynamics are developed to simulate and control the motion of objects in fluid flows. To simplify the physics for animation, the problem is broken down into two parts: a fluid flow regime and an object boundary regime. With this simplification one can approximate the realistic behaviour of objects moving in liquids or air. It also enables a

Jakub Wejchert; David R. Haumann

1991-01-01

313

Analyzing an Ecosystem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this interactive activity adapted from the University of Alberta, identify the living and nonliving things in an ecosystem. Then look further at the living things to identify the producers, the consumers, and examples of mimicry.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2007-08-09

314

Ecosystems in the Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

Madders, M.

1975-01-01

315

Transgenesis in Animal Agriculture: Addressing Animal Health and Welfare Concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Food and Drug Administration’s final Guidance for Industry on the regulation of transgenesis in animal agriculture\\u000a has paved the way for the commercialization of genetically engineered (GE) farm animals. The production-related diseases associated\\u000a with extant breeding technologies are reviewed, as well as the predictable welfare consequences of continued emphasis on prolificacy\\u000a at the potential expense of physical fitness.

Michael Greger

316

[Forest ecosystems and Ebola virus].  

PubMed

Despite data collected since the emergence of the Ebola virus in 1976, its natural transmission cycle and especially the nature of its reservoirs and means of transmission are still an enigma. This means that effective epidemiological surveillance and prevention are difficult to implement. The location of outbreak areas has suggested that the reservoir and the transmission cycle of the Ebola virus are closely linked to the rainforest ecosystem. The fact that outbreaks seldom occur suggests the presence of a rare animal reservoir having few contacts with man. Paradoxically, various serological investigations have shown a high prevalence in human beings, especially in forest areas of the Central African Republic (CAR), with no pathology associated. This would appear to suggest a circulation of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains as well as frequent contacts with man. The ecological changes resulting from human activity (agriculture and logging) account for the modification of the fauna (movement of rainforest fauna, introduction of savannah species) and could explain a multiplication of contacts. Likewise, it is interesting to note that the centre of outbreaks has always been in areas bordering on forests (ecotone foreset-savannah in the Democratic Republic of Congo, savannah in Sudan). All these considerations have led us to establish a permanent "watch" in areas bordering on forests in the CAR, involving a multidisciplinary approach to the virological study (strain isolation, molecular biology) of the biodiversity of small terrestrial mammals. The results of a study conducted on 947 small mammals has shown for the first time the presence of the Ebola virus genome in two species of rodents and one species of shrew living in forest border areas. These animals must be considered as intermediary hosts and research should now focus on reservoirs in the ecosystem of forest border areas where contacts with man are likely to be more frequent. PMID:11030051

Morvan, J M; Nakouné, E; Deubel, V; Colyn, M

2000-07-01

317

An Escherichia coli O157-specific engineered pyocin prevents and ameliorates infection by E. coli O157:H7 in an animal model of diarrheal disease.  

PubMed

AvR2-V10.3 is an engineered R-type pyocin that specifically kills Escherichia coli O157, an enteric pathogen that is a major cause of food-borne diarrheal disease. New therapeutics to counteract E. coli O157 are needed, as currently available antibiotics can exacerbate the consequences of infection. We show here that orogastric administration of AvR2-V10.3 can prevent or ameliorate E. coli O157:H7-induced diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in an infant rabbit model of infection when the compound is administered either in a postexposure prophylactic regimen or after the onset of symptoms. Notably, administration of AvR2-V10.3 also reduces bacterial carriage and fecal shedding of this pathogen. Our findings support the further development of pathogen-specific R-type pyocins as a way to treat enteric infections. PMID:21947394

Ritchie, Jennifer M; Greenwich, Jennifer L; Davis, Brigid M; Bronson, Roderick T; Gebhart, Dana; Williams, Steven R; Martin, David; Scholl, Dean; Waldor, Matthew K

2011-12-01

318

Allelopathy in Forested Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the context of forestry, the concept of allelopathy has recently been expanded from a plant to plant interference phenomenon\\u000a to an ecosystem-level phenomenon that is influenced by ecosystem disturbance. This chapter reviews the latest development\\u000a in our understanding of forest allelopathy and the ways in which this new knowledge can be used in sustainable forest management.\\u000a Allelopathic effects of

Azim U. Mallik

319

Limiting Factors in Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unit, designed to span two class periods, helps students understand that physical factors, particularly temperature and precipitation, limit the growth of plant ecosystems. The activity begins with a discussion in which students develop their own ideas about the role of temperature, precipitation, and environment on plant growth. They will then examine X-Y graphs of vegetation growth, temperature, and precipitation versus month for four diverse ecosystems to determine which climatic factor is limiting growth. A worksheet and scoring rubric are provided.

320

Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes  

E-print Network

Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes Michel Abdul Massih Philip Jarvis Purdue University Daniel G. Aliaga Carlos A. Vanegas a) b) c) Figure 1: This example demonstrates the need for urban ecosystems and the ecosystem is chaotic with no control. The image c) shows the managed urban ecosystem that has areas

Aliaga, Daniel G.

321

Ecosystem Management Strategies Katy Ransone  

E-print Network

Ecosystem Management Strategies Katy Ransone Biol 379- Dr. Dever 11/14/13 How we should manage as ecosystem management. The term 'ecosystem' is one that is somewhat loosely defined. In general, it includes all of the biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) factors in a specified area. With the ecosystem

Dever, Jennifer A.

322

Desert USA: Desert Animals And Wildlife  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It is a miracle that life can survive in the extreme conditions of the desert. Users can learn about mammals (including wolves), insects and spiders, fish and birds(including hawks), and reptiles and amphibians (including rattlesnakes) that have adapted and, in fact, thrive in the harsh desert ecosystems. Links to related topics such as animal survival in the desert and animal rescues are included.

2000-01-01

323

Animated Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A commercial site, Animated Atlas provides excellent audio-visual resources for teachers and students of European and American history. The resources combine maps and animation to create short video presentations on such subjects as the growth of the United States and the First World War. Though most of the videos must be ordered, the site provides free samples of its presentations, including a ten minute presentation on the westward expansion of the United States, the early history of the American Revolution, the European alliances before the First World War, and the beginnings of the Mexican American War. The site provides a timeline of American history that can be referred to during the American expansion video. Students and educators should also explore the site's listings of American history sites and primary source on the Web.

2002-01-01

324

Geoscience Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation is an animation that shows Earth's orbit around the sun and the tilt of Earth's axis relative to the sun in each month of the orbit. Students can move the cursor to a given month to see the position of Earth in its orbit at that time of year or can run a full animation of the yearly orbit. If one clicks on "Show Earth Profile" at the bottom, right corner of the resource, a small box pops up in the lower, right corner that shows the position of the Earth's axis in relation to the sun's rays at various points in the orbit. As such, it shows how the sun's rays directly strike different places on Earth during the orbit because of Earth's tilt. Accompanying text also points out number of daylight hours at the equator and at each pole during each solstice and equinox.

325

Animation Magazine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online magazine is all about animation and features regular articles, reviews of films and books, and profiles about people in the industry and tutorials. Articles in the current issue address topics such as "the impact of new technology on performance and the future roles of technology, new and old" and international perspectives on Bridging the Cultural Divide in Digital Entertainment. The tutorials cover topics such as how to make 3-D characters come to life and making molds. The Special Features articles report on gaming, production, technology and voice acting. Past issues are also available and can be searched by key word or sorted by category. Numerous other links are listed for more information on animation, resources for education, and listings of upcoming events and contests.

326

Translation of an engineered nanofibrous disc-like angle-ply structure for intervertebral disc replacement in a small animal model.  

PubMed

Intervertebral disc degeneration has been implicated in the etiology of low back pain; however, the current surgical strategies for treating symptomatic disc disease are limited. A variety of materials have been developed to replace disc components, including the nucleus pulposus (NP), the annulus fibrosus (AF) and their combination into disc-like engineered constructs. We have previously shown that layers of electrospun poly(?-caprolactone) scaffold, mimicking the hierarchical organization of the native AF, can achieve functional parity with native tissue. Likewise, we have combined these structures with cell-seeded hydrogels (as an NP replacement) to form disc-like angle-ply structures (DAPS). The objective of this study was to develop a model for the evaluation of DAPS in vivo. Through a series of studies, we developed a surgical approach to replace the rat caudal disc with an acellular DAPS and then stabilized the motion segment via external fixation. We then optimized cell infiltration into DAPS by including sacrificial poly(ethylene oxide) layers interspersed throughout the angle-ply structure. Our findings illustrate that DAPS are stable in the caudal spine, are infiltrated by cells from the peri-implant space and that infiltration is expedited by providing additional routes for cell migration. These findings establish a new in vivo platform in which to evaluate and optimize the design of functional disc replacements. PMID:24560621

Martin, John T; Milby, Andrew H; Chiaro, Joseph A; Kim, Dong Hwa; Hebela, Nader M; Smith, Lachlan J; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

2014-06-01

327

Contrasting Ecosystem-Effects of Morphologically Similar Copepods  

PubMed Central

Organisms alter the biotic and abiotic conditions of ecosystems. They can modulate the availability of resources to other species (ecosystem engineering) and shape selection pressures on other organisms (niche construction). Very little is known about how the engineering effects of organisms vary among and within species, and, as a result, the ecosystem consequences of species diversification and phenotypic evolution are poorly understood. Here, using a common gardening experiment, we test whether morphologically similar species and populations of Diaptomidae copepods (Leptodiaptomus ashlandi, Hesperodiaptomus franciscanus, Skistodiaptomus oregonensis) have similar or different effects on the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. We found that copepod species had contrasting effects on algal biomass, ammonium concentrations, and sedimentation rates, and that copepod populations had contrasting effects on prokaryote abundance, sedimentation rates, and gross primary productivity. The average size of ecosystem-effect contrasts between species was similar to those between populations, and was comparable to those between fish species and populations measured in previous common gardening experiments. Our results suggest that subtle morphological variation among and within species can cause multifarious and divergent ecosystem-effects. We conclude that using morphological trait variation to assess the functional similarity of organisms may underestimate the importance of species and population diversity for ecosystem functioning. PMID:22140432

Matthews, Blake; Hausch, Stephen; Winter, Christian; Suttle, Curtis A.; Shurin, Jonathan B.

2011-01-01

328

An animal welfare perspective on animal testing of GMO crops.  

PubMed

The public discussion on the introduction of agro-genetic engineering focuses mainly on economical, ecological and human health aspects. The fact is neglected that laboratory animals must suffer before either humans or the environment are affected. However, numerous animal experiments are conducted for toxicity testing and authorisation of genetically modified plants in the European Union. These are ethically questionable, because death and suffering of the animals for purely commercial purposes are accepted. Therefore, recent political initiatives to further increase animal testing for GMO crops must be regarded highly critically. Based on concrete examples this article demonstrates that animal experiments, on principle, cannot provide the expected protection of users and consumers despite all efforts to standardise, optimise or extend them. PMID:18551237

Kolar, Roman; Rusche, Brigitte

2008-01-01

329

Animal behavior and animal welfare.  

PubMed

The value of behavioral techniques in assessing animal welfare, and in particular assessing the psychological well being of animals, is reviewed. Using cats and horses as examples, 3 behavioral methods are presented: (1) comparison of behavior patterns and time budgets; (2) choice tests; and (3) operant conditioning. The behaviors of intact and declawed cats were compared in order to determine if declawing led to behavioral problems or to a change in personality. Apparently it did not. The behavior of free ranging horses was compared with that of stabled horses. Using two-choice preference tests, the preference of horses for visual contact with other horses and the preference for bedding were determined. Horses show no significant preference for locations from which they can make visual contact with other horses, but they do prefer bedding, especially when lying down. Horses will perform an operant response in order to obtain light in a darkened barn or heat in an outside shed. These same techniques can be used to answer a variety of questions about an animal's motivation for a particular attribute of its environment. PMID:2061151

Houpt, K A

1991-04-15

330

Animal Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of a new anticancer drug is a long, complex and multistep process which is supervised by regulatory authorities from the different countries all around the world [1]. Application of a new drug for admission to the market is supported by preclinical and clinical data, both including the determination of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, antitumour activity, therapeutic index, etc. As preclinical studies are associated with high cost, optimization of animal experiments is crucial for the overall development of a new anticancer agent. Moreover, in vivo efficacy studies remain a determinant panel for advancement of agents to human trials and thus, require cautious design and interpretation from experimental and ethical point of views.

Moretto, Johnny; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

331

Structure and Function of Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem The Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Site  

E-print Network

Research Center (CDRRC) during the twentieth century. Early studies dealt with animal species that were by it. Because this research focused on the role of animals in ecosystems, studies of animal populations Research Site Edited by: Kris Havstad, Laura F. Huenneke, William H. Schlesinger Chapter 12. Whitford, W

332

Animated Space  

E-print Network

spaces of Boston and Birmingham, but the ontology of plurality is the same as in Bamako and Bogota, only less visible, more ordered. In both kinds of city, the ecology of public space is rich, 5 its inhabitation germane to sociality and citizenship... is fraught with difficulty. The label conceals more than it reveals, its singularity better a 7 reflection of the predilections of the urban designer keen to engineer a particular place aesthetic or of the urban scholar trained to think public space...

Amin, Ash

2014-01-01

333

Grays Lake Ecosystem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case study looks at the marsh ecosystem of Grays Lake in southeast Idaho, and is hosted by the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC). Grays Lake has been the focus of numerous research studies to understand factors affecting breeding water birds, habitat management practices, populations, and geological factors. This report gives general information about the Grays Lake ecosystem, including climate, habitats, plant communities, wildlife, water, and geology. More specific details are given through flora and fauna lists, historical and cultural overviews, details about the Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge, and research information on management of wetlands.

334

Fantastic animals as an experimental model to teach animal adaptation  

PubMed Central

Background Science curricula and teachers should emphasize evolution in a manner commensurate with its importance as a unifying concept in science. The concept of adaptation represents a first step to understand the results of natural selection. We settled an experimental project of alternative didactic to improve knowledge of organism adaptation. Students were involved and stimulated in learning processes by creative activities. To set adaptation in a historic frame, fossil records as evidence of past life and evolution were considered. Results The experimental project is schematized in nine phases: review of previous knowledge; lesson on fossils; lesson on fantastic animals; planning an imaginary world; creation of an imaginary animal; revision of the imaginary animals; adaptations of real animals; adaptations of fossil animals; and public exposition. A rubric to evaluate the student's performances is reported. The project involved professors and students of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia and of the "G. Marconi" Secondary School of First Degree (Modena, Italy). Conclusion The educational objectives of the project are in line with the National Indications of the Italian Ministry of Public Instruction: knowledge of the characteristics of living beings, the meanings of the term "adaptation", the meaning of fossils, the definition of ecosystem, and the particularity of the different biomes. At the end of the project, students will be able to grasp particular adaptations of real organisms and to deduce information about the environment in which the organism evolved. This project allows students to review previous knowledge and to form their personalities. PMID:17767729

Guidetti, Roberto; Baraldi, Laura; Calzolai, Caterina; Pini, Lorenza; Veronesi, Paola; Pederzoli, Aurora

2007-01-01

335

Engineering Electrical &  

E-print Network

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2011 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

336

Engineering Electrical &  

E-print Network

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2012 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

337

Environmental contamination in Antarctic ecosystems.  

PubMed

Although the remote continent of Antarctica is perceived as the symbol of the last great wilderness, the human presence in the Southern Ocean and the continent began in the early 1900s for hunting, fishing and exploration, and many invasive plant and animal species have been deliberately introduced in several sub-Antarctic islands. Over the last 50 years, the development of research and tourism have locally affected terrestrial and marine coastal ecosystems through fuel combustion (for transportation and energy production), accidental oil spills, waste incineration and sewage. Although natural "barriers" such as oceanic and atmospheric circulation protect Antarctica from lower latitude water and air masses, available data on concentrations of metals, pesticides and other persistent pollutants in air, snow, mosses, lichens and marine organisms show that most persistent contaminants in the Antarctic environment are transported from other continents in the Southern Hemisphere. At present, levels of most contaminants in Antarctic organisms are lower than those in related species from other remote regions, except for the natural accumulation of Cd and Hg in several marine organisms and especially in albatrosses and petrels. The concentrations of organic pollutants in the eggs of an opportunistic top predator such as the south polar skua are close to those that may cause adverse health effects. Population growth and industrial development in several countries of the Southern Hemisphere are changing the global pattern of persistent anthropogenic contaminants and new classes of chemicals have already been detected in the Antarctic environment. Although the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty provides strict guidelines for the protection of the Antarctic environment and establishes obligations for all human activity in the continent and the Southern Ocean, global warming, population growth and industrial development in countries of the Southern Hemisphere will likely increase the impact of anthropogenic contaminants on Antarctic ecosystems. PMID:18765160

Bargagli, R

2008-08-01

338

Ecosystem approach to management I. "dynamic" ecosystem management v.  

E-print Network

parts of it, ecosystem structure and function is the focus of management Considers the effects = long term Ecosystem management Considers humans and all living components as one interacting system of the community #12;4 Sustainable management at an ecosystem level will only succeed when human welfare

Dever, Jennifer A.

339

Engineering Engineering Education  

E-print Network

E School of Engineering Engineering Education in a University Setting 292 Degree Programs in Engineering 294 Special Programs 296 Honors 298 Academic Regulations 300 Courses of Study 305 Engineering of Engineering is the largest and oldest private engineering school in the South. Classes offering engineering

Simaan, Nabil

340

Prince William Sound: An Ecosystem in Transition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, reports on environmental recovery since the March 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. It provides explanations of ecosystem recovery, the toxicity of oil, oil weathering, and fingerprinting (determining where a hydrocarbon residue originated). As evidence of the resiliency of the ecosystem, there is a photo time series of a plot on Block Island and photos of recolonization on rocks at Herring Bay. To show how plants and animals are adjusting, there are graphs of the pink salmon harvest and abundance of periwinkle snails and rockweed cover in the years since the spill. Information is provided on findings of NOAA's long-term monitoring program at Prince William Sound to improve future oil spill cleanups.

341

Shelf-sea ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

Walsh, J J

1980-01-01

342

DECOMPOSITION IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review examines the sources and composition of organic matter and the decomposition of particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM and DOM) in freshwater ecosystems. The main points to emerge from the review are listed below.1. Terrestrial plant material is an important source of allochthonous POM in lotlc systems.2. In lentic systems important autochthonous sources of DOM are the algae

R. D. Robarts

1986-01-01

343

Effects on aquatic ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regarding the effects of UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems, recent scientific and public interest has focused on marine primary producers and on the aquatic web, which has resulted in a multitude of studies indicating mostly detrimental effects of UV-B radiation on aquatic organisms. The interest has expanded to include ecologically significant groups and major biomass producers using mesocosm studies, emphasizing

D.-P. Häder; H. D. Kumar; R. C. Smith; R. C. Worrest

1998-01-01

344

The Global Ecosystem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains 11 questions on the topic of ecosystems, which covers food chains and organism characteristics. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit an answer and are provided immediate verification.

Heaton, Timothy

345

TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SIMULATOR  

EPA Science Inventory

The Terrestrial Habitats Project at the Western Ecology Division (Corvallis, OR) is developing tools and databases to meet the needs of Program Office clients for assessing risks to wildlife and terrestrial ecosystems. Because habitat is a dynamic condition in real-world environm...

346

Ecosystem Restoration Research at GWERD  

EPA Science Inventory

Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division, Ada, OK Mission: Conduct research and technical assistance to provide the scientific basis to support the development of strategies and technologies to protect and restore ground water, surface water, and ecosystems impacted b...

347

Introduction Ecosystem management has been  

E-print Network

65(2) 1 Introduction Ecosystem management has been vigorously debated at many meetings, conferences, and workshops (Inter- agency Ecosystem Management Task Force, 1995; Malone, 1995; Stanley, 1995; Christensen et

348

Ecological effects of ozone: integrating exposure and response with ecosystem dynamics and function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional ecosystems are essential for supplying adequate clean air and water, habitat for wildlife, commercial fiber and food products, recreational resources and for preserving biodiversity. In addition to the many natural stresses that may affect ecosystem structure and function, introduced pathogens and pests, including exotic plants and animals and pollution may also extract a toll. Ozone is the most important

J. A Laurence

1998-01-01

349

ERDC/ELTR-10-5 Ecosystem Management and Restoration Research Program  

E-print Network

ERDC/ELTR-10-5 Ecosystem Management and Restoration Research Program Implementing Herpetofaunal. Guilfoyle May 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Ecosystem Management and amphibians such as snakes, lizards, turtles, alligators, frogs, and salamanders. These animals are recognized

US Army Corps of Engineers

350

The Effect of Various Ecosystems on the Levels of Fecal Coliforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

: The purpose of this experiment was to determine if various ecosystems affect the levels of fecal coliforms. An ecosystem, or ecological system, is a community that has all the physical aspects of its habitat such as the water, soil, and weather. Fecal coliforms are a special group of bacteria, which live and reproduce in the intestines of warm-blooded animals.

X. W. Belcher

2002-01-01

351

Mapping cryptic invaders and invisability of tropical forest ecosystems: Chromolaena odorata in Nepal  

Microsoft Academic Search

For centuries, people continuously increased the rate of biological invasions and there is no sign of slowing down. From the depth of the Ocean to the crest of Himalayas, they are occupying pristine and semi-natural ecosystems at an alarming rate, threatening human, animal, plant as well as ecosystem health. Efforts to avoid or eradicate them are not achievable except for

Chudamani Joshi

2006-01-01

352

SYNTHESIS Pollination and other ecosystem services produced by mobile organisms: a conceptual framework for the  

E-print Network

REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Pollination and other ecosystem services produced by mobile organisms such mobile-agent-based ecosystem service (MABES), pollination, is affected by land-use change land use, market forces and the biology of the organisms involved. Animal-mediated pollination

Vermont, University of

353

Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 120 Economic and environmental threats of alien plant,  

E-print Network

Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 1­20 Economic and environmental threats of alien. Precise economic costs associated with some of the most ecologically damaging alien species; Animals; Alien; Economic; Ecology; Environment; Agriculture; Non-indigenous 1. Introduction Quantifying

California at Berkeley, University of

354

Rats are not the only introduced rodents producing ecosystem impacts on islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

In addition to rats, nutria (Myocastor coypus) and the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) have certainly caused damage at an ecosystem level when introduced to islands, in both cases primarily by ecosystem engineering.\\u000a Of other introduced rodents successfully established on islands, the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) may be in the process of damaging entire forest ecosystems, particularly by bark-stripping. Though

Daniel Simberloff

2009-01-01

355

IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES ON EMERGING AND RE-EMERGING ANIMAL DISEASE AND ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Climate change and environmental change are a subset of the larger set of ecosystem changes that are promoting the emergence and re-emergence of animal diseases. The complexity of the interconnectedness between a wide range of factors influencing the emergence and re-emergence of animal diseases means that uncertainty will continue to be a feature of the future. Central Veterinary Authorities

Peter Black; Mike Nunn

356

Engineering Building a better  

E-print Network

protection through water and waste treatment, but today they also focus on areas such as ecosystem'Ã?LE-DE-MONTRÃ?AL #12;Civil engineers use and develop modern tech- nologies to meet the needs of our changing society restoration, waste reduction, climate change impact mitigation and air pollution abatement. + 5 COURSES

Barthelat, Francois

357

Teaching about Ecosystems. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ecosystems are available to educators as interactive units and as such the National Science Education Standards (NSES) and the Excellence in Environmental Education: Guidelines for Learning (EEE) put considerable emphasis on ecosystems. This ERIC Digest describes the NSES and EEE guidelines for grades 5-8 and 9-12 to provide a basic ecosystem

Haury, David L.

358

Antarctica: A Cold Desert Ecosystem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Antarctica lesson has students locate the continent on a globe and on a map, describe and illustrate major Antarctic ecosystems, and explain relationships between those ecosystems. They will also construct a rough map of Antarctic ecosystems and explore relationships among the creatures that populate them. This lesson can be adapted to focus on other regions, including the one in which students live.

359

Evolution of Continental Aquatic Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecosystem evolution still remains the least under- stood part of evolutionary theory. Discussions of eco- system evolution almost inevitably digress to biotic components, often to a single group of organisms. Cer- tainly, biotic components evolve with ecosystems, but the focus should not be displaced from ecosystem char- acters as such, the trophic and, more generally speak- ing, the information links

A. G. Ponomarenko

1996-01-01

360

Ecosystem services and water economics  

E-print Network

Ecosystem services and water economics Florida Agricultural Commodity & Policy Outlook Conference, Food & Resource Economics Department, University of Florida/IFAS · Part II. Markets for Ecosystem preferences o Technological changes o Market competition o Recent: · Water availability · Ecosystem service

Hill, Jeffrey E.

361

Ecosystem Task Force Meeting Minutes  

E-print Network

Ecosystem Task Force Meeting Minutes Date: April 28, 2011 Title of Meeting: Monthly Meeting. A focus on planning helps ground the Task Force because of the complexity of ecosystems. UNH-862-0785 sustainability.info@unh.edu http://www.sustainableunh.unh.edu/ #12;3.1. Ecosystem work has no defined parameters

New Hampshire, University of

362

Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits  

E-print Network

Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 February 2009 #12;2 #12;3 Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), is a rich and varied ecosystem stretching from the Pacific Ocean

Tsien, Roger Y.

363

1, 275309, 2004 Net ecosystem  

E-print Network

BGD 1, 275­309, 2004 Net ecosystem exchange of carbondioxide and water A. J. Dolman et al. Title Discussions Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Net ecosystem.dolman@geo.falw.vu.nl) 275 #12;BGD 1, 275­309, 2004 Net ecosystem exchange of carbondioxide and water A. J. Dolman et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

[Coarse woody debris and its function in forest ecosystem].  

PubMed

Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural and functional element in forest ecosystem. In this paper, the definition, dynamics, and role of CWD in a forest ecosystem were overviewed. CWD include all woody debris above and under the ground with a diameters > or = 2.5 cm, and mainly comes from the dead trees resulted from competition and disturbances. The biomass of CWD changes like "U" form along with the development of a forest community. The decay rate of CWD is determined by the compound course of the respiration and natural fragmentation. Insects and microorganisms play an important role in the course. CWD basically has two functions in an ecosystem. One is as the nutrition pool for some living creatures, and the other is that the large CWD can form some special habitats for animals and plants. Conclusively these two functions are helpful to reserve the biodiversity and the integrity of ecological process in a natural ecosystem. Gaps are formed while dead trees falling down, and all gaps in a forest succeed one another randomly in the development of a forest ecosystem, which pushes the inner circulation of the forest. Because of the vital roles of CWD in a forest ecosystem, much more attention should be paid in the management of forest ecosystem. PMID:11757388

Hou, P; Pan, C

2001-04-01

365

SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION Introduction to Special Feature  

E-print Network

of materials between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and spatial interactions among the plants, animals that include dy- namic effects that may cause broad-scale and long- term impacts. Burke and colleagues examine the relative importance of topography, grazing, plant species composition, and microsite characteristics

Turner, Monica G.

366

Conservation of Priority Birds in Sagebrush Ecosystems1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sagebrush ecosystems occupy over 62,000,000 ha of the western US. However, they have been degraded or completely eliminated by agricultural conversion, over- grazing by domestic livestock, invasion of exotic plants, expansion of pinyon and juniper woodlands, un- characteristic wildfires, and fragmentation. This habitat loss has led to an increasing number of special status species, including 630 plant and animal species

Terrell D. Rich; Michael J. Wisdom; Victoria A. Saab

367

Lipid Catabolism of Invertebrate Predator Indicates Widespread Wetland Ecosystem Degradation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animals frequently undergo periods when they accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent energetically expensive activities, such as migration or breeding. During such periods, daily lipid-reserve dynamics (DLD) of sentinel species can quantify how landscape modifications affect function, health, and resilience of ecosystems. Aythya affinis (Eyton 1838; lesser scaup; diving duck) are macroinvertebrate predators; they migrate through an agriculturally dominated landscape in

Michael J. Anteau; Alan D. Afton; Bradley Steven Launikonis

2011-01-01

368

An ecosystem-based approach to assess the status of a Mediterranean ecosystem, the Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadow.  

PubMed

Biotic indices, which reflect the quality of the environment, are widely used in the marine realm. Sometimes, key species or ecosystem engineers are selected for this purpose. This is the case of the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica, widely used as a biological quality element in the context of the European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD). The good quality of a water body and the apparent health of a species, whether or not an ecosystem engineer such as P. oceanica, is not always indicative of the good structure and functioning of the whole ecosystem. A key point of the recent Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) is the ecosystem-based approach. Here, on the basis of a simplified conceptual model of the P. oceanica ecosystem, we have proposed an ecosystem-based index of the quality of its functioning, compliant with the MSFD requirements. This index (EBQI) is based upon a set of representative functional compartments, the weighting of these compartments and the assessment of the quality of each compartment by comparison of a supposed baseline. The index well discriminated 17 sites in the north-western Mediterranean (French Riviera, Provence, Corsica, Catalonia and Balearic Islands) covering a wide range of human pressure levels. The strong points of the EBQI are that it is easy to implement, non-destructive, relatively robust, according to the selection of the compartments and to their weighting, and associated with confidence indices that indicate possible weakness and biases and therefore the need for further field data acquisition. PMID:24933020

Personnic, Sébastien; Boudouresque, Charles F; Astruch, Patrick; Ballesteros, Enric; Blouet, Sylvain; Bellan-Santini, Denise; Bonhomme, Patrick; Thibault-Botha, Delphine; Feunteun, Eric; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille; Pergent, Gérard; Pergent-Martini, Christine; Pastor, Jérémy; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Florent; Thibaut, Thierry; Ruitton, Sandrine

2014-01-01

369

Subsurface ecosystem resilience: long-term attenuation of subsurface contaminants supports a dynamic microbial community  

Microsoft Academic Search

The propensity for groundwater ecosystems to recover from contamination by organic chemicals (in this case, coal-tar waste) is of vital concern for scientists and engineers who manage polluted sites. The microbially mediated cleanup processes are also of interest to ecologists because they are an important mechanism for the resilience of ecosystems. In this study we establish the long-term dynamic nature

Jane M Yagi; Edward F Neuhauser; John A Ripp; David M Mauro; Eugene L Madsen

2010-01-01

370

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey  

E-print Network

11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

US Army Corps of Engineers

371

Bivalve grazing, nutrient cycling and phytoplankton dynamics in an estuarine ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis has considered the impact of the suspension feeding bivalve Mytilusedulis on nutrient cycling and phytoplankton in an estuarine ecosystem. The research was started within the framework of an extensive research project with the objective to evaluate the changes in the Oosterschelde ecosystem as an effect of a coastal engineering project (Nienhuis & Smaal, 1994). The Oosterschelde estuary is

T. C. Prins

1996-01-01

372

Building an Ecosystem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is designed to follow our students from grade 7 - 12. Each year adds to or builds upon previous years. The project is centered around a 400 gallon, 4 tank system which is placed in sunlight in the lobby of our science building. It was seeded with water from nearby rivers, lakes, ponds, and creeks. The only mechanical part is a pump which returns water from tank 4 back to tank 1. This aquatic ecosystem is a constant, woven through the curriculum as students progress through science. At the end of 3-5 science courses students have greater awareness of the role of detritivores and decomposers in the cycling of matter and understand how human activities may upset the balance in an ecosystem. One goal is for students to see the relationship between what is studied in a classroom and the real world; another is for them to understand the role of wetlands in making water suitable to sustain life.

BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Charlotte C. Freeman N:C. Freeman;Charlotte ORG:Girls Preparatory School REV:2005-04-08 END:VCARD

1995-06-30

373

75 FR 62313 - Establishing the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...engine for the entire United States; its waters sustain a diverse and vibrant ecosystem; and the Gulf's culture, natural beauty, and historic significance are unique. Each year, millions of tourists visit the Gulf to vacation, swim, boat,...

2010-10-08

374

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-print Network

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology Program The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology (BSET) is a hands-on program based upon engineering technology fundamentals, engineering for employment or further education. The focus is on current engineering technology issues and applications used

375

SFRSF: Our Coastal Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This South Florida Restoration Science Forum (SFRSF) page highlights the coastal ecosystems of southern Florida. Research displayed from poster presentations covers the coastal area habitats, sustaining and enhancing coastal waters, major coastal challenges, restoring and enhancing estuaries, and using science for effective resource management. The six estuaries discussed are the Caloosahatchee, Southwest Florida, Biscayne Bay, Florida Bay, Florida Keys, and St. Lucie estuaries. Specific issues concerning each estuary are covered, and links are provided for additional information.

376

World Ecosystem and Environmental Science and Policy 30  

E-print Network

World Ecosystem and Geography Environmental Science and Policy 30 Pete Richerson, Instructor #12 of ecology and evolution · Fun and interesting! #12;Example of natural history observation: James Hutton engine" · that drives air and ocean currents · Moving water transports heat · Moving air transports heat

Richerson, Peter J.

377

Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and  

E-print Network

was initially defined by Civil Works policy to mean fish and wildlife habitat improvement, similar to habitat of Engineers #12;The Issue The Corps created an ecosystem restoration mission out of congressional authorities benefits analysis has roots in the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (FWCA) of 1958 and the National

US Army Corps of Engineers

378

BMW Hydrogen Technology 3D Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Tank and engine animation of the BMW Hydrogen 7 car. There are currently several hundred hydrogen vehicles in operation throughout the world. Soon it will number several thousand. There are also many hydrogen filling stations in operation throughout the world. This particular vehicle is an internal combustion engine that can change between hydrogen or petrol at the flick of a switch.

2008-10-31

379

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-print Network

:45 AM Machines in engineering use mostly hard materials, while machines in nature are often soft to the life of animals and plants? Softness enables deformation, and deformation provides functions. Familiar

Lin, Xi

380

Obscuring ecosystem function with application of the ecosystem services concept.  

PubMed

Conservationists commonly have framed ecological concerns in economic terms to garner political support for conservation and to increase public interest in preserving global biodiversity. Beginning in the early 1980s, conservation biologists adapted neoliberal economics to reframe ecosystem functions and related biodiversity as ecosystem services to humanity. Despite the economic success of programs such as the Catskill/Delaware watershed management plan in the United States and the creation of global carbon exchanges, today's marketplace often fails to adequately protect biodiversity. We used a Marxist critique to explain one reason for this failure and to suggest a possible, if partial, response. Reframing ecosystem functions as economic services does not address the political problem of commodification. Just as it obscures the labor of human workers, commodification obscures the importance of the biota (ecosystem workers) and related abiotic factors that contribute to ecosystem functions. This erasure of work done by ecosystems impedes public understanding of biodiversity. Odum and Odum's radical suggestion to use the language of ecosystems (i.e., emergy or energy memory) to describe economies, rather than using the language of economics (i.e., services) to describe ecosystems, reverses this erasure of the ecosystem worker. Considering the current dominance of economic forces, however, implementing such solutions would require social changes similar in magnitude to those that occurred during the 1960s. Niklas Luhmann argues that such substantive, yet rapid, social change requires synergy among multiple societal function systems (i.e., economy, education, law, politics, religion, science), rather than reliance on a single social sphere, such as the economy. Explicitly presenting ecosystem services as discreet and incomplete aspects of ecosystem functions not only allows potential economic and environmental benefits associated with ecosystem services, but also enables the social and political changes required to ensure valuation of ecosystem functions and related biodiversity in ways beyond their measurement on an economic scale. PMID:19659684

Peterson, Markus J; Hall, Damon M; Feldpausch-Parker, Andrea M; Peterson, Tarla Rai

2010-02-01

381

Carbon dioxide dynamics in an artificial ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental artificial ecosystem was established as a tool to understand the behavior of closed ecosystem and to develop the technology for a future bioregenerative life support system for lunar or planetary exploration. Total effective volume of the system is 0.7 m3 . It consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a photo-bioreactor which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella), respectively. For uniform and sustained observations, lettuce and silkworms was cultivated using sequential cultivation method, and microalgae using continuous culture. Four researchers took turns breathing the system air through a tube for brief periods every few hours. A mathematic model, simulating the carbon dioxide dynamics was developed. The main biological parameters concerning photosynthesis of lettuce and microalgae, respiration of silkworms and human were validated by the experimental data. The model described the respiratory relationship between autotrophic and heterotrophic compartments. A control strategy was proposed as a tool for the atmosphere management of the artificial ecosystem.

Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Liu, Hong

382

Resilience, Integrity and Ecosystem Dynamics: Bridging Ecosystem Theory and Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper different approaches to elucidate ecosystem dynamics are described, illustrated and interrelated. Ecosystem development is distinguished into two separate sequences, a complexifying phase which is characterized by orientor optimization and a destruction based phase which follows disturbances. The two developmental pathways are integrated in a modified illustration of the "adaptive cycle". Based on these fundamentals, the recent definitions of resilience, adaptability and vulnerability are discussed and a modified comprehension is proposed. Thereafter, two case studies about wetland dynamics are presented to demonstrate both, the consequences of disturbance and the potential of ecosystem recovery. In both examples ecosystem integrity is used as a key indicator variable. Based on the presented results the relativity and the normative loading of resilience quantification is worked out. The paper ends with the suggestion that the features of adaptability could be used as an integrative guideline for the analysis of ecosystem dynamics and as a well-suited concept for ecosystem management.

Müller, Felix; Burkhard, Benjamin; Kroll, Franziska

383

Resilience, Integrity and Ecosystem Dynamics: Bridging Ecosystem Theory and Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper different approaches to elucidate ecosystem dynamics are described, illustrated and interrelated. Ecosystem development is distinguished into two separate sequences, a complexifying phase which is characterized by orientor optimization and a destruction based phase which follows disturbances. The two developmental pathways are integrated in a modified illustration of the “adaptive cycle”. Based on these fundamentals, the recent definitions of resilience, adaptability and vulnerability are discussed and a modified comprehension is proposed. Thereafter, two case studies about wetland dynamics are presented to demonstrate both, the consequences of disturbance and the potential of ecosystem recovery. In both examples ecosystem integrity is used as a key indicator variable. Based on the presented results the relativity and the normative loading of resilience quantification is worked out. The paper ends with the suggestion that the features of adaptability could be used as an integrative guideline for the analysis of ecosystem dynamics and as a well-suited concept for ecosystem management.

Müller, Felix; Burkhard, Benjamin; Kroll, Franziska

384

Investigating Local Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this Science NetLinks lesson is to guide students through investigations of the habitats of local plants and animals; to explore some of the ways animals depend on plants and each other. In order to learn about living environments, young children should begin with direct observation of their immediate surroundings, such as a backyard, schoolyard or local pond. As students observe their environment, they should have many opportunities to record and communicate their findings using words and pictures.

Science Netlinks;

2000-12-06

385

From genes to ecosystems: a genetic basis to ecosystem services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecosystems provide services, many of which are regulated through species interactions. Emerging research in the fields of\\u000a community and ecosystem genetics indicate that genetic variation in one species can influence species interactions and affect\\u000a subsequent patterns of energy flow and nutrient cycles. Because there can be a genetic basis to community- and ecosystem-level\\u000a processes, evolutionary processes that alter standing genetic

Joseph K. Bailey

2011-01-01

386

Brominated Flame Retardants in North-East Atlantic Marine Ecosystems  

PubMed Central

Background Concentrations of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are reported to increase in marine ecosystems. Objectives Characterize exposure to BFRs in animals from different trophic levels in North-East Atlantic coastal marine ecosystems along a latitudinal gradient from southern Norway to Spitsbergen, Svalbard, in the Arctic. Calanoid species were collected from the Oslofjord (59°N), Froan (64°N), and Spitsbergen (> 78°N); Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from the Oslofjord and Froan; polar cod (Boreogadus saida) from Bear Island (74°N) and Spitsbergen; harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) from the Oslofjord, Froan, and Spitsbergen; and ringed seal (Phoca vitulina) from Spitsbergen. Eggs of common tern (Sterna hirundo) were collected from the Oslofjord, and eggs of arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea) from Froan and Spitsbergen. Results Levels of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) generally decreased as a function of increasing latitude, reflecting distance from release sources. The clear latitudinal decrease in levels of BFRs was not pronounced in the two tern species, most likely because they are exposed during migration. The decabrominated compound BDE-209 was detected in animals from all three ecosystems, and the highest levels were found in arctic tern eggs from Spitsbergen. HBCD was found in animals from all trophic levels, except for in calanoids at Froan and Spitsbergen. Conclusions Even though the levels of PBDEs and HBCD are generally low in North-East Atlantic coastal marine ecosystems, there are concerns about the relatively high presence of BDE-209 and HBCD. PMID:18174948

Jenssen, Bj?rn Munro; S?rmo, Eugen G.; Baek, Kine; Bytingsvik, Jenny; Gaustad, Hege; Ruus, Anders; Skaare, Janneche Utne

2007-01-01

387

Animal-Plant/Animal-Animal-Interactions The module Animal-Plant/Animal-Animal-Interactions deals with various aspects of  

E-print Network

(herbivory and plant defensive substances) are introduced using various examples (ant-plant interactions are discussed, e.g. pollination of commercially used plants. · Practical course: o Experiments on various aspects of animal-plant and animal-animal interactions. o Overview of the most important methods used

Pfeifer, Holger

388

The WSRC Engineering Analyzer  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a multi-platform, multi-program engineering analysis tool that runs in either real-time or post-process modes, providing the analyst with a consistent, adaptable interface for 2-d color animation of time-oriented engineering data on any X-terminal.

Beckmeyer, R.R.; Buckner, M.R.

1992-01-01

389

Tropical Ecosystem and Soil Development  

E-print Network

nutrient content and ecosystem development #12;How is soil generated from rocks? Weathering #12;SoilTropical Ecosystem and Soil Development Joost van Haren Ecology 596L 09/03/10 #12;Ecosystem biomass strongly dependent on soil Manaus, BDFF plots #12;0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 O ld oxisols

Saleska, Scott

390

Assessing risks to ecosystem quality  

SciTech Connect

Ecosystems are not organisms. Because ecosystems do not reproduce, grow old or sick, and die, the term ecosystem health is somewhat misleading and perhaps should not be used. A more useful concept is ``ecosystem quality,`` which denotes a set of desirable ecosystem characteristics defined in terms of species composition, productivity, size/condition of specific populations, or other measurable properties. The desired quality of an ecosystem may be pristine, as in a nature preserve, or highly altered by man, as in a managed forest or navigational waterway. ``Sustainable development`` implies that human activities that influence ecosystem quality should be managed so that high-quality ecosystems are maintained for future generations. In sustainability-based environmental management, the focus is on maintaining or improving ecosystem quality, not on restricting discharges or requiring particular waste treatment technologies. This approach requires management of chemical impacts to be integrated with management of other sources of stress such as erosion, eutrophication, and direct human exploitation. Environmental scientists must (1) work with decision makers and the public to define ecosystem quality goals, (2) develop corresponding measures of ecosystem quality, (3) diagnose causes for departures from desired states, and (4) recommend appropriate restoration actions, if necessary. Environmental toxicology and chemical risk assessment are necessary for implementing the above framework, but they are clearly not sufficient. This paper reviews the state-of-the science relevant to sustaining the quality of aquatic ecosystems. Using the specific example of a reservoir in eastern Tennessee, the paper attempts to define roles for ecotoxicology and risk assessment in each step of the management process.

Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31

391

Declining Birds in Grassland Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication discusses the grassland ecosystem with respect to declining bird species. This report is the effort of a number of agencies to develop a strategy for addressing grassland bird information needs. Grasslands are the most imperiled ecosystem worldwide, and birds associated with this ecosystem are on a decline. This report addresses monitoring issues, species in concern, and the effects of habitat and landscape on grassland birds.

392

Baltimore Ecosystem Study  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many ecologists work to understand how various parts of a given ecological system work or function with other systems in their vicinity, but relatively few attempt to bring together all of this work with major urban areas. One such impressive project is the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, which aims to understand metropolitan Baltimore as an ecological system; and in doing so, bring together researchers from the biological, physical and social sciences to work on this formidable task that is truly interdisciplinary. At the site, visitors can learn about the staff of the project and read about its various thematic areas of inquiry, including biodiversity, education, soil, stream and watershed studies, and vegetation. A good place to start before diving into the numerous research projects would be the research area, which explains the basic goals of the project, the theories that the research team is drawing on, and the central questions of its work. The Baltimore Ecosystem Study has also been approved for use in classrooms by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and educators will find materials that they can draw on to teach various concepts and ideas here as well.

393

Attitudes towards wild animal conservation: a comparative study of the Yi and Mosuo in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global wild animal resources are declining due to various pressures, which will greatly affect local biodiversity and ecosystem services. Understanding local people's attitudes towards wild animal conservation in high biodiversity areas is of major importance for conservation efforts. Sampling and questionnaire survey methods were employed to examine people's attitudes toward wild animal conservation in a comparative case study of two

Naiyi Yang; Endi Zhang; Min Chen

2010-01-01

394

"Pleistocene Park" - A Glacial Ecosystem in a Warming World  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most people if asked what association they have to the phrase - ice age, will answer - "Mammoth". But mammoths are not only big wooly elephants which went extinct in the beginning of Holocene. They were also part of a great ecosystem, the Northern Steppe or Mammoth Ecosystem, which was the world's largest ecosystem for hundreds thousand of years. This ecosystem, with extremely high rates of biocycling, could maintain animal densities which can be hardly found anywhere in the modern world. Northern steppe played an important role in shaping the glacial climate of the planet. High albedo grasslands reflected a much bigger portion of sun heat back to the atmosphere. Cold soils and permafrost served as sinks of carbon, helping to keep greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere at low levels. In the beginning of Holocene, simultaneously with wave of human expansion, an extinction wave took place. Tens of megafauna species became extinct at that time worldwide, while ones that resisted the extinction substantially dropped in numbers. The Northern Steppe ecosystem became imbalanced. Without large numbers of herbivores grazing and trampling the pasture, trees, shrubs and moss invaded grasslands. Within just a few hundreds years the mammoth ecosystem was gone, replaced by much lower productivity ecosystems. Already 14 thousand year ago, by simply increasing hunting pressure, humans managed to dramatically change Earth's appearance. We propose that by artificially maintaining a high animal density and diversity on a limited territory for extended period of time, it will be possible to reverse the shift, reestablishing the productive Northern Steppe ecosystem. Moss, shrubs and tree sprouts are not able to resist grazing pressure so they will be quickly replaced by grasses and herbs. Animals digesting all aboveground biomass would accelerate nutrition cycling and consequently increase bioproductivity. Higher bioproductivity would increase evapotranspiration, keeping soils dry and runoff low. This would further increase nutrient availability in the soil. Water limitation would force roots grow deeper to cold soil horizons where these roots (carbon) will be sequestered for a long period of time. After high productivity and high diversity of animals in the ecosystem is reached, this ecosystem will once again be able to compete and to expand. To test this hypothesis, we have started the experiment named "Pleistocene Park". For over 15 years we have brought different herbivore species to the fenced area in the Kolyma river lowland, keep them at high density and see the ecosystem transformation. Now Pleistocene Park is size of 20 km2 and home for 7 big herbivores species. It is a small version of how the Mammoth Steppe ecosystem looked in the past and may look in the future. Pleistocene Park is a place where scientists can conduct in situ research and see how restoration of the ice age ecosystem may help mitigate future climatic changes. Arctic is a weakly populated region with no possibilities for agriculture. Modern civilization treats bigger part of the Arctic as wastelands. So why don't turn this "wasteland" into something that can strongly benefit our civilization in the future?

Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

2011-12-01

395

Patents for genetically modified animals.  

PubMed

Should genetically engineered animals be patented? This issue has been one of the most contentious as lawmakers have grappled with how best to protect intellectual property. Since the 1980 case of Diamond v. Chakrabarty, in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a living microorganism is patentable, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has determined that plants and nonhuman animals can be patented. These policy decisions have led to congressional debate on whether animals should be patentable subject matter. Patenting of living organisms is unique for three reasons: the invention itself is alive; the invention in some instances can reproduce itself; and the invention sometimes cannot be adequately described for patent specification purposes, leading to the need for deposit of the invention for patent purposes. PMID:8505268

O'Connor, K W

1993-01-01

396

Assuring consumer safety without animals  

PubMed Central

Humans are exposed to a variety of chemicals in their everyday lives through interactions with the environment and through the use of consumer products. It is a basic requirement that these products are tested to assure they are safe under normal and reasonably foreseeable conditions of use. Within the European Union, the majority of tests used for generating toxicological data rely on animals. However recent changes in legislation (e.g., 7th amendment of the Cosmetics Directive and REACH) are driving researchers to develop and adopt non-animal alternative methods with which to assure human safety. Great strides have been made to this effect, but what other opportunities/technologies exist that could expedite this? Tissue engineering has increasing scope to contribute to replacing animals with scientifically robust alternatives in basic research and safety testing, but is this application of the technology being fully exploited? This review highlights how the consumer products industry is applying tissue engineering to ensure chemicals are safe for human use without using animals, and identifies areas for future development and application of the technology. PMID:19794902

Westmoreland, Carl

2009-01-01

397

Animal Intelligence Insights into the Animal Mind  

E-print Network

Animal Intelligence Insights into the Animal Mind Edited by R. J.Hoage and Larry Goldman Smithsonian Institution Press Washington, D.C., and London #12;Tradition and Social Learning in Animals of the prestigious Royal Society and a leading figure in the bio- logical establishment of his day. Romanes

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

398

Global Trajectories of the Long-Term Decline of Coral Reef Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Degradation of coral reef ecosystems began centuries ago, but there is no global summary of the magnitude of change. We compiled records, extending back thousands of years, of the status and trends of seven major guilds of carnivores, herbivores, and architectural species from 14 regions. Large animals declined before small animals and architectural species, and Atlantic reefs declined before reefs

John M. Pandolfi; Roger H. Bradbury; Enric Sala; Terence P. Hughes; Karen A. Bjorndal; Richard G. Cooke; Deborah McArdle; Loren McClenachan; Marah J. H. Newman; Gustavo Paredes; Robert R. Warner; Jeremy B. C. Jackson

2003-01-01

399

Animals around the world  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What kinds of animals live in South Africa? Your teacher will give you KWL chart First, lets learn about Elephants Animals Record in your chart what you learn. Now lets learn about other animals Animals How is it similar or different from the Elephant? Project: Create a poster on one of the animals we discussed in this lesson. See the teacher ...

Carly, Ms.

2011-10-27

400

Using expert judgment to estimate marine ecosystem vulnerability in the California Current.  

PubMed

As resource management and conservation efforts move toward multi-sector, ecosystem-based approaches, we need methods for comparing the varying responses of ecosystems to the impacts of human activities in order to prioritize management efforts, allocate limited resources, and understand cumulative effects. Given the number and variety of human activities affecting ecosystems, relatively few empirical studies are adequately comprehensive to inform these decisions. Consequently, management often turns to expert judgment for information. Drawing on methods from decision science, we offer a method for eliciting expert judgment to (1) quantitatively estimate the relative vulnerability of ecosystems to stressors, (2) help prioritize the management of stressors across multiple ecosystems, (3) evaluate how experts give weight to different criteria to characterize vulnerability of ecosystems to anthropogenic stressors, and (4) identify key knowledge gaps. We applied this method to the California Current region in order to evaluate the relative vulnerability of 19 marine ecosystems to 53 stressors associated with human activities, based on surveys from 107 experts. When judging the relative vulnerability of ecosystems to stressors, we found that experts primarily considered two criteria: the ecosystem's resistance to the stressor and the number of species or trophic levels affected. Four intertidal ecosystems (mudflat, beach, salt marsh, and rocky intertidal) were judged most vulnerable to the suite of human activities evaluated here. The highest vulnerability rankings for coastal ecosystems were invasive species, ocean acidification, sea temperature change, sea level rise, and habitat alteration from coastal engineering, while offshore ecosystems were assessed to be most vulnerable to ocean acidification, demersal destructive fishing, and shipwrecks. These results provide a quantitative, transparent, and repeatable assessment of relative vulnerability across ecosystems to any ongoing or emerging human activity. Combining these results with data on the spatial distribution and intensity of human activities provides a systematic foundation for ecosystem-based management. PMID:20666257

Teck, Sarah J; Halpern, Benjamin S; Kappel, Carrie V; Micheli, Fiorenza; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Crain, Caitlin M; Martone, Rebecca; Shearer, Christine; Arvai, Joe; Fischhoff, Baruch; Murray, Grant; Neslo, Rabin; Cooke, Roger

2010-07-01

401

COMPUTER ANIMATION AND VIRTUAL WORLDS Comp. Anim. Virtual Worlds 2013; 24:285295  

E-print Network

2 Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TXCOMPUTER ANIMATION AND VIRTUAL WORLDS Comp. Anim. Virtual Worlds 2013; 24:285­295 Published online Geraerts1 1 Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Geraerts, R.J.

402

Biodiversity and Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This learning activity from the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) will allow students to examine how biodiversity affects an environment's temperature and determine how animal diversity changes in different environments. A student worksheet and discussion questions are included. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

2011-02-16

403

The landscape as an ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landscape, in this paper, is defined as “a complex of geographically, functionally and historically interrelated ecosystems” (also: “organised land”). For its planning and management, mapping of geomorphological, hydrological, and climatic conditions is crucial to understand the ecological patterns. To warrant the landscape's sustainability, its ecosystems' multiple and interdependent functions should be carefully identified on macro-, meso- and micro-level. It is

H. Doing

1997-01-01

404

Climate Change and Arctic Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students learn about how climate change is affecting the Arctic ecosystem and then investigate how this change is impacting polar bear populations. Students analyze maps of Arctic sea ice, temperature graphs, and polar bear population data to answer questions about the impact of climate change on the Arctic ecosystem.

Change, Project A.; University, Purdue

405

The formation of island ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Island ecosystems are formed from the same generic building blocks as continental ecosystems. These can be reduced to five: (1) the terrestrial habitat (soil-parent material and topography), (2) the regional and local climate, (3) the regional biota with differential restrictions of accessibility, (4) the ecological roles assumed by the species including their potential for adaptation, and (5) the overriding dimensions

Dieter Mueller-Dombois

1992-01-01

406

Sensitivity and Thresholds of Ecosystems to Abrupt Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapid vegetational change is a hallmark of past abrupt climate change, as evidenced from Younger Dryas records in Europe, eastern North America, and the Pacific North American rim. The potential response of future ecosystems to abrupt climate change is targeted, with a focus on particular changes in the hydrological cycle. The vulnerability of ecosystems is notable when particular shifts cross thresholds of precipitation and temperature, as many plants and animals are adapted to specific climatic "windows". Significant forest species compositional changes occur at ecotonal boundaries, which are often the first locations to record a climatic response. Historical forest declines have been linked to stress, and even Pleistocene extinctions have been associated with human interaction at times of rapid climatic shifts. Environmental extremes are risky for reproductive stages, and result in nonlinearities. The role of humans in association with abrupt climate change suggests that many ecosystems may cross thresholds from which they will find it difficult to recover. Sectors particularly vulnerable will be reviewed.

Peteet, D. M.; Peteet, D. M.

2001-12-01

407

Bridge Rectifier Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an animation of a bridge rectifier circuit or diode bridge. Voltages and parts of the circuit of this 3-D animated gif are highlighted with different colors. Current is displayed by green arrows indicating directional flow. The animation requires a Web browser or other video player software capable of displaying gif animations. A link provides an optional Quicktime version of this same animation.Other 3-D Circuit Animations can be seen here.

2009-11-26

408

Engineering. Mechanical Engineering.  

E-print Network

Department Of Mechanical Engineering. Studying Mechanical Engineering. www.sheffield.ac.uk/mecheng #12;from the Head of Department A degree in mechanical engineering is the key to an exciting course is an MEng or BEng in Mechanical Engineering. You can also learn a language and study abroad

Stevenson, Mark

409

Artimate: an articulatory animation framework for audiovisual speech synthesis  

E-print Network

to articulatory animation synthesis, as well as an example application to illustrate its use with a 3D game engine systems use simple rules to animate the articulators, others omit them altogether [3]. Meanwhile, speech applications such as speech therapy or biomechanical simulation. While the lips can be animated using optical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE  

E-print Network

for Establishing an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure Foreword The Internet is one of the mostRECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE THE DEPARTMENT an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Recommendations

Perkins, Richard A.

411

How Much Is an Ecosystem Worth?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson engages students in critical thinking about the value of ecosystems. Students assess ecosystem services, consider the benefits of biomonitors, explore ecosystem databases, brainstorm What if? scenariosand more!

John Ausema (Gonzaga College High School;)

2005-07-01

412

Environmental Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this unit, students explore the various roles of environmental engineers, including: environmental cleanup, water quality, groundwater resources, surface water and groundwater flow, water contamination, waste disposal and air pollution. Specifically, students learn about the factors that affect water quality and the conditions that enable different animals and plants to survive in their environments. Next, students learn about groundwater and how environmental engineers study groundwater to predict the distribution of surface pollution. Students also learn how water flows through the ground, what an aquifer is and what soil properties are used to predict groundwater flow. Additionally, students discover that the water they drink everyday comes from many different sources, including surface water and groundwater. They investigate possible scenarios of drinking water contamination and how contaminants can negatively affect the organisms that come in contact with them. Students learn about the three most common methods of waste disposal and how environmental engineers continue to develop technologies to dispose of trash. Lastly, students learn what causes air pollution and how to investigate the different pollutants that exist, such as toxic gases and particulate matter. Also, they investigate the technologies developed by engineers to reduce air pollution.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

413

Environments that Induce Synthetic Microbial Ecosystems  

PubMed Central

Interactions between microbial species are sometimes mediated by the exchange of small molecules, secreted by one species and metabolized by another. Both one-way (commensal) and two-way (mutualistic) interactions may contribute to complex networks of interdependencies. Understanding these interactions constitutes an open challenge in microbial ecology, with applications ranging from the human microbiome to environmental sustainability. In parallel to natural communities, it is possible to explore interactions in artificial microbial ecosystems, e.g. pairs of genetically engineered mutualistic strains. Here we computationally generate artificial microbial ecosystems without re-engineering the microbes themselves, but rather by predicting their growth on appropriately designed media. We use genome-scale stoichiometric models of metabolism to identify media that can sustain growth for a pair of species, but fail to do so for one or both individual species, thereby inducing putative symbiotic interactions. We first tested our approach on two previously studied mutualistic pairs, and on a pair of highly curated model organisms, showing that our algorithms successfully recapitulate known interactions, robustly predict new ones, and provide novel insight on exchanged molecules. We then applied our method to all possible pairs of seven microbial species, and found that it is always possible to identify putative media that induce commensalism or mutualism. Our analysis also suggests that symbiotic interactions may arise more readily through environmental fluctuations than genetic modifications. We envision that our approach will help generate microbe-microbe interaction maps useful for understanding microbial consortia dynamics and evolution, and for exploring the full potential of natural metabolic pathways for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:21124952

Klitgord, Niels; Segre, Daniel

2010-01-01

414

Putting the Engine Back in Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Electrical and Computer Engineering programs across the nation are seeing a decrease in engineering student enrollment and retention. Electronic systems and components these days are far too small and complex to allow an inquisitive student to explore and satisfy their curiosity about how these gadgets work. These students often take to exploring mechanical systems instead and are thus led away from Electrical and Computer Engineering. Similarly, with advances in computer simulations of engineering circuits and models that produce realistic results, engineering programs have transitioned away from physical hardware and hands-on experimentation. This trend away from having students being able to "tinker" with real hardware is detrimental to their development into well rounded engineers. In addition, as globalization continues, engineers must broaden their team-work and technical skills. This paper describes a hardware, software and courseware learning ecosystem that has been created to capture student attention and develop a broader skill set. Laboratory and in-class exercises use POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) based laboratory modules to engage students in learning through exploration, critical thinking, and team and cooperative participation exercises. Laboratory and in-class exercises are designed to teach the student how to explore a new technology to be able to learn more about it. In fact, learning how to learn is a key outcome. Laboratory hardware is designed to provide easy connection to real-world devices and allow students to extend their explorations from classroom theory to the practical application of technology they are learning.

Cady, Fred; Mclellan, John

2011-05-25

415

INVESTIGATING THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST MESIC FOREST ECOSYSTEM: HYPOTHESIS TESTING WITHIN A COMPARATIVE PHYLOGEOGRAPHIC FRAMEWORK  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the evolution of mesic forest ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest of North America using a statistical phylogeography approach in four animal and two plant lineages. Three a priori hypotheses, which explain the disjunction in the mesic forest ecosystem with either recent dispersal or ancient vicariance, are tested with phylogenetic and coalescent methods. We find strong support in three

Bryan C. Carstens; Steven J. Brunsfeld; John R. Demboski; Jeffrey M. Good; Jack Sullivan

2005-01-01

416

Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Clostridium perfringens , and Plesiomonas shigelloides in Marine and Freshwater Invertebrates from Coastal California Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The coastal ecosystems of California are highly utilized by humans and animals, but the ecology of fecal bacteria at the land–sea interface is not well understood. This study evaluated the distribution of potentially pathogenic bacteria in invertebrates from linked marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems in central California. A variety of filter-feeding clams, mussels, worms, and crab tissues were selectively cultured

W. A. Miller; M. A. Miller; I. A. Gardner; E. R. Atwill; B. A. Byrne; S. Jang; M. Harris; J. Ames; D. Jessup; D. Paradies; K. Worcester; A. Melli; P. A. Conrad

2006-01-01

417

Mapping invasive plant species in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems helps to understand the causes of their progres-  

E-print Network

Abstract Mapping invasive plant species in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems helps to understand. Introduction The invasion of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems by non- indigenous plant and animal species of Optimal Dates for the Discrimination of Invasive Wetland Plant Species Using Derivative Spectral Analysis

Tsai, Fuan "Alfonso"

418

Meta-ecosystems and biological energy transport from ocean to coast: the ecological importance of herring migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecosystems are not closed, but receive resource subsidies from other ecosystems. Energy, material and organisms are moved between systems by physical vectors, but migrating animals also transport resources between systems. We report on large scale energy transport from ocean to coast by a migrating fish population, the Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring Clupea harengus. We observe a rapid body mass increase

Øystein Varpe; Øyvind Fiksen; Aril Slotte

2005-01-01

419

Biotic and Abiotic Factors in Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will research ecosystems and list the biotic and abiotic factors in that ecosystem. As table partners visit the links below, choose 3 of the listed ecosystems and find out what kinds of biotic and abiotic factors are present in each of the ecosystems you picked. Read about each ecosystem, look at any pictures included on the website, and then list 12 factors of each ecosystem in ...

Smith, Mrs.

2010-10-17

420

Ann Yager, Animal Sciences Student Michael Neary, Extension Animal Scientist  

E-print Network

Ann Yager, Animal Sciences Student Michael Neary, Extension Animal Scientist Wayne Singleton, Extension Reproductive Physiologist Photo Credits: Wayne Singleton AS-559-W Estrus Detection in Farm Animals Purdue University Department of Animal Sciences Farm Animal Management @Purdue Farm Animal Management

421

Seabird-driven shifts in Arctic pond ecosystems  

PubMed Central

Migratory animals such as seabirds, salmon and whales can transport large quantities of nutrients across ecosystem boundaries, greatly enriching recipient food webs. As many of these animals biomagnify contaminants, they can also focus pollutants at toxic levels. Seabirds arguably represent the most significant biovectors of nutrients and contaminants from the ocean to the land, given their sheer numbers and global distribution. However, long-term census data on seabirds are rare. Using palaeolimnological proxies, we show that a colony of Arctic seabirds has experienced climate-induced population increases in recent decades. We then document increasing concentrations of contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls and cadmium, in pond sediments that are linked to biotransport by seabirds. Our findings suggest that climate-related shifts in global seabird populations will have the unexpected consequence of restructuring coastal ecosystems. PMID:18945662

Michelutti, Neal; Keatley, Bronwyn E.; Brimble, Samantha; Blais, Jules M.; Liu, Huijun; Douglas, Marianne S.V.; Mallory, Mark L.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Smol, John P.

2008-01-01

422

Assessing the effects of large mobile predators on ecosystem connectivity.  

PubMed

Large predators are often highly mobile and can traverse and use multiple habitats. We know surprisingly little about how predator mobility determines important processes of ecosystem connectivity. Here we used a variety of data sources drawn from Palmyra Atoll, a remote tropical marine ecosystem where large predators remain in high abundance, to investigate how these animals foster connectivity. Our results indicate that three of Palmyra's most abundant large predators (e.g., two reef sharks and one snapper) use resources from different habitats creating important linkages across ecosystems. Observations of cross-system foraging such as this have important implications for the understanding of ecosystem functioning, the management of large-predator populations, and the design of conservation measures intended to protect whole ecosystems. In the face of widespread declines of large, mobile predators, it is important that resource managers, policy makers, and ecologists work to understand how these predators create connectivity and to determine the impact that their depletions may be having on the integrity of these linkages. PMID:23092009

McCauley, Douglas J; Young, Hillary S; Dunbar, Robert B; Estes, James A; Semmens, Brice X; Micheli, Fiorenza

2012-09-01

423

Animal Thinking An Introduction  

E-print Network

1 Animal Thinking An Introduction Randolf Menzel and Julia Fischer The topic of this Strüngmann Forum--animal thinking--was not formulated as a question--"Do animals think?--but rather as a statement species alone. The issue of whether animals experience conscious recollections in some similar way

Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

424

Microsoft policy brief | executive suMMary m Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist, partici-  

E-print Network

consumers, online publishers, advertisers, search engines, social networking sites, Internet service creativity and inno- vation, and protecting consumers. This paper addresses the consumer-facing online ecosystem, which is fueled in large part by online advertising. Another online ecosystem is developing

Narasayya, Vivek

425

The Decline of Freshwater Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article discusses the risks that freshwater ecosystems face and how species nearby are affected by dams, dredging, and channelization of streams. It points out that even though freshwater ecosystems are limited in extent, covering about 1 percent of the Earth's surface, they are highly diverse and contain a disproportionally large number of the world's species. Statistics are given to illustrate the increase in waterways that have been altered for navigation. Some actions that are being taken to reduce threats to freshwater ecosystems are also mentioned.

1999-01-01

426

Carotenoids in Marine Animals  

PubMed Central

Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of ?-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade. PMID:21566799

Maoka, Takashi

2011-01-01

427

Coral Reef Ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coral reefs are geological structures of significant dimensions, constructed over millions of years by calcifying organisms. The present day reef-builders are hard corals belonging to the order Scleractinia, phylum Cnidaria. The greatest concentrations of coral reefs are in the tropics, with highest levels of biodiversity situated in reefs of the Indo-West Pacific region. These ecosystems have provided coastal protection and livelihood to human populations over the millennia. Human activities have caused destruction of these habitats, the intensity of which has increased alarmingly since the latter decades of the twentieth century. The severity of this impact is directly related to exponential growth rates of human populations especially in the coastal areas of the developing world. However, a more recently recognized phenomenon concerns disturbances brought about by the changing climate, manifested mainly as rising sea surface temperatures, and increasing acidification of ocean waters due to greater drawdown of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Management efforts have so far not kept pace with the rates of degradation, so that the spatial extent of damaged reefs and the incidences of localized extinction of reef species are increasing year after year. The major management efforts to date consist of establishing marine protected areas and promoting the active restoration of coral habitats.

Yap, Helen T.

428

SeaWorld/Busch Gardens ANIMALS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

SeaWorld/Busch Gardens ANIMALS is the virtual representative of Busch Entertainment Corporation's zoological and educational resources. The site provides access to online educational materials as well as program information for the SeaWorld/Busch Gardens theme parks. Materials include detailed information on marine animals, ecosystems, and zoological research programs of the parks. There are also news articles, a frequently-asked-questions feature, and information about the parks' on-site educational programs, tours, and student camps. The teachers' page features guides, classroom activities, information on television programming, and a catalog of publications. For children, there are games and coloring pages, downloadables (screensavers, desktops), and interactive features about marine animals and environments.

429

College of Engineering College of Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Engineering College of Engineering Office in Engineering Building, Room 202 (970) 491 UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Biomedical Engineering Chemical and Biological Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Engineering Science Environmental Engineering Mechanical Engineering

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

430

Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyond the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment  

PubMed Central

The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) introduced a new framework for analyzing social–ecological systems that has had wide influence in the policy and scientific communities. Studies after the MA are taking up new challenges in the basic science needed to assess, project, and manage flows of ecosystem services and effects on human well-being. Yet, our ability to draw general conclusions remains limited by focus on discipline-bound sectors of the full social–ecological system. At the same time, some polices and practices intended to improve ecosystem services and human well-being are based on untested assumptions and sparse information. The people who are affected and those who provide resources are increasingly asking for evidence that interventions improve ecosystem services and human well-being. New research is needed that considers the full ensemble of processes and feedbacks, for a range of biophysical and social systems, to better understand and manage the dynamics of the relationship between humans and the ecosystems on which they rely. Such research will expand the capacity to address fundamental questions about complex social–ecological systems while evaluating assumptions of policies and practices intended to advance human well-being through improved ecosystem services. PMID:19179280

Carpenter, Stephen R.; Mooney, Harold A.; Agard, John; Capistrano, Doris; DeFries, Ruth S.; Diaz, Sandra; Dietz, Thomas; Duraiappah, Anantha K.; Oteng-Yeboah, Alfred; Pereira, Henrique Miguel; Perrings, Charles; Reid, Walter V.; Sarukhan, Jose; Scholes, Robert J.; Whyte, Anne

2009-01-01

431

Animal and Plant Cells  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What are the similarities and differences between plant cells and animal cells? Use the graphic organizer. Graphic Organizer Go here and look at the diagram. Make notes about the anatomy of an animal cell in your graphic organizer. Anatomy of an Animal Cell Go to this website and explore the typical animal cell. Press start and interact with the model. Typical Animal Cell Take the plant cell tutorial with this link. Interact ...

Wlcounts

2012-04-04

432

Avian wildlife as sentinels of ecosystem health.  

PubMed

Birds have been widely used as sentinels of ecosystem health reflecting changes in habitat quality, increased incidence of disease, and exposure to and effects of chemical contaminants. Numerous studies addressing these issues focus on the breeding period, since hormonal, behavioural, reproductive, and developmental aspects of the health can be observed over a relatively short time-span. Many body systems within individuals are tightly integrated and interdependent, and can be affected by contaminant chemicals, disease, and habitat changes in complex ways. Animals higher in the food web will reflect cumulative effects of multiple stressors. Such features make birds ideal indicators for assessing environmental health in areas of environmental concern. Five case studies are presented, highlighting the use of different species which have provided insight into ecosystem sustainability, including (i) the consequences of anthropogenic disturbances of sagebrush habitat on the greater northern sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus; (ii) the high prevalence of disease in very specific passerine species in the Canary Islands closely paralleling deterioration of formerly productive desert habitat and ensuing interspecific stressors; (iii) fractures, abnormal bone structure, and associated biochemical aberrations in nestling storks exposed to acidic tailings mud from a dyke rupture at an iron pyrite mine near Sevilla, Spain; (iv) newly presented data demonstrating biochemical changes in nestling peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus and associations with exposure to major chemical classes in the Great Lakes Basin of Canada; and (v) the variability in responses of tree swallows Tachycineta bicolor to contaminants, biological and meteorological challenges when breeding in the Athabasca oil sands. PMID:23260372

Smits, Judit E G; Fernie, Kimberly J

2013-05-01

433

The ecosystem study on Rongelap Atoll  

SciTech Connect

During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Laboratory of Radiation Biology at the University of Washington carried out an intensive study of this Atoll, which was contaminated with radioactive fallout from the {open_quotes}Bravo shot{close_quotes} in 1954. This study involved many aspects of the environment and the plant and animal life: soils, land plants, marine life, birds, geology and hydrology, and human diets as well. In much of the research, the fortuitiously present radioactive isotopes, especially {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, were tracers. Although the term {open_quotes}ecosystem study{close_quotes} was not in vogue at that time, it is clear that this was an early use of the ecosystem approach. Soil types and their development, the distribution of mineral elements in plants and soils, including predominant radionuclides, distribution and growth of native terrestrial plants in relation to topography and salinity, some aspects of the human diets, micronutrient nutrition of the coconut palm, island and islet development and stability, were given attention in the studies. Some of the findings in the various areas of study will be presented and discussed. 32 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

Walker, R.B.; Gessel, S.P.; Held, E.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-07-01

434

Windows to the Universe: Biomes and Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Windows to the Universe website is maintained by the National Earth Science Teachers Association, and it has been around since the mid-1990s. One particularly interesting area of the site focuses in on the world of biomes and ecosystems. For those who might be unacquainted with such matters, biomes are large regions of the world with similar plants, animals, and other living things that are adapted to the region's climate and conditions. Visitors can use the interactive map to explore these various biomes, and learn about the natural history and current conditions in the dry steppes, Alpine tundra, and a dozen other biomes. Each section contains photographs and a narrative essay that describes in summary detail the key features of each biome.

2011-01-01

435

Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world  

E-print Network

Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

Kumar, Anand R

2013-01-01

436

ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION: DYNAMIC WATERSHED SIMULATOR  

EPA Science Inventory

This research focuses on developing methods and models to determine how terrestrial ecosystem/habitats will respond to anthropogenic stress. The primary objective is to develop a comprehensive modeling framework for predicting the effects of multiple stressors on key hydrologic,...

437

Pacific salmon effects on stream ecosystems: a quantitative synthesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) disturb sediments and fertilize streams with marine-derived nutrients during their annual spawning runs, leading researchers\\u000a to classify these fish as ecosystem engineers and providers of resource subsidies. While these processes strongly influence\\u000a the structure and function of salmon streams, the magnitude of salmon influence varies widely across studies. Here, we use\\u000a meta-analysis to evaluate potential sources

David J. Janetski; Dominic T. Chaloner; Scott D. Tiegs; Gary A. Lamberti

2009-01-01

438

Impacts of Climate Change on Terrestrial Ecosystems and Adaptation Measures for Natural Resource Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Emissions from motor vehicles, power plants, deforestation, and other human sources are warming the Earth and damaging ecosystems\\u000a and human well-being. Field observations from around the world have detected significant changes in terrestrial ecosystems\\u000a and attributed them to climate change rather than other factors. Climate change has shifted the ranges of plants, animals,\\u000a and biomes, altered the timing of life

Patrick Gonzalez

439

Changing Perspectives on Pearly Mussels, North America's Most Imperiled Animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

P early mussels (Unionacea) are among the most fascinating, most widespread, and most endangered animals in fresh waters. They play important roles in fresh- water ecosystems and are economically valuable for their shells and pearls. Recent research, fueled by concern over widespread extinctions and population declines, has pro- duced valuable and even astonishing insights into the ecol- ogy, biology, and

DAVID L. STRAYER; JOHN A. DOWNING; WENDELL R. HAAG; TIMOTHY L. KING; JAMES B. LAYZER; TERESA J. NEWTON; S. JERRINE NICHOLS

2004-01-01

440

The Connection to Other Animals and Caring for Nature  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an era in which natural resources are under unprece- dented pressure, it is vital to ask how the human relationships with the natural world might be improved. One avenue of inquiry is to explore whether there is a relationship between caring for a non-human animal, for a species, and for an ecosystem and whether this relationship may be a

Joanne Vining

2003-01-01

441

225 Animal Industries Building College Station, Texas 77843  

E-print Network

225 Animal Industries Building 2138 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843 Tel. 979.845.5579 Fax. 979.845.6430 http://essm.tamu.edu COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE of Agriculture and Life Sciences faculty holding the rank of Senior Lecturer, Assistant Professor, Associate

Boas, Harold P.

442

World Veterinary Year 2011: 250 Years of Improving Animal and  

E-print Network

Health Evolving and advancing veterinary medical education Leaders Champions and Heroes #12;FOOD SECURITY under and over nutrition, poverty, climate change, ecosystem health, animal welfare Use of antibiotics Livestock/Poultry Reduce Poverty Health, Development, and Poverty #12;Millenium Development Goals Goal 8

Straight, Aaron

443

Greater Yellowstone ecosYstem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yellowstone National Park forms the core of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE)— and at 28,000 square miles, is one of the largest intact temperate-zone ecosystems on Earth today. Each of Yellowstone National Park's sepa- rate parts—the hydrothermal features, the wildlife, the lakes, the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, and the petrified trees— could easily stand alone as a national

GYE BASICS

444

Aerial Explorers and Robotic Ecosystems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A unique bio-inspired approach to autonomous aerial vehicle, a.k.a. aerial explorer technology is discussed. The work is focused on defining and studying aerial explorer mission concepts, both as an individual robotic system and as a member of a small robotic "ecosystem." Members of this robotic ecosystem include the aerial explorer, air-deployed sensors and robotic symbiotes, and other assets such as rovers, landers, and orbiters.

Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg

2004-01-01

445

Coastal Ecosystem Science: Getting Thirsty?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is designed to help students understand what causes droughts and how they affect coastal ecosystems and human communities. As a result of these activities students will be able to define drought and explain how drought conditions may affect coastal ecosystems, discuss how drought conditions correlate with water temperature changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean, and use various data sources to investigate streamflow and drought conditions in selected locations. This site provides required worksheets and links to complete the lesson.

446

Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology  

E-print Network

Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world://bee.oregonstate.edu/ecoe Ecological Engineering is: · Ecosystem restoration and habitat design at multiple scales · Watershed · Phytoremediation and bioremediation · Industrial ecology · Constructed wetlands and tidal marshlands · Mitigation

Tullos, Desiree

447

Thermal Acclimation and Adaptation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ecosystem responses to temperature change are collectively determined by its constituents, which are plants, animals, microbes, and their interactions. It has been long documented that all plant, animals, and microbial carbon metabolism (photosynthesis, respiration) can acclimate and respond to changing temperatures, influencing the response of ecosystem carbon fluxes to climate change. Climate change also can induce competition between species with different thermal responses leading to changes in community composition. While a great deal of research has been done on species-level responses to temperature, it is yet to examine thermal acclimation of adaptation of ecosystem carbon processes to temperature change. With the advent of eddy flux measurements, it is possible to directly characterize the ecosystem-scale temperature response of carbon storage. In this study, we quantified the temperature response functions of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE), from which the responses of apparent optimal temperatures across broad spatial and temporal scales were examined. While temperature responses are normally parameterized in terms of the physiological variables describing photosynthesis and respiration, we focus on the apparent optimal behavior of NEE. Because the measurement integrated over multiple individuals and species within the footprint of the measurement (100s to 1000s of ha), it is challenging to interpret this measurement in terms of classical physiological variables such as the Q10. Rather we focus on the realized behavior of the ecosystem and its sensitivity to temperature. These empirical response functions can then be used as a benchmark for model evaluation and testing. Our synthesis of 656 site-years of eddy covariance data over the world shows that temperature response curves of NEE are parabolic, with their optima temperature strongly correlated with site growing season temperature across the globe and with annual mean temperature over years at individual sites. The differential response of photosynthesis and respiration to temperature may act to produce apparent optima, and an internannual adjustment of this optimum to within-year weather conditions. This phenomenon may influence the long-term response of ecosystem carbon storage and community composition to global temperature changes, and may contribute to the apparent higher sensitivity of global ecosystem carbon storage to rainfall anomalies than to temperature. Thermal responses on interannual time scales may dampen temperature-driven variability of NEE directly caused by temperature anomalies.

Luo, Y.; Niu, S.; Fei, S.; Yuan, W.; Zhang, Z.; Schimel, D.; Fluxnet Pis, .

2010-12-01

448

Understanding Animal Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The public debate on animal research sometimes gets so heated that the facts can be overlooked. How many animals are used in research every year? Do people know that most of them are mice or rats? Why are animals genetically modified? How is animal research regulated? How are the animals cared for? What actually happens to research animals? How does the use of animals in research and testing compare with other uses of animals by society? This website aims to answer all of these questions as well as provide information on animal research and human health, policy issues, and latest news. This website also includes a learning center. Information is geared towards learners in the U.K.

Understanding Animal Research (Understanding Animal Research)

2009-01-01

449

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Cornell University Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering School of Civil and Environmental Engineering enve.cornell.edu 2013-2014 #12;Environmental Engineering 2013-2014 1 UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING MISSION STATEMENT

Walter, M.Todd

450

electrical, engineering  

E-print Network

and Sustainable Solar Technologies (QESST), works with students building solar cars in Fulton Engineering's BEST barrier: room-temperature electrically powered nanolasers New mobile app enables research, education engineering materials science and engineering mechanical engineering solar energy engineering

Zhang, Junshan

451

Process-Based Thinking in Ecosystem Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding complex systems such as ecosystems is difficult for young K-12 students, and students' representations of ecosystems are often limited to nebulously defined relationships between macro-level structural components inherent to the ecosystem in focus (rainforest, desert, pond, etc.) instead of generalizing processes across ecosystems

Jordan, Rebecca C.; Gray, Steven A.; Brooks, Wesley R.; Honwad, Sameer; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.

2013-01-01

452

GE540 Ecosystem Services Spring Semester 2012  

E-print Network

1 GE540 ­ Ecosystem Services Spring Semester 2012 TR 2:00­3:30 (STO 465) Professor: Dana Bauer-353-7555 or by appointment bauer@bu.edu Course Description: Ecosystems provide a variety of valuable services that improve human well-being. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment defines four major categories of ecosystem

Bauer, Dana Marie

453

The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem  

E-print Network

The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

454

COMMENTARIES Opening the Black Boxes: Ecosystem  

E-print Network

COMMENTARIES Opening the Black Boxes: Ecosystem Science and Economic Valuation Stephen R. Carpenter, Wisconsin 53706 USA Ecologists increasingly are enlisted to participate in economic valuations of ecosystem economy'' must become more than just a node in the ecosystem scientist's flowchart, and ``the ecosystem

Turner, Monica G.

455

Animals in a Grassland  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this outdoor, warm weather activity, learners use sweepnets to search a grassy area such as a large lawn or field, collecting small animals to find as many different kinds of animals as possible. Learners observe and try to identify the animals they catch and observe how different animals interact with each other. Because some animals can't be caught easily with sweepnets, the Branching Out part of the activity involves making very small "pitfall traps" in the ground. At the end of the activity, learners release all the animals back into the grassy area.

Science, Lawrence H.

1982-01-01

456

Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems  

E-print Network

, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i.e. promoting plant productivity, enhancing water relations, regulating nutrient mineralisation, permitting. This apparent lack of knowledge does not, however, diminish the importance of soil organisms. Evolutionary

Neher, Deborah A.

457

Mechanical engineering COLLEGE of ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

Mechanical engineering COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofMechanicalEngineering CollegeofEngineering Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to a mechanical engineering degree. The EDGE.wayne.edu/advising t engadmissions@wayne.edu Learn more online t engineering.wayne.edu/me #12;What is Mechanical Engineering? Harness

Berdichevsky, Victor

458

Use of an Object-Based Model to Represent Complex Features of Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, an ecosystem model that has been developed as an engineering tool is briefly described. Sample results from\\u000a two simulations are then presented, and the model is examined with regards to its usefulness and applicability vis è vis the\\u000a representation of complex features of ecosystems. The model is in many ways unique: First, its scope (i.e., the number

Lael Parrott; Robert Kok

459

What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons?  

E-print Network

What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons? The overarching goal of Ecosystem Commons is to enhance the use of ecosystem services and related science in conservation at regional and national ecosystem services events and conferences Provide news and information

Escher, Christine

460

Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals i SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS January 2001;Systems Engineering Fundamentals Introduction ii #12;Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals iii ............................................................................................................................................. iv PART 1. INTRODUCTION Chapter 1. Introduction to Systems Engineering Management

Rhoads, James

461

Animals in Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes viewpoints on the use of animals in science experiments in the biology classroom, including those of teachers, education researchers, biomedical scientists, science education administrators, and animal welfare advocates. (Author/CS)

Rowan, Andrew N.

1981-01-01

462

Animal Drug Safety FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... market? Why can’t I find information on vaccines on CVM’s Website? Why does the veterinarian have ...

463

Fuel Cell Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fuel cell animation demonstrates how a fuel cell uses hydrogen to produce electricity, with only water and heat as byproducts. The animation consists of four parts - an introduction, fuel cell components, chemical process, and fuel cell stack.

Development, Us D.

464

Aquatic Animal Appendages - Flippers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Several aquatic animals have appendages, such as flippers, that are used as a source of locomotion. Depending on the type of animal, flippers come in different sizes and are usually associated with the same type of bone joints.

Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)

2007-06-18

465

Aquatic Animal Skeleton - Ribcage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The main purpose of an aquatic animal's ribcage is to protect its inner organs, such as the heart, from damage or injury. The ribcage is connected to the backbone of the animal and is made of mostly bone.

Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton;)

2007-07-15

466

DECOMPOSTION OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED TOBACCO UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS: PERSISTENCE OF THE PROTEINASE INHIBITOR I PRODUCT AND EFFECTS OF SOIL MICROBIAL RESPIRATION AND PROTOZOA, NEMATODE AND MICROARTHR  

EPA Science Inventory

1. To evaluate the potential effects of genetically engineered (transgenic) plants on soil ecosystems, litterbags containing leaves of non-engineered (parental) and transgenic tobacco plants were buried in field plots. The transgenic tobacco plants were genetically engineered to ...

467

Plant and Animal Cells  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Compare and contrast animal cells and plant cells. Use this graphic organizer diagram to help you organize your thoughts while you are looking at each webpage. First go to this link interactive animal and plant cell model and look at both the plant and animal cell models. After you get done with that site go to this site inside a plant and animal cell and take some more ...

Montgomery, Ms.

2012-04-04

468

Aestheticizing Animal Cruelty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal-standpoint criticism is a new vein in literary criticism that questions ideologically-driven representations of animals, their aesthetic exploitation, their absence or silence in literary texts, and the obliviousness of earlier critics to these issues. This article briefly summarizes the main tenets of animal-standpoint criticism to date. Its main focus is then on the question of aesthetic exploitation of animal cruelty,

Josephine Donovan

2011-01-01

469

Aestheticizing Animal Cruelty  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Animal-standpoint criticism is a new vein in literary criticism that questions ideologically-driven representations of animals, their aesthetic exploitation, their absence or silence in literary texts, and the obliviousness of earlier critics to these issues. This article briefly summarizes the main tenets of animal-standpoint criticism to date. Its main focus is then on the question of aesthetic exploitation of animal cruelty,

Josephine Donovan

2011-01-01

470

Animation on the GPU Prof. Aaron Lanterman  

E-print Network

11/10/10 1 Animation on the GPU Prof. Aaron Lanterman School of Electrical and Computer Engineering,! uniform float keyFrameBlend,! uniform float4x4 modelViewProj)! {! float3 position = lerp,! uniform float keyFrameBlend,! uniform Light light,! uniform float4x4 modelViewProj)! {! float3 position

Lanterman, Aaron

471

Animation on the GPU Prof. Aaron Lanterman  

E-print Network

Animation on the GPU Prof. Aaron Lanterman School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia float4 oColor : COLOR,! uniform float keyFrameBlend,! uniform float4x4 modelViewProj)! {! float30,! out float4 color : COLOR,! uniform float keyFrameBlend,! uniform Light light,! uniform float4x4

Lanterman, Aaron

472

Expanding exergy analysis to account for ecosystem products and services.  

PubMed

Exergy analysis is a thermodynamic approach used for analyzing and improving the efficiency of chemical and thermal processes. It has also been extended for life cycle assessment and sustainability evaluation of industrial products and processes. Although these extensions recognize the importance of capital and labor inputs and environmental impact, most of them ignore the crucial role that ecosystems play in sustaining all industrial activity. Decisions based on approaches that take nature for granted continue to cause significant deterioration in the ability of ecosystems to provide goods and services that are essential for every human activity. Accounting for nature's contribution is also important for determining the impact and sustainablility of industrial activity. In contrast, emergy analysis, a thermodynamic method from systems ecology, does account for ecosystems, but has encountered a lot of resistance and criticism, particularly from economists, physicists, and engineers. This paper expands the engineering concept of Cumulative Exergy Consumption (CEC) analysis to include the contribution of ecosystems, which leads to the concept of Ecological Cumulative Exergy Consumption (ECEC). Practical challenges in computing ECEC for industrial processes are identified and a formal algorithm based on network algebra is proposed. ECEC is shown to be closely related to emergy, and both concepts become equivalent if the analysis boundary, allocation method, and approach for combining global energy inputs are identical. This insight permits combination of the best features of emergy and exergy analysis, and shows that most of the controversial aspects of emergy analysis need not hinder its use for including the exergetic contribution of ecosystems. Examples illustrate the approach and highlight the potential benefits of accounting for nature's contribution to industrial activity. PMID:15296331

Hau, Jorge L; Bakshi, Bhavik R

2004-07-01

473

Training for Animal Welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Laboratory Animal Welfare Act of 1985 mandates training for a wide spectrum of individuals. A profile of each group of individuals requiring training is presented. These groups include students, animal caretakers, research and animal technicians, investigators, and principal investigators. An educational profile is provided for each group. Their educational needs are described, with examples of available training materials. This

Jean Larson

1988-01-01

474

Undergraduate Animal Behaviour  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science Faculty of Medical and Veterinary Sciences #12 scientists. We are a large and active research group, and many of us work with industry, animal charities you with a scientific understanding of the biological principles underlying animal behaviour

Bristol, University of

475

Purdue extension Animal Sciences  

E-print Network

, testing, quarantine, eradication, and recovery efforts prior to, during, and after the animal diseasePurdue extension AS-572-W Animal Sciences Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service, West. of Animal Sciences, Purdue University; P. Brennan, Indiana State Poultry Association; M. Kopp, DVM, and M

476

Animal Testing Medical Research  

E-print Network

Animal Testing In Medical Research Past, present and future. Marte Thomassen Ellen Trolid Tonje.............................................................................................................................. 2 2. ETHICS IN ANIMAL TESTING Arondsen Marit Gystøl #12;ZO-8091 Forsøksdyrlære Animal experiments in medical research NTNU ­ Norges

Bech, Claus

477

Animals in Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, learners use a Flash animation running in a browser to study how animals and humans move. Students examine images captured by Eadweard Muybridge in the late nineteenth century; by starting, slowing, and stopping the animation, learners gain valuable insights into biomechanics of bipeds and quadrupeds.

478

Animals in Disguise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity in which first grade students learn why camouflage is important to an animal's survival. Students see living examples of animals who use camouflage for protection, then create their own camouflaged animals and hide them around the classroom. For assessment, students write and illustrate five things they learned from the study…

Burke, Mary C.

2001-01-01

479

Animals of the Desert.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information and student activities on how desert animals have adapted to dryness and heat, how and when animals move on the desert, and nocturnal/diurnal animals. Each activity includes objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Ready-to-copy pages are included for a…

NatureScope, 1985

1985-01-01

480

Plants & Animals Insects (and  

E-print Network

APA MLA See also: Plants & Animals Insects (and Butterflies) Animals Mating and Breeding Earth worlds portrayed in the animated films Antz and Bee Movie, in which the characters live in rigidly of AAAS. Email or share this story: Need to cite this story in your essay, paper, or report? Use one

Gardner, Andy