Science.gov

Sample records for animal groups theoretical

  1. Collective motion in animal groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Iain

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the relationship between individual behavior and population-level properties in animal groups. One of the fundamental problems is related to spatial scale; how do interactions over a local range result in population properties at larger, averaged, scales, and how can we integrate the properties of aggregates over these scales? Many group-living animals exhibit complex, and coordinated, spatio-temporal patterns which despite their ubiquity and ecological importance are very poorly understood. This is largely due to the difficulties associated with quantifying the motion of, and interactions among, many animals simultaneously. It is on how these behaviors scale to collective behaviors that I will focus here. Using a combined empirical approach (using novel computer vision techniques) and individual-based computer models, I investigate pattern formation in both invertebrate and vertebrate systems, including - Collective memory and self-organized group structure in vertebrate groups (Couzin, I.D., Krause, J., James, R., Ruxton, G.D. & Franks, N.R. (2002) Journal of Theoretical Biology 218, 1-11. (2) Couzin, I.D. & Krause, J. (2003) Advances in the Study of Behavior 32, 1-75. (3) Hoare, D.J., Couzin, I.D. Godin, J.-G. & Krause, J. (2003) Animal Behaviour, in press.) - Self-organized lane formation and optimized traffic flow in army ants (Couzin, I.D. & Franks, N.R. (2003) Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B 270, 139-146) - Leadership and information transfer in flocks, schools and swarms. - Why do hoppers hop? Hopping and the generation of long-range order in some of the largest animal groups in nature, locust hopper bands.

  2. Collective cognition in animal groups.

    PubMed

    Couzin, Iain D

    2009-01-01

    The remarkable collective action of organisms such as swarming ants, schooling fish and flocking birds has long captivated the attention of artists, naturalists, philosophers and scientists. Despite a long history of scientific investigation, only now are we beginning to decipher the relationship between individuals and group-level properties. This interdisciplinary effort is beginning to reveal the underlying principles of collective decision-making in animal groups, demonstrating how social interactions, individual state, environmental modification and processes of informational amplification and decay can all play a part in tuning adaptive response. It is proposed that important commonalities exist with the understanding of neuronal processes and that much could be learned by considering collective animal behavior in the framework of cognitive science. PMID:19058992

  3. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  4. Scaling in animal group-size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Bonabeau, Eric; Dagorn, Laurent; Fréon, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    An elementary model of animal aggregation is presented. The group-size distributions resulting from this model are truncated power laws. The predictions of the model are found to be consistent with data that describe the group-size distributions of tuna fish, sardinellas, and African buffaloes. PMID:10200286

  5. Deciphering Interactions in Moving Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gautrais, Jacques; Ginelli, Francesco; Fournier, Richard; Blanco, Stéphane; Soria, Marc; Chaté, Hugues; Theraulaz, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Collective motion phenomena in large groups of social organisms have long fascinated the observer, especially in cases, such as bird flocks or fish schools, where large-scale highly coordinated actions emerge in the absence of obvious leaders. However, the mechanisms involved in this self-organized behavior are still poorly understood, because the individual-level interactions underlying them remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the power of a bottom-up methodology to build models for animal group motion from data gathered at the individual scale. Using video tracks of fish shoal in a tank, we show how a careful, incremental analysis at the local scale allows for the determination of the stimulus/response function governing an individual's moving decisions. We find in particular that both positional and orientational effects are present, act upon the fish turning speed, and depend on the swimming speed, yielding a novel schooling model whose parameters are all estimated from data. Our approach also leads to identify a density-dependent effect that results in a behavioral change for the largest groups considered. This suggests that, in confined environment, the behavioral state of fish and their reaction patterns change with group size. We debate the applicability, beyond the particular case studied here, of this novel framework for deciphering interactions in moving animal groups. PMID:23028277

  6. Family group conferencing: a theoretical underpinning.

    PubMed

    Metze, Rosalie N; Abma, Tineke A; Kwekkeboom, Rick H

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, Family Group Conferences (FGCs) have increasingly been used to help people and their networks deal with their problems. The FGC fits well with the call for equal rights and self-management coming from clients and client movements, as well as the economy-driven pressure towards more informal and less professional care coming from governments. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the underlying theory to explain how the FGC works. In this article, we aim to provide such a theoretical basis by examining how the concept of empowerment can be linked with the basic assumptions underlying the FGC. Can making a plan of their own indeed help to empower people and if so, how does the process of empowerment proceed? Empowerment is often mentioned as a goal of the FGC, but authors are not unanimous when it comes to the operationalisation of empowerment, especially on the relational level of the person in his or her social context. In the article, we use the concepts of relational autonomy and resilience to conceptualize empowerment on the relational and individual level. PMID:23996065

  7. Group decisions in humans and animals: a survey

    PubMed Central

    Conradt, Larissa; List, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Humans routinely make many decisions collectively, whether they choose a restaurant with friends, elect political leaders or decide actions to tackle international problems, such as climate change, that affect the future of the whole planet. We might be less aware of it, but group decisions are just as important to social animals as they are for us. Animal groups have to collectively decide about communal movements, activities, nesting sites and enterprises, such as cooperative breeding or hunting, that crucially affect their survival and reproduction. While human group decisions have been studied for millennia, the study of animal group decisions is relatively young, but is now expanding rapidly. It emerges that group decisions in animals pose many similar questions to those in humans. The purpose of the present issue is to integrate and combine approaches in the social and natural sciences in an area in which theoretical challenges and research questions are often similar, and to introduce each discipline to the other's key ideas, findings and successful methods. In order to make such an introduction as effective as possible, here, we briefly review conceptual similarities and differences between the sciences, and provide a guide to the present issue. PMID:19073475

  8. Interpretation in Group Counseling: Theoretical and Operational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    Examines theoretical and practical considerations for interpretation in group counseling. Application issues discussed include interpretation process, providers, recipients, content, depth, timing, and form. Explores theoretical issues and clarifies operational considerations for effective utilization of interpretation in group counseling.…

  9. Collective Learning and Optimal Consensus Decisions in Social Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Albert B.; Miller, Noam; Torney, Colin; Hartnett, Andrew; Couzin, Iain D.

    2014-01-01

    Learning has been studied extensively in the context of isolated individuals. However, many organisms are social and consequently make decisions both individually and as part of a collective. Reaching consensus necessarily means that a single option is chosen by the group, even when there are dissenting opinions. This decision-making process decouples the otherwise direct relationship between animals' preferences and their experiences (the outcomes of decisions). Instead, because an individual's learned preferences influence what others experience, and therefore learn about, collective decisions couple the learning processes between social organisms. This introduces a new, and previously unexplored, dynamical relationship between preference, action, experience and learning. Here we model collective learning within animal groups that make consensus decisions. We reveal how learning as part of a collective results in behavior that is fundamentally different from that learned in isolation, allowing grouping organisms to spontaneously (and indirectly) detect correlations between group members' observations of environmental cues, adjust strategy as a function of changing group size (even if that group size is not known to the individual), and achieve a decision accuracy that is very close to that which is provably optimal, regardless of environmental contingencies. Because these properties make minimal cognitive demands on individuals, collective learning, and the capabilities it affords, may be widespread among group-living organisms. Our work emphasizes the importance and need for theoretical and experimental work that considers the mechanism and consequences of learning in a social context. PMID:25101642

  10. Putting flexible animal prospection into context: escaping the theoretical box.

    PubMed

    Osvath, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The debate on non-human future-oriented cognition has long revolved around the question whether such cognition at all occurs. Closer inspection reveals just how much cognition in general-down to its simplest forms-is geared toward predicting the future in a bid to maintain homeostasis and fend off entropy. Over the course of life's existence on Earth, evolution and natural selection have, through a series of evolutionary arms races, gotten increasingly good at achieving this. Prospection has reached its current pinnacle based partly on a system for episodic cognition that-as research increasingly is showing-is not limited principally to human beings. Nevertheless, and despite some notable recent defections, many researchers remain convinced of the merits of the Bischof-Köhler Hypothesis with its claim that no species other than human beings is able to anticipate future needs or otherwise live in anything other than the immediate present moment. What might, at first, appear to be empirical disputes turn out to reveal largely unquestioned theoretical divides. Without due care, one risks setting out conditions for 'true' future orientation that are irrelevant for describing human cognition. In sorting out the theoretical and terminological muddle framing contemporary debate, this article makes a plea for moving beyond past dogmas while putting animal prospection research into the context of evolution and contemporary cognitive science. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26537868

  11. Jet propulsion in animals: theoretical innovation and biological constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Jet propulsion is arguably the oldest and simplest form of animal locomotion, and simple hydrodynamic theory highlights the many possible ways in which animals might maximize speed and minimize metabolic cost while using jet propulsion to travel from one point to another. However, environmental and physiological reality constrains the potential for hydrodynamic innovation. We explore two heuristic examples: Antarctic scallops, in which ecological release from predation apparently constrains the evolution of improved locomotory capacity, and squids, in which the fundamental limitations of muscular contraction constrain the hydrodynamic efficiency of locomotion for all but a small range of sizes. Even simple forms of locomotion can be complex in a biological context.

  12. INFORMATION-THEORETIC INEQUALITIES ON UNIMODULAR LIE GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Classical inequalities used in information theory such as those of de Bruijn, Fisher, Cramér, Rao, and Kullback carry over in a natural way from Euclidean space to unimodular Lie groups. These are groups that possess an integration measure that is simultaneously invariant under left and right shifts. All commutative groups are unimodular. And even in noncommutative cases unimodular Lie groups share many of the useful features of Euclidean space. The rotation and Euclidean motion groups, which are perhaps the most relevant Lie groups to problems in geometric mechanics, are unimodular, as are the unitary groups that play important roles in quantum computing. The extension of core information theoretic inequalities defined in the setting of Euclidean space to this broad class of Lie groups is potentially relevant to a number of problems relating to information gathering in mobile robotics, satellite attitude control, tomographic image reconstruction, biomolecular structure determination, and quantum information theory. In this paper, several definitions are extended from the Euclidean setting to that of Lie groups (including entropy and the Fisher information matrix), and inequalities analogous to those in classical information theory are derived and stated in the form of fifteen small theorems. In all such inequalities, addition of random variables is replaced with the group product, and the appropriate generalization of convolution of probability densities is employed. An example from the field of robotics demonstrates how several of these results can be applied to quantify the amount of information gained by pooling different sensory inputs. PMID:21113416

  13. Theoretical perspectives and applications of group learning in PBL.

    PubMed

    Torre, Dario M; van der Vleuten, Cees; Dolmans, Diana

    2016-01-01

    An essential part of problem-based learning (PBL) is group learning. Thus, an in depth understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of group learning in PBL allows educators to bridge theory and practice more effectively thus providing ideas and tools to enhance PBL practices and research. The theory-driven applications examined in this article establish grounds for future research in PBL. The purpose of this article is to describe and examine two theoretical perspectives of group learning in PBL and their potential applications to improve educational practice. They include: (1) social interdependence theory and the meaning of positive interdependence, (2) socio cognitive theory of networked expertise and the concept of knowledge creation in innovative knowledge communities (IKC). Potential applications include the following: development of instructional material to foster positive interdependency using concept maps; formal and structured use of peer feedback throughout PBL courses to promote individual and group accountability; creation and sharing of new knowledge about different topics within and across IKC; and use of rotating students with hybrid abilities across PBL groups to foster distributed cognition. PMID:26075957

  14. Metabolic scaling in animals: methods, empirical results, and theoretical explanations.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Kearney, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Life on earth spans a size range of around 21 orders of magnitude across species and can span a range of more than 6 orders of magnitude within species of animal. The effect of size on physiology is, therefore, enormous and is typically expressed by how physiological phenomena scale with mass(b). When b ≠ 1 a trait does not vary in direct proportion to mass and is said to scale allometrically. The study of allometric scaling goes back to at least the time of Galileo Galilei, and published scaling relationships are now available for hundreds of traits. Here, the methods of scaling analysis are reviewed, using examples for a range of traits with an emphasis on those related to metabolism in animals. Where necessary, new relationships have been generated from published data using modern phylogenetically informed techniques. During recent decades one of the most controversial scaling relationships has been that between metabolic rate and body mass and a number of explanations have been proposed for the scaling of this trait. Examples of these mechanistic explanations for metabolic scaling are reviewed, and suggestions made for comparing between them. Finally, the conceptual links between metabolic scaling and ecological patterns are examined, emphasizing the distinction between (1) the hypothesis that size- and temperature-dependent variation among species and individuals in metabolic rate influences ecological processes at levels of organization from individuals to the biosphere and (2) mechanistic explanations for metabolic rate that may explain the size- and temperature-dependence of this trait. PMID:24692144

  15. Quantifying group specificity of animal vocalizations without specific sender information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vester, Heike; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Timme, Marc; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Recordings of animal vocalization can lack information about sender and context. This is often the case in studies on marine mammals or in the increasing number of automated bioacoustics monitorings. Here, we develop a framework to estimate group specificity without specific sender information. We introduce and apply a bag-of-calls-and-coefficients approach (BOCCA) to study ensembles of cepstral coefficients calculated from vocalization signals recorded from a given animal group. Comparing distributions of such ensembles of coefficients by computing relative entropies reveals group specific differences. Applying the BOCCA to ensembles of calls recorded from group of long-finned pilot whales in northern Norway, we find that differences of vocalizations within social groups of pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are significantly lower than intergroup differences.

  16. Quantifying group specificity of animal vocalizations without specific sender information.

    PubMed

    Vester, Heike; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Timme, Marc; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Recordings of animal vocalization can lack information about sender and context. This is often the case in studies on marine mammals or in the increasing number of automated bioacoustics monitorings. Here, we develop a framework to estimate group specificity without specific sender information. We introduce and apply a bag-of-calls-and-coefficients approach (BOCCA) to study ensembles of cepstral coefficients calculated from vocalization signals recorded from a given animal group. Comparing distributions of such ensembles of coefficients by computing relative entropies reveals group specific differences. Applying the BOCCA to ensembles of calls recorded from group of long-finned pilot whales in northern Norway, we find that differences of vocalizations within social groups of pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are significantly lower than intergroup differences. PMID:26986319

  17. Bayesian inference for identifying interaction rules in moving animal groups.

    PubMed

    Mann, Richard P

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of similar collective patterns from different self-propelled particle models of animal groups points to a restricted set of "universal" classes for these patterns. While universality is interesting, it is often the fine details of animal interactions that are of biological importance. Universality thus presents a challenge to inferring such interactions from macroscopic group dynamics since these can be consistent with many underlying interaction models. We present a Bayesian framework for learning animal interaction rules from fine scale recordings of animal movements in swarms. We apply these techniques to the inverse problem of inferring interaction rules from simulation models, showing that parameters can often be inferred from a small number of observations. Our methodology allows us to quantify our confidence in parameter fitting. For example, we show that attraction and alignment terms can be reliably estimated when animals are milling in a torus shape, while interaction radius cannot be reliably measured in such a situation. We assess the importance of rate of data collection and show how to test different models, such as topological and metric neighbourhood models. Taken together our results both inform the design of experiments on animal interactions and suggest how these data should be best analysed. PMID:21829657

  18. Coarse-grained dynamics of alignment in animal group models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sung Joon; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Yannis

    2006-03-01

    Coordinated motion in animal groups, such as bird flocks and fish schools, and their models gives rise to remarkable coherent structures. Using equation-free computational tools we explore the coarse-grained dynamics of a model for the orientational movement decision in animal groups, consisting of a small number of informed "leaders" and a large number of uninformed, nonidentical ``followers.'' The direction in which each group member is headed is characterized by a phase angle of a limit-cycle oscillator, whose dynamics are nonlinearly coupled with those of all the other group members. We identify a small number of proper coarse-grained variables (using uncertainty quantification methods) that describe the collective dynamics, and perform coarse projective integration and equation-free bifurcation analysis of the coarse-grained model behavior in these variables.

  19. Group theoretical modeling of thermal explosion with reactant consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Dameron, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Today engineering and science researchers routinely confront problems in mathematical modeling involving nonlinear differential equations. Many mathematical models formulated in terms of nonlinear differential equations can be successfully treated and solved by Lie group methods. Lie group analysis is especially valuable in investigating nonlinear differential equations, for its algorithms act as reliably as for linear cases. The aim of this article is to provide the group theoretical modeling of the symmetrical heating of an exothermally reacting medium with approximations to the body's temperature distribution similar to those made by Thomas [17] and Squire [15]. The quantitative results were found to be in a good agreement with Adler and Enig in [1], where the authors were comparing the integral curves corresponding to the critical conditions for the first-order reaction. Further development of the modeling by including the critical temperature is proposed. Overall, it is shown, in particular, that the application of Lie group analysis allows one to extend the previous analytic results for the first order reactions to nth order ones.

  20. Animal signals and emotion in music: coordinating affect across groups

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on non-human animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. The emotional impact of music might be best understood as a proximate mechanism serving an ultimately social function. Recent work reveals intimate connections between properties of certain animal signals and evocative aspects of human music, including (1) examinations of the role of nonlinearities (e.g., broadband noise) in non-human animal vocalizations, and the analogous production and perception of these features in human music, and (2) an analysis of group musical performances and possible relationships to non-human animal chorusing and emotional contagion effects. Communicative features in music are likely due primarily to evolutionary by-products of phylogenetically older, but still intact communication systems. But in some cases, such as the coordinated rhythmic sounds produced by groups of musicians, our appreciation and emotional engagement might be driven by an adaptive social signaling system. Future empirical work should examine human musical behavior through the comparative lens of behavioral ecology and an adaptationist cognitive science. By this view, particular coordinated sound combinations generated by musicians exploit evolved perceptual response biases – many shared across species – and proliferate through cultural evolutionary processes. PMID:24427146

  1. Animal signals and emotion in music: coordinating affect across groups.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on non-human animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. The emotional impact of music might be best understood as a proximate mechanism serving an ultimately social function. Recent work reveals intimate connections between properties of certain animal signals and evocative aspects of human music, including (1) examinations of the role of nonlinearities (e.g., broadband noise) in non-human animal vocalizations, and the analogous production and perception of these features in human music, and (2) an analysis of group musical performances and possible relationships to non-human animal chorusing and emotional contagion effects. Communicative features in music are likely due primarily to evolutionary by-products of phylogenetically older, but still intact communication systems. But in some cases, such as the coordinated rhythmic sounds produced by groups of musicians, our appreciation and emotional engagement might be driven by an adaptive social signaling system. Future empirical work should examine human musical behavior through the comparative lens of behavioral ecology and an adaptationist cognitive science. By this view, particular coordinated sound combinations generated by musicians exploit evolved perceptual response biases - many shared across species - and proliferate through cultural evolutionary processes. PMID:24427146

  2. Emergent sensing of complex environments by mobile animal groups.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, Andrew; Torney, Colin J; Ioannou, Christos C; Faria, Jolyon J; Couzin, Iain D

    2013-02-01

    The capacity for groups to exhibit collective intelligence is an often-cited advantage of group living. Previous studies have shown that social organisms frequently benefit from pooling imperfect individual estimates. However, in principle, collective intelligence may also emerge from interactions between individuals, rather than from the enhancement of personal estimates. Here, we reveal that this emergent problem solving is the predominant mechanism by which a mobile animal group responds to complex environmental gradients. Robust collective sensing arises at the group level from individuals modulating their speed in response to local, scalar, measurements of light and through social interaction with others. This distributed sensing requires only rudimentary cognition and thus could be widespread across biological taxa, in addition to being appropriate and cost-effective for robotic agents. PMID:23372013

  3. A new entropy based on a group-theoretical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curado, Evaldo M. F.; Tempesta, Piergiulio; Tsallis, Constantino

    2016-03-01

    A multi-parametric version of the nonadditive entropy Sq is introduced. This new entropic form, denoted by S a , b , r, possesses many interesting statistical properties, and it reduces to the entropy Sq for b = 0, a = r : = 1 - q (hence Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy SBG for b = 0, a = r → 0). The construction of the entropy S a , b , r is based on a general group-theoretical approach recently proposed by one of us, Tempesta (2016). Indeed, essentially all the properties of this new entropy are obtained as a consequence of the existence of a rational group law, which expresses the structure of S a , b , r with respect to the composition of statistically independent subsystems. Depending on the choice of the parameters, the entropy S a , b , r can be used to cover a wide range of physical situations, in which the measure of the accessible phase space increases say exponentially with the number of particles N of the system, or even stabilizes, by increasing N, to a limiting value. This paves the way to the use of this entropy in contexts where the size of the phase space does not increase as fast as the number of its constituting particles (or subsystems) increases.

  4. Discovering loose group movement patterns from animal trajectories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Yuwei; Luo, Ze; Xiong, Yan; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Yan, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    The technical advances of positioning technologies enable us to track animal movements at finer spatial and temporal scales, and further help to discover a variety of complex interactive relationships. In this paper, considering the loose gathering characteristics of the real-life groups' members during the movements, we propose two kinds of loose group movement patterns and corresponding discovery algorithms. Firstly, we propose the weakly consistent group movement pattern which allows the gathering of a part of the members and individual temporary leave from the whole during the movements. To tolerate the high dispersion of the group at some moments (i.e. to adapt the discontinuity of the group's gatherings), we further scheme the weakly consistent and continuous group movement pattern. The extensive experimental analysis and comparison with the real and synthetic data shows that the group pattern discovery algorithms proposed in this paper are similar to the the real-life frequent divergences of the members during the movements, can discover more complete memberships, and have considerable performance.

  5. Group theoretical methods and wavelet theory: coorbit theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feichtinger, Hans G.

    2013-05-01

    Before the invention of orthogonal wavelet systems by Yves Meyer1 in 1986 Gabor expansions (viewed as discretized inversion of the Short-Time Fourier Transform2 using the overlap and add OLA) and (what is now perceived as) wavelet expansions have been treated more or less at an equal footing. The famous paper on painless expansions by Daubechies, Grossman and Meyer3 is a good example for this situation. The description of atomic decompositions for functions in modulation spaces4 (including the classical Sobolev spaces) given by the author5 was directly modeled according to the corresponding atomic characterizations by Frazier and Jawerth,6, 7 more or less with the idea of replacing the dyadic partitions of unity of the Fourier transform side by uniform partitions of unity (so-called BUPU's, first named as such in the early work on Wiener-type spaces by the author in 19808). Watching the literature in the subsequent two decades one can observe that the interest in wavelets "took over", because it became possible to construct orthonormal wavelet systems with compact support and of any given degree of smoothness,9 while in contrast the Balian-Low theorem is prohibiting the existence of corresponding Gabor orthonormal bases, even in the multi-dimensional case and for general symplectic lattices.10 It is an interesting historical fact that* his construction of band-limited orthonormal wavelets (the Meyer wavelet, see11) grew out of an attempt to prove the impossibility of the existence of such systems, and the final insight was that it was not impossible to have such systems, and in fact quite a variety of orthonormal wavelet system can be constructed as we know by now. Meanwhile it is established wisdom that wavelet theory and time-frequency analysis are two different ways of decomposing signals in orthogonal resp. non-orthogonal ways. The unifying theory, covering both cases, distilling from these two situations the common group theoretical background lead to the

  6. Importance of blood groups and blood group antibodies in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Hohenhaus, Ann E

    2004-04-01

    Dogs, cats, birds, and ferrets are popular companion animals. Because these pets are considered by many to be family members, they are provided high-quality veterinary medical care, including blood transfusions. This article reviews the current status of blood groups in dogs, cats, birds, and ferrets and discusses the impact of blood groups on veterinary transfusion medicine. One blood group with 3 types has been described in the cat, whereas multiple blood groups have been described in the dog. Only rudimentary knowledge exists regarding pet bird blood groups, and, to date, the ferret appears to be unique because no blood groups have been described. Antibodies against blood group antigens also play a role in animal blood transfusions. Cats have naturally occurring alloantibodies; however, dogs do not appear to have clinically significant naturally occurring alloantibodies. Understanding the issues related to blood groups and blood group antibodies in companion animals will also benefit those using these species as research models for human diseases. PMID:15067591

  7. Modelling Animal Group Fission Using Social Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sueur, Cédric; Maire, Anaïs

    2014-01-01

    Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion). This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems. PMID:24831471

  8. Improving animal research with an institutional electronic discussion group.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Norman C

    2005-09-01

    To remain at the forefront of scientific discovery, investigators continually are challenged to apply new approaches, instruments, and models to their work. Research institutions work to foster the exchange of ideas and resources, but this objective becomes more difficult to meet as the organization's size and complexity increase. To facilitate communication among researchers that use mice in their work and to provide increased opportunities for resource sharing, an electronic discussion group was formed at The Johns Hopkins University. The discussion group (jhu-mousers) is restricted to individuals within the institution's three campuses, and its 145 subscribers comprise faculty (including veterinarians), postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and technicians. During its beginning 2 1/2-year period, jhu-mousers has received 207 postings that include seminar announcements; resource information; requests for mice, equipment, biological reagents, and technical assistance; and responses to these requests. The value of the electronic mailing list is evidenced by the fact that 70% of requests for resources or technical help have received at least one response, and this figure is likely to be underestimated because off-line responses are not included. Because the mailing list provides opportunities for tissue sharing and is conducive to refining experimental procedures used in mice, its application promotes the use of alternatives in animal research. To promote and assist the development of animal-user discussion groups at other institutions, the administration, applications, and benefits of an electronic mailing list for mouse users are discussed here. PMID:16138783

  9. Initiation and spread of escape waves within animal groups

    PubMed Central

    Herbert-Read, James E.; Buhl, Jerome; Hu, Feng; Ward, Ashley J. W.; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional reactivity of animal collectives to predatory attacks is thought to be owing to rapid, but local, transfer of information between group members. These groups turn together in unison and produce escape waves. However, it is not clear how escape waves are created from local interactions, nor is it understood how these patterns are shaped by natural selection. By startling schools of fish with a simulated attack in an experimental arena, we demonstrate that changes in the direction and speed by a small percentage of individuals that detect the danger initiate an escape wave. This escape wave consists of a densely packed band of individuals that causes other school members to change direction. In the majority of cases, this wave passes through the entire group. We use a simulation model to demonstrate that this mechanism can, through local interactions alone, produce arbitrarily large escape waves. In the model, when we set the group density to that seen in real fish schools, we find that the risk to the members at the edge of the group is roughly equal to the risk of those within the group. Our experiments and modelling results provide a plausible explanation for how escape waves propagate in nature without centralized control. PMID:26064630

  10. Swarm Intelligence in Animal Groups: When Can a Collective Out-Perform an Expert?

    PubMed Central

    Katsikopoulos, Konstantinos V.; King, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    An important potential advantage of group-living that has been mostly neglected by life scientists is that individuals in animal groups may cope more effectively with unfamiliar situations. Social interaction can provide a solution to a cognitive problem that is not available to single individuals via two potential mechanisms: (i) individuals can aggregate information, thus augmenting their ‘collective cognition’, or (ii) interaction with conspecifics can allow individuals to follow specific ‘leaders’, those experts with information particularly relevant to the decision at hand. However, a-priori, theory-based expectations about which of these decision rules should be preferred are lacking. Using a set of simple models, we present theoretical conditions (involving group size, and diversity of individual information) under which groups should aggregate information, or follow an expert, when faced with a binary choice. We found that, in single-shot decisions, experts are almost always more accurate than the collective across a range of conditions. However, for repeated decisions – where individuals are able to consider the success of previous decision outcomes – the collective's aggregated information is almost always superior. The results improve our understanding of how social animals may process information and make decisions when accuracy is a key component of individual fitness, and provide a solid theoretical framework for future experimental tests where group size, diversity of individual information, and the repeatability of decisions can be measured and manipulated. PMID:21124803

  11. Stochastic analysis of the extra clustering model for animal grouping.

    PubMed

    Drmota, Michael; Fuchs, Michael; Lee, Yi-Wen

    2016-07-01

    We consider the extra clustering model which was introduced by Durand et al. (J Theor Biol 249(2):262-270, 2007) in order to describe the grouping of social animals and to test whether genetic relatedness is the main driving force behind the group formation process. Durand and François (J Math Biol 60(3):451-468, 2010) provided a first stochastic analysis of this model by deriving (amongst other things) asymptotic expansions for the mean value of the number of groups. In this paper, we will give a much finer analysis of the number of groups. More precisely, we will derive asymptotic expansions for all higher moments and give a complete characterization of the possible limit laws. In the most interesting case (neutral model), we will prove a central limit theorem with a surprising normalization. In the remaining cases, the limit law will be either a mixture of a discrete and continuous law or a discrete law. Our results show that, except of in degenerate cases, strong concentration around the mean value takes place only for the neutral model, whereas in the remaining cases there is also mass concentration away from the mean. PMID:26520857

  12. Confidence sharing: an economic strategy for efficient information flows in animal groups.

    PubMed

    Korman, Amos; Greenwald, Efrat; Feinerman, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    Social animals may share information to obtain a more complete and accurate picture of their surroundings. However, physical constraints on communication limit the flow of information between interacting individuals in a way that can cause an accumulation of errors and deteriorated collective behaviors. Here, we theoretically study a general model of information sharing within animal groups. We take an algorithmic perspective to identify efficient communication schemes that are, nevertheless, economic in terms of communication, memory and individual internal computation. We present a simple and natural algorithm in which each agent compresses all information it has gathered into a single parameter that represents its confidence in its behavior. Confidence is communicated between agents by means of active signaling. We motivate this model by novel and existing empirical evidences for confidence sharing in animal groups. We rigorously show that this algorithm competes extremely well with the best possible algorithm that operates without any computational constraints. We also show that this algorithm is minimal, in the sense that further reduction in communication may significantly reduce performances. Our proofs rely on the Cramér-Rao bound and on our definition of a Fisher Channel Capacity. We use these concepts to quantify information flows within the group which are then used to obtain lower bounds on collective performance. The abstract nature of our model makes it rigorously solvable and its conclusions highly general. Indeed, our results suggest confidence sharing as a central notion in the context of animal communication. PMID:25275649

  13. Confidence Sharing: An Economic Strategy for Efficient Information Flows in Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Amos; Greenwald, Efrat; Feinerman, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Social animals may share information to obtain a more complete and accurate picture of their surroundings. However, physical constraints on communication limit the flow of information between interacting individuals in a way that can cause an accumulation of errors and deteriorated collective behaviors. Here, we theoretically study a general model of information sharing within animal groups. We take an algorithmic perspective to identify efficient communication schemes that are, nevertheless, economic in terms of communication, memory and individual internal computation. We present a simple and natural algorithm in which each agent compresses all information it has gathered into a single parameter that represents its confidence in its behavior. Confidence is communicated between agents by means of active signaling. We motivate this model by novel and existing empirical evidences for confidence sharing in animal groups. We rigorously show that this algorithm competes extremely well with the best possible algorithm that operates without any computational constraints. We also show that this algorithm is minimal, in the sense that further reduction in communication may significantly reduce performances. Our proofs rely on the Cramér-Rao bound and on our definition of a Fisher Channel Capacity. We use these concepts to quantify information flows within the group which are then used to obtain lower bounds on collective performance. The abstract nature of our model makes it rigorously solvable and its conclusions highly general. Indeed, our results suggest confidence sharing as a central notion in the context of animal communication. PMID:25275649

  14. The highs and lows of theoretical interpretation in animal-metacognition research

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. David; Couchman, Justin J.; Beran, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Humans feel uncertain. They know when they do not know. These feelings and the responses to them ground the research literature on metacognition. It is a natural question whether animals share this cognitive capacity, and thus animal metacognition has become an influential research area within comparative psychology. Researchers have explored this question by testing many species using perception and memory paradigms. There is an emerging consensus that animals share functional parallels with humans’ conscious metacognition. Of course, this research area poses difficult issues of scientific inference. How firmly should we hold the line in insisting that animals’ performances are low-level and associative? How high should we set the bar for concluding that animals share metacognitive capacities with humans? This area offers a constructive case study for considering theoretical problems that often confront comparative psychologists. The authors present this case study and address diverse issues of scientific judgement and interpretation within comparative psychology. PMID:22492748

  15. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  16. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  17. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    The XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP), also known as the Group30 conference, took place in Ghent (Belgium) from Monday 14 to Friday 18 July 2014. The conference was organised by Ghent University (Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, and Department of Mathematical Analysis). The website http://www.group30.ugent.be is still available. The ICGTMP is one of the traditional conference series covering the most important topics of symmetry which are relevant to the interplay of present-day mathematics and physics. More than 40 years ago a group of enthusiasts, headed by H. Bacry of Marseille and A. Janner of Nijmegen, initiated a series of annual meetings with the aim to provide a common forum for scientists interested in group theoretical methods. At that time most of the participants belonged to two important communities: on the one hand solid state specialists, elementary particle theorists and phenomenologists, and on the other mathematicians eager to apply newly-discovered group and algebraic structures. The conference series has become a meeting point for scientists working at modelling physical phenomena through mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry. It is considered as the oldest one among the conference series devoted to geometry and physics. It has been further broadened and diversified due to the successful applications of geometric and algebraic methods in life sciences and other areas. The first four meetings took place alternatively in Marseille and Nijmegen. Soon after, the conference acquired an international standing, especially following the 1975 colloquium in Nijmegen and the 1976 colloquium in Montreal. Since then it has been organized in many places around the world. It has become a bi-annual colloquium since 1990, the year it was organized in Moscow. This was the first time the colloquium took place in Belgium. There were 246 registered

  18. Comparative Genomics of the Staphylococcus intermedius Group of Animal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Beatson, Scott A.; van den Broek, Adri H. M.; Thoday, Keith L.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2012-01-01

    The Staphylococcus intermedius group consists of three closely related coagulase-positive bacterial species including S. intermedius, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, and Staphylococcus delphini. S. pseudintermedius is a major skin pathogen of dogs, which occasionally causes severe zoonotic infections of humans. S. delphini has been isolated from an array of different animals including horses, mink, and pigeons, whereas S. intermedius has been isolated only from pigeons to date. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the S. pseudintermedius whole genome sequence in comparison to high quality draft S. intermedius and S. delphini genomes, and to other sequenced staphylococcal species. The core genome of the SIG was highly conserved with average nucleotide identity (ANI) between the three species of 93.61%, which is very close to the threshold of species delineation (95% ANI), highlighting the close-relatedness of the SIG species. However, considerable variation was identified in the content of mobile genetic elements, cell wall-associated proteins, and iron and sugar transporters, reflecting the distinct ecological niches inhabited. Of note, S. pseudintermedius ED99 contained a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat locus of the Nmeni subtype and S. intermedius contained both Nmeni and Mtube subtypes. In contrast to S. intermedius and S. delphini and most other staphylococci examined to date, S. pseudintermedius contained at least nine predicted reverse transcriptase Group II introns. Furthermore, S. pseudintermedius ED99 encoded several transposons which were largely responsible for its multi-resistant phenotype. Overall, the study highlights extensive differences in accessory genome content between closely related staphylococcal species inhabiting distinct host niches, providing new avenues for research into pathogenesis and bacterial host-adaptation. PMID:22919635

  19. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ngendakumana, Ancille Todjihoundé, Leonard; Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim

    2014-01-15

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  20. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    The XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP), also known as the Group30 conference, took place in Ghent (Belgium) from Monday 14 to Friday 18 July 2014. The conference was organised by Ghent University (Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, and Department of Mathematical Analysis). The website http://www.group30.ugent.be is still available. The ICGTMP is one of the traditional conference series covering the most important topics of symmetry which are relevant to the interplay of present-day mathematics and physics. More than 40 years ago a group of enthusiasts, headed by H. Bacry of Marseille and A. Janner of Nijmegen, initiated a series of annual meetings with the aim to provide a common forum for scientists interested in group theoretical methods. At that time most of the participants belonged to two important communities: on the one hand solid state specialists, elementary particle theorists and phenomenologists, and on the other mathematicians eager to apply newly-discovered group and algebraic structures. The conference series has become a meeting point for scientists working at modelling physical phenomena through mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry. It is considered as the oldest one among the conference series devoted to geometry and physics. It has been further broadened and diversified due to the successful applications of geometric and algebraic methods in life sciences and other areas. The first four meetings took place alternatively in Marseille and Nijmegen. Soon after, the conference acquired an international standing, especially following the 1975 colloquium in Nijmegen and the 1976 colloquium in Montreal. Since then it has been organized in many places around the world. It has become a bi-annual colloquium since 1990, the year it was organized in Moscow. This was the first time the colloquium took place in Belgium. There were 246 registered

  1. Animal Welfare Groups Press for Limits on High School Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BioScience, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Discussions from the conference on "The Use of Animals in High School Biology Classes" are highlighted in this article. The list of science fair rules, which resulted from the conference, is included. (SA)

  2. Effect of vision angle on the phase transition in flocking behavior of animal groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, P. The; Lee, Sang-Hee; Ngo, V. Thanh

    2015-09-01

    The nature of the phase transition in a system of self-propelling particles has been extensively studied during the past few decades. A theoretical model was proposed by [T. Vicsek et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.75.1226] with a simple rule for updating the direction of motion of each particle. Based on the model of Vicsek et al., in this paper, we consider a group of animals as particles moving freely in a two-dimensional space. Due to the fact that the viewable area of animals depends on the species, we consider the motion of each individual within an angle φ =ϕ /2 (ϕ is called the angle of view) of a circle centered at its position of radius R . We obtained a phase diagram in the space (φ ,ηc ) with ηc being the critical noise. We show that the phase transition exists only in the case of a wide view's angle φ ≥0.5 π . The flocking of animals is a universal behavior of the species of prey but not the one of the predator. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observation [C. Beccoa et al., Physica A 367, 487 (2006), 10.1016/j.physa.2005.11.041].

  3. Effect of vision angle on the phase transition in flocking behavior of animal groups.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P The; Lee, Sang-Hee; Ngo, V Thanh

    2015-09-01

    The nature of the phase transition in a system of self-propelling particles has been extensively studied during the past few decades. A theoretical model was proposed by [T. Vicsek et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.75.1226] with a simple rule for updating the direction of motion of each particle. Based on the model of Vicsek et al., in this paper, we consider a group of animals as particles moving freely in a two-dimensional space. Due to the fact that the viewable area of animals depends on the species, we consider the motion of each individual within an angle φ=ϕ/2 (ϕ is called the angle of view) of a circle centered at its position of radius R. We obtained a phase diagram in the space (φ,η_{c}) with η_{c} being the critical noise. We show that the phase transition exists only in the case of a wide view's angle φ≥0.5π. The flocking of animals is a universal behavior of the species of prey but not the one of the predator. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observation [C. Beccoa et al., Physica A 367, 487 (2006)PHYADX0378-437110.1016/j.physa.2005.11.041]. PMID:26465507

  4. Effects of Number of Animals Monitored on Representations of Cattle Group Movement Characteristics and Spatial Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Green, Angela R.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Ramirez, Brett C.; Shike, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    The number of animals required to represent the collective characteristics of a group remains a concern in animal movement monitoring with GPS. Monitoring a subset of animals from a group instead of all animals can reduce costs and labor; however, incomplete data may cause information losses and inaccuracy in subsequent data analyses. In cattle studies, little work has been conducted to determine the number of cattle within a group needed to be instrumented considering subsequent analyses. Two different groups of cattle (a mixed group of 24 beef cows and heifers, and another group of 8 beef cows) were monitored with GPS collars at 4 min intervals on intensively managed pastures and corn residue fields in 2011. The effects of subset group size on cattle movement characterization and spatial occupancy analysis were evaluated by comparing the results between subset groups and the entire group for a variety of summarization parameters. As expected, more animals yield better results for all parameters. Results show the average group travel speed and daily travel distances are overestimated as subset group size decreases, while the average group radius is underestimated. Accuracy of group centroid locations and group radii are improved linearly as subset group size increases. A kernel density estimation was performed to quantify the spatial occupancy by cattle via GPS location data. Results show animals among the group had high similarity of spatial occupancy. Decisions regarding choosing an appropriate subset group size for monitoring depend on the specific use of data for subsequent analysis: a small subset group may be adequate for identifying areas visited by cattle; larger subset group size (e.g. subset group containing more than 75% of animals) is recommended to achieve better accuracy of group movement characteristics and spatial occupancy for the use of correlating cattle locations with other environmental factors. PMID:25647571

  5. Animal escapology I: theoretical issues and emerging trends in escape trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Escape responses are used by many animal species as their main defence against predator attacks. Escape success is determined by a number of variables; important are the directionality (the percentage of responses directed away from the threat) and the escape trajectories (ETs) measured relative to the threat. Although logic would suggest that animals should always turn away from a predator, work on various species shows that these away responses occur only approximately 50–90% of the time. A small proportion of towards responses may introduce some unpredictability and may be an adaptive feature of the escape system. Similar issues apply to ETs. Theoretically, an optimal ET can be modelled on the geometry of predator–prey encounters. However, unpredictability (and hence high variability) in trajectories may be necessary for preventing predators from learning a simple escape pattern. This review discusses the emerging trends in escape trajectories, as well as the modulating key factors, such as the surroundings and body design. The main ET patterns identified are: (1) high ET variability within a limited angular sector (mainly 90–180 deg away from the threat; this variability is in some cases based on multiple peaks of ETs), (2) ETs that allow sensory tracking of the threat and (3) ETs towards a shelter. These characteristic features are observed across various taxa and, therefore, their expression may be mainly related to taxon-independent animal design features and to the environmental context in which prey live – for example whether the immediate surroundings of the prey provide potential refuges. PMID:21753039

  6. The shifting balance of diversity among major marine animal groups.

    PubMed

    Alroy, J

    2010-09-01

    The fossil record demonstrates that each major taxonomic group has a consistent net rate of diversification and a limit to its species richness. It has been thought that long-term changes in the dominance of major taxonomic groups can be predicted from these characteristics. However, new analyses show that diversity limits may rise or fall in response to adaptive radiations or extinctions. These changes are idiosyncratic and occur at different times in each taxa. For example, the end-Permian mass extinction permanently reduced the diversity of important, previously dominant groups such as brachiopods and crinoids. The current global crisis may therefore permanently alter the biosphere's taxonomic composition by changing the rules of evolution. PMID:20813951

  7. Personality, Leadership Style, and Theoretical Orientation as Predictors of Group Co-Leadership Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridbord, Karen; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict group co-leader satisfaction using personality, leadership style, and perceived compatibility of theoretical orientation. Fifty-four co-leader pairs (n = 108 group leaders) completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, Leadership Characteristics Inventory, Co-Therapy Relationship Questionnaire, and Co-Therapist…

  8. Invariant-theoretic method for calculating Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space groups

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenberg, A.Ya.; Gufan, Yu.M.

    1995-03-01

    A new invariant-theoretic method to directly calculate Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space and point groups representations is proposed. The method is exemplified with the space groups O{sub h}{sup 5} and D{sub 6h}{sup 1}. 34 refs.

  9. Evaluating Animal-Assisted Therapy in Group Treatment for Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Tracy J.; Davis, Diana; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of three group interventions on trauma symptoms for children who have been sexually abused. All of the groups followed the same treatment protocol, with two of them incorporating variations of animal-assisted therapy. A total of 153 children ages 7 to 17 who were in group therapy at a Child…

  10. The Effects of Visual Grouping on Learning from Computer Animated Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.

    The effects of visual grouping strategies involving animated and static graphic presentations on learning were studied. Also studied was the ability of students to learn a scientific rule presented incidentally in an animated sequence in the hope of replicating results from previous research. A total of 39 fourth graders participated in an…

  11. Perspective on Models in Theoretical and Practical Traditions of Knowledge: The Example of Otto Engine Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Jesper; Stromdahl, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Nineteen informants (n = 19) were asked to study and comment two computer animations of the Otto combustion engine. One animation was non-interactive and realistic in the sense of depicting a physical engine. The other animation was more idealised, interactive and synchronised with a dynamic PV-graph. The informants represented practical and…

  12. Theoretical considerations on maximum running speeds for large and small animals.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Mauricio A

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical equations for fast running speeds are presented and analyzed. One of the equations and its associated model predict that animals tend to experience larger mechanical stresses in their limbs (muscles, tendons and bones) as a result of larger stride lengths, suggesting a structural restriction entailing the existence of an absolute maximum possible stride length. The consequence for big animals is that an increasingly larger body mass implies decreasing maximal speeds, given that the stride frequency generally decreases for increasingly larger animals. Another restriction, acting on small animals, is discussed only in preliminary terms, but it seems safe to assume from previous studies that for a given range of body masses of small animals, those which are bigger are faster. The difference between speed scaling trends for large and small animals implies the existence of a range of intermediate body masses corresponding to the fastest animals. PMID:26646766

  13. A group theoretical approach to structural transitions of icosahedral quasicrystals and point arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, Emilio; Dykeman, Eric C.; Geraets, James A.; Twarock, Reidun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we describe a group theoretical approach to the study of structural transitions of icosahedral quasicrystals and point arrays. We apply the concept of Schur rotations, originally proposed by Kramer, to the case of aperiodic structures with icosahedral symmetry; these rotations induce a rotation of the physical and orthogonal spaces invariant under the icosahedral group, and hence, via the cut-and-project method, a continuous transformation of the corresponding model sets. We prove that this approach allows for a characterisation of such transitions in a purely group theoretical framework, and provide explicit computations and specific examples. Moreover, we prove that this approach can be used in the case of finite point sets with icosahedral symmetry, which have a wide range of applications in carbon chemistry (fullerenes) and biology (viral capsids).

  14. Toward a unifying model of identification with groups: integrating theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roccas, Sonia; Sagiv, Lilach; Schwartz, Shalom; Halevy, Nir; Eidelson, Roy

    2008-08-01

    Building on the contributions of diverse theoretical approaches, the authors present a multidimensional model of group identification. Integrating conceptions from the social identity perspective with those from research on individualism-collectivism, nationalism- patriotism, and identification with organizations, we propose four conceptually distinct modes of identification: importance (how much I view the group as part of who I am), commitment (how much I want to benefit the group), superiority (how much I view my group as superior to other groups), and deference (how much I honor, revere, and submit to the group's norms, symbols, and leaders). We present an instrument for assessing the four modes of identification and review initial empirical findings that validate the proposed model and show its utility in understanding antecedents and consequences of identification. PMID:18641386

  15. Psychophysiological effects of human-animal interaction: theoretical issues and long-term interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Virués-Ortega, Javier; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews literature published on the psychophysiological effects of long-term human-animal interaction (i.e., pet ownership, pet adoption). A literature search was conducted using PsycInfo and Medline databases. Although the available evidence is far from being consistent, it can be concluded that, in some cases, long-term relationships with animals may moderate baseline physiological variables, particularly blood pressure. Results proved more coherent in studies where animals were adopted by owners as part of the procedure. This paper examines existing hypotheses seeking to account for these effects and the supporting evidence. Two major hypotheses have been suggested to explain the psychophysiological effects of long-term interaction, namely (1) stress-buffering effects of noncritical social support provided by pets; and (2) classical conditioning of relaxation. These mechanisms may partially account for the long-term health outcomes observed in a number of human-animal interaction studies. PMID:16462556

  16. Predicting rarity and decline in animals, plants, and mushrooms based on species attributes and indicator groups

    PubMed Central

    Musters, C J M; Kalkman, Vincent; van Strien, Arco

    2013-01-01

    In decisions on nature conservation measures, we depend largely on knowledge of the relationship between threats and environmental factors for a very limited number of species groups, with relevant environmental factors often being deduced from the relationship between threat and species traits. But can relationships between traits and levels of threats be identified across species from completely different taxonomic groups; and how accurately do well-known taxonomic groups indicate levels of threat in other species groups? To answer these questions, we first made a list of 152 species attributes of morphological and demographic traits and habitat requirements. Based on these attributes we then grew random forests of decision trees for 1183 species in the 18 different taxonomic groups for which we had Red Lists available in the Netherlands, using these to classify animals, plants, and mushrooms according to their rarity and decline. Finally, we grew random forests for four species groups often used as indicator groups to study how well the relationship between attribute and decline within these groups reflected that relationship within the larger taxonomic group to which these groups belong. Correct classification of rarity based on all attributes was as high as 88% in animals, 85% in plants, and 94% in mushrooms and correct classification of decline was 78% in animals, 69% in plants, and 70% in mushrooms. Vertebrates indicated decline in all animals well, as did birds for all vertebrates and vascular plants for all plants. However, butterflies poorly indicated decline in all insects. Random forests are a useful tool to relate rarity and decline to species attributes thereby making it possible to generalize rarity and decline to a wider set of species groups. Random forests can be used to estimate the level of threat to complete faunas and floras of countries or regions. In regions like the Netherlands, conservation policy based on attributes known to be relevant

  17. Motion reconstruction of animal groups: From schooling fish to swarming mosquitoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butail, Sachit

    The long-term goal of this research is to provide kinematic data for the design and validation of spatial models of collective behavior in animal groups. The specific research objective of this dissertation is to apply methods from nonlinear estimation and computer vision to construct multi-target tracking systems that process multi-view calibrated video to reconstruct the three-dimensional movement of animals in a group. We adapt the tracking systems for the study of two animal species: Danio aequipinnatus, a common species of schooling fish, and Anopheles gambiae, the most important vector of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Together these tracking systems span variability in target size on image, density, and movement. For tracking fish, we automatically initialize, predict, and reconstruct shape trajectories of multiple fish through occlusions. For mosquitoes, which appear as faded streaks on in-field footage, we provide methods to extract velocity information from the streaks, adaptively seek missing measurements, and resolve occlusions within a multi-hypothesis framework. In each case the research has yielded an unprecedented volume of trajectory data for subsequent analysis. We present kinematic data of fast-start response in fish schools and first-ever trajectories of wild mosquito swarming and mating events. The broader impact of this work is to advance the understanding of animal groups for the design of bio-inspired robotic systems, where, similar to the animal groups we study, the collective is able to perform tasks far beyond the capabilities of a single inexpensive robot.

  18. Group theoretical interpretation of the modified gravity in de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, M.

    2016-03-01

    A framework has been presented for theoretical interpretation of various modified gravitational models which is based on the group theoretical approach and unitary irreducible representations (UIR's) of de Sitter (dS) group. In order to illustrate the application of the proposed method, a model of modified gravity has been investigated. The background field method has been utilized and the linearized modified gravitational field equation has been obtained in the 4-dimensional dS space-time as the background. The field equation has been written as the eigne-value equation of the Casimir operators of dS space using the flat 5-dimensional ambient space notations. The Minkowskian correspondence of the theory has been obtained by taking the zero curvature limit. It has been shown that under some simple conditions, the linearized modified field equation transforms according to two of the UIR's of dS group labeled by Π 2,1 ± and Π 2,2 ± in the discrete series. It means that the proposed modified gravitational theory can be a suitable one to describe the quantum gravitational effects in its linear approximation on dS space. The field equation has been solved and the solution has been written as the multiplication of a symmetric rank-2 polarization tensor and a massless scalar field using the ambient space notations. Also the two-point function has been calculated in the ambient space formalism. It is dS invariant and free of any theoretical problems.

  19. Group theoretical analysis of the H3+ +H2 ↔ H5+ reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    The H3+ +H2 →H2 + H3+ proton transfer reaction is complicated due to the proton scrambling from the large amplitude motions in the H5+ intermediate. In order to understand this reaction, high-resolution spectroscopic studies are necessary for the reactants/products and the intermediate, and the group theoretical analysis is an essential aspect in the prediction and interpretation of these spectra. With five indistinguishable protons, H5+ is characterized using the G240 complete nuclear permutation-inversion (CNPI) group. For most of the configurations sampled by the reaction path, the feasible permutations depend on the distance between the H3+ and H2 fragments. Subgroups of G240 can be used to describe these feasible permutations. Specifically, we consider two limits of the molecular configurations. The equilibrium structure of H5+ , i.e., [H2 -H -H2 ]+, can be described using the G16 molecular symmetry group, while the dissociation products, i.e., H3+ ⋯H2 , require the G24 molecular symmetry group. In the present study, a group theoretical analysis is performed for both limits, providing the symmetries for the nuclear spins and rovibrational wave functions. Also, spectroscopic properties for [H2 -H -H2 ]+, particularly rovibrational couplings and electric dipole selection rules, as well as correlations of energy levels between [H2 -H -H2 ]+ and H3+ ⋯H2 , are obtained.

  20. Group theoretical Laws and Geometrical Phase for Paraxial Self-focusing and Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantu, Subbarao; Uma, R.

    1998-11-01

    Group theoretical laws are formulated for the dynamics of paraxial self-focusing and soliton dynamics. The close similarity in the dynamical formulation of the theory of paraxial self-focusing of cylindrical laser beams of circular as well as elliptical cross-sections and paraxial solitons is exploited to state the group theoretical laws for the dynamics which in their limited form are known as ABCD laws in optics using our recent formulation of one of these phenomena^1. The dynamics of the laser beam is in terms of its evolution in the direction propagation while the soliton dynamics is along the actual time axis. (Conceiving soliton dynamics similar to a planar beam in the x-t plane, it can be analyzed using the paraxial approximation.) The group governing the dynamics is shown to be the Lorentz group, which gets reduced to the rotation group in the absorption-less case. Geometrical phase is evaluated for all these beams and solitons using our recent formulation of the geometric phase in projective space^2. 1. D. Subbarao, R. Uma and H. Singh, Phys. Plasmas, 5, Aug. (1998). 2. D.Subbarao Opt. Lett. 20, 2162 (1995) The authors acknowledge the financial support of CSIR(India) under the project 03(0815)/97/EMR-II for this work.

  1. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-12-15

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-sister" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703

  2. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the “Ctenophora-sister” hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703

  3. A theoretical analysis of the bearing performance of vertically loaded large-diameter pipe pile groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanming; Zhang, Ting; Li, Ping; Cheng, Ke

    2016-02-01

    This paper aims to present a theoretical method to study the bearing performance of vertically loaded large-diameter pipe pile groups. The interactions between group piles result in different bearing performance of both a single pile and pile groups. Considering the pile group effect and the skin friction from both outer and inner soils, an analytical solution is developed to calculate the settlement and axial force in large-diameter pipe pile groups. The analytical solution was verified by centrifuge and field testing results. An extensive parametric analysis was performed to study the bearing performance of the pipe pile groups. The results reveal that the axial forces in group piles are not the same. The larger the distance from central pile, the larger the axial force. The axial force in the central pile is the smallest, while that in corner piles is the largest. The axial force on the top of the corner piles decreases while that in the central pile increases with increasing of pile spacing and decreasing of pile length. The axial force in side piles varies little with the variations of pile spacing, pile length, and shear modulus of the soil and is approximately equal to the average load shared by one pile. For a pile group, the larger the pile length is, the larger the influence radius is. As a result, the pile group effect is more apparent for a larger pile length. The settlement of pile groups decreases with increasing of the pile number in the group and the shear modulus of the underlying soil.

  4. Group-theoretic insights on the vibration of symmetric structures in engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zingoni, Alphose

    2014-01-01

    Group theory has been used to study various problems in physics and chemistry for many years. Relatively recently, applications have emerged in engineering, where problems of the vibration, bifurcation and stability of systems exhibiting symmetry have been studied. From an engineering perspective, the main attraction of group-theoretic methods has been their potential to reduce computational effort in the analysis of large-scale problems. In this paper, we focus on vibration problems in structural mechanics and reveal some of the insights and qualitative benefits that group theory affords. These include an appreciation of all the possible symmetries of modes of vibration, the prediction of the number of modes of a given symmetry type, the identification of modes associated with the same frequencies, the prediction of nodal lines and stationary points of a vibrating system, and the untangling of clustered frequencies. PMID:24379427

  5. Both information and social cohesion determine collective decisions in animal groups

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Noam; Garnier, Simon; Hartnett, Andrew T.; Couzin, Iain D.

    2013-01-01

    During consensus decision making, individuals in groups balance personal information (based on their own past experiences) with social information (based on the behavior of other individuals), allowing the group to reach a single collective choice. Previous studies of consensus decision making processes have focused on the informational aspects of behavioral choice, assuming that individuals make choices based solely on their likelihood of being beneficial (e.g., rewarded). However, decisions by both humans and nonhuman animals systematically violate such expectations. Furthermore, the typical experimental paradigm of assessing binary decisions, those between two mutually exclusive options, confounds two aspects common to most group decisions: minimizing uncertainty (through the use of personal and social information) and maintaining group cohesion (for example, to reduce predation risk). Here we experimentally disassociate cohesion-based decisions from information-based decisions using a three-choice paradigm and demonstrate that both factors are crucial to understanding the collective decision making of schooling fish. In addition, we demonstrate how multiple informational dimensions (here color and stripe orientation) are integrated within groups to achieve consensus, even though no individual is explicitly aware of, or has a unique preference for, the consensus option. Balancing of personal information and social cues by individuals in key frontal positions in the group is shown to be essential for such group-level capabilities. Our results demonstrate the importance of integrating informational with other social considerations when explaining the collective capabilities of group-living animals. PMID:23440218

  6. Both information and social cohesion determine collective decisions in animal groups.

    PubMed

    Miller, Noam; Garnier, Simon; Hartnett, Andrew T; Couzin, Iain D

    2013-03-26

    During consensus decision making, individuals in groups balance personal information (based on their own past experiences) with social information (based on the behavior of other individuals), allowing the group to reach a single collective choice. Previous studies of consensus decision making processes have focused on the informational aspects of behavioral choice, assuming that individuals make choices based solely on their likelihood of being beneficial (e.g., rewarded). However, decisions by both humans and nonhuman animals systematically violate such expectations. Furthermore, the typical experimental paradigm of assessing binary decisions, those between two mutually exclusive options, confounds two aspects common to most group decisions: minimizing uncertainty (through the use of personal and social information) and maintaining group cohesion (for example, to reduce predation risk). Here we experimentally disassociate cohesion-based decisions from information-based decisions using a three-choice paradigm and demonstrate that both factors are crucial to understanding the collective decision making of schooling fish. In addition, we demonstrate how multiple informational dimensions (here color and stripe orientation) are integrated within groups to achieve consensus, even though no individual is explicitly aware of, or has a unique preference for, the consensus option. Balancing of personal information and social cues by individuals in key frontal positions in the group is shown to be essential for such group-level capabilities. Our results demonstrate the importance of integrating informational with other social considerations when explaining the collective capabilities of group-living animals. PMID:23440218

  7. Theoretical study on magnetic coupling interaction for Cu(II) binuclear systems with extended bridging groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwei; Liu, Chengbu; Hu, Haiquan; Zhang, Changqiao

    2001-12-01

    The magnetic coupling interaction for Cu(II) binuclear systems with bridging groups C2O4 2- , C2O2( NH) 2 2- ( cis), C2O2( NH) 2 2- ( trans) and C2S2( NH) 2 2- ( trans) was studied by the broken symmetry (BS) approach within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). The influence of different coordination atoms and geometry on magnetic coupling interaction was theoretically analyzed. Both of the calculated and experimental results were compared. The variation trends of coupling interaction calculated are in agreement with experimental ones.

  8. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  9. Synthesis, characterization, investigation of biological activity and theoretical studies of hydrazone compounds containing choloroacetyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukurovali, Alaaddin; Yilmaz, Engin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, three new hydrazide-hydrazone derivative compounds which contain choloroacetyl group have been synthesized and characterized. In the characterization, spectral techniques such as IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques were used. Antibacterial effects of the synthesized compounds were investigated against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. In the theoretical calculations Gaussian 09 software was used with the DFT/6-311+(d,p) basis set. Experimental X-ray analysis of compounds has not been studied. Theoretical bond lengths of synthesized compounds were compared with experimental bond lengths of a similar compound. Theoretical and experimental bond lengths are in good agreement with R2: 0.896, 0.899 and 0.900 for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For antibacterial activity, the most effective one was found to be N‧-(4-bromobenzylidene)-2-chloro-N-(4-(3-methyl-3-phenylcyclobutyl)-thiazol-2-yl) acetohydrazide against P.aeroginaosa ATTC 27853, among the studied compounds.

  10. Group-theoretic models of the inversion process in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Egri-Nagy, Attila; Gebhardt, Volker; Tanaka, Mark M; Francis, Andrew R

    2014-07-01

    The variation in genome arrangements among bacterial taxa is largely due to the process of inversion. Recent studies indicate that not all inversions are equally probable, suggesting, for instance, that shorter inversions are more frequent than longer, and those that move the terminus of replication are less probable than those that do not. Current methods for establishing the inversion distance between two bacterial genomes are unable to incorporate such information. In this paper we suggest a group-theoretic framework that in principle can take these constraints into account. In particular, we show that by lifting the problem from circular permutations to the affine symmetric group, the inversion distance can be found in polynomial time for a model in which inversions are restricted to acting on two regions. This requires the proof of new results in group theory, and suggests a vein of new combinatorial problems concerning permutation groups on which group theorists will be needed to collaborate with biologists. We apply the new method to inferring distances and phylogenies for published Yersinia pestis data. PMID:23793228

  11. To Eat and Not Be Eaten: Modelling Resources and Safety in Multi-Species Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Umesh; Quader, Suhel

    2012-01-01

    Using mixed-species bird flocks as an example, we model the payoffs for two types of species from participating in multi-species animal groups. Salliers feed on mobile prey, are good sentinels and do not affect prey capture rates of gleaners; gleaners feed on prey on substrates and can enhance the prey capture rate of salliers by flushing prey, but are poor sentinels. These functional types are known from various animal taxa that form multi-species associations. We model costs and benefits of joining groups for a wide range of group compositions under varying abundances of two types of prey–prey on substrates and mobile prey. Our model predicts that gleaners and salliers show a conflict of interest in multi-species groups, because gleaners benefit from increasing numbers of salliers in the group, whereas salliers benefit from increasing gleaner numbers. The model also predicts that the limits to size and variability in composition of multi-species groups are driven by the relative abundance of different types of prey, independent of predation pressure. Our model emphasises resources as a primary driver of temporal and spatial group dynamics, rather than reproductive activity or predation per se, which have hitherto been thought to explain patterns of multi-species group formation and cohesion. The qualitative predictions of the model are supported by empirical patterns from both terrestrial and marine multi-species groups, suggesting that similar mechanisms might underlie group dynamics in a range of taxa. The model also makes novel predictions about group dynamics that can be tested using variation across space and time. PMID:22848706

  12. Electrophysiology for biomedical engineering students: a practical and theoretical course in animal electrocorticography.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Ana L; Farfán, Fernando D; Coletti, Marcos A; Teruya, Pablo Y; Felice, Carmelo J

    2016-09-01

    The major challenge in laboratory teaching is the application of abstract concepts in simple and direct practical lessons. However, students rarely have the opportunity to participate in a laboratory that combines practical learning with a realistic research experience. In the Biomedical Engineering career, we offer short and optional courses to complement studies for students as they initiate their Graduation Project. The objective of these theoretical and practical courses is to introduce students to the topics of their projects. The present work describes an experience in electrophysiology to teach undergraduate students how to extract cortical information using electrocorticographic techniques. Students actively participate in some parts of the experience and then process and analyze the data obtained with different signal processing tools. In postlaboratory evaluations, students described the course as an exceptional opportunity for students interested in following a postgraduate science program and fully appreciated their contents. PMID:27503901

  13. Viability of decision-making systems in human and animal groups.

    PubMed

    Sueur, Cédric

    2012-08-01

    Shared and unshared consensuses are present in both human and animal societies. To date, few studies have applied an evolutionary perspective to the viability of these systems. This study therefore aimed to assess if decision-making allows group members to satisfy all their needs and to survive, decision after decision, day after day. The novelty of this study is the inclusion of multiple decision-making events with varying conditions and the parameterization of the model based on data in macaques, bringing the model closer to ecologically reality. The activity budgets of group members in the model did not differ significantly from those observed in macaques, making the model robust and providing mechanistic insight. Three different decision-making systems were then tested: (1) One single leader, (2) Leading according to needs and (3) Voting process. Results show that when individuals have equal needs, all decision-making systems are viable. However, one single leader cannot impose its decision when the needs of other group members differ too much from its own needs. The leading according to needs system is always viable whatever the group heterogeneity. However, the individual with the highest body mass decides in the majority of cases. Finally, the voting process also appears to be viable, with a majority threshold that differs according to group size and to different individual needs. This study is the first clear prediction of the different types of consensus in animal groups used in various different conditions. PMID:22554449

  14. Recommendations on vaccination for Asian small animal practitioners: a report of the WSAVA Vaccination Guidelines Group.

    PubMed

    Day, M J; Karkare, U; Schultz, R D; Squires, R; Tsujimoto, H

    2015-02-01

    In 2012 and 2013, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Vaccination Guidelines Group (VGG) undertook fact-finding visits to several Asian countries, with a view to developing advice for small companion animal practitioners in Asia related to the administration of vaccines to dogs and cats. The VGG met with numerous first opinion practitioners, small animal association leaders, academic veterinarians, government regulators and industry representatives and gathered further information from a survey of almost 700 veterinarians in India, China, Japan and Thailand. Although there were substantial differences in the nature and magnitude of the challenges faced by veterinarians in each country, and also differences in the resources available to meet those challenges, overall, the VGG identified insufficient undergraduate and postgraduate training in small companion animal microbiology, immunology and vaccinology. In most of the countries, there has been little academic research into small animal infectious diseases. This, coupled with insufficient laboratory diagnostic support, has limited the growth of knowledge concerning the prevalence and circulating strains of key infectious agents in most of the countries visited. Asian practitioners continue to recognise clinical infections that are now considered uncommon or rare in western countries. In particular, canine rabies virus infection poses a continuing threat to animal and human health in this region. Both nationally manufactured and international dog and cat vaccines are variably available in the Asian countries, but the product ranges are small and dominated by multi-component vaccines with a licensed duration of immunity (DOI) of only 1 year, or no description of DOI. Asian practitioners are largely unaware of current global trends in small animal vaccinology or of the WSAVA vaccination guidelines. Consequently, most practitioners continue to deliver annual revaccination with both core and non

  15. On the group-theoretical approach to the study of interpenetrating nets.

    PubMed

    Baburin, Igor A

    2016-05-01

    Using group-subgroup and group-supergroup relations, a general theoretical framework is developed to describe and derive interpenetrating 3-periodic nets. The generation of interpenetration patterns is readily accomplished by replicating a single net with a supergroup G of its space group H under the condition that site symmetries of vertices and edges are the same in both H and G. It is shown that interpenetrating nets cannot be mapped onto each other by mirror reflections because otherwise edge crossings would necessarily occur in the embedding. For the same reason any other rotation or roto-inversion axes from G \\ H are not allowed to intersect vertices or edges of the nets. This property significantly narrows the set of supergroups to be included in the derivation of interpenetrating nets. A procedure is described based on the automorphism group of a Hopf ring net [Alexandrov et al. (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 484-493] to determine maximal symmetries compatible with interpenetration patterns. The proposed approach is illustrated by examples of twofold interpenetrated utp, dia and pcu nets, as well as multiple copies of enantiomorphic quartz (qtz) networks. Some applications to polycatenated 2-periodic layers are also discussed. PMID:27126113

  16. NEIGHBOUR-IN: Image processing software for spatial analysis of animal grouping

    PubMed Central

    Caubet, Yves; Richard, Freddie-Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Animal grouping is a very complex process that occurs in many species, involving many individuals under the influence of different mechanisms. To investigate this process, we have created an image processing software, called NEIGHBOUR-IN, designed to analyse individuals’ coordinates belonging to up to three different groups. The software also includes statistical analysis and indexes to discriminate aggregates based on spatial localisation of individuals and their neighbours. After the description of the software, the indexes computed by the software are illustrated using both artificial patterns and case studies using the spatial distribution of woodlice. The added strengths of this software and methods are also discussed. PMID:26261448

  17. Topics in mode conversion theory and the group theoretical foundations of path integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew Stephen

    This dissertation reports research about the phase space perspective for solving wave problems, with particular emphasis on the phenomenon of mode conversion in multicomponent wave systems, and the mathematics which underlie the phase space perspective. Part I of this dissertation gives a review of the phase space theory of resonant mode conversion. We describe how the WKB approximation is related to geometrical structures in phase space, and how in particular ray-tracing algorithms can be used to construct the WKB solution. We further review how to analyze the phenomena of mode conversion from the phase space perspective. By making an expansion of the dispersion matrix about the mode conversion point in phase space, a local coupled wave equation is obtained. The solution of this local problem then provides a way to asymptotically match the WKB solutions on either side of the mode conversion region. We describe this theory in the context of a pedagogical example; that of a pair of coupled harmonic oscillators undergoing resonant conversion. Lastly, we present new higher order corrections to the local solution for the mode conversion problem which allow better asymptotic matching to the WKB solutions. The phase space tools used in Part I rely on the Weyl symbol calculus, which gives a way to relate operators to functions on phase space. In Part II of this dissertation, we explore the mathematical foundations of the theory of symbols. We first review the theory of representations of groups, and the concept of a group Fourier transform. The Fourier transform for commutative groups gives the ordinary transform, while the Fourier transform for non-commutative groups relates operators to functions on the group. We go on to present the group theoretical formulation of symbols, as developed recently by Zobin. This defines the symbol of an operator in terms of a double Fourier transform on a non-commutative group. We give examples of this new type of symbol, using the

  18. Friends with benefits: the role of huddling in mixed groups of torpid and normothermic animals.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Julia; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-02-01

    Huddling and torpor are widely used for minimizing heat loss by mammals. Despite the questionable energetic benefits from social heterothermy of mixed groups of warm normothermic and cold torpid individuals, the heterothermic Australian sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) rests in such groups during the cold season. To unravel why they might do so, we examined torpor expression of two sugar glider groups of four individuals each in outside enclosures during winter. We observed 79 torpor bouts during 50 days of observation and found that torpor bouts were longer and deeper when all individuals of a group entered torpor together, and therefore infer that they would have saved more energy in comparison to short and shallow solitary torpor bouts. However, all gliders of either group only expressed torpor uniformly in response to food restriction, whereas on most occasions at least one individual per group remained normothermic. Nevertheless, the presence of warm gliders in mixed groups also appears to be of energetic advantage for torpid individuals, because nest box temperature was negatively correlated with the number of torpid gliders, and normothermic individuals kept the nest temperature at a value closer to the threshold for thermoregulatory heat production during torpor. Our study suggests that mixed groups of torpid and normothermic individuals are observed when environmental conditions are adverse but food is available, leading to intermediate energy savings from torpor. However, under especially challenging conditions and when animals are starving, energy savings are maximized by uniform and pronounced expression of torpor. PMID:26685170

  19. Thermochemical properties and contribution groups for ketene dimers and related structures from theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Morales, Giovanni; Martínez, Ramiro

    2009-07-30

    This research's main goals were to analyze ketene dimers' relative stability and expand group additivity value (GAV) methodology for estimating the thermochemical properties of high-weight ketene polymers (up to tetramers). The CBS-Q multilevel procedure and statistical thermodynamics were used for calculating the thermochemical properties of 20 cyclic structures, such as diketenes, cyclobutane-1,3-diones, cyclobut-2-enones and pyran-4-ones, as well as 57 acyclic base compounds organized into five groups. According to theoretical heat of formation predictions, diketene was found to be thermodynamically favored over cyclobutane-1,3-dione and its enol-tautomeric form (3-hydroxycyclobut-2-enone). This result did not agree with old combustion experiments. 3-Hydroxycyclobut-2-enone was found to be the least stable dimer and its reported experimental detection in solution may have been due to solvent effects. Substituted diketenes had lower stability than substituted cyclobutane-1,3-diones with an increased number of methyl substituents, suggesting that cyclobutane-1,3-dione type dimers are the major products because of thermodynamic control of alkylketene dimerization. Missing GAVs for the ketene dimers and related structures were calculated through linear regression on the 57 acyclic base compounds. Corrections for non next neighbor interactions (such as gauche, eclipses, and internal hydrogen bond) were needed for obtaining a highly accurate and precise regression model. To the best of our knowledge, the hydrogen bond correction for GAV methodology is the first reported in the literature; this correction was correlated to MP2/6-31Gdagger and HF/6-31Gdagger derived geometries to facilitate its application. GAVs assessed by the linear regression model were able to reproduce acyclic compounds' theoretical thermochemical properties and experimental heat of formation for acetylacetone. Ring formation and substituent position corrections were calculated by consecutively

  20. A method to quantify movement activity of groups of animals using automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianyu; Yu, Haizhen; Liu, Ying

    2009-07-01

    Most physiological and environmental changes are capable of inducing variations in animal behavior. The behavioral parameters have the possibility to be measured continuously in-situ by a non-invasive and non-contact approach, and have the potential to be used in the actual productions to predict stress conditions. Most vertebrates tend to live in groups, herds, flocks, shoals, bands, packs of conspecific individuals. Under culture conditions, the livestock or fish are in groups and interact on each other, so the aggregate behavior of the group should be studied rather than that of individuals. This paper presents a method to calculate the movement speed of a group of animal in a enclosure or a tank denoted by body length speed that correspond to group activity using computer vision technique. Frame sequences captured at special time interval were subtracted in pairs after image segmentation and identification. By labeling components caused by object movement in difference frame, the projected area caused by the movement of every object in the capture interval was calculated; this projected area was divided by the projected area of every object in the later frame to get body length moving distance of each object, and further could obtain the relative body length speed. The average speed of all object can well respond to the activity of the group. The group activity of a tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) school to high (2.65 mg/L) levels of unionized ammonia (UIA) concentration were quantified based on these methods. High UIA level condition elicited a marked increase in school activity at the first hour (P<0.05) exhibiting an avoidance reaction (trying to flee from high UIA condition), and then decreased gradually.

  1. The nuclear question: rethinking species importance in multi-species animal groups.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Umesh; Raza, Rashid Hasnain; Quader, Suhel

    2010-09-01

    1. Animals group for various benefits, and may form either simple single-species groups, or more complex multi-species associations. Multi-species groups are thought to provide anti-predator and foraging benefits to participant individuals. 2. Despite detailed studies on multi-species animal groups, the importance of species in group initiation and maintenance is still rated qualitatively as 'nuclear' (maintaining groups) or 'attendant' (species following nuclear species) based on species-specific traits. This overly simplifies and limits understanding of inherently complex associations, and is biologically unrealistic, because species roles in multi-species groups are: (i) likely to be context-specific and not simply a fixed species property, and (ii) much more variable than this dichotomy indicates. 3. We propose a new view of species importance (measured as number of inter-species associations), along a continuum from 'most nuclear' to 'least nuclear'. Using mixed-species bird flocks from a tropical rainforest in India as an example, we derive inter-species association measures from randomizations on bird species abundance data (which takes into account species 'availability') and data on 86 mixed-species flocks from two different flock types. Our results show that the number and average strength of inter-species associations covary positively, and we argue that species with many, strong associations are the most nuclear. 4. From our data, group size and foraging method are ecological and behavioural traits of species that best explain nuclearity in mixed-species bird flocks. Parallels have been observed in multi-species fish shoals, in which group size and foraging method, as well as diet, have been shown to correlate with nuclearity. Further, the context in which multi-species groups occur, in conjunction with species-specific traits, influences the role played by a species in a multi-species group, and this highlights the importance of extrinsic factors in

  2. Nuclear Astrophysics Animations from the Nuclear Astrophysics Group at Clemson University

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meyer, Bradley; The, Lih-Sin

    The nuclear astrophysics group at Clemson University in South Carolina develops on-line tools and computer programs for astronomy, nuclear physics, and nuclear astrophysics. They have also done short animations that illustrate results from research with some of their tools. The animations are organized into three sections. The r-Process Movies demonstrate r-Process network calculations from the paper "Neutrino Capture and the R-Process" Meyer, McLaughlin, and Fuller, Phys. Rev. C, 58, 3696-3710 (1998). The Alpha-Rich Freezeout Movies are related to the reference: Standard alpha-rich freezeout calculation from The, Clayton, Jin, and Meyer 1998, Astrophysical Journal, "Reaction Rates Governing the Synthesis of 44Ti" At the current writing, the category for Low Metallicity s-Process Movies has only one item called n, p, 13C, 14N, 54Fe, and 88Sr Time evolution in convective zone.

  3. Unsmooth cuticles of soil animals and theoretical analysis of their hydrophobicity and anti-soil-adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xian

    2006-03-15

    Soil adhesion is a natural phenomenon, and it is harmful to terrain machines and tillage equipment that have soil as their work medium, such as automobiles, tractors, earth-moving machines, spades, hoes, and plows. Soil adhesion increases motion resistance and energy consumption, quickens damage to the soil-engaging components, and lowers work quality. The biomimetic research has provided a promising method to solve the soil adhesion problem. In this work, the cuticles of typical soil animals were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their wettability and mechanism of antiadhesion were analyzed in theory. The results of experimental observation have shown that the cuticles of soil animals have different unsmooth appearances, such as pimple-shaped, pit-like, and undee structures. But for the cross sections of the unsmooth cuticles, their common character is undee. Theoretical analysis has indicated that the larger the ratio of the amplitude of the wave to the period of the wave, the stronger the hydrophobicity, the more easily the composite interface between the liquid and the unsmooth cuticles forms, and the function of reducing soil adhesion of the unsmooth cuticles will be better. PMID:16298383

  4. Systems Approach to Studying Animal Sociality: Individual Position versus Group Organization in Dynamic Social Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Karlo; Ng, Kah Loon; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2010-01-01

    Social networks can be used to represent group structure as a network of interacting components, and also to quantify both the position of each individual and the global properties of a group. In a series of simulation experiments based on dynamic social networks, we test the prediction that social behaviors that help individuals reach prominence within their social group may conflict with their potential to benefit from their social environment. In addition to cases where individuals were able to benefit from improving both their personal relative importance and group organization, using only simple rules of social affiliation we were able to obtain results in which individuals would face a trade-off between these factors. While selection would favor (or work against) social behaviors that concordantly increase (or decrease, respectively) fitness at both individual and group level, when these factors conflict with each other the eventual selective pressure would depend on the relative returns individuals get from their social environment and their position within it. The presented results highlight the importance of a systems approach to studying animal sociality, in which the effects of social behaviors should be viewed not only through the benefits that those provide to individuals, but also in terms of how they affect broader social environment and how in turn this is reflected back on an individual's fitness. PMID:21203425

  5. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kirrilly; Every, Danielle; Rainbird, Sophia; Cornell, Victoria; Smith, Bradley; Trigg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to members of the community who are already considered vulnerable? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes seven particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. It concludes that animal attachment could provide a novel conduit for accessing, communicating with and motivating vulnerable people to engage in resilience building behaviors that promote survival and facilitate recovery. Abstract Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or ‘piggybacking’ disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general). Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required

  6. Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: • An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 • Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 • MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

  7. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William; Nemec, Alexandr

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171(T) and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171(T) ( = CIP 110486(T) = CCUG 26390(T) = CCM 8555(T)). PMID:25510976

  8. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171T and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171T ( = CIP 110486T = CCUG 26390T = CCM 8555T). PMID:25510976

  9. Molecular characterizations of human and animal group a rotaviruses in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, R; Koopmans, M P G; Shekary, N; Houwers, D J; van Duynhoven, Y T H P; van der Poel, W H M

    2005-02-01

    To gain more insight into interspecies transmission of rotavirus group A, human and animal fecal samples were collected between 1997 and 2001 in The Netherlands. A total of 110 human stool samples were successfully P and G genotyped by reverse transcriptase PCR. All strains belonged to the main human rotavirus genotypes G1 to G4, G9, [P4], [P6], [P8], and [P9]. [P8]G1 was predominant, and 5.5% belonged to the G9 genotype. Eleven percent of all P[8] genotypes could be genotyped only by a recently published modified primer. Rotavirus-positive fecal samples from 28 calf herds were genotyped by DNA sequencing. Genotypes G6 and G10 predominated; G6 and G10 were detected in 22 (78.6%) and 16 (57.1%) of the rotavirus-positive calf herds, respectively. In 12 (42.9%) calf herds, we found mixed infections. Genotype G8 was not found. Genotype G6 bovine rotaviruses were divided into three clusters: UK-like, VMRI-29-like, and Hun4-like. DNA sequencing of a part of the VP7 gene was shown to be useful as a quick determination of uncommon or novel strains of which the genotyping cannot be done by genotyping PCR. Of equine strains, both VP4 and VP7 genes could be used for genotyping: two [P12]G3 and four [P12]G14 equine rotaviruses were determined. We did not find indications for rotavirus interspecies transmissions, although the recently published human G6-Hun4 is genetically related to our G6 bovine isolates. All bovine, porcine, and equine rotaviruses were within genotypes previously reported for these animal species. PMID:15695662

  10. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R; Hartnett, Andrew T; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D

    2015-04-14

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  11. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R.; Hartnett, Andrew T.; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  12. COLLECTIVE VORTEX BEHAVIORS: DIVERSITY, PROXIMATE, AND ULTIMATE CAUSES OF CIRCULAR ANIMAL GROUP MOVEMENTS.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Johann; Bode, Nikolai W F; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-03-01

    Ant mill, caterpillar circle, bat doughnut, amphibian vortex, duck swirl, and fish torus are different names for rotating circular animal formations, where individuals turn around a common center. These "collective vortex behaviors" occur at different group sizes from pairs to several million individuals and have been reported in a large number of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates, including humans. However, to date, no comprehensive review and synthesis of the literature on vortex behaviors has been conducted. Here, we review the state of the art of the proximate and ultimate causes of vortex behaviors. The ubiquity of this behavioral phenomenon could suggest common causes or fundamental underlying principles across contexts. However, we find that a variety of proximate mechanisms give rise to vortex behaviors. We highlight the potential benefits of collective vortex behaviors to individuals involved in them. For example, in some species, vortices increase feeding efficiency and could give protection against predators. It has also been argued that vortices could improve collective decision-making and information transfer. We highlight gaps in our understanding of these ubiquitous behavioral phenomena and discuss future directions for research in vortex studies. PMID:27192777

  13. Theoretical discovery of stable structures of group III-V monolayers: The materials for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2015-11-23

    Group III-V compounds are very important as the materials of semiconductor devices. Stable structures of the monolayers of group III-V binary compounds have been discovered by using first-principles calculations. The primitive unit cell of the discovered structures is a rectangle, which includes four group-III atoms and four group-V atoms. A group-III atom and its three nearest-neighbor group-V atoms are placed on the same plane; however, these connections are not the sp{sup 2} hybridization. The bond angles around the group-V atoms are less than the bond angle of sp{sup 3} hybridization. The discovered structure of GaP is an indirect transition semiconductor, while the discovered structures of GaAs, InP, and InAs are direct transition semiconductors. Therefore, the discovered structures of these compounds have the potential of the materials for semiconductor devices, for example, water splitting photocatalysts. The discovered structures may become the most stable structures of monolayers which consist of other materials.

  14. Neotropical Siluriformes as a Model for Insights on Determining Biodiversity of Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Renata Rúbia; Message, Hugo José; da Graça, Weferson Júnio; Pavanelli, Carla Simone

    2015-01-01

    We performed an analysis of the descriptions of new species of Neotropical Siluriformes (catfishes) to estimate the number of new species that remain to be described for a complete knowledge on biodiversity of this order, to verify the effectiveness of taxonomic support, and to identify trends and present relevant information for future policies. We conducted a literature review of species descriptions between January 1990 and August 2014. The following metadata were recorded from each article: year of publication, number of species, journal and impact factor, family(s) of the described species, number of authors, age of the authors and coauthors, country of the first author’s institution and ecoregion of the type-locality. From accumulation of descriptions, we built an estimate model for number of species remaining to be described. We found 595 described species in 402 articles. The data demonstrated that there has been an increased understanding of the diversity of Siluriformes over the last 25 years in the Neotropical region, although 35% of the species still remain to be described. The model estimated that with the current trends and incentives, the biodiversity will be known in almost seven decades. We have reinforced the idea that greater joint efforts should be made by society and the scientific community to obtain this knowledge in a shorter period of time through enhanced programs for promoting science, training and the advancement of professionals before undiscovered species become extinct. The model built in this study can be used for similar estimates of other groups of animals. PMID:26168270

  15. Group theoretical classification of halogen nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra of distorted tetragonal antifluorite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, Rose M.; Armstrong, Robin L.

    A classification of the patterns of halogen nuclear quadrupole resonance lines resulting from distortions of the tetragonal R 2MX 6 structures C4 h5( I4/ m) and D4 h6( P4/ mnc) is given. Formal methods of group thepry are used to identify low symmetry space groups with the symmetries of vectors in an irreducible representation space of the high symmetry space group. Classification charts are presented which permit the identification of those space groups and primary order parameters which are compatible with particular halogen nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra. The discussion is limited to structural phase transitions involving the points of symmetry in the Brillouin zones of the high temperature phases. The sequences of structural transitions in K 2ReCl 6 and (NH 4) 2SnBr 6 are discussed as illustrations of the use of these charts.

  16. Report of the FELASA Working Group on evaluation of quality systems for animal units.

    PubMed

    Howard, B; van Herck, H; Guillen, J; Bacon, B; Joffe, R; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M

    2004-04-01

    This report compares and considers the merits of existing, internationally available quality management systems suitable for implementation in experimental animal facilities. These are: the Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines, ISO 9000:2000 (International Organization for Standardization) and AAALAC International (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International). Good laboratory practice (GLP) is a legal requirement for institutions undertaking non-clinical health and environmental studies for the purpose of registering or licensing for use and which have to be 'GLP-compliant'. GLP guidelines are often only relevant for and obtainable by those institutions. ISO is primarily an external business standard, which provides a management tool to master and optimize a business activity; it aims to implement and enhance 'customer satisfaction'. AAALAC is primarily a peer-reviewed system of accreditation which evaluates the organization and procedures in programmes of animal care and use to ensure the appropriate use of animals, safeguard animal well-being (ensuring state-of-the-art housing, management, procedural techniques, etc.) as well as the management of health and safety of staff. Management needs to determine, on the basis of a facility's specific goals, whether benefits would arise from the introduction of a quality system and, if so, which system is most appropriate. The successful introduction of a quality system confers peer-recognition against an independent standard, thereby providing assurance of standards of animal care and use, improving the quality of animal studies, and contributing to the three Rs-reduction, refinement and replacement. PMID:15070450

  17. Group theoretical study of the radical cation of methane: The effect of tunneling motions on the hyperfine interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Michio; Momose, Takamasa; Shida, Tadamasa; Knight, Lon B., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of CH+4 indicates that some large amplitude tunneling motions among Jahn-Teller distorted structures make the four protons equivalent. A group theoretical study using the permutation-inversion (PI) group is performed to analyze the hyperfine interaction of the nonrigid CH+4. It is shown that three patterns of the interaction are possible depending upon the type of tunneling motions. Only one of the three patterns is consistent with the experimental spectrum, which is presented in the accompanying paper [J. Chem. Phys. 103, 3377 (1995)].

  18. Reversible valence equilibrium reactions in main group compounds. A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Lin; Su, Ming-Der

    2006-05-18

    The potential energy surface for the intramolecular reaction of singlet state RR'E=ERR' (E = C, Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb) has been explored using density functional theory. All the stationary points, including the unsymmetrical reactant (R'R(2)E-ER'), the transition state, the symmetric product (R'RE=ERR'), and the monomer (R'RE) were completely optimized at the B3LYP/LANL2DZdp level of theory. Our theoretical findings suggest the following: (1) Both double-bonded RR'C=CRR' and RR'Si=SiRR' species are true minima on their potential energy surfaces and should be the only compounds existing at all temperatures. (2) The germanium system will occur either in the dimeric R(2)R'Ge-GeR' and RR'Ge=GeRR' structures or the monomeric RR'Ge structure, depending on the temperature. (3) If the size of the substituent (R) is small, then the unsymmetrical single-bonded R(2)R'Sn-SnR' molecule can exist at low temperatures. At room temperature, the unsymmetrical R(2)R'Sn-SnR' species can exist in equilibrium with its RR'Sn monomer. (4) The unsymmetrical R(3)Pb-PbR compound may be kinetically stable at low temperatures. On the other hand, it is predicted that both the unsymmetrical R(3)Pb-PbR and the symmetric R(2)Pb=PbR(2) species will spontaneously dissociate into R(2)Pb monomers at room temperature. Our theoretical results are in good agreement with available experimental observations (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 7520), and the results obtained allow a number of predictions to be made. PMID:16686454

  19. [Seroprevalence of tularemia in risk groups of humans and animals in Van, eastern Turkey].

    PubMed

    Bayram, Yasemin; Özkaçmaz, Ayşe; Parlak, Mehmet; Başbuğan, Yıldıray; Kılıç, Selçuk; Güdücüoğlu, Hüseyin

    2015-10-01

    Tularemia has become a re-emerging zoonotic disease in Turkey recently. The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of tularemia in humans and their animals living in rural risky areas of our region and to investigate the risk factors. Between January and July 2012, people living in rural areas of Van province (located at eastern part of Turkey) and their domestic animals were included in the study. The sample size was determined by using cluster sampling method like in an event with known prevalence and planned as a cross-sectional epidemiological study. Proportional random sampling method was used to determine which individuals will be included in the study. Presence of tularemia antibodies in the sera of a total 495 voluntary persons (343 female, 152 male; age range: 18-79 years, mean age: 40.61) and their 171 animals (40 cattle, 124 sheep and 7 goats) were screened by microagglutination test using safranin O-stained F.tularensis antigen (Public Health Agency of Turkey). For the evaluation of cross-reactivity between Brucella spp., tularemia positive serum samples were also tested with brucella microagglutination test. Among human and animal samples, 11.9% (59/495) and 44% (76/171) yielded positive results with the titers of ≥ 1:20 in F.tularensis microagglutination test, respectively. However, 69.5% (41/59) of human sera and 78.9% (60/76) of animal sera demonstrated equal or higher titers in the brucella test, so those sera were considered as cross-reactive. After exclusion of these sera, the seroprevalence for F.tularensis were calculated as 3.6% (18/495) for humans and 9.4% (16/171) for animals. Among the 16 animals with positive results, 12 were sheep, three were cattle and one was goat. The difference between seropositivity rates among the domestic animal species was not statistically significant (p> 0.05). In addition, no statistically significant differences were found between risk factors including insect bite, tick bite, contact with

  20. Theoretical study of vibrational energy transfer of free OH groups at the water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Renhui; Wei, Wenmei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown that the vibrational dynamics of free OH groups at the water-air interface is significantly different from that in bulk water. In this work, by performing molecular dynamics simulations and mixed quantum/classical calculations, we investigate different vibrational energy transfer pathways of free OH groups at the water-air interface. The calculated intramolecular vibrational energy transfer rate constant and the free OH bond reorientation time scale agree well with the experiment. It is also found that, due to the small intermolecular vibrational couplings, the intermolecular vibrational energy transfer pathway that is very important in bulk water plays a much less significant role in the vibrational energy relaxation of the free OH groups at the water-air interface.

  1. Conducting effective focus groups in the context of diversity: theoretical underpinnings and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Dreachslin, J L

    1998-11-01

    Demographic trends reveal that the socially and culturally relevant diversity of patients, caregivers, and managers in health care organizations will continue to increase. In addition, social attitudes are moving from a goal of assimilation or homogenization to one of differentiation and maintenance of subgroup identity. These shifts in demographics and social attitudes require the associated development of theory and practice guidelines for focus groups conducted in the context of diversity. Diversity has a profound impact on factors ranging from study design to the selection and training of facilitators and the analysis of results. Racial identity development theory, models of communication style differences, ethnographic studies of cultural archetypes or ethnic markers, and the author's experiences in facilitating focus groups that explore the sensitive topic of race/ethnicity provide insights for researchers and practitioners who want to ensure that focus groups conducted in the context of diversity produce valid results. PMID:10558348

  2. Theoretical study of vibrational energy transfer of free OH groups at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Renhui; Wei, Wenmei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang

    2016-04-14

    Recent experimental studies have shown that the vibrational dynamics of free OH groups at the water-air interface is significantly different from that in bulk water. In this work, by performing molecular dynamics simulations and mixed quantum/classical calculations, we investigate different vibrational energy transfer pathways of free OH groups at the water-air interface. The calculated intramolecular vibrational energy transfer rate constant and the free OH bond reorientation time scale agree well with the experiment. It is also found that, due to the small intermolecular vibrational couplings, the intermolecular vibrational energy transfer pathway that is very important in bulk water plays a much less significant role in the vibrational energy relaxation of the free OH groups at the water-air interface. PMID:27083739

  3. Learning New Behaviours through Group Adventure Initiative Tasks: A Theoretical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Travis; McCarron, Leonie

    This paper presents a model for implementation of behavior therapies in adventure programs that use Group Adventure Initiative Tasks (GAITs) to promote personal development. Behavior therapies include various techniques and processes based in learning and pedagogical theory and used to promote changes in behavioral responses to environmental…

  4. σ-Aromaticity in hexa-group 16 atom-substituted benzene dications: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Miho; Saito, Masaichi; Fujita, Masahiro; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-03-21

    C6I6(2+) has been reported to have a σ-aromatic character since removal of two σ anti-bonding electrons localized on iodines results in fulfilling Hückel (4n+2) rules for I6(2+) as well as C6 parts. To search for molecules possessing similar character, hexa-group 16 atom-substituted benzene dications C6(ChH)6(2+) (Ch = S, Se, Te) and their derivatives are examined for aromatic character by using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). For these dications, in which iodines in C6I6(2+) are replaced by group 16 atoms, negative NICS values larger in magnitude than for benzene are found when a σ anti-bonding orbital localized on group 16 atoms is unoccupied. To clarify the origin of large negative NICS values, they are decomposed into individual molecular orbitals. It has been shown that both π bonding orbitals on C6 and σ bonding orbitals on Se6 or Te6 contribute to the negative NICS values, indicating that the aromaticity of these dications have a substantial σ character as well as π characters. Aromaticity of group 14 and 15 atom-substituted benzene dications is also discussed. PMID:24564420

  5. Comparison of Sewage and Animal Fecal Microbiomes by using Oligotyping Reveals Potential Human Fecal Indicators in Multiple Taxonomic Groups

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most DNA-based microbial source tracking (MST) approaches target host-associated organisms within the order Bacteroidales, but human and other animal gut microbiota contain an array of other taxonomic groups that might serve as indicators for sources of fecal pollution. High thr...

  6. The reporting of clinical signs in laboratory animals: FELASA Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Fentener van Vlissingen, J M; Borrens, M; Girod, A; Lelovas, P; Morrison, F; Torres, Y Saavedra

    2015-10-01

    Observing and reporting clinical signs in laboratory animals is necessary for many reasons: the assessment of animal welfare, compliance with the principle of refinement (e.g. humane endpoints), regulatory compliance (e.g. reporting severity) and, importantly, as a scientific outcome, e.g. in animal models of disease or safety studies. Developments in the reporting of clinical signs will enhance the scientific value gained from animal experiments and further address the ethical cost. This paper discusses systematic approaches to the observation and reporting of clinical signs in animals (to be) used for research. Glossaries from public and corporate institutions have been consulted and a reference glossary has been set up, providing terminology to be tailored for institutional or project-specific use. The clinical examination of animals must be carried out by competent and specifically trained staff in a systematic way and repeated at adequate intervals and clinical observations must be registered effectively to allow this information to be used. The development of institutional or project-specific glossaries and the use of handwritten records or automated databases are discussed in detail. Among the users are animal care staff, veterinarians and researchers who will need to agree on a given set of clinical signs to be monitored routinely or as a scientific read-out and to train for the proper application. The paper introduces a long list of clinical signs with scientific terminology, descriptions and explanations as a reference glossary to be published and maintained online as a living document supported by the authors as an editorial committee. PMID:25957286

  7. On the group-theoretic structure of a class of quantum dialogue protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chitra; Kothari, Vivek; Banerjee, Anindita; Pathak, Anirban

    2013-02-01

    A sufficient condition for implementation of the quantum dialogue protocol is obtained and it is shown that the set of unitary operators used for the purpose must form a group under multiplication. A generalized protocol of quantum dialogue is obtained using the sufficient condition. Further, several examples of possible groups of unitary operators and quantum states that may be used for implementation of quantum dialogue are systematically generated. As examples, it is shown that GHZ state, GHZ-like state, W state, 4 and 5-qubit Cluster states, Ω state, Brown state, Q4 state and Q5 state can be used to implement quantum dialogue protocol. It is also shown that if a quantum system is found to be suitable for quantum dialogue then that can provide solution of the socialist millionaire problem too.

  8. Group-Theoretic Approach to Boundary Layer Equations of an Oldroy-B Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdemirli, Mehmet; Hayat, Tasawar; Aksoy, Yiğit

    2013-12-01

    Boundary layer equations are derived for the first time for an Oldroy-B fluid. The symmetry analysis of the equations is performed using Lie Group theory and the partial differential system is transferred to an ordinary differential system via symmetries. Resulting equations are numerically solved for the case of the stretching sheet problem. Effects of non-Newtonian parameters on the solutions are discussed.

  9. A novel group of type I polyketide synthases (PKS) in animals and the complex phylogenomics of PKSs.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Stephens, Tricia; Noonan, Brice P; Calestani, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Type I polyketide synthases (PKSs), and related fatty acid synthases (FASs), represent a large group of proteins encoded by a diverse gene family that occurs in eubacteria and eukaryotes (mainly in fungi). Collectively, enzymes encoded by this gene family produce a wide array of polyketide compounds that encompass a broad spectrum of biological activity including antibiotic, antitumor, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and predator defense functional roles. We employed a phylogenomics approach to estimate relationships among members of this gene family from eubacterial and eukaryotic genomes. Our results suggest that some animal genomes (sea urchins, birds, and fish) possess a previously unidentified group of pks genes, in addition to possessing fas genes used in fatty acid metabolism. These pks genes in the chicken, fish, and sea urchin genomes do not appear to be closely related to any other animal or fungal genes, and instead are closely related to pks genes from the slime mold Dictyostelium and eubacteria. Continued accumulation of genome sequence data from diverse animal lineages is required to clarify whether the presence of these (non-fas) pks genes in animal genomes owes their origins to horizontal gene transfer (from eubacterial or Dictostelium genomes) or to more conventional patterns of vertical inheritance coupled with massive gene loss in several animal lineages. Additionally, results of our broad-scale phylogenetic analyses bolster the support for previous hypotheses of horizontal gene transfer of pks genes from bacterial to fungal and protozoan lineages. PMID:17207587

  10. Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, Saroj K.; Sahu, Sridhar

    2015-08-28

    Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen is calculated using density functional theory (DFT). In addition, Bader topological analysis show large electron density at the bond critical point (BCP) between carbon of C{sub 2}X cluster and oxygen (of molecular oxygen), inferring that the C–O bonding to be more shared-type as compared to that of X - O bonding. This fact is also confirmed by larger positive value of electron density (ρ) and negative ∇{sup 2}ρ. Similar conclusion is also obtained from the delocalization index (δ) which, in the case of C-O is found to be comparatively large.

  11. Graphics and Animation in Teaching Dialogues. CAL Research Group Technical Report No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Every, I. M.

    An Open University project was planned to develop a set of computer assisted learning (CAL) microcomputer programs for a second level, summer school physics course, scheduled to begin in 1982. Major project aims were the development of an underlying system to effectively use medium resolution graphics with a simple animation capability;…

  12. What Makes Hydroxamate a Promising Anchoring Group in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells? Insights from Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Rego, Luis G C; Bai, Fu-Quan; Wang, Jian; Jia, Ran; Xie, Li-Ming; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-11-20

    We report, from a theoretical point of view, the first comparative study between the highly water-stable hydroxamate and the widely used carboxylate, in addition to the robust phosphate anchors. Theoretical calculations reveal that hydroxamate would be better for photoabsorption. A quantum dynamics description of the interfacial electron transfer (IET), including the underlying nuclear motion effect, is presented. We find that both hydroxamate and carboxylate would have efficient IET character; for phosphate the injection time is significantly longer (several hundred femtoseconds). We also verified that the symmetry of the geometry of the anchoring group plays important roles in the electronic charge delocalization. We conclude that hydroxamate can be a promising anchoring group, as compared to carboxylate and phosphate, due to its better photoabsorption and comparable IET time scale as well as the experimental advantage of water stability. We expect the implications of these findings to be relevant for the design of more efficient anchoring groups for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) application. PMID:26276483

  13. Motivation gains in performance groups: paradigmatic and theoretical developments on the Köhler effect.

    PubMed

    Hertel, G; Kerr, N L; Messé, L A

    2000-10-01

    In contrast to many demonstrations of social loafing, relatively few studies have documented group motivation gains. One such exception was O. Köhler's (1926, 1927) finding that team members working together did better at a taxing persistence task than would be expected from their individual performances, particularly when there was a moderate discrepancy in coworkers' capabilities. In Experiment 1, we developed a paradigm within which Köhler's overall motivation gain effect could be replicated, although the discrepancy in coworkers' capabilities did not moderate these motivation gains (after statistical artifacts were taken into account). Experiment 2 indicated that this motivation gain occurred under conjunctive but not under additive task demands, suggesting that the instrumentality of one's contribution to valued outcomes is a more likely explanation of the Köhler effect than social comparison processes. PMID:11045740

  14. Modelling, Simulation, Animation, and Real-Time Control (Mosart) for a Class of Electromechanical Systems: A System-Theoretic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Armando A.; Metzger, Richard P.; Cifdaloz, Oguzhan; Dhirasakdanon, Thanate; Welfert, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive modelling, simulation, animation, and real-time control (MoSART) environment for a class of 'cart-pendulum' electromechanical systems that may be used to enhance learning within differential equations and linear algebra classes. The environment is useful for conveying fundamental mathematical/systems concepts…

  15. Theoretical Study of Material and Device Properties of Group-III Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qimin

    Group-III nitride semiconductors, including AlN, GaN, InN, and their alloys, are ideal materials for solid state lighting applications. Current research focuses on improving the efficiency by improvements in materials quality and novel device designs, for instance based on nonpolar and semipolar growth. The motivation for our work is to assist and guide the experimental development of high-performance solid state optoelectronic devices by performing computational studies. Our investigations range from basic structural and electronic properties of nitrides to the effects of device design on efficiency of light emission. In the area of fundamental properties, we performed a systematic study of strain effects on the electronic band structures of the group-III-nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN) using density-functional theory with an advanced hybrid functional as well as using the quasiparticle GW method. We present a complete set of deformation potentials that allows us to predict the band positions of group-III nitrides and their alloys (InGaN and AlGaN) under realistic strain conditions. We then employed the resulting first-principles deformation potentials to predict the effects of strain on transition energies and valence-band structures of c-plane, nonpolar, and semipolar InGaN alloy layers grown on GaN substrates, with particular attention to the role of strain in the polarized light emission. We also investigated the role of native defects in the optical properties of GaN and AlN, again using hybrid density-functional calculations. We established that complexes between Mg and nitrogen vacancies lead to the broad red luminescence that has often been observed in GaN. We find that isolated nitrogen vacancies can give rise to broad emission peaked at 2.18 eV. We show that isolated aluminum vacancies lead to an absorption peak at 3.43 eV and an emission peak at 2.73 eV. We also find that the complexes can give rise to absorption peaked at 3.97 eV and

  16. Lead-chromium carbonyl complexes incorporated with group 8 metals: synthesis, reactivity, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Minghuey; Chu, Yen-Yi; Hsu, Miao-Hsing; Ke, Wei-Ming; Lin, Chien-Nan

    2011-01-17

    The trichromium-lead complex [Pb{Cr(CO)5}3](2-) (1) was isolated from the reaction of PbCl2 and Cr(CO)6 in a KOH/MeOH solution, and the new mixed chromium-iron-lead complex [Pb{Cr(CO)5}{Fe(CO)4}2](2-) (3) was synthesized from the reaction of PbCl2 and Cr(CO)6 in a KOH/MeOH solution followed by the addition of Fe(CO)5. X-ray crystallography showed that 3 consisted of a central Pb atom bound in a trigonal-planar environment to two Fe(CO)4 and one Cr(CO)5 fragments. When complex 1 reacted with 1.5 equiv of Mn(CO)5Br, the Cr(CO)4-bridged dimeric lead-chromium carbonyl complex [Pb2Br2Cr4(CO)18](2-) (4) was produced. However, a similar reaction of 3 or the isostructural triiron-lead complex [Pb{Fe(CO)4}3](2-) (2) with Mn(CO)5Br in MeCN led to the formation of the Fe3Pb2-based trigonal-bipyramidal complexes [Fe3(CO)9{PbCr(CO)5}2](2-) (6) and [Fe3(CO)9{PbFe(CO)4}2](2-) (5), respectively. On the other hand, the Ru3Pb2-based trigonal-bipyramidal complex [Ru3(CO)9{PbCr(CO)5}2](2-) (7) was obtained directly from the reaction of PbCl2, Cr(CO)6, and Ru3(CO)12 in a KOH/MeOH solution. X-ray crystallography showed that 5 and 6 each had an Fe3Pb2 trigonal-bipyramidal core geometry, with three Fe(CO)3 groups occupying the equatorial positions and two PbFe(CO)4 or PbCr(CO)5 units in the axial positions, while 7 displayed a Ru3Pb2 trigonal-bipyramidal geometry with three equatorial Ru(CO)3 groups and two axial PbCr(CO)5 units. The complexes 3-7 were characterized spectroscopically, and their nature, formation, and electrochemistry were further examined by molecular orbital calculations at the B3LYP level of density functional theory. PMID:21142206

  17. Design and implementation of a calibrated hyperspectral small-animal imager: Practical and theoretical aspects of system optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas Josiah

    Pre-clinical imaging has been an important development within the bioscience and pharmacology fields. A rapidly growing area within these fields is small animal fluorescence imaging, in which molecularly targeted fluorescent probes are used to non-invasively image internal events on a gross anatomical scale. Small-animal fluorescence imaging has transitioned from a research technique to pre-clinical technology very quickly, due to its molecular specificity, low cost, and relative ease of use. In addition, its potential uses in gene therapy and as a translational technology are becoming evident. This thesis outlines the development of an alternative modality for small animal/tissue imaging, using hyperspectral techniques to enable the collection of fluorescence images at different excitation and emission wavelengths. In specific, acousto-optical tunable filters (AOTFs) were used to construct emission-wavelength-scanning and excitation-wavelength-scanning small animal fluorescence imagers. Statistical, classification, and unmixing algorithms have been employed to extract specific fluorescent-dye information from hyperspectral image sets. In this work, we have designed and implemented hyperspectral imaging and analysis techniques to remove background autofluorescence from the desired fluorescence signal, resulting in highly specific and localized fluorescence. Therefore, in practice, it is possible to more accurately pin-point the location and size of diagnostic anatomical markers (e.g. tumors) labeled with fluorescent probes. Furthermore, multiple probes can be individually distinguished. In addition to imaging hardware and acquisition and analysis software, we have designed an optical tissue phantom for quality control and inter-system comparison. The phantom has been modeled using Monte Carlo techniques. The culmination of this work results in an understanding of the advantages and complexities in applying hyperspectral techniques to small animal fluorescence

  18. Electronic and optical response of Ru(II) complexes functionalized by methyl, carboxylate groups: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge - a carboxyl group - is added to one or two of the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure, indeed, affect electronic and optical properties and consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru-systems. In this study, we apply both theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the Ru(II) bipyridine complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state structures of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase, as well as in acetonitrile solution. In addition, an inelaborate Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states. All theoretical results nicely complement experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes and contribute to their interpretation. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show a high probability of deprotonation of the carbboxyl group in the Ru-complexes resulted in a slight blue shift and decrease of intensities of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotanated complexes demonstrate strong agreement when acetonitrile solvent is used in simulations. A polar solvent is found to play an important role in calculations of optical spectra: it

  19. Comparative value of blood and skin samples for diagnosis of spotted fever group rickettsial infection in model animals.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael L; Snellgrove, Alyssa N; Zemtsova, Galina E

    2016-07-01

    The definitive diagnosis of spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsioses in humans is challenging due to the retrospective nature and cross reactivity of the serological methods and the absence of reliable and consistent samples for molecular diagnostics. Existing data indicate the transient character of bacteremia in experimentally infected animals. The ability of arthropod vectors to acquire rickettsial infection from the laboratory animals in the absence of systemic infection and known tropism of rickettsial agents to endothelial cells of peripheral blood vessels underline the importance of local infection and consequently the diagnostic potential of skin samples. In order to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity of rickettsial DNA detection in blood and skin samples, we compared results of PCR testing in parallel samples collected from model laboratory animals infected with Rickettsia rickettsii, Rickettsia parkeri and Rickettsia slovaca-like agent at different time points after infection. Skin samples were collected from ears - away from the site of tick placement and without eschars. Overall, testing of skin samples resulted in a higher proportion of positive results than testing of blood samples. Presented data from model animals demonstrates that testing of skin samples from sites of rickettsial proliferation can provide definitive molecular diagnosis of up to 60-70% of tick-borne SFG rickettsial infections during the acute stage of illness. Detection of pathogen DNA in cutaneous samples is a valuable alternative to blood-PCR at least in model animals. PMID:27282078

  20. Randomized trial of group interventions to reduce HIV/STD risk and change theoretical mediators among detained adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schmiege, Sarah J; Broaddus, Michelle R; Levin, Michael; Bryan, Angela D

    2009-02-01

    Criminally involved adolescents engage in high levels of risky sexual behavior and alcohol use, and alcohol use may contribute to lack of condom use. Detained adolescents (n = 484) were randomized to (1) a theory-based sexual risk reduction intervention (GPI), (2) the GPI condition with a group-based alcohol risk reduction motivational enhancement therapy component (GPI + GMET), or (3) an information-only control (INFO). All interventions were presented in same-sex groups in single sessions lasting from 2 to 4 hr. Changes to putative theoretical mediators (attitudes, perceived norms, self-efficacy, and intentions) were measured immediately following intervention administration. The primary outcomes were risky sexual behavior and sexual behavior while drinking measured 3 months later (65.1% retention). The GPI + GMET intervention demonstrated superiority over both other conditions in influencing theoretical mediators and over the INFO control in reducing risky sexual behavior. Self-efficacy and intentions were significant mediators between condition and later risky sexual behavior. This study contributes to an understanding of harm reduction among high-risk adolescents and has implications for understanding circumstances in which the inclusion of GMET components may be effective. PMID:19170452

  1. A Functional Generalization of the Field-Theoretical Renormalization Group Approach for the Single-Impurity Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Hermann; Corrêa, Eberth

    2012-02-01

    We apply a functional implementation of the field-theoretical renormalization group (RG) method up to two loops to the single-impurity Anderson model. To achieve this, we follow a RG strategy similar to that proposed by Vojta et al. (in Phys. Rev. Lett. 85:4940, 2000), which consists of defining a soft ultraviolet regulator in the space of Matsubara frequencies for the renormalized Green's function. Then we proceed to derive analytically and solve numerically integro-differential flow equations for the effective couplings and the quasiparticle weight of the present model, which fully treat the interplay of particle-particle and particle-hole parquet diagrams and the effect of the two-loop self-energy feedback into them. We show that our results correctly reproduce accurate numerical renormalization group data for weak to slightly moderate interactions. These results are in excellent agreement with other functional Wilsonian RG works available in the literature. Since the field-theoretical RG method turns out to be easier to implement at higher loops than the Wilsonian approach, higher-order calculations within the present approach could improve further the results for this model at stronger couplings. We argue that the present RG scheme could thus offer a possible alternative to other functional RG methods to describe electronic correlations within this model.

  2. To follow or not? How animals in fusion-fission societies handle conflicting information during group decision-making.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Jerod A; Sigaud, Marie; Fortin, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    When group members possess differing information about the environment, they may disagree on the best movement decision. Such conflicts result in group break-ups, and are therefore a fundamental driver of fusion-fission group dynamics. Yet, a paucity of empirical work hampers our understanding of how adaptive evolution has shaped plasticity in collective behaviours that promote and maintain fusion-fission dynamics. Using movement data from GPS-collared bison, we found that individuals constantly associated with other animals possessing different spatial knowledge, and both personal and conspecific information influenced an individual's patch choice decisions. During conflict situations, bison used group familiarity coupled with their knowledge of local foraging options and recently sampled resource quality when deciding to follow or leave a group - a tactic that led to energy-rewarding movements. Natural selection has shaped collective behaviours for coping with social conflicts and resource heterogeneity, which maintain fusion-fission dynamics and play an essential role in animal distribution. PMID:26013202

  3. Characterization of Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Lancefield group C) from human and selected animal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Barnham, M.; Cole, G.; Efstratiou, A.; Tagg, J. R.; Skjold, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    We assembled an international collection of strains from sporadic and epidemic human infection with Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Lancefield group C) for laboratory study. Cultural and physiological characteristics of the isolates were determined, including biotyping with the API 20 STREP test kit and susceptibility testing with penicillin, erythromycin and tetracycline. The strains were examined for bacteriocin production and sensitivity and typed with a specially developed group-C streptococcal bacteriophage system incorporating a panel of 14 phages. Results of these tests gave useful discrimination between many of the strains: differences were shown between each of the major outbreak strains, including those complicated by post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Serious group C streptococcal infection may be caused by S. zooepidemicus and isolates should be identified to species level; the application of a typing scheme such as this may help to distinguish epidemiological patterns of infection. PMID:3556444

  4. A Biosocial View of Population: Fertility Behavior in Animal Groups and Early Human Societies. A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.

    The paper discusses the relationship between social structure and fertility behavior in man. Focusing upon human fertility within the context of varying social groups, the document reviews recent interdisciplinary population studies. Information and interpretations from biology, ethnology, anthropology, history, and sociology are presented in four…

  5. A 25 years experience of group-housed sows–reproduction in animal welfare-friendly systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since January 1 2013, group housing of sows has been compulsory within the European Union (EU) in all pig holdings with more than ten sows. Sows and gilts need to be kept in groups from 4 weeks after service to 1 week before the expected time of farrowing (Article 3(4) of Directive 2008/120/EC on the protection of pigs). The legislation regarding group housing was adopted already in 2001 and a long transitional period was allowed to give member states and producers enough time for adaptation. Even so, group housing of sows still seems to be uncommon in the EU, and is also uncommon in commercial pig farming systems in the rest of the world. In this review we share our experience of the Swedish 25 years of animal welfare legislation stipulating that sows must be loose-housed which de facto means group housed. The two most important concerns related to reproductive function among group-housed sows are the occurrence of lactational oestrus when sows are group-housed during lactation, and the stress that is associated with group housing during mating and gestation. Field and clinical observations in non-lactating, group-housed sows in Sweden suggest that by making basic facts known about the pig reproductive physiology related to mating, we might achieve application of efficient batch-wise breeding without pharmacological interventions. Group housing of lactating sows has some production disadvantages and somewhat lower productivity would likely have to be expected. Recordings of behavioural indicators in different housing systems suggest a lower welfare level in stalled animals compared with group-housed ones. However, there are no consistent effects on the reproductive performance associated with different housing systems. Experimental studies suggest that the most sensitive period, regarding disturbance of reproductive functions by external stressors, is the time around oestrus. We conclude that by keeping sows according to the pig welfare-friendly Directive 2008

  6. Theoretical Analysis of a Self-Replicator With Reduced Template Inhibition Based on an Informational Leaving Group.

    PubMed

    Bigan, Erwan; Mattelaer, Henri-Philippe; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-03-01

    The first non-enzymatic self-replicating systems, as proposed by von Kiedrowski (Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 25(10):932-935, 1986) and Orgel (Nature 327(6120):346-347, 1987), gave rise to the analytical background still used today to describe artificial replicators. What separates a self-replicating from an autocatalytic system is the ability to pass on structural information (Orgel, Nature 358(6383):203-209, 1992). Utilising molecular information, nucleic acids were the first choice as prototypical examples. But early self-replicators showed parabolic over exponential growth due to the strongly bound template duplex after template-directed ligation of substrates. We propose a self-replicating scheme with a weakly bound template duplex, using an informational leaving group. Such a scheme is inspired by the role of tRNA as leaving group and information carrier during protein synthesis, and is based on our previous experience with nucleotide chemistry. We analyse theoretically this scheme and compare it to the classical minimal replicator model. We show that for an example hexanucleotide template mirroring that is used by von Kiedrowski (Bioorganic chemistry frontiers, 1993) for the analysis of the classical minimal replicator, the proposed scheme is expected to result in higher template self-replication rate. The proposed self-replicating scheme based on an informational leaving group is expected to outperform the classical minimal replicator because of a weaker template duplex bonding, resulting in reduced template inhibition. PMID:27002711

  7. Group Theoretical Analysis of Vibrational Modes, Rovibronic Levels and Nuclear Spin Statistics of extended aromatic C48N12 Azafullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2004-03-17

    We have presented a group theoretical analysis of the vibrational modes and rovibronic levels of a novel extended aromatic C{sub 48}N{sub 12} azafullerene. The nuclear spin multiplets and statistical weights of {sup 14}N spin-1 bosons, vibrational and rotational analysis and computed vibrational spectra are provided. We have also predicted the properties of the {sup 3}A{sub u}, {sup 3}E{sub g}, and {sup 3}E{sub u} excited states of C{sub 48}N{sub 12} that lie 1.9 eV above the {sup 1}A{sub g} ground state, and that the {sup 3}E{sub g} and {sup 3}E{sub u} states would undergo Jahn-Teller distortion into chiral structures with no symmetry and an achiral structure with C{sub i} symmetry.

  8. Group theoretic method for analyzing interaction of a discontinuity wave with a strong shock in an ideal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    A group theoretic method is used to obtain an exact particular solution to the system of partial differential equations, describing one-dimensional unsteady planar, cylindrically and spherically symmetric motions in an ideal gas, involving shock waves. It is interesting to remark that the exact solution obtained here is precisely the blast wave solution obtained earlier using a different method of approach. Further, the evolution of a discontinuity wave and its interaction with the strong shock are studied within the state characterized by the exact particular solution. The properties of reflected and transmitted waves and the jump in the shock acceleration are completely characterized, and certain observations are noted in respect to their contrasting behavior.

  9. Fish in a ring: spatio-temporal pattern formation in one-dimensional animal groups

    PubMed Central

    Abaid, Nicole; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we study the collective behaviour of fish shoals in annular domains. Shoal mates are modelled as self-propelled particles moving on a discrete lattice. Collective decision-making is determined by information exchange among neighbours. Neighbourhoods are specified using the perceptual limit and numerosity of fish. Fish self-propulsion and obedience to group decisions are described through random variables. Spatio-temporal schooling patterns are measured using coarse observables adapted from the literature on coupled oscillator networks and features of the time-varying network describing the fish-to-fish information exchange. Experiments on zebrafish schooling in an annular tank are used to validate the model. Effects of group size and obedience parameter on coarse observables and network features are explored to understand the implications of perceptual numerosity and spatial density on fish schooling. The proposed model is also compared with a more traditional metric model, in which the numerosity constraint is released and fish interactions depend only on physical configurations. Comparison shows that the topological regime on which the proposed model is constructed allows for interpreting characteristic behaviours observed in the experimental study that are not captured by the metric model. PMID:20413559

  10. The diversity and radiation of the largest monophyletic animal group on New Caledonia (Trichoptera: Ecnomidae: Agmina).

    PubMed

    Espeland, M; Johanson, K A

    2010-10-01

    In area, New Caledonia is the smallest of the world's 25 official biodiversity hotspots, but in many taxonomic groups, the island has the highest concentration of species on earth, particularly so in the freshwater insect order Trichoptera. This study aims at applying molecular data and morphology for estimating the real species diversity of the genus Agmina on New Caledonia and investigating potential effects of ultramafic rock substrate on diversification. A dated molecular phylogeny was applied to study diversity and diversification related to geological substrate using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model, diva and Bayesian ancestral character reconstruction. More than 47 species (>63%) were unknown to science. Initial radiation occurred on ultramafic substrate followed by several independent dispersal events to nonultramafic substrate. The rate of shift from ultramafic to nonultramafic substrate was significantly higher than the rate of shift in the opposite direction, indicating a possible cost associated with living on ultramafic substrate. PMID:20722893

  11. Spotted fever group rickettsiae in ticks collected from wild animals in Israel.

    PubMed

    Keysary, Avi; Eremeeva, Marina E; Leitner, Moshe; Din, Adi Beth; Wikswo, Mary E; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; Inbar, Moshe; Wallach, Arian D; Shanas, Uri; King, Roni; Waner, Trevor

    2011-11-01

    We report molecular evidence for the presence of spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) in ticks collected from roe deer, addax, red foxes, and wild boars in Israel. Rickettsia aeschlimannii was detected in Hyalomma marginatum and Hyalomma detritum while Rickettsia massiliae was present in Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks. Furthermore, a novel uncultured SFGR was detected in Haemaphysalis adleri and Haemaphysalis parva ticks from golden jackals. The pathogenicity of the novel SFGR for humans is unknown; however, the presence of multiple SFGR agents should be considered when serological surveillance data from Israel are interpreted because of significant antigenic cross-reactivity among Rickettsia. The epidemiology and ecology of SFGR in Israel appear to be more complicated than was previously believed. PMID:22049050

  12. Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Ticks Collected from Wild Animals in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Keysary, Avi; Eremeeva, Marina E.; Leitner, Moshe; Din, Adi Beth; Wikswo, Mary E.; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Inbar, Moshe; Wallach, Arian D.; Shanas, Uri; King, Roni; Waner, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    We report molecular evidence for the presence of spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) in ticks collected from roe deer, addax, red foxes, and wild boars in Israel. Rickettsia aeschlimannii was detected in Hyalomma marginatum and Hyalomma detritum while Rickettsia massiliae was present in Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks. Furthermore, a novel uncultured SFGR was detected in Haemaphysalis adleri and Haemaphysalis parva ticks from golden jackals. The pathogenicity of the novel SFGR for humans is unknown; however, the presence of multiple SFGR agents should be considered when serological surveillance data from Israel are interpreted because of significant antigenic cross-reactivity among Rickettsia. The epidemiology and ecology of SFGR in Israel appear to be more complicated than was previously believed. PMID:22049050

  13. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. PMID:26945637

  14. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of Group Exercise and Animal-Assisted Therapy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Grubbs, Brandon; Artese, Ashley; Schmitt, Karla; Cormier, Eileen; Panton, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility of incorporating animal-assisted therapy teams (ATT) into a 6-week group exercise program for older adults (77 ± 6 years). Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to an exercise with ATT (E+ATT; n = 8) or exercise only (E; n = 7) group. Groups exercised 3x/week for 45 min. Feasibility was assessed by three objectives: (1) ATT will not need extensive preparation beyond their original therapy training; (2) the study will require minimal cost; and (3) ATT must not impair the effectiveness of the exercise program. By the study conclusion, all objectives were met. Time and cost were minimal for ATT, and adherence was 93% and 90% for E+ATT and E, respectively. There were significant improvements in both groups (p ≤ .05) for arm curls, get-up and go, and 6-min walk. The results of this pilot study suggest that it is feasible to incorporate ATT into group exercise programming for older adults. PMID:26439234

  15. The biological effects of ozone on representative members of five groups of animal viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, D.C.; Zee, Y.C.; Osebold, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    In an effort to establish the biological relevance of the reactions of ozone with soluble proteins and lipid bilayer membrane systems, representative viruses from five major virus groups were exposed to moderate concentrations of ozone. The virus suspensions were exposed at 37/sup 0/C to 0.00, 0.16, and 0.64 ppm ozone in the gas phase. The ozone reacted with the virus suspensions as a thin film of fluid on the surface of a rotating culture bottle as the gas was drawn through the bottle at a flow rate of 2 liters/min. The three enveloped viruses tested exhibited different susceptibilities to ozone inactivation which correlated with their thermolability in the absence of ozone. The order of susceptibility to ozone inactivation of the enveloped viruses was vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (Rhabdoviridae) > influenza A virus (WSN strain) (Orthomyxoviridae) > infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV) (Herpesviridae). The inactivation reactions of the enveloped viruses with ozone showed pseudo-first-order kinetics. A simple reaction model was used to derive a reaction rate expression from which rate constrants and reaction stoichiometry were estimated. In contrast to the enveloped viruses, the two nonenveloped viruses examined were relatively resistant to ozone inactivation. Polio virus type I (Picornaviridae) was found to be completely resistant to ozone inactivation after 60 hr exposure to either ozone concentration, while infectious canine hepatitis virus (Adenoviridae) showed only slight inactivation after exposure to 0.64 ppm ozone for 66 hr. The significance of these results with regard to the reactions of ozone with cell membranes and other components is discussed.

  16. Detection of Hidden Hostile/Terrorist Groups in Harsh Territories by Using Animals as Mobile Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Ercan, Tuncay

    2008-01-01

    Terrorism is the greatest threat to national security and cannot be defeated by conventional military force alone. In critical areas such as Iraq, Afghanistan and Turkey, regular forces cannot reach these hostile/terrorist groups, the instigators of terrorism. These groups have a clear understanding of the relative ineffectiveness of counter-guerrilla operations and rely on guerrilla warfare to avoid major combat as their primary means of continuing the conflict with the governmental structures. In Internal Security Operations, detection of terrorist and hostile groups in their hiding places such as caves, lairs, etc. can only be achieved by professionally trained people such as Special Forces or intelligence units with the necessary experience and tools suitable for collecting accurate information in these often harsh, rugged and mountainous countries. To assist these forces, commercial micro-sensors with wireless interfaces could be utilized to study and monitor a variety of phenomena and environments from a certain distance for military purposes. In order to locate hidden terrorist groups and enable more effective use of conventional military resources, this paper proposes an active remote sensing model implanted into animals capable of living in these environments. By using these mobile sensor devices, improving communications for data transfer from the source, and developing better ways to monitor and detect threats, terrorist ability to carry out attacks can be severely disrupted.

  17. Comparison of Sewage and Animal Fecal Microbiomes by Using Oligotyping Reveals Potential Human Fecal Indicators in Multiple Taxonomic Groups.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jenny C; Eren, A Murat; Green, Hyatt C; Shanks, Orin C; Morrison, Hilary G; Vineis, Joseph H; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L

    2015-10-01

    Most DNA-based microbial source tracking (MST) approaches target host-associated organisms within the order Bacteroidales, but the gut microbiota of humans and other animals contain organisms from an array of other taxonomic groups that might provide indicators of fecal pollution sources. To discern between human and nonhuman fecal sources, we compared the V6 regions of the 16S rRNA genes detected in fecal samples from six animal hosts to those found in sewage (as a proxy for humans). We focused on 10 abundant genera and used oligotyping, which can detect subtle differences between rRNA gene sequences from ecologically distinct organisms. Our analysis showed clear patterns of differential oligotype distributions between sewage and animal samples. Over 100 oligotypes of human origin occurred preferentially in sewage samples, and 99 human oligotypes were sewage specific. Sequences represented by the sewage-specific oligotypes can be used individually for development of PCR-based assays or together with the oligotypes preferentially associated with sewage to implement a signature-based approach. Analysis of sewage from Spain and Brazil showed that the sewage-specific oligotypes identified in U.S. sewage have the potential to be used as global alternative indicators of human fecal pollution. Environmental samples with evidence of prior human fecal contamination had consistent ratios of sewage signature oligotypes that corresponded to the trends observed for sewage. Our methodology represents a promising approach to identifying new bacterial taxa for MST applications and further highlights the potential of the family Lachnospiraceae to provide human-specific markers. In addition to source tracking applications, the patterns of the fine-scale population structure within fecal taxa suggest a fundamental relationship between bacteria and their hosts. PMID:26231648

  18. Comparison of Sewage and Animal Fecal Microbiomes by Using Oligotyping Reveals Potential Human Fecal Indicators in Multiple Taxonomic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jenny C.; Eren, A. Murat; Green, Hyatt C.; Shanks, Orin C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Vineis, Joseph H.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2015-01-01

    Most DNA-based microbial source tracking (MST) approaches target host-associated organisms within the order Bacteroidales, but the gut microbiota of humans and other animals contain organisms from an array of other taxonomic groups that might provide indicators of fecal pollution sources. To discern between human and nonhuman fecal sources, we compared the V6 regions of the 16S rRNA genes detected in fecal samples from six animal hosts to those found in sewage (as a proxy for humans). We focused on 10 abundant genera and used oligotyping, which can detect subtle differences between rRNA gene sequences from ecologically distinct organisms. Our analysis showed clear patterns of differential oligotype distributions between sewage and animal samples. Over 100 oligotypes of human origin occurred preferentially in sewage samples, and 99 human oligotypes were sewage specific. Sequences represented by the sewage-specific oligotypes can be used individually for development of PCR-based assays or together with the oligotypes preferentially associated with sewage to implement a signature-based approach. Analysis of sewage from Spain and Brazil showed that the sewage-specific oligotypes identified in U.S. sewage have the potential to be used as global alternative indicators of human fecal pollution. Environmental samples with evidence of prior human fecal contamination had consistent ratios of sewage signature oligotypes that corresponded to the trends observed for sewage. Our methodology represents a promising approach to identifying new bacterial taxa for MST applications and further highlights the potential of the family Lachnospiraceae to provide human-specific markers. In addition to source tracking applications, the patterns of the fine-scale population structure within fecal taxa suggest a fundamental relationship between bacteria and their hosts. PMID:26231648

  19. Is Counseling Going to the Dogs? An Exploratory Study Related to the Inclusion of an Animal in Group Counseling with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Amber M.; Cox, Jane A.; Bernert, Donna J.; Jenkins, Christie D.

    2007-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that the use of animals in counseling provides beneficial effects to clients. This article presents literature on Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT), and details an exploratory study that applied AAT in an adolescent anger management group. Consistent with other research, beneficial effects noted in this study included a…

  20. Detection of group C rotavirus antigens and antibodies in animals and humans by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tsunemitsu, H; Jiang, B; Saif, L J

    1992-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed to detect group (gp) C rotavirus antigens and antibodies. Both assays were confirmed to be specific for gp C rotavirus by using serogroup A, B, and C rotaviruses; hyperimmune antisera to these serogroups of rotaviruses; and paired serum specimens from animals infected with gp C rotaviruses. The ELISA for antigen detection reacted not only with porcine gp C rotaviruses but also with human and bovine gp C rotaviruses. Following experimental challenge of gnotobiotic pigs with porcine gp C rotavirus, the virus was found by ELISA in all diarrheic feces. A high prevalence of antibodies to gp C rotaviruses was detected in sera from adult pigs (93 to 97%) and cattle (47 to 56%) in the United States and Japan. However, no antibody to gp C rotavirus was detected in the sera (n = 20) of adult horses in the United States. In human sera from Hokkaido, Japan, 3% of children and 13% of adults possessed antibody to gp C rotaviruses. These results suggest that the ELISA that we developed may be useful for surveying gp C rotavirus infections in animals and humans. On the basis of serology, gp C rotavirus infections are common in pigs and cattle in the United States and Japan, but they occur at lower levels in humans from the Hokkaido area of Japan. PMID:1323577

  1. WORKSHOP ON THE QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE COMPARABILITY OF HUMAN AND ANIMAL DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY, WORK GROUP I REPORT: COMPARABILITY OF MEASURES OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY IN HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment measures used in developmental neurotoxicology are reviewed for their comparability in humans and laboratory animals, and their ability to detect comparable, adverse effects across species. ompounds used for these comparisons include: abuse substances, anticonvulsant d...

  2. Human-Computer Interaction and Sociological Insight: A Theoretical Examination and Experiment in Building Affinity in Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oren, Michael Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The juxtaposition of classic sociological theory and the, relatively, young discipline of human-computer interaction (HCI) serves as a powerful mechanism for both exploring the theoretical impacts of technology on human interactions as well as the application of technological systems to moderate interactions. It is the intent of this dissertation…

  3. Workshop on the qualitative and quantitative comparability of human and animal developmental neurotoxicity, Work Group I report: comparability of measures of developmental neurotoxicity in humans and laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M E; Spear, L P

    1990-01-01

    Assessment measures used in developmental neurotoxicology are reviewed for their comparability in humans and laboratory animals, and their ability to detect comparable adverse effects across species. Compounds used for these comparisons include: substances of abuse, anticonvulsant drugs, ethanol, methylmercury, lead, PCBs, and ionizing radiation. At the level of functional category (sensory, motivational, cognitive and motor function, and social behavior), close agreement was found across species for all neurotoxic agents reviewed, particularly at high exposure levels. This was true even though the specific end points used to assess these functions often varied substantially across species. In addition, it was found that: 1) the U.S. EPA Developmental Neurotoxicology Test Battery presented at the Workshop would have identified the hazard to humans of exposure to the above compounds, although it may have underestimated human risk in some cases; 2) assessment of developmental neurotoxicity should involve evaluation of all categories of function; 3) for most compounds reviewed, the neurotoxic effects of prenatal exposure cannot be attributed to maternal toxicity, and exposure at or just below the threshold for such toxicity is an appropriate upper level for developmental neurotoxicity testing; 4) maternal exposure during the postnatal period poses a number of serious methodological problems; and 5) animal studies would better parallel human studies if more emphasis was placed on evaluation during development. PMID:2115099

  4. An Approach to Life Skills Group Work with Youth in Transition to Independent Living: Theoretical, Practice, and Operational Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Terrence T.; Williams, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    Group work is fundamental to working with youth learning about independent living and in making the tough and challenging transition to independence. The authors, seasoned and experienced group workers and researchers with youth leaving the child welfare system, will present a conceptual framework and set of practices for helping youth gain those…

  5. A theoretical study of the relaxation of a phenyl group chemisorbed to an RDX freestanding thin film.

    PubMed

    Pereverzev, Andrey; Sewell, Thomas D

    2016-08-01

    Energy relaxation from an excited phenyl group chemisorbed to the surface of a crystalline thin film of α-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (α-RDX) at 298 K and 1 atm is simulated using molecular dynamics. Two schemes are used to excite the phenyl group. In the first scheme, the excitation energy is added instantaneously as kinetic energy by rescaling momenta of the 11 atoms in the phenyl group. In the second scheme, the phenyl group is equilibrated at a higher temperature in the presence of static RDX geometries representative of the 298 K thin film. An analytical model based on ballistic phonon transport that requires only the harmonic part of the total Hamiltonian and includes no adjustable parameters is shown to predict, essentially quantitatively, the short-time dynamics of the kinetic energy relaxation (∼200 fs). The dynamics of the phenyl group for times longer than about 6 ps follows exponential decay and agrees qualitatively with the dynamics described by a master equation. Long-time heat propagation within the bulk of the crystal film is consistent with the heat equation. PMID:27497561

  6. A theoretical study of the relaxation of a phenyl group chemisorbed to an RDX freestanding thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Andrey; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2016-08-01

    Energy relaxation from an excited phenyl group chemisorbed to the surface of a crystalline thin film of α-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (α-RDX) at 298 K and 1 atm is simulated using molecular dynamics. Two schemes are used to excite the phenyl group. In the first scheme, the excitation energy is added instantaneously as kinetic energy by rescaling momenta of the 11 atoms in the phenyl group. In the second scheme, the phenyl group is equilibrated at a higher temperature in the presence of static RDX geometries representative of the 298 K thin film. An analytical model based on ballistic phonon transport that requires only the harmonic part of the total Hamiltonian and includes no adjustable parameters is shown to predict, essentially quantitatively, the short-time dynamics of the kinetic energy relaxation (˜200 fs). The dynamics of the phenyl group for times longer than about 6 ps follows exponential decay and agrees qualitatively with the dynamics described by a master equation. Long-time heat propagation within the bulk of the crystal film is consistent with the heat equation.

  7. The Effect of Participating in a Pre-Veterinary Learning Community of Freshmen Interest Group (FIG) Has on the Odds of New Animal Science Majors Graduate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdie, John R., II; Williams, James E.; Ellersieck, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    All first-year students who entered the University of Missouri-Columbia as animal science majors between the fall of 1998 and 2004 (n = 619) had the opportunity to participate in a residentially-based Freshmen Interest Group (FIG) and/or a learning community specifically designed for them. The odds of graduating is significant for all three…

  8. Randomized Trial of Group Interventions to Reduce HIV/STD Risk and Change Theoretical Mediators among Detained Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmiege, Sarah J.; Broaddus, Michelle R.; Levin, Michael; Bryan, Angela D.

    2009-01-01

    Criminally involved adolescents engage in high levels of risky sexual behavior and alcohol use, and alcohol use may contribute to lack of condom use. Detained adolescents (n = 484) were randomized to (1) a theory-based sexual risk reduction intervention (GPI), (2) the GPI condition with a group-based alcohol risk reduction motivational enhancement…

  9. Animal learning.

    PubMed

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Pavlov and Thorndike pioneered the experimental study of animal learning and provided psychologists with powerful tools to unveil its underlying mechanisms. Today's research developments and theoretical analyses owe much to the pioneering work of these early investigators. Nevertheless, in the evolution of our knowledge about animal learning, some initial conceptions have been challenged and revised. We first review the original experimental procedures and findings of Pavlov and Thorndike. Next, we discuss critical research and consequent controversies which have greatly shaped animal learning theory. For example, although contiguity seemed to be the only condition that is necessary for learning, we now know that it is not sufficient; the conditioned stimulus (CS) also has to provide information about the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). Also, animals appear to learn different things about the same stimuli when circumstances vary. For instance, when faced with situations in which the meaning of a CS changes, as in the case of acquisition and later extinction, animals seem to preserve the original knowledge (CS-US) in addition to learning about the new conditions (CS-noUS). Finally, we discuss how parallels among Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and human causal judgment suggest that causal knowledge may lie at the root of both human and animal learning. All of these empirical findings and theoretical developments prove that animal learning is more complex and intricate than was once imagined. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26272842

  10. Additional Evidence that Juvenile Oyster Disease Is Caused by a Member of the Roseobacter Group and Colonization of Nonaffected Animals by Stappia stellulata-Like Strains†

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Juvenile oyster disease (JOD) causes significant annual mortalities of hatchery-produced Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, cultured in the Northeast. We have reported that a novel species of the α-proteobacteria Roseobacter group (designated CVSP) was numerically dominant in JOD-affected animals sampled during the 1997 epizootic on the Damariscotta River, Maine. In this study we report the isolation of CVSP bacteria from JOD-affected oysters during three separate epizootics in 1998. These bacteria were not detected in nonaffected oysters at the enzootic site, nor in animals raised at a JOD-free site. Animals raised at the JOD enzootic site that were unaffected by JOD were stably and persistently colonized by Stappia stellulata-like strains. These isolates (designated M1) inhibited the growth of CVSP bacteria in a disk-diffusion assay and thus may have prevented colonization of these animals by CVSP bacteria in situ. Laboratory-maintained C. virginica injected with CVSP bacteria experienced statistically significant elevated mortalities compared to controls, and CVSP bacteria were recovered from these animals during the mortality events. Together, these results provide additional evidence that CVSP bacteria are the etiological agent of JOD. Further, there are no other descriptions of specific marine α-proteobacteria that have been successfully cultivated from a defined animal host. Thus, this system presents an opportunity to investigate both bacterial and host factors involved in the establishment of such associations and the role of the invertebrate host in the ecology of these marine α-proteobacteria. PMID:10966410

  11. Biosafety considerations for in vivo work with risk group 3 pathogens in large animals and wildlife in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regulations in the United States require BL3 or BL3-Ag containment for many endemic zoonotic pathogens and etiologic agents of foreign animal diseases. In an effort to protect public health, billions of dollars were invested in regulatory programs over many years to reduce the prevalence of zoonotic...

  12. An experimental and theoretical study on concomitant polymorphism of a dithiocarbonimidates derivate in a single space group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnkaya, Ersin; Dinçer, Muharrem; Şahan, Emine; Korkusuz, Elif; Yıldırım, İsmail; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2013-05-01

    The title organic dithiocarbonimidates derivate crystallizes in two different polymorphic modifications. The conformational differences between the two crystalline modifications lead to differences in crystal packing and thus result in the formation of the two polymorphic forms. In this paper, we will report a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the molecular structure and spectroscopic parameters (FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR) of 5-benzoyl-2-oxo-4-phenyl-1(2H)-[diethyldithiocarbonimidate]-pyrimidine.The molecular geometry was also optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set in ground state and compared with the experimental data. From the optimized geometry of the molecule, vibrational frequencies, Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C-NMR chemical shift values, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distribution, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) and thermodynamic properties of the title compound were performed at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). The calculated MEP map verifies the solid-state interactions. The computed vibrational frequencies are used to determine the types of molecular motions associated with each of the experimental bands observed. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap shows that charge transfer occur within the molecule. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecules has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with electrostatic potential (ESP).

  13. Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Fangyong; Lartey, Michael; Damodaran, Krishnan; Albenze, Erik; Thompson, Robert L.; Kim, Jihan; Harancyzk, Maciel; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Luebke, David R.; Smit, Berend

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquids are an emerging class of materials with applications in a variety of fields. Steady progress has been made in the creation of ionic liquids tailored to specific applications. However, the understanding of the underlying structure–property relationships has been slower to develop. As a step in the effort to alleviate this deficiency, the influence of side groups on ionic liquid properties has been studied through an integrated approach utilizing synthesis, experimental determination of properties, and simulation techniques. To achieve this goal, a classical force field in the framework of OPLS/Amber force fields has been developed to predict ionic liquid properties accurately. Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry was employed to synthesize triazolium-based ionic liquids with diverse side groups. Values of densities were predicted within 3% of experimental values, whereas self-diffusion coefficients were underestimated by about an order of magnitude though the trends were in excellent agreement, the activation energy calculated in simulation correlates well with experimental values. The predicted Henry coefficient for CO{sub 2} solubility reproduced the experimentally observed trends. This study highlights the importance of integrating experimental and computational approaches in property prediction and materials development, which is not only useful in the development of ionic liquids for CO{sub 2} capture but has application in many technological fields.

  14. Geometric and electronic structure of ground and excited states of group VA diatomics. A theoretical LCGTO-MP-LSD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, M.; Russo, N.

    1992-12-01

    LCGTO-MP-LSD calculation was performed for the ground and several low-lying excited states of homo- (N2, P2, As2, and Sb2) and hetero-nuclear (PN, AsN, AsP, AsSb, SbN, and SbP) group VA diatomics. For all the systems the ground state is found to be1Σ+. For N2 and P2, the1Σ{/g +} ground state is followed by the3Σ{/u +},3Π g ,3Δ u ,1Π g , and1Δ u low-lying exited states while for As2 the order is found to be3Σ{/u +},3Δ u ,3Π g ,1Δ u ,1Π g . Finally for Sb2 the relative stability of excited states is3Σ{/u +},3Δ u ,1Δ u ,3Π g ,1Π g . For the hetero-nuclear diatomics the1Σ+ ground state is, in the case of PN, AsN, AsP, SbN, and SbP, followed by the3Σ+,3Δ,3Π,1Π and1Δ low-lying excited states while for the AsSb diatomic an inversion of stability of the two last singlets occurs. The calculated spectroscopic parameters ( Re, ω e, and De) are in good agreement with all the available experimental results while, the Te values are overestimated by about 0.5 eV. Mulliken population analysis shows that both homo- and hetero-nuclear group VA diatomics are essentially triple bonded systems.

  15. Crystal structure characterization as well as theoretical study of spectroscopic properties of novel Schiff bases containing pyrazole group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jia; Ren, Tiegang; Zhang, Jinglai; Li, Guihui; Li, Weijie; Yang, Lirong

    2012-09-01

    A series of novel Schiff bases containing pyrazole group were synthesized using 1-aryl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone and phenylenediamine as the starting materials. All as-synthesized Schiff bases were characterized by means of NMR, FT-IR, and MS; and the molecular geometries of two Schiff bases as typical examples were determined by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the meantime, the ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectra and fluorescent spectra of various as-synthesized products were also measured. Moreover, the B3LYP/6-1G(d,p) method was used for the optimization of the ground state geometry of the Schiff bases; and the spectroscopic properties of the products were computed and compared with corresponding experimental data based on cc-pVTZ basis set of TD-B3LYP method. It has been found that all as-synthesized Schiff bases show a remarkable absorption peak in a wavelength range of 270-370 nm; and their maximum emission peaks are around 344 nm and 332 nm, respectively.

  16. Active performance of tetrahedral groups to SHG response: theoretical interpretations of Ge/Si-containing borate crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Linping; Yang, Zhihua; Lei, Bing-Hua; Kong, Qingrong; Lee, Ming-Hsein; Zhang, Bingbing; Pan, Shilie; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-17

    As potential candidates for deep-UV nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals, borosilicates and borogermanates, which contain NLO-active groups such as B-O, Si-O and Ge-O, have fascinated many scientists. The crystal structures, electronic structures and optical properties of seven borates in different B/R (R = Si, Ge) ratios have been studied using DFT methods. Through the SHG-density, we find that besides the recognized contribution of the π-conjugation configuration of BO3 to second harmonic generation (SHG), the tetrahedra have a non-negligible influence. This is because the non-bonding p orbitals of the bridging oxygen in the tetrahedra are observably closer to the Fermi level than those in BO3, which is observed in the PDOS of Rb4Ge3B6O17 and RbGeB3O7. This conclusion would be very meaningful in the understanding of the relationship between the crystal structure and nonlinear optical properties. PMID:26844983

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies on the permeation of argon through matrices of acrylic polymers containing 1,3-dioxane groups in their structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, Mari-Fe; Guzmán, Julio; Saiz, Enrique; Riande, Evaristo

    1999-02-01

    The permeation of argon gas through membranes of poly(cis/trans 2-phenyl-5-ethyl-5acryloxymethyl-1,3-dioxacyclohexane) (PAEDP) has been measured in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature of this polymer (˜Tg≈50 °C). Both the permeation and the diffusion coefficients show only a slight dependence on temperature while the membrane remains in glassy state, but exhibit a sharp increase with temperature in the rubbery state. Theoretical calculations of the diffusion coefficient were performed according to the transition-state approach, i.e., assuming that the diffusant path is independent of the structural relaxation in the polymeric matrix, as a function of the smearing factor Δ and temperature. Reasonably good agreement among theoretical and experimental values of the diffusion coefficient was obtained. Theoretical calculations were also performed for poly(cis/trans 2-phenyl-5-ethyl-5-methacryloxymethyl-1,3-dioxacyclohexane) (PMAEDP), the methacrylate analog of PAEDP, which indicate that the diffusion coefficient of glassy PMAEDP is lower than that of glassy PAEDP when the same temperature is taken as the basis of comparison, due to the higher values of Tg in methacrylate than in acrylate polymers which, in turn is a consequence of the rigidity conferred to the polymeric chain by the methyl group.

  18. Comparison of Safety and Immunogenicity of PVRV and PCECV Immunized in Patients with WHO Category II Animal Exposure: A Study Based on Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man-Qing; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Hu, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the safety and immunogenicity between purified vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) and purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) in patients with WHO category II animal exposure, especially in different age groups. Methodology/Principal Findings In one-year clinical observation after vaccination with PVRV or PCECV under Zagreb (2-1-1) or Essen (1-1-1-1-1) regimens, information collection for the demographic and adverse events (AEs) and rabies virus laboratory examination of neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titers were performed for all patients with WHO category II animal exposure in Wuhan city. The results showed no significant differences of safety and immunogenicity between PVRV and PCECV both in Zagreb and Essen regimens. However, when compared with other age groups, most systemic AEs (36/61) occurred in <5-year-old patients, and <5-year-old patients have significant lower RVNA titer and seroconversion rate (RVNA ≥0.5 IU/ml) at day 7 both in Zagreb and Essen regimens or PVRV and PCECV groups. Conclusions Our data showed that vaccination with PVRV is as safe and immunogenic as PCECV in patients of all age groups, but might be more popular for clinical use. When performing a vaccination with rabies vaccine in young children, the most optimal vaccine regimen should be selected. PMID:25522244

  19. Twelve-year proximity relationships in a captive group of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Masayuki; Onishi, Kenji; Silldorf, April; Sexton, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Proximity data were collected in a captive breeding group of gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park (currently called the San Diego Zoo Safari Park) twice a year (spring and fall periods) for over 12 years, by using a convenient method in which individuals less than 5 m from each animal in the group were recorded by scan sampling, approximately once per hour. Immature females from infancy to young adulthood maintained relatively frequent proximity to both their mothers and the silverback male and spent little time alone (no animals within 10 m), with relatively large individual differences. On the other hand, immature males decreased the time spent near their mothers and the silverback male and increased the time spent alone with increasing age. Therefore, sex differences in proximity to mothers and the silverback male became apparent after late juvenility. Some adult females maintained increased frequency of proximity to the silverback male than that by other females over the 12-year period, indicating the presence of long-term, stable proximity relationships between the silverback male and the adult females. Such long-term, stable proximity relationships were also observed among adult females. Some association patterns reported in wild gorillas, such as frequent proximity between adult females with dependent offspring and the silverback male and close relationships between related females, were not observed in the present study. The idiosyncratic or individual factors influencing some association patterns were easily reflected in captive situations. PMID:24838632

  20. Geometric Algorithms for Modeling, Motion, and Animation (GAMMA): Collision Detection Videos from the University of North Carolina GAMMA Research Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    Collision detection has been a fundamental problem in computer animation, physically-based modeling, geometric modeling, and robotics. In these applications, interactions between moving objects are modeled by dynamic constraints and contact analysis. The objects' motions are constrained by various interactions, including collisions. A virtual environment, like a walkthrough, creates a computer-generated world, filled with virtual objects. Such an environment should give the user a feeling of presence, which includes making the images of both the user and the surrounding objects feel solid. For example, the objects should not pass through each other, and things should move as expected when pushed, pulled or grasped. Such actions require accurate collision detection, if they are to achieve any degree of realism. However, there may be hundreds, even thousands of objects in the virtual world, so a naive algorithm could take a long time just to check for possible collisions as the user moves. This is not acceptable for virtual environments, where the issues of interactivity impose fundamental constraints on the system. A fast and interactive collision detection algorithm is a fundamental component of a complex virtual environment. Physically based modeling simulations depend highly on the physical interaction between objects in a scene. Complex physics engines require fast, accurate, and robust proximity queries to maintain a realistic simulation at interactive rates. We couple our proximity query research with physically based modeling to ensure that our packages provide the capabilities of today's physics engines.[Copied from http://www.cs.unc.edu/~geom/collide/index.shtml

  1. Platinum-catalyzed reduction of amides with hydrosilanes bearing dual Si-H groups: a theoretical study of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Naoki; Hasegawa, Jun-ya; Sunada, Yusuke; Nagashima, Hideo

    2015-11-28

    A platinum-catalyzed amide reduction through hydrosilylation with 1,2-bis(dimethylsilyl)benzene (BDSB) was investigated on a theoretical basis. While the platinum-catalyzed hydrosilylation of alkenes is well known, that of carbonyl groups rarely occurs. The only exception involves the use of bifunctional hydrosilanes having dual, closely located Si-H groups, which accelerate the hydrosilylation of carbonyl groups, leading to successful reduction of amides to amines under mild conditions. In the present study, we determined through density functional theory calculations that the platinum-catalyzed hydrosilylation of the C=O bond proceeds via a Pt(IV)-disilyl-dihydride intermediate with an associated activation energy of 29.6 kcal mol(-1). Although it was believed that the hydrosilylation of carbonyl groups does not occur via the classical Chalk-Harrod cycle, the computational results support a mechanism involving the insertion of the amide C=O bond into a Pt-H bond. This insertion readily occurs because a Pt-H bond in the Pt(IV)-disilyl-dihydride intermediate is highly activated due to the strong σ-donating interaction of the silyl groups. The modified Chalk-Harrod mechanism that occurs preferentially in rhodium-catalyzed hydrosilylation as well as the ionic outer sphere mechanism associated with iridium-catalyzed amide reduction were both safely ruled out as mechanisms for this platinum-catalyzed amide reduction, because of the unexpectedly large activation barrier (>40 kcal mol(-1)) for the Si-O bond formation. PMID:26497866

  2. Field theoretical Lie symmetry analysis: The Möbius group, exact solutions of conformal autonomous systems, and predictive model-building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Kyriakos

    2014-07-01

    We study single and coupled first-order differential equations (ODEs) that admit symmetries with tangent vector fields, which satisfy the N-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann equations. In the two-dimensional case, classes of first-order ODEs which are invariant under Möbius transformations are explored. In the N dimensional case we outline a symmetry analysis method for constructing exact solutions for conformal autonomous systems. A very important aspect of this work is that we propose to extend the traditional technical usage of Lie groups to one that could provide testable predictions and guidelines for model-building and model-validation. The Lie symmetries in this paper are constrained and classified by field theoretical considerations and their phenomenological implications. Our results indicate that conformal transformations are appropriate for elucidating a variety of linear and nonlinear systems which could be used for, or inspire, future applications. The presentation is pragmatic and it is addressed to a wide audience.

  3. Antimicrobial Use Guidelines for Treatment of Urinary Tract Disease in Dogs and Cats: Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weese, J. Scott; Blondeau, Joseph M.; Boothe, Dawn; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Guardabassi, Luca; Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Papich, Mark G.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Turnidge, John D.; Sykes, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract disease is a common reason for use (and likely misuse, improper use, and overuse) of antimicrobials in dogs and cats. There is a lack of comprehensive treatment guidelines such as those that are available for human medicine. Accordingly, guidelines for diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections were created by a Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases. While objective data are currently limited, these guidelines provide information to assist in the diagnosis and management of upper and lower urinary tract infections in dogs and cats. PMID:21776346

  4. Final report to the DOE for the period 8/1/96 to 5/31/00 by the SCRI Theoretical High Energy Group

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, Urs

    2000-11-29

    This is the final report on grant DE-FG05-96ER40979 from the US Department of Energy supporting the research of the Theoretical High Energy Physics group at the Supercomputer Computations Research Institute (SCRI) at Florida State University. The research primarily involved lattice field theory simulations such as Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although QCD is generally accepted as the theory which describes the strong interactions responsible for nuclear binding, convincing computations of the properties of the elementary particles from first principles are still elusive. The problem lies in the fact that for data at the low energies involved ({approx} 1 GeV), the coupling constant in QCD is large, preventing application of the physicist's usual tool, perturbation theory. Non-perturbative computations are necessary and they appear possible only via large scale numerical simulations. Especially simulations of full QCD, including the effect of light dynamical quarks, are extremely CPU time consuming. The scientists in SCRI's lattice gauge theory group have been in the forefront of such numerical simulations since the inception of SCRI in 1985. A major research topic was the study of improved lattice actions, designed to diminish finite lattice spacing effects and thus accelerate the approach to the continuum limit. Most of this work was carried out in the quenched approximation. Very encouraging results were obtained. In the second half of the funding period, a major focus of the group has been the use of a new lattice fermion representation, Overlap fermions, that has achieved the much desired goal of preserving the chiral symmetry properties of the continuum theory at finite lattice spacing. After developing an algorithm for the numerical simulations of overlap fermions, the SCRI group has completed the first studies of the relation between chiral symmetry breaking and topology using this new formalism.

  5. Two forms of minority-group test bias as psychometric artifacts with an animal model (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Harrington, G M

    1988-12-01

    Controversy abounds over attributing group differences on tests to nature, nurture, or test bias. Limitations of correlational sampling from natural populations necessitate experimental methods to resolve underlying issues. In classical psychometrics test items are selected from a larger item pool through analysis of item responses in a sample of subjects. Rats of six inbred strains (n = 366) were tested in multiple mazes to provide a large item pool. Six populations were created, each with differing proportions of each strain. Items selected through independent item analyses within each population yielded six tests. An independent cross-validation sample (n = 146) provided scores on all six tests. This sample was also tested in another set of maze problems defined as the criterion to be predicted. Strain means and intrastrain predictive validities for the six tests varied with strain representation in the population used for item selection (p less than .001). Conventional item-selection procedures clearly produced two forms of minority test bias. PMID:3215015

  6. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: an empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change

    PubMed Central

    Styła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-Concept Clarity (SCC) describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of SCC change (especially stable increase and “V” shape) observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable SCC increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while SCC change characterized by a “V” shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Method: Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M = 5.8) was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale (SCCS), Symptoms' Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The SCCS was also administered every 2 weeks during psychotherapy. Results: As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable SCC increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and “V” shape of SCC change. Conclusions: The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of SCC is a sign of a good treatment prognosis. PMID:26579001

  7. Analysis of Individual Mouse Activity in Group Housed Animals of Different Inbred Strains using a Novel Automated Home Cage Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Rasneer S.; Cater, Heather L.; Sillito, Rowland R.; Chartsias, Agisilaos; Sneddon, Duncan; Concas, Danilo; Keskivali-Bond, Piia; Lukins, Timothy C.; Wells, Sara; Acevedo Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Armstrong, J. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system disorders such as autism as well as the range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease are commonly investigated using genetically altered mouse models. The current system for characterizing these mice usually involves removing the animals from their home-cage environment and placing them into novel environments where they undergo a battery of tests measuring a range of behavioral and physical phenotypes. These tests are often only conducted for short periods of times in social isolation. However, human manifestations of such disorders are often characterized by multiple phenotypes, presented over long periods of time and leading to significant social impacts. Here, we have developed a system which will allow the automated monitoring of individual mice housed socially in the cage they are reared and housed in, within established social groups and over long periods of time. We demonstrate that the system accurately reports individual locomotor behavior within the group and that the measurements taken can provide unique insights into the effects of genetic background on individual and group behavior not previously recognized. PMID:27375446

  8. CO2 Pneumoperitoneum Preserves β-Arrestin 2 Content and Reduces High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB-1) Expression in an Animal Model of Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, Angela Simona; Minutoli, Letteria; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Costa, Gaetano; Squadrito, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopy (LS) has been shown to decrease the inflammatory sequelae of endotoxemia. β-arrestin 2 plays an important function in signal transduction pathway of TLR4. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) is involved in the delayed systemic inflammatory response. We investigated the effects of CO2 insufflation on liver, lung, and kidney expression of both β-arrestin 2 and HMGB-1 during sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was performed in male rats and 6 h later the animals were randomly assigned to receive a CO2 pneumoperitoneum or laparotomy. Animals were euthanized; liver, lung, and kidney were removed for the evaluation of β-arrestin 2 and HMGB-1 expression. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was investigated in lung and liver and bacterial load was determined in the peritoneal fluid. CO2 pneumoperitoneum reduced peritoneal bacterial load, increased the expression of β-arrestin 2, and blunted the expression of the potent proinflammatory HMGB-1 in liver, lung, and kidney compared with laparotomy. Liver and lung MPO was markedly reduced in rats subjected to LS compared with laparotomy. We believe that CO2 exerts an early protective effect by reducing bacterial load and likely toll-like receptor activation which in turn leads to a preserved β-arrestin 2 expression and a reduced HMGB-1 expression. PMID:25810808

  9. MLVA-16 typing of 295 marine mammal Brucella isolates from different animal and geographic origins identifies 7 major groups within Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 1994, Brucella strains have been isolated from a wide range of marine mammals. They are currently recognized as two new Brucella species, B. pinnipedialis for the pinniped isolates and B. ceti for the cetacean isolates in agreement with host preference and specific phenotypic and molecular markers. In order to investigate the genetic relationships within the marine mammal Brucella isolates and with reference to terrestrial mammal Brucella isolates, we applied in this study the Multiple Loci VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) Analysis (MLVA) approach. A previously published assay comprising 16 loci (MLVA-16) that has been shown to be highly relevant and efficient for typing and clustering Brucella strains from animal and human origin was used. Results 294 marine mammal Brucella strains collected in European waters from 173 animals and a human isolate from New Zealand presumably from marine origin were investigated by MLVA-16. Marine mammal Brucella isolates were shown to be different from the recognized terrestrial mammal Brucella species and biovars and corresponded to 3 major related groups, one specific of the B. ceti strains, one of the B. pinnipedialis strains and the last composed of the human isolate. In the B. ceti group, 3 subclusters were identified, distinguishing a cluster of dolphin, minke whale and porpoise isolates and two clusters mostly composed of dolphin isolates. These results were in accordance with published analyses using other phenotypic or molecular approaches, or different panels of VNTR loci. The B. pinnipedialis group could be similarly subdivided in 3 subclusters, one composed exclusively of isolates from hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) and the two others comprising other seal species isolates. Conclusion The clustering analysis of a large collection of marine mammal Brucella isolates from European waters significantly strengthens the current view of the population structure of these two species, and their

  10. Animal issues and society.

    PubMed

    Grabau, J H

    1993-05-01

    Animal use topics are sensitive issues today. Animal uses issues are often presented as black and white or 'we' are right and 'they' are wrong. This is clearly demonstrated in the available literature from most organizations. Topics presented will include: delineation of issues and concerned groups; examples of animal issues in education and agriculture; the terrorist issue; examples of animal issues/sportsman issues; examples of political and legislative impact; and examples of biomedical and toxicology animal use issues. PMID:8516774

  11. Building genetic networks using relatedness information: a novel approach for the estimation of dispersal and characterization of group structure in social animals.

    PubMed

    Rollins, Lee Ann; Browning, Lucy E; Holleley, Clare E; Savage, James L; Russell, Andrew F; Griffith, Simon C

    2012-04-01

    Natal dispersal is an important life history trait driving variation in individual fitness, and therefore, a proper understanding of the factors underlying dispersal behaviour is critical to many fields including population dynamics, behavioural ecology and conservation biology. However, individual dispersal patterns remain difficult to quantify despite many years of research using direct and indirect methods. Here, we quantify dispersal in a single intensively studied population of the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps) using genetic networks created from the combination of pairwise relatedness data and social networking methods and compare this to dispersal estimates from re-sighting data. This novel approach not only identifies movements between social groups within our study sites but also provides an estimation of immigration rates of individuals originating outside the study site. Both genetic and re-sighting data indicated that dispersal was strongly female biased, but the magnitude of dispersal estimates was much greater using genetic data. This suggests that many previous studies relying on mark-recapture data may have significantly underestimated dispersal. An analysis of spatial genetic structure within the sampled population also supports the idea that females are more dispersive, with females having no structure beyond the bounds of their own social group, while male genetic structure expands for 750 m from their social group. Although the genetic network approach we have used is an excellent tool for visualizing the social and genetic microstructure of social animals and identifying dispersers, our results also indicate the importance of applying them in parallel with behavioural and life history data. PMID:22335253

  12. Delivery of the high-mobility group box 1 box A peptide using heparin in the acute lung injury animal models.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Piao, Chunxian; Lee, Seonyeong; Kim, Bora; Song, Su Jeong; Choi, Joon Sig; Lee, Minhyung

    2016-07-28

    In this study, the efficacy of the high-mobility group box-1 box A (HMGB1A)/heparin complex was evaluated for the treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). HMGB1A is an antagonist against wild-type high-mobility group box-1 (wtHMGB1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is involved in ALIs. HMGB1A has positive charges and can be captured in the mucus layer after intratracheal administration. To enhance the delivery and therapeutic efficiency of HMGB1A, the HMGB1A/heparin complex was produced using electrostatic interactions, with the expectation that the nano-sized complex with a negative surface charge could efficiently penetrate the mucus layer. Additionally, heparin itself had an anti-inflammatory effect. Complex formation with HMGB1A and heparin was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The particle size and surface charge of the HMGB1A/heparin complex at a 1:1 weight ratio were 113nm and -25mV, respectively. Intratracheal administration of the complex was performed into an ALI animal model. The results showed that the HMGB1A/heparin complex reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1β, more effectively than HMGB1A or heparin alone. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the decreased inflammatory reaction in the lungs after delivery of the HMGB1A/heparin complex. In conclusion, the HMGB1A/heparin complex might be useful to treat ALI. PMID:27196743

  13. Project EAGLE (Early Academic Gifted Learning Experience): A Program for Gifted and Talented Students (Grades K-3)--Animals 3; Magnets; Sight; Geoboards 3; Dinosaurs 3; and Groups 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkoski, Kay

    Six thematic activity booklets are presented for implementing Project EAGLE, an enrichment program for gifted and talented primary-level children. "Animals 3" introduces endangered animals and locates their home areas on maps or globes, using nine learning activities involving science and creative writing. "Magnets" discusses what magnets are and…

  14. The role of threats in animal cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    In human societies, social behaviour is strongly influenced by threats of punishment, even though the threats themselves rarely need to be exercised. Recent experimental evidence suggests that similar hidden threats can promote cooperation and limit within-group selfishness in some animal systems. In other animals, however, threats appear to be ineffective. Here I review theoretical and empirical studies that help to understand the evolutionary causes of these contrasting patterns, and identify three factors—impact, accuracy and perception—that together determine the effectiveness of threats to induce cooperation. PMID:20798110

  15. In service teachers' understanding of salt dissolution process through representational animations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkoc, Ummuhan

    Animations of molecular structure and dynamics are repeatedly applied to support student comprehension in the theoretical ideas of chemistry. However, students' understanding the dynamics of the phenomena is directly related to the understanding of teachers as instructors. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate how the features of three different molecular level animations are viewed and understood by the teachers who had more than 2 years experience. Participants (n=10) are in-service science teachers, mostly high school, grouped into three groups with four participants in the first group and three people in the other two. Each group viewed short different animations and one common animation demonstrating the salt dissolution process. Teachers were asked to take pre and post-tests to measure the influence of the animations in their understandings of the content in addition to a group discussion and an interview. The study suggests that the animations improved the content knowledge of the teachers slightly.

  16. Effect of chemical functionalization groups on Zr6-AzoBDC to enhance H2, CH4 storage and CO2 capture: a theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, Khung M.; Pham, Hung Q.; Pham-Tran, Nguyen-Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation combined with the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) and a statistical method were utilized to investigate the effect of functional groups on zirconium oxide based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) Zr6-AzoBDC (Zr6A) for the gases (H2, CH4) adsorption property and CO2/CH4 selectivity under low pressure. The results showed that phenyl groups containing nitrogen (pyridine, pyrimidine) and thiophene group enhance the gas affinity with MOFs, therefore increasing both gravimetric and volumetric uptake. In addition, this behavior can also cause significantly improved selective capture of CO2 from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures. Among functional groups studied, the sulfonic acid group can potentially improve CH4, CO2 uptake and H2 isosteric heat of adsorption. These findings would play a vital role in designing new materials toward gas adsorption properties.

  17. Amazing Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Kuwari, Najat Saad

    2007-01-01

    "Animals" is a three-part lesson plan for young learners with a zoo animal theme. The first lesson is full of activities to describe animals, with Simon Says, guessing games, and learning stations. The second lesson is about desert animals, but other types of animals could be chosen depending on student interest. This lesson teaches…

  18. Theoretical study on the influence of the Mg2+ and Al3+ octahedral cations on the vibrational spectra of the hydroxy groups of dioctahedral 2:1 phyllosilicate models.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Haro, N; Ortega-Castro, J; Pruneda, M; Sainz-Díaz, C I; Hernández-Laguna, A

    2014-09-01

    The effect on the vibrational spectrum of the hydroxy groups in dioctahedral 2:1 phyllosilicates of the isomorphous cation substitution of Mg(2+) by Al(3+) in the octahedral sheet was investigated at the DFT level. Ortho, meta and para Mg(2+) configurational polymorphs were defined. The theoretical vibration frequencies of OH groups depend significantly on the nature of the cations they are joined with. Theoretical values are spread out over narrow ranges: 3,612-3,626 cm(-1) for ν(AlOHMg), 3,604-3,606 cm(-1) for ν(AlOHAl), and 3,657-3,660 cm(-1) for ν(MgOHMg); 803-830 cm(-1) for δ(AlOHMg), 877 cm(-1) for δ(AlOHAl), and 693-711 cm(-1) for δ(MgOHMg), in agreement with known experimental values. From the intensities of the XOHY bands, we observe that the vibrational adsorptivities of the ν(OH) vibrations are not the same for all XOHY groups, and that ν(MgOHMg) absorptivity is much lower than that of ν(AlOHAl). These theoretical results should be taken into account in quantitative analysis of experimental vibrational studies in clay minerals, introducing different molar extinction coefficients in the Lambert-Beer law to determine the relative concentrations of both cationic arrangements. PMID:25182015

  19. Theoretical study of the structures and electron affinities of the dimers and trimers of the group IB metals (Cu, Ag, and Au)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1989-01-01

    The molecular structure of both the neutral and negatively charged diatomic and triatomic systems containing the Cu, Ag, and Au metals are determined from ab initio calculations. For the neutral triatomic systems, the lowest energy structure is found to be triangular. The relative stability of the 2A1 and 2B2 structures can be predicted simply by knowing the constituent diatomic bond distances and atomic electron affinities (EAs). The lowest energy structure is linear for all of the negative ions. For anionic clusters containing Au, the Au atom(s) preferentially occupy the terminal position(s). The EAs of the heteronuclear systems can be predicted relatively accurately from a weighted average of the corresponding homonuclear systems. Although the theoretical EAs are systematically too small, accurate predictions for the EAs of the triatomics are obtained by uniformly scaling the ab initio results using the accurate experimental EA values available for the atoms and homonuclear diatomics.

  20. Vaccines and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Morton, D B

    2007-04-01

    Vaccination promotes animal welfare by protecting animal health, but it also has other welfare benefits, e.g. recent investigations have looked at the potential of vaccines in immunoneutering such as immunocastration--a humane alternative to the painful traditional methods. Similarly, vaccination can be used during disease outbreaks as a viable alternative to stamping-out, thus avoiding the welfare problems that on-farm mass slaughter can cause. Protecting animal health through vaccination leads to improved animal welfare, and maintaining good welfare ensures that animals can respond successfully to vaccination (as poor welfare can lead to immunosuppression, which can affect the response to vaccination). It is clear that vaccination has tremendous advantages for animal welfare and although the possible side effects of vaccination can have a negative effect on the welfare of some individual animals, the harm caused by these unwanted effects must be weighed against the undoubted benefits for groups of animals. PMID:17633300

  1. Theoretical predictions of properties and gas-phase chromatography behaviour of carbonyl complexes of group-6 elements Cr, Mo, W, and element 106, Sg.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Anton, J

    2013-05-01

    Fully relativistic, four-component density functional theory electronic structure calculations were performed for M(CO)6 of group-6 elements Cr, Mo, W, and element 106, Sg, with an aim to predict their adsorption behaviour in the gas-phase chromatography experiments. It was shown that seaborgium hexacarbonyl has a longer M-CO bond, smaller ionization potential, and larger polarizability than the other group-6 molecules. This is explained by the increasing relativistic expansion and destabilization of the (n - 1)d AOs with increasing Z in the group. Using results of the calculations, adsorption enthalpies of the group-6 hexacarbonyls on a quartz surface were predicted via a model of physisorption. According to the results, -ΔHads should decrease from Mo to W, while it should be almost equal--within the experimental error bars--for W and Sg. Thus, we expect that in the future gas-phase chromatography experiments it will be almost impossible--what concerns ΔHads--to distinguish between the W and Sg hexacarbonyls by their deposition on quartz. PMID:23656128

  2. Theoretical predictions of properties and gas-phase chromatography behaviour of carbonyl complexes of group-6 elements Cr, Mo, W, and element 106, Sg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershina, V.; Anton, J.

    2013-05-01

    Fully relativistic, four-component density functional theory electronic structure calculations were performed for M(CO)6 of group-6 elements Cr, Mo, W, and element 106, Sg, with an aim to predict their adsorption behaviour in the gas-phase chromatography experiments. It was shown that seaborgium hexacarbonyl has a longer M-CO bond, smaller ionization potential, and larger polarizability than the other group-6 molecules. This is explained by the increasing relativistic expansion and destabilization of the (n - 1)d AOs with increasing Z in the group. Using results of the calculations, adsorption enthalpies of the group-6 hexacarbonyls on a quartz surface were predicted via a model of physisorption. According to the results, -ΔHads should decrease from Mo to W, while it should be almost equal - within the experimental error bars - for W and Sg. Thus, we expect that in the future gas-phase chromatography experiments it will be almost impossible - what concerns ΔHads - to distinguish between the W and Sg hexacarbonyls by their deposition on quartz.

  3. [Methods for determining the glomerular filtration rate in experiments with small animals: position report of the Animal Experiment Diagnosis of Kidney Function Study Group of the Society of Nephrology of East Germany].

    PubMed

    Hagemann, I; Wüstenberg, P W

    1987-10-01

    The methods of the investigation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the animal experiment on cats and rats used at present are demonstrated as survey and the results of the basic investigations are compared. The values in cats lie between 20 and 30 ml/min/100 g kidney, in rats GFR values are between 0.6 and 1.0 ml/min/100 g body mass and 0.6-0.3 ml/min/1 g kidney. The basic values are essentially influenced by the experimental conditions and determination methods so that only clearance values within the working team concerned are comparable. PMID:3433988

  4. Animal picobirnavirus.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Masachessi, Gisela; Mladenova, Zornitsa

    2014-01-01

    Picobirnavirus (PBV) is a small, non-enveloped, bisegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of vertebrate hosts. The name 'Picobirnavirus' derives from the prefix 'pico' (latin for 'small') in reference to the small virion size, plus the prefix 'bi' (latin for 'two') and the word 'RNA' to indicate the nature of the viral genome. The serendipitous discovery of PBV dates back to 1988 from Brazil, when human fecal samples collected during the acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were subjected for routine rotavirus surveillance by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and silver straining (S/S). The PAGE gels after silver staining showed a typical 'two RNA band' pattern, and it was identified as Picobirnavirus. Likewise, the feces of wild black-footed pigmy rice rats (Oryzomys nigripes) subjected for PAGE assay by the same research group in Brazil reported the presence of PBV (Pereira et al., J Gen Virol 69:2749-2754, 1988). PBVs have been detected in faeces of humans and wide range of animal species with or without diarrhoea, worldwide. The probable role of PBV as either a 'primary diarrhoeal agent' in 'immunocompetent children'; or a 'potential pathogen' in 'immunocompromised individuals' or an 'innocuous virus' in the intestine remains elusive and needs to be investigated despite the numerous reports of the presence of PBV in fecal samples of various species of domestic mammals, wild animals, birds and snakes; our current knowledge of their biology, etiology, pathogenicity or their transmission characteristics remains subtle. This review aims to analyse the veterinary and zoonotic aspects of animal Picobirnavirus infections since its discovery. PMID:25674589

  5. Capture-recapture and multiple-record systems estimation I: History and theoretical development. International Working Group for Disease Monitoring and Forecasting.

    PubMed

    1995-11-15

    This paper reviews the historical background and the theoretical development of models for the analysis of data from capture-recapture or multiple-record systems for estimating the size of closed populations. The models and methods were originally developed for use in fisheries and wildlife biology and were later adapted for use in connection with human populations. Application to epidemiology came much later. The simplest capture-recapture model involves two lists or samples and has four key assumptions: that the population is closed, that individuals can be matched from capture to recapture, that capture in the second sample is independent of capture in the first sample, and that the capture probabilities are homogeneous across all individuals in the population. Log-linear models provide a convenient representation for this basic capture-recapture model and its extensions to K lists. The paper provides an overview for these models and illustrates how they allow for dependency among the lists and heterogeneity in the population. The use of log-linear models for estimation in the presence of both dependence and heterogeneity is illustrated on a four-list example involving ascertainment of diabetes using data gathered in 1988 from residents of Casale Monferrato, Italy. The final section of the paper discusses techniques for model selection in the context of models for estimating the size of populations. PMID:7485050

  6. Theoretical study of heavy-atom tuning of nonlinear optical properties in group 15 derivatives of N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine).

    PubMed

    Milne, Bruce F; Nogueira, Fernando; Cardoso, Cláudia

    2013-03-14

    Nitrogen is a common structural element in the acceptor moieties of organic donor-acceptor nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores. In order to assess the effect of substitution with heavier group 15 elements, computational studies of the nonlinear optical properties of betaine derivatives, (CH(3))(3)X(+)CH(2)CO(2)(-) (X = N, P, As, Sb, Bi), have been performed. First hyperpolarisabilities, β(HRS)(-2ω; ω, ω), corresponding to hyper-Rayleigh scattering susceptibilities have been estimated for this series using TDDFT quadratic response calculations including polarisable-continuum method water solvation and show a five-fold increase on going from N to Bi. Differential frequency dispersion effects lead to a gradual increase in this ratio as the wavelength of the incident radiation is increased from 1907 nm to 800 nm. The depolarisation ratio of the NLO response indicates that the change in β is accompanied by a change in the type of chromophore from octupolar (X = N) to a linear donor-acceptor type (X = Bi). The observed increase of the NLO response correlates with the changing electronic configurations of the group 15 elements and alterations in the character of the frontier molecular orbitals. Relativistic effects are found to play an important part in enhancement of the NLO response in the Sb and Bi betaine derivatives. These results suggest that derivatisation of organic molecules that otherwise display small β values with heavy group 15 elements is a useful method for creating enhanced NLO chromophores. PMID:23299281

  7. Group Theoretical Classification of Instabilities and Interconnection Relation of the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock Solutions in a Molecular System with a Spatial Point Symmetry. II ---Special Cases; RHF, ASDW, TSDW and TSW---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, M.

    1982-02-01

    The general theory of the group theoretical classification of instability and interconnection relation of UHF solution developed in I is applied to the cases; RHF(TICS), ASDW, TSDW and TSW. In these cases, single valued irreducible representations over the real number field (R-rep) are obtained. For each R-rep, the possible type of the invariance group is gained. The explicit forms of R-irreducible instability matrices in the case of RHF(TICS) are given. An example of the interconnection relation is given on a four-center exchange reaction of two hydrogen molecules in reaction paths with D_2 symmetry including D2d as a special case. It is shown that the group theory works effectively for the determination of the symmetry of the bifurcating solution.

  8. [Proposals of the working group "Antibiotic resistance" for the configuration of microtitre plates to be used in routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens from infections of large food-producing animals and mastitis cases].

    PubMed

    Luhofer, Gabriele; Böttner, Alexander; Hafez, H Mohamed; Kaske, Martin; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Kietzmann, Manfred; Klarmann, Dieter; Klein, Günter; Krabisch, Peter; Kühn, Tilman; Richter, Angelika; Sigge, Claudia; Traeder, Wolfgang; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Wallmann, Jürgen; Werckenthin, Christiane; Schwarz, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Two layouts for microtitre plates, which should serve for in-vitro susceptibility testing in routine diagnostics, have been set up by the working group "Antibiotic resistance" of the German Society for Veterinary Medicine. One of these layouts was designed for the testing of bacteria from cases of mastitis and the other for bacteria from infections in large food-producing animals. The choice of the antimicrobial agents and their concentrations to be included in these layouts were based on (1) the bacteria frequently associated with the respective diseases/animals, (2) the antimicrobial agents licensed for therapeutic use in these diseases/animals, (3) the currently available breakpoints, and (4) cross-resistances between the antimicrobial agerts so far known to occur in the respective bacteria. PMID:15298050

  9. Evolutionary models of in-group favoritism

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In-group favoritism is the tendency for individuals to cooperate with in-group members more strongly than with out-group members. Similar concepts have been described across different domains, including in-group bias, tag-based cooperation, parochial altruism, and ethnocentrism. Both humans and other animals show this behavior. Here, we review evolutionary mechanisms for explaining this phenomenon by covering recently developed mathematical models. In fact, in-group favoritism is not easily realized on its own in theory, although it can evolve under some conditions. We also discuss the implications of these modeling results in future empirical and theoretical research. PMID:25926978

  10. Evolutionary models of in-group favoritism.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki; Fu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In-group favoritism is the tendency for individuals to cooperate with in-group members more strongly than with out-group members. Similar concepts have been described across different domains, including in-group bias, tag-based cooperation, parochial altruism, and ethnocentrism. Both humans and other animals show this behavior. Here, we review evolutionary mechanisms for explaining this phenomenon by covering recently developed mathematical models. In fact, in-group favoritism is not easily realized on its own in theory, although it can evolve under some conditions. We also discuss the implications of these modeling results in future empirical and theoretical research. PMID:25926978

  11. Current concepts of Harm-Benefit Analysis of Animal Experiments - Report from the AALAS-FELASA Working Group on Harm-Benefit Analysis - Part 1.

    PubMed

    Brønstad, Aurora; Newcomer, Christian E; Decelle, Thierry; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Guillen, Javier; Laber, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    International regulations and guidelines strongly suggest that the use of animal models in scientific research should be initiated only after the authority responsible for the review of animal studies has concluded a well-thought-out harm-benefit analysis (HBA) and deemed the project to be appropriate. Although the process for conducting HBAs may not be new, the relevant factors and algorithms used in conducting them during the review process are deemed to be poorly defined or lacking by committees in many institutions. This paper presents the current concept of HBAs based on a literature review. References on cost or risk benefit from clinical trials and other industries are also included. Several approaches to HBA have been discovered including algorithms, graphic presentations and generic processes. The aim of this study is to better aid and harmonize understanding of the concepts of 'harm', 'benefit' and 'harm-benefit analysis'. PMID:27188275

  12. Evaluation of an Immunochromatographic Assay for Rapid Detection of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a in Human and Animal Staphylococcus intermedius Group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Arnold, A R; Burnham, C-A D; Ford, B A; Lawhon, S D; McAllister, S K; Lonsway, D; Albrecht, V; Jerris, R C; Rasheed, J K; Limbago, B; Burd, E M; Westblade, L F

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a rapid penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) detection assay, the Alere PBP2a culture colony test, was evaluated for identification of PBP2a-mediated beta-lactam resistance in human and animal clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi. The assay was sensitive and specific, with all PBP2a-negative and PBP2a-positive strains testing negative and positive, respectively. PMID:26677248

  13. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  14. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  15. [Animal experimentation in Israel].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram; Leshem, Micah

    2002-04-01

    In 1994 the Israeli parliament (Knesset) amended the Cruelty to Animals Act to regulate the use of experimental animals. Accordingly, animal experiments can only be carried out for the purposes of promoting health and medical science, reducing suffering, advancing scientific research, testing or production of materials and products (excluding cosmetics and cleaning products) and education. Animal experiments are only permitted if alternative methods are not possible. The National Board for Animal Experimentation was established to implement the law. Its members are drawn from government ministries, representatives of doctors, veterinarians, and industry organizations, animal rights groups, and academia. In order to carry out an animal experiment, the institution, researchers involved, and the specific experiment, all require approval by the Board. To date the Board has approved some 35 institutions, about half are public institutions (universities, hospitals and colleges) and the rest industrial firms in biotechnology and pharmaceutics. In 2000, 250,000 animals were used in research, 85% were rodents, 11% fowls, 1,000 other farm animals, 350 dogs and cats, and 39 monkeys. Academic institutions used 74% of the animals and industry the remainder. We also present summarized data on the use of animals in research in other countries. PMID:12017891

  16. Animal v. plant-based bait: does the bait type affect census of fish assemblages and trophic groups by baited remote underwater video (BRUV) systems?

    PubMed

    Ghazilou, A; Shokri, M R; Gladstone, W

    2016-05-01

    Coral reef fish communities were sampled at the Nayband Marine Park, Iran, using baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVSs) which incorporated animal (i.e. frigate tuna Auxis thazard and beef liver), or plant-based baits (i.e. raw dough and raw dough-turmeric powder mix). The A. thazard was found to record significantly (P < 0·05) higher species richness and number of carnivorous fishes than plant-based baits, while abundance of herbivores was maximum in raw dough-turmeric powder mix trials. There was also a significant difference in trophic composition of fish assemblages surveyed by animal- and plant-based baits which seemed to be due to variations in attraction patterns of carnivores and herbivores occurring at the earlier phases of each BRUV deployments. Meanwhile, the assemblage structure was comparable among fish assemblages sampled by different bait treatments, indicating that species-level responses to each bait type may be more complicated. In essence, the efficiency of mixed baits should also be examined in future studies. PMID:27170108

  17. Theoretical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  18. Project EAGLE (Early Academic Gifted Learning Experience): A Program for Gifted and Talented Students (Grades K-3)--Sound; Groups 1; Geoboards 1; Animals; and Dinosaurs 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkoski, Kay

    Five activity booklets are presented for implementing Project EAGLE, an enrichment program for gifted and talented primary-level children. The first booklet, "Sound," contains four activity pages to accompany teaching of the concept that sound is transmitted through air to the ear. The "Groups 1" booklet provides nine enrichment activities…

  19. A STUDY OF THE INHIBITION OF STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE BY SERA OF NORMAL AND IMMUNE ANIMALS AND OF PATIENTS INFECTED WITH GROUP A HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Edgar W.

    1947-01-01

    Antiproteinase sera were prepared by immunizing horses with filtrates from a selected strain of group A streptococcus. This strain, which produced high titred proteinase but no erythrogenic toxin, was selected from forty-two strains of group A streptococci which produced varying amounts of proteinase. A few strains belonging to groups B, C, and G were also tested; they were all proteinase-negative. Methods are described for titrating streptococcal proteinase in crude culture filtrates and for measuring the antiproteinase activity of serum. The antiproteinase titres of sera from immunized horses ranged from 125 units to 1,000 units per cc. in contrast to the low titres of normal horse sera, only 5 per cent of which had titres as high as 10 to 30 units per cc. The available evidence suggests that the antiproteinase activity of immune sera is dependent on the action of specific antibody for streptococcal proteinase. Patients infected with group A streptococci do not develop high anti-proteinase titres. There appears to be no correlation between the occurrence of rheumatic fever and the antiproteinase titre of the patient's serum. PMID:19871638

  20. Theoretical geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical geology Present day geology is mostly empirical of nature. I claim that geology is by nature complex and that the empirical approach is bound to fail. Let's consider the input to be the set of ambient conditions and the output to be the sedimentary rock record. I claim that the output can only be deduced from the input if the relation from input to output be known. The fundamental question is therefore the following: Can one predict the output from the input or can one predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? If one can, than the empirical/deductive method has changes, if one can't than that method is bound to fail. The fundamental problem to solve is therefore the following: How to predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? It is interesting to observe that this question is never asked and many a study is conducted by the empirical/deductive method; it seems that the empirical method has been accepted as being appropriate without question. It is, however, easy to argument that a sedimentary system is by nature complex and that several input parameters vary at the same time and that they can create similar output in the rock record. It follows trivially from these first principles that in such a case the deductive solution cannot be unique. At the same time several geological methods depart precisely from the assumption, that one particular variable is the dictator/driver and that the others are constant, even though the data do not support such an assumption. The method of "sequence stratigraphy" is a typical example of such a dogma. It can be easily argued that all the interpretation resulting from a method that is built on uncertain or wrong assumptions is erroneous. Still, this method has survived for many years, nonwithstanding all the critics it has received. This is just one example of the present day geological world and is not unique. Even the alternative methods criticising sequence stratigraphy actually depart from the same

  1. [Transgenic animals and animal welfare

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Under the pressure of a public vote in Switzerland (7 June 1998) on an initiative to ban the production, use and patenting of transgenic animals, their value for biomedical research and development is intensely debated. In addition, the Swiss legislation has adopted (1992) a constitutional obligation to "take into account the dignity of creatures". The term "dignity of creatures", however, can be interpreted in anthropocentric or biocentric ways. The government has now formulated the legal implications of this term for transgenic animals and plants in various laws including the animal and environmental protection laws. This paper gives arguments for a fair evaluation of trangenic animals from an animal welfare point of view where not only the costs of animal suffering must be considered but also the probability of potential benefit for man. A self-confident research community should allow such an evaluation procedure even in view of an outcome which could ban many uses of transgenic animals PMID:11208266

  2. MEDLI Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of MEDLI, the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument, which contains multiple sophisticated temperature sensors to measure atmospheric conditions and performance o...

  3. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Staczek, J

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovirus infections. Recent advances in biotechnology have permitted the study of many of the animal cytomegaloviruses in vitro. Consequently, animal cytomegaloviruses can be used as model systems for studying the pathogenesis, immunobiology, and molecular biology of cytomegalovirus-host and cytomegalovirus-cell interactions. PMID:2170830

  4. Theoretical Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöltzner, Michael

    Answering to the double-faced influence of string theory on mathematical practice and rigour, the mathematical physicists Arthur Jaffe and Frank Quinn have contemplated the idea that there exists a `theoretical' mathematics (alongside `theoretical' physics) whose basic structures and results still require independent corroboration by mathematical proof. In this paper, I shall take the Jaffe-Quinn debate mainly as a problem of mathematical ontology and analyse it against the backdrop of two philosophical views that are appreciative towards informal mathematical development and conjectural results: Lakatos's methodology of proofs and refutations and John von Neumann's opportunistic reading of Hilbert's axiomatic method. The comparison of both approaches shows that mitigating Lakatos's falsificationism makes his insights about mathematical quasi-ontology more relevant to 20th century mathematics in which new structures are introduced by axiomatisation and not necessarily motivated by informal ancestors. The final section discusses the consequences of string theorists' claim to finality for the theory's mathematical make-up. I argue that ontological reductionism as advocated by particle physicists and the quest for mathematically deeper axioms do not necessarily lead to identical results.

  5. Kindergarten Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  6. Animal transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Perna, Andrea; Latty, Tanya

    2014-11-01

    Many group-living animals construct transportation networks of trails, galleries and burrows by modifying the environment to facilitate faster, safer or more efficient movement. Animal transportation networks can have direct influences on the fitness of individuals, whereas the shape and structure of transportation networks can influence community dynamics by facilitating contacts between different individuals and species. In this review, we discuss three key areas in the study of animal transportation networks: the topological properties of networks, network morphogenesis and growth, and the behaviour of network users. We present a brief primer on elements of network theory, and then discuss the different ways in which animal groups deal with the fundamental trade-off between the competing network properties of travel efficiency, robustness and infrastructure cost. We consider how the behaviour of network users can impact network efficiency, and call for studies that integrate both network topology and user behaviour. We finish with a prospectus for future research. PMID:25165598

  7. Animal transportation networks

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Andrea; Latty, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Many group-living animals construct transportation networks of trails, galleries and burrows by modifying the environment to facilitate faster, safer or more efficient movement. Animal transportation networks can have direct influences on the fitness of individuals, whereas the shape and structure of transportation networks can influence community dynamics by facilitating contacts between different individuals and species. In this review, we discuss three key areas in the study of animal transportation networks: the topological properties of networks, network morphogenesis and growth, and the behaviour of network users. We present a brief primer on elements of network theory, and then discuss the different ways in which animal groups deal with the fundamental trade-off between the competing network properties of travel efficiency, robustness and infrastructure cost. We consider how the behaviour of network users can impact network efficiency, and call for studies that integrate both network topology and user behaviour. We finish with a prospectus for future research. PMID:25165598

  8. Animals in research.

    PubMed

    Smith, S J; Hendee, W R

    1988-04-01

    The authors urge American physicians and scientists to undertake a primary role in defending the use of animals in biomedical research against a strategy of progressively more restrictive legislation and regulation initiated by determined and well-financed opponents. They argue that medical progress may be impeded by the objectives of both those who seek only more humane treatment of an absolute minimum of research animals and those whose belief in animals' moral rights precludes all use of animals. Smith and Hendee maintain that the greatest danger to animal research is not the activities of its opponents but the inactivity of its defenders in presenting their arguments to legislators and the public. They appeal for an aggressive, organized campaign by the biomedical community not only at the national level but by local professional groups and individuals at the state and county level. PMID:3346982

  9. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation. PMID:16501652

  10. Theoretical geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Kosek, Wiesław

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a summary of research activities concerning theoretical geodesy performed in Poland in the period of 2011-2014. It contains the results of research on new methods of the parameter estimation, a study on robustness properties of the M-estimation, control network and deformation analysis, and geodetic time series analysis. The main achievements in the geodetic parameter estimation involve a new model of the M-estimation with probabilistic models of geodetic observations, a new Shift-Msplit estimation, which allows to estimate a vector of parameter differences and the Shift-Msplit(+) that is a generalisation of Shift-Msplit estimation if the design matrix A of a functional model has not a full column rank. The new algorithms of the coordinates conversion between the Cartesian and geodetic coordinates, both on the rotational and triaxial ellipsoid can be mentioned as a highlights of the research of the last four years. New parameter estimation models developed have been adopted and successfully applied to the control network and deformation analysis. New algorithms based on the wavelet, Fourier and Hilbert transforms were applied to find time-frequency characteristics of geodetic and geophysical time series as well as time-frequency relations between them. Statistical properties of these time series are also presented using different statistical tests as well as 2nd, 3rd and 4th moments about the mean. The new forecasts methods are presented which enable prediction of the considered time series in different frequency bands.

  11. Impact of risk aversion and disease outbreak characteristics on the incentives of producers as a group to participate in animal disease insurance-A simulation.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Jarkko K; Heikkilä, Jaakko

    2011-06-01

    The participation of agricultural producers in financing losses caused by livestock epidemics has been debated in many countries. One of the issues raised is how reluctant producers are to participate voluntarily in the financing of disease losses before an outbreak occurs. This study contributes to the literature by examining whether disease losses should be financed through pre- or post-outbreak premiums or their combination. A Monte Carlo simulation was employed to illustrate the costs of financing two diseases of different profiles. The profiles differed in the probability in which the damage occurs and in the average damage per event. Three hypothetical financing schemes were compared based on their ability to reduce utility losses in the case of risk-neutral and risk-averse producer groups. The schemes were examined in a dynamic setting where premiums depended on the compensation history of the sector. If producers choose the preferred financing scheme based on utility losses, results suggest that the timing of the premiums, the transaction costs of the scheme, the degree of risk aversion of the producer, and the level and the volatility of premiums affect the choice of the financing scheme. PMID:21497923

  12. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  13. Suzaku Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the Suzaku spacecraft. Suzaku (originally known as Astro-E2) was launched July 10, 2005, and maintains a low-Earth orbit while it observes X-rays from the universe. The satel...

  14. Wild Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and other resources focuses on wild animals. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines, and professional resources, as well as a class activity. (LRW)

  15. Pulsar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Pulsars are thought to emit relatively narrow radio beams, shown as green in this animation. If these beams don't sweep toward Earth, astronomers cannot detect the radio signals. Pulsar gamma-ray e...

  16. Making Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, James

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides simple instructions for making an animation using "PowerPoint". He describes the process by walking readers through it for a sample image. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  17. [Dangerous animals].

    PubMed

    Koljonen, Virve; Söderlund, Tim; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Gissler, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Contacts between humans and animals inevitably involve encounters possibly resulting in the human being injured. During the period of 2000 to 2014 almost 90 people died in this kind of conflict in Finland. Of these deaths, one third were associated with horses. In addition, over the same period 85 people died in traffic accidents in which an animal was hit by a car. Accidents requiring hospitalization occurred for approx. 8 000 people. PMID:27522833

  18. The 'whole-animal approach' as a heuristic principle in neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Serani-Merlo, Alejandro; Paz, Rodrigo; Castillo, Andrés

    2005-01-01

    Neuroscience embraces a heterogeneous group of disciplines. A conceptual framework that allows a better articulation of these different theoretical and experimental perspectives is needed. A 'whole-animal approach is proposed as a theoretical and hermeneutic tool. To illustrate the potential of this point of view, an overview of the research that has been performed in the extinction of fear-conditioned responses from Pavlov to the present is discussed. This is an example of how a whole-animal-based approach may help to organize and integrate basic and clinical neuroscience research. Our proposal is in agreement with recent statements calling for more integrative approaches in biological and neuropsychiatric research. PMID:16579518

  19. Animal Bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Neville H.

    Animals rely upon their acoustic and vibrational senses and abilities to detect the presence of both predators and prey and to communicate with members of the same species. This chapter surveys the physical bases of these abilities and their evolutionary optimization in insects, birds, and other land animals, and in a variety of aquatic animals other than cetaceans, which are treated in Chap. 20. While there are many individual variations, and some animals devote an immense fraction of their time and energy to acoustic communication, there are also many common features in their sound production and in the detection of sounds and vibrations. Excellent treatments of these matters from a biological viewpoint are given in several notable books [19.1,2] and collections of papers [19.3,4,5,6,7,8], together with other more specialized books to be mentioned in the following sections, but treatments from an acoustical viewpoint [19.9] are rare. The main difference between these two approaches is that biological books tend to concentrate on anatomical and physiological details and on behavioral outcomes, while acoustical books use simplified anatomical models and quantitative analysis to model vocalization frequency scaling in animals hearing sound production animal animal biological biological bioacoustics whole-system behavior. This latter is the approach to be adopted here.

  20. Theoretical Astrophysics at Fermilab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Theoretical Astrophysics Group works on a broad range of topics ranging from string theory to data analysis in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The group is motivated by the belief that a deep understanding of fundamental physics is necessary to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the universe. During the three years 2001-2003 of our previous NASA grant, over 120 papers were written; ten of our postdocs went on to faculty positions; and we hosted or organized many workshops and conferences. Kolb and collaborators focused on the early universe, in particular and models and ramifications of the theory of inflation. They also studied models with extra dimensions, new types of dark matter, and the second order effects of super-horizon perturbations. S tebbins, Frieman, Hui, and Dodelson worked on phenomenological cosmology, extracting cosmological constraints from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also worked on theoretical topics such as weak lensing, reionization, and dark energy. This work has proved important to a number of experimental groups [including those at Fermilab] planning future observations. In general, the work of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group has served as a catalyst for experimental projects at Fennilab. An example of this is the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Fennilab is now a member of SNAP, and much of the work done here is by people formerly working on the accelerator. We have created an environment where many of these people made transition from physics to astronomy. We also worked on many other topics related to NASA s focus: cosmic rays, dark matter, the Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect, the galaxy distribution in the universe, and the Lyman alpha forest. The group organized and hosted a number of conferences and workshop over the years covered by the grant. Among them were:

  1. Animal models of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Bari, A; Robbins, T W

    2011-01-01

    Studies employing animal models of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) present clear inherent advantages over human studies. Animal models are invaluable tools for the study of underlying neurochemical, neuropathological and genetic alterations that cause ADHD, because they allow relatively fast, rigorous hypothesis testing and invasive manipulations as well as selective breeding. Moreover, especially for ADHD, animal models with good predictive validity would allow the assessment of potential new therapeutics. In this chapter, we describe and comment on the most frequently used animal models of ADHD that have been created by genetic, neurochemical and physical alterations in rodents. We then discuss that an emerging and promising direction of the field is the analysis of individual behavioural differences among a normal population of animals. Subjects presenting extreme characteristics related to ADHD can be studied, thereby avoiding some of the problems that are found in other models, such as functional recovery and unnecessary assumptions about aetiology. This approach is justified by the theoretical need to consider human ADHD as the extreme part of a spectrum of characteristics that are distributed normally in the general population, as opposed to the predominant view of ADHD as a separate pathological category. PMID:21287324

  2. Comparison of electron microscopy, ELISA, real time RT-PCR and insulated isothermal RT-PCR for the detection of Rotavirus group A (RVA) in feces of different animal species.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Mohamed A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    There is no gold standard for detection of Rotavirus Group A (RVA), one of the main causes of diarrhea in neonatal animals. Sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) assays are available for RVA but require submission of the clinical samples to diagnostic laboratories. Patient-side immunoassays for RVA protein detection have shown variable results, particularly with samples from unintended species. A sensitive and specific test for detection of RVA on the farm would facilitate rapid management decisions. The insulated isothermal RT-PCR (RT-iiPCR) assay works in a portable machine to allow sensitive and specific on-site testing. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate a commercially available RT-iiPCR assay for RVA detection in feces from different animal species. This assay was compared to an in-house rtRT-PCR assay and a commercially available rtRT-PCR kit, as well as an ELISA and EM for RVA detection. All three PCR assays targeted the well-conserved NSP5 gene. Clinical fecal samples from 108 diarrheic animals (mainly cattle and horses) were tested. The percentage of positive samples by ELISA, EM, in-house rtRT-PCR, commercial rtRT-PCR, and RT-iiPCR was 29.4%, 31%, 36.7%, 51.4%, 56.9%, respectively. The agreement between different assays was high (81.3-100%) in samples containing high viral loads. The sensitivity of the RT-iiPCR assay appeared to be higher than the commercially available rtRT-PCR assay, with a limit of detection (95% confidence index) of 3-4 copies of in vitro transcribed dsRNA. In conclusion, the user-friendly, field-deployable RT-iiPCR system holds substantial promise for on-site detection of RVA. PMID:27180038

  3. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. II. Adsorption of tetrachlorides and oxydichlorides of Zr, Hf, and Rf on neutral and modified surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Iliaš, M.; Türler, A.

    2014-08-14

    With the aim to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments on volatility of group-4 tetrachlorides and oxychlorides including those of Rf, adsorption enthalpies of these species on neutral, and modified quartz surfaces were estimated on the basis of relativistic, two-component Density Functional Theory calculations of MCl{sub 4}, MOCl{sub 2}, MCl{sub 6}{sup −}, and MOCl{sub 4}{sup 2} with the use of adsorption models. Several mechanisms of adsorption were considered. In the case of physisorption of MCl{sub 4}, the trend in the adsorption energy in the group should be Zr > Hf > Rf, so that the volatility should change in the opposite direction. The latter trend complies with the one in the sublimation enthalpies, ΔH{sub sub}, of the Zr and Hf tetrachlorides, i.e., Zr < Hf. On the basis of a correlation between these quantities, ΔH{sub sub}(RfCl{sub 4}) was predicted as 104.2 kJ/mol. The energy of physisorption of MOCl{sub 2} on quartz should increase in the group, Zr < Hf < Rf, as defined by increasing dipole moments of these molecules along the series. In the case of adsorption of MCl{sub 4} on quartz by chemical forces, formation of the MOCl{sub 2} or MOCl{sub 4}{sup 2−} complexes on the surface can take place, so that the sequence in the adsorption energy should be Zr > Hf > Rf, as defined by the complex formation energies. In the case of adsorption of MCl{sub 4} on a chlorinated quartz surface, formation of the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} surface complexes can occur, so that the trend in the adsorption strength should be Zr ≤ Hf < Rf. All the predicted sequences, showing a smooth change of the adsorption energy in the group, are in disagreement with the reversed trend Zr ≈ Rf < Hf, observed in the “one-atom-at-a-time” gas-phase chromatography experiments. Thus, currently no theoretical explanation can be found for the experimental observations.

  4. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

    2011-01-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as ‘non-recovery’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’, using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of ‘subthreshold’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’, ‘severe’ and ‘upper threshold’ procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

  5. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa).

    PubMed

    Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

    2011-10-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as 'non-recovery', 'mild', 'moderate' or 'severe', using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of 'subthreshold', 'mild', 'moderate', 'severe' and 'upper threshold' procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

  6. Animal Bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Neville

    Animals rely upon their acoustic and vibrational senses and abilities to detect the presence of both predators and prey and to communicate with members of the same species. This chapter surveys the physical bases of these abilities and their evolutionary optimization in insects, birds, and other land animals, and in a variety of aquatic animals other than cetaceans, which are treated in Chap. 20. While there are many individual variations, and some animals devote an immense fraction of their time and energy to acoustic communication, there are also many common features in their sound production and in the detection of sounds and vibrations. Excellent treatments of these matters from a biological viewpoint are given in several notable books [19.1,2] and collections of papers [19.3,4,5,6,7,8], together with other more specialized books to be mentioned in the following sections, but treatments from an acoustical viewpoint [19.9] are rare. The main difference between these two approaches is that biological books tend to concentrate on anatomical and physiological details and on behavioral outcomes, while acoustical books use simplified anatomical models and quantitative analysis to model whole-system behavior. This latter is the approach to be adopted here.

  7. Adapting Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedman, John; Wedman, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The "Animals" program found on the Apple II and IIe system master disk can be adapted for use in the mathematics classroom. Instructions for making the necessary changes and suggestions for using it in lessons related to geometric shapes are provided. (JN)

  8. Animal Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on, outdoor science experiments designed to teach elementary school students about animal adaptation. The experiments focus on: how color camouflage affects an insect population; how spiderlings find a home; and how chameleons camouflage themselves by changing color. (SM)

  9. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  10. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MAINTENANCE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1962-01-22

    A method of housing experimental animals such as mice in individual tube- like plastic enclosures is described. Contrary to experience, when this was tried with metal the mice did not become panicky. Group housing, with its attendant difficulties, may thus be dispensed with. (AEC)

  11. Animal leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, William A

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global disease of animals, which can have a major economic impact on livestock industries and is an important zoonosis. The current knowledge base is heavily biased towards the developed agricultural economies. The disease situation in the developing economies presents a major challenge as humans and animals frequently live in close association. The severity of disease varies with the infecting serovar and the affected species, but there are many common aspects across the species; for example, the acute phase of infection is mostly sub-clinical and the greatest economic losses arise from chronic infection causing reproductive wastage. The principles of, and tests for, diagnosis, treatment, control and surveillance are applicable across the species. PMID:25388134

  12. [Dangerous animals].

    PubMed

    Hasle, Gunnar

    2002-06-30

    As travellers seek ever more exotic destinations they are more likely to encounter dangerous animals. Compared to risks such as AIDS, traffic accidents and malaria, the risk is not so great; many travellers are, however, concerned about this and those who give pre-travel vaccines and advice should know something about it. This article is mainly based on medical and zoological textbooks. Venomous stings and bites may be prevented by adequate clothing and by keeping safe distance to the animals. Listening to those who live in the area is of course important. Travellers should not carry antisera with them, but antisera should be available at local hospitals. It should be borne in mind that plant eaters cause just as many deaths as large predators. In some cases it is necessary to carry a sufficiently powerful firearm. PMID:12555616

  13. Modeling animal landscapes.

    PubMed

    Porter, W P; Ostrowski, S; Williams, J B

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing need to assess the effects of climate and land-use change on habitat quality, ideally from a mechanistic basis. The symposium "Molecules to Migration: Pressures of Life" at the Fourth International Conference in Africa for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry, Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, 2008, illustrated how the principles of biophysical ecology can capture the mechanistic links between organisms, climate, and other habitat features. These principles provide spatially explicit assessments of habitat quality from a physiological perspective (i.e., "animal landscapes") that can be validated independently of the data used to derive and parameterize them. The contents of this symposium showcased how the modeling of animal landscapes can be used to assess key issues in applied and theoretical ecology. The presentations included applications to amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. The rare Arabian oryx on the Arabian Peninsula is used as an example for energetic calculations and their implications for behavior on the landscape. PMID:20670170

  14. Animal Violence Demystified

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Deepa; Caramaschi, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Violence has been observed in humans and animals alike, indicating its evolutionary/biological significance. However, violence in animals has often been confounded with functional forms of aggressive behavior. Currently, violence in animals is identified primarily as either a quantitative behavior (an escalated, pathological and abnormal form of aggression characterized primarily by short attack latencies, and prolonged and frequent harm-oriented conflict behaviors) or a qualitative one (characterized by attack bites aimed at vulnerable parts of the opponent's body and context independent attacks regardless of the environment or the sex and type of the opponent). Identification of an operational definition for violence thus not only helps in understanding its potential differences from adaptive forms of aggression but also in the selection of appropriate animal models for both. We address this issue theoretically by drawing parallels from research on aggression and appeasement in humans and other animals. We also provide empirical evidences for violence in mice selected for high aggression by comparing our findings with other currently available potentially violent rodent models. The following violence-specific features namely (1) Display of low levels of pre-escalatory/ritualistic behaviors. (2) Immediate and escalated offense durations with low withdrawal rates despite the opponent's submissive supine and crouching/defeat postures. (3) Context independent indiscriminate attacks aimed at familiar/unfamiliar females, anaesthetized males and opponents and in neutral environments. (4) Orientation of attack-bites toward vulnerable body parts of the opponent resulting in severe wounding. (5) Low prefrontal serotonin (5-HT) levels upon repeated aggression. (6) Low basal heart rates and hyporesponsive hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis were identified uniquely in the short attack latency (SAL) mice suggesting a qualitative difference between violence

  15. CyAnimator: Simple Animations of Cytoscape Networks.

    PubMed

    Morris, John H; Vijay, Dhameliya; Federowicz, Steven; Pico, Alexander R; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    CyAnimator (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/cyanimator) is a Cytoscape app that provides a tool for simple animations of Cytoscape networks. The tool allows you to take a series of snapshots (CyAnimator calls them frames) of Cytoscape networks. For example, the first frame might be of a network shown from a "zoomed out" viewpoint and the second frame might focus on a specific group of nodes. Once these two frames are captured by the tool, it can animate between them by interpolating the changes in location, zoom, node color, node size, edge thickness, presence or absence of annotations, etc. The animations may be saved as a series of individual frames, animated GIFs, or H.264/MP4 movies. CyAnimator is available from within the Cytoscape App Manager or from the Cytoscape app store. PMID:26937268

  16. CyAnimator: Simple Animations of Cytoscape Networks

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John H.; Vijay, Dhameliya; Federowicz, Steven; Pico, Alexander R.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    CyAnimator (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/cyanimator) is a Cytoscape app that provides a tool for simple animations of Cytoscape networks. The tool allows you to take a series of snapshots (CyAnimator calls them frames) of Cytoscape networks. For example, the first frame might be of a network shown from a ”zoomed out” viewpoint and the second frame might focus on a specific group of nodes. Once these two frames are captured by the tool, it can animate between them by interpolating the changes in location, zoom, node color, node size, edge thickness, presence or absence of annotations, etc. The animations may be saved as a series of individual frames, animated GIFs, or H.264/MP4 movies. CyAnimator is available from within the Cytoscape App Manager or from the Cytoscape app store. PMID:26937268

  17. Computer-assisted assignment of functional domains in the nonstructural polyprotein of hepatitis E virus: delineation of an additional group of positive-strand RNA plant and animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V; Gorbalenya, A E; Purdy, M A; Rozanov, M N; Reyes, G R; Bradley, D W

    1992-09-01

    Computer-assisted comparison of the nonstructural polyprotein of hepatitis E virus (HEV) with proteins of other positive-strand RNA viruses allowed the identification of the following putative functional domains: (i) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, (ii) RNA helicase, (iii) methyltransferase, (iv) a domain of unknown function ("X" domain) flanking the papain-like protease domains in the polyproteins of animal positive-strand RNA viruses, and (v) papain-like cysteine protease domain distantly related to the putative papain-like protease of rubella virus (RubV). Comparative analysis of the polymerase and helicase sequences of positive-strand RNA viruses belonging to the so-called "alpha-like" supergroup revealed grouping between HEV, RubV, and beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), a plant furovirus. Two additional domains have been identified: one showed significant conservation between HEV, RubV, and BNYVV, and the other showed conservation specifically between HEV and RubV. The large nonstructural proteins of HEV, RubV, and BNYVV retained similar domain organization, with the exceptions of relocation of the putative protease domain in HEV as compared to RubV and the absence of the protease and X domains in BNYVV. These observations show that HEV, RubV, and BNYVV encompass partially conserved arrays of distinctive putative functional domains, suggesting that these viruses constitute a distinct monophyletic group within the alpha-like supergroup of positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:1518855

  18. Scientific assessment of animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, P H; Mellor, D J; Cronin, G M; Tilbrook, A J

    2015-01-01

    Animal welfare is a state within the animal and a scientific perspective provides methodologies for evidence-based assessment of an animal's welfare. A simplistic definition of animal welfare might be how the animal feels now. Affective experiences including emotions, are subjective states so cannot be measured directly in animals, but there are informative indirect physiological and behavioural indices that can be cautiously used to interpret such experiences. This review enunciates several key science-based frameworks for understanding animal welfare. The biological functioning and affective state frameworks were initially seen as competing, but a recent more unified approach is that biological functioning is taken to include affective experiences and affective experiences are recognised as products of biological functioning, and knowledge of the dynamic interactions between the two is considered to be fundamental to managing and improving animal welfare. The value of these two frameworks in understanding the welfare of group-housed sows is reviewed. The majority of studies of the welfare of group-housed sows have employed the biological functioning framework to infer compromised sow welfare, on the basis that suboptimal biological functioning accompanies negative affective states such as sow hunger, pain, fear, helplessness, frustration and anger. Group housing facilitates social living, but group housing of gestating sows raises different welfare considerations to stall housing, such as high levels of aggression, injuries and stress, at least for several days after mixing, as well as subordinate sows being underfed due to competition at feeding. This paper highlights the challenges and potential opportunities for the continued improvement in sow management through well-focused research and multidisciplinary assessment of animal welfare. In future the management of sentient animals will require the promotion of positive affective experiences in animals and this

  19. Animal Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Johnny; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

    The development of a new anticancer drug is a long, complex and multistep process which is supervised by regulatory authorities from the different countries all around the world [1]. Application of a new drug for admission to the market is supported by preclinical and clinical data, both including the determination of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, antitumour activity, therapeutic index, etc. As preclinical studies are associated with high cost, optimization of animal experiments is crucial for the overall development of a new anticancer agent. Moreover, in vivo efficacy studies remain a determinant panel for advancement of agents to human trials and thus, require cautious design and interpretation from experimental and ethical point of views.

  20. Animal Intuitions.

    PubMed

    Kaebnick, Gregory E

    2016-07-01

    As described by Lori Gruen in the Perspective column at the back of this issue, federally supported biomedical research conducted on chimpanzees has now come to an end in the United States, although the wind-down has taken longer than expected. The process began with a 2011 Institute of Medicine report that set up several stringent criteria that sharply limited biomedical research. The National Institutes of Health accepted the recommendations and formed a committee to determine how best to implement them. The immediate question raised by this transition was whether the IOM restrictions should be extended in some form to other nonhuman primates-and beyond them to other kinds of animals. In the lead article in this issue, Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe, and Franklin Miller consider the status of other nonhuman primates. PMID:27417859

  1. Bioethical Problems: Animal Welfare, Animal Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various bioethical issues and problems related to animal welfare and animal rights. Areas examined include: Aristotelian views; animal welfare legislation; Darwin and evolutionary theory; animal and human behavior; and vegetarianism. A 14-point universal declaration of the rights of animals is included. (JN)

  2. Social Information Transmission in Animals: Lessons from Studies of Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Duboscq, Julie; Romano, Valéria; MacIntosh, Andrew; Sueur, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to use information provided by others to guide behavior is a widespread phenomenon in animal societies. A standard paradigm to test if and/or how animals use and transfer social information is through social diffusion experiments, by which researchers observe how information spreads within a group, sometimes by seeding new behavior in the population. In this article, we review the context, methodology and products of such social diffusion experiments. Our major focus is the transmission of information from an individual (or group thereof) to another, and the factors that can enhance or, more interestingly, inhibit it. We therefore also discuss reasons why social transmission sometimes does not occur despite being expected to. We span a full range of mechanisms and processes, from the nature of social information itself and the cognitive abilities of various species, to the idea of social competency and the constraints imposed by the social networks in which animals are embedded. We ultimately aim at a broad reflection on practical and theoretical issues arising when studying how social information spreads within animal groups. PMID:27540368

  3. Social Information Transmission in Animals: Lessons from Studies of Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Duboscq, Julie; Romano, Valéria; MacIntosh, Andrew; Sueur, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to use information provided by others to guide behavior is a widespread phenomenon in animal societies. A standard paradigm to test if and/or how animals use and transfer social information is through social diffusion experiments, by which researchers observe how information spreads within a group, sometimes by seeding new behavior in the population. In this article, we review the context, methodology and products of such social diffusion experiments. Our major focus is the transmission of information from an individual (or group thereof) to another, and the factors that can enhance or, more interestingly, inhibit it. We therefore also discuss reasons why social transmission sometimes does not occur despite being expected to. We span a full range of mechanisms and processes, from the nature of social information itself and the cognitive abilities of various species, to the idea of social competency and the constraints imposed by the social networks in which animals are embedded. We ultimately aim at a broad reflection on practical and theoretical issues arising when studying how social information spreads within animal groups. PMID:27540368

  4. History of animal bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popper, Arthur N.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2002-11-01

    The earliest studies on animal bioacoustics dealt largely with descriptions of sounds. Only later did they address issues of detection, discrimination, and categorization of complex communication sounds. This literature grew substantially over the last century. Using the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America as an example, the number of papers that fall broadly within the realm of animal sound production, communication, and hearing rose from two in the partial first decade of the journal in the 1930's, to 20 in the 1970's, to 92 in the first 2 years of this millennium. During this time there has been a great increase in the diversity of species studied, the sophistication of the methods used, and the complexity of the questions addressed. As an example, the first papers in JASA focused on a guinea pig and a bird. In contrast, since the year 2000 studies are often highly comparative and include fish, birds, dolphins, dogs, ants, crickets, and snapping shrimp. This paper on the history of animal bioacoustics will consider trends in work over the decades and discuss the formative work of a number of investigators who have spurred the field by making critical theoretical and experimental observations.

  5. Animal welfare: an animal science approach.

    PubMed

    Koknaroglu, H; Akunal, T

    2013-12-01

    Increasing world population and demand for animal-derived protein puts pressure on animal production to meet this demand. For this purpose animal breeding efforts were conducted to obtain the maximum yield that the genetic makeup of the animals permits. Under the influence of economics which is the driving force behind animal production, animal farming became more concentrated and controlled which resulted in rearing animals under confinement. Since more attention was given on economics and yield per animal, animal welfare and behavior were neglected. Animal welfare which can be defined as providing environmental conditions in which animals can display all their natural behaviors in nature started gaining importance in recent years. This does not necessarily mean that animals provided with good management practices would have better welfare conditions as some animals may be distressed even though they are in good environmental conditions. Consumers are willing to pay more for welfare-friendly products (e.g.: free range vs caged egg) and this will change the animal production practices in the future. Thus animal scientists will have to adapt themselves for the changing animal welfare rules and regulations that differ for farm animal species and countries. In this review paper, animal welfare is discussed from an animal science standpoint. PMID:23664009

  6. Animating Brains.

    PubMed

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title 'Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience'. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of 'soul catching', the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain's electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  7. Animating Brains

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  8. Animal models of tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Brozoski, Thomas J; Bauer, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    Presented is a thematic review of animal tinnitus models from a functional perspective. Chronic tinnitus is a persistent subjective sound sensation, emergent typically after hearing loss. Although the sensation is experientially simple, it appears to have central a nervous system substrate of unexpected complexity that includes areas outside of those classically defined as auditory. Over the past 27 years animal models have significantly contributed to understanding tinnitus' complex neurophysiology. In that time, a diversity of models have been developed, each with its own strengths and limitations. None has clearly become a standard. Animal models trace their origin to the 1988 experiments of Jastreboff and colleagues. All subsequent models derive some of their features from those experiments. Common features include behavior-dependent psychophysical determination, acoustic conditions that contrast objective sound and silence, and inclusion of at least one normal-hearing control group. In the present review, animal models have been categorized as either interrogative or reflexive. Interrogative models use emitted behavior under voluntary control to indicate hearing. An example would be pressing a lever to obtain food in the presence of a particular sound. In this type of model animals are interrogated about their auditory sensations, analogous to asking a patient, "What do you hear?" These models require at least some training and motivation management, and reflect the perception of tinnitus. Reflexive models, in contrast, employ acoustic modulation of an auditory reflex, such as the acoustic startle response. An unexpected loud sound will elicit a reflexive motor response from many species, including humans. Although involuntary, acoustic startle can be modified by a lower-level preceding event, including a silent sound gap. Sound-gap modulation of acoustic startle appears to discriminate tinnitus in animals as well as humans, and requires no training or

  9. Neuroprotective potential of the group III mGlu receptor agonist ACPT-I in animal models of ischemic stroke: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Domin, Helena; Przykaza, Łukasz; Jantas, Danuta; Kozniewska, Ewa; Boguszewski, Paweł M; Śmiałowska, Maria

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACPT-I [(1S, 3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid], a blood-brain-barrier permeable agonist of group III mGlu receptor, against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-evoked neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cell cultures and in the model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. We found that ACPT-I (1-200 μM) in a concentration- and time-dependent way attenuated the OGD-induced neuronal cell damage, being also effective after a delayed application (30 min after OGD). The neuroprotective effects of ACPT-I were blocked by the group III mGlu receptor antagonist, (RS)-alpha-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenyl glycine (CPPG), and by the activator of cAMP-dependent PKA, 8-Bromo-cAMP, but not by an inhibitor of PI-3-K signaling pathway. Moreover, ACPT-I attenuated the OGD-induced calpain activity and glutamate release. In the in vitro study, we also demonstrated the neuroprotective potential of mGluR4 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), PHCCC (30 μM) and VU0155041 (10 and 30 μM) and synergism in neuroprotective action of low concentrations of ACPT-I and mGluR4 PAMs suggesting an important role of mGluR4 activation in prevention of ischemic neuronal cell death. In the rat MCAO model, we demonstrated that ACPT-I (30 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally either 30 min after starting MCAO or 30 min after beginning reperfusion not only diminished the infarction volume by about 30%, but also improved selected gait parameters (CatWalk analysis) and the mobility of animals in the open field test. In conclusion, our results indicate that ACPT-I may be not only neuroprotective against ischemic neuronal damage but may also diminish the postischemic functional deficits. PMID:26647070

  10. Science Teachers to Ban Testing Harmful to Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Marjorie

    1980-01-01

    This article reports the adoption of new policies to restrict experiments on animals in the elementary or secondary school classroom. The controversy involving animal welfare groups is discussed as it relates to animal abuse by students. (SA)