Sample records for anisotropic composite materials

  1. Ultrasonic defect evaluation using DGS-diagrams modified for the inspection of anisotropic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, Martin; Rieder, Hans; Dillhöfer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The application of DGS-diagrams (Distance-Gain-Size) for defect sizing using ultrasonics is considered for anisotropic materials. Based on far-field formulations for transducers with circular apertures, it is shown that the general DGS-diagram for isotropic materials can be applied to anisotropic media as well, if some modifications in the evaluation are performed. The modified procedure is illustrated and validated using ultrasonic inspection data acquired at a unidirectionally carbon-fiber reinforced composite test block with flat-bottomed holes as model defects.

  2. A model for inverting eddy-current data and reconstructing three-dimensional flaws embedded in anisotropic advanced composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Barkeshli; H. A. Sabbagh; D. J. Radecki; B. Shamee

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a three-dimensional linearized model for inverting eddy-current data to reconstruct flaws in advanced anisotropic composite materials, such as graphite epoxy. This problem is significant for enhancing the detection capability for the variety of failure modes in composites, such as delamination, fiber breakage, flaws, etc. The inversion scheme takes the form of an integral equation, which then is

  3. Defect imaging with elastic waves in inhomogeneous-anisotropic materials with composite geometries.

    PubMed

    Shlivinski, A; Langenberg, K J

    2007-03-01

    Imaging of defects in composite structures plays an important role in non-destructive testing (NDT) with elastic waves, i.e., ultrasound. Traditionally the imaging of such defects is performed using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) algorithm assuming homogeneous isotropic materials. However, if parts of the structure are inhomogeneous and/or anisotropic, this algorithm fail to produce correct results that are needed in order to asses the lifetime of the part under test. Here we present a modification of this algorithm which enables a correct imaging of defects in inhomogeneous and/or anisotropic composite structures, whence it is termed InASAFT. The InASAFT is based on the exact modelling of the structure in order to account for the true nature of the elastic wave propagation using travel time ray tracing techniques. The algorithm is validated upon several numerical and real life examples yielding satisfactory results for imaging of cracks. The modified algorithm suffers, though, from the same difficulties encountered in the SAFT algorithm, namely "ghost" images and eventual lack of clear focused images. However, these artifacts can be identified using a forward wave propagation analysis of the structure. PMID:17258256

  4. Singularity analysis and fracture energy-release rate for composites: Piecewise homogeneous-anisotropic materials

    E-print Network

    Vu-Quoc, Loc

    -anisotropic materials Loc Vu-Quoc *, Van-Xuan Tran 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Computational: +1 352 392 7303. E-mail address: vu-quoc@ufl.edu (L. Vu-Quoc). URL: www.mae.ufl.edu/~vql (L. Vu

  5. Negative refraction in anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, S. T.

    2004-03-01

    Left-handed materials (LHM) are materials in which the direction of wave propagation S is opposite to the wave vector k . S <0 .[1,2,3] LHM exhibit nagative refraction. Experiments have been carried out on a medium consisting of arrays of metallic rings and wrires.[3] An example of a different class of anisotropic left-handed materials are metallic magnetic granular composites. Based on the effective medium approximation, we show that by incorporating metallic magnetic nanoparticles into an appropriate insulating matrix, it may be possible to prepare a composite medium of low eddy current loss which is left-handed for electromagnetic waves propagating in some special direction and polarization in a frequency region near the ferromagnetic resonance frequency.[4,5] This composite may be easier to make on an industrial scale. In addition, its physical properties may be easily tuned by rotating the magnetization locally. The physics involved seems to be different from the original argument.[1,2] In our argument[5], the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the metal is much larger than the real part, opposite to the original argument. In anisotropic materials so that some of the susceptibilities are negative, the criterion for LHM may not be the same as that for negative refraction.[6] Ansiotropic materials exhibit a richer manifold of anomlous behaviour[6,7,8] and offers more flexibility in apllications.[8] More recently it was found that negative refraction can occur in anisotropic materials where all the susceptibilities are positive.[9] We found that the range of applicability of this effect is much larger than originally thought.[10] S. T. Chui was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research, by the Army Research Laboratory through the Center of Composite Materials at the University of Delaware, by DARPA and by the NSF. [1] J.B.Pendry, A.J.Holden, W.J.Stewart, and I.Youngs, Phys. Rev. Lett 76, 4773 (1996). [2] V.G.Veselago, Sov. Phys. Usp. 10, 509 (1968). [3] D.R.Smith, W.J.Padilla, D.C.Vier, S.C.Nemet-Nasser, S.Schultz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 3578 (2000). [4] S. T. Chui and L. B. Hu, Phys. Rev. B 65, 144407 (2002), [5] S. T. Chui, L. B. Hu and Z. F. Lin, Phys. Lett. A319, 85 (2003). [6] L. B. Hu, S. T. Chui and Z. F. Lin, Phys. Rev. B66, 085108 (2002). [7] V. Lindell and coworkers, Microwave and Opt. Tech Lett. 31, 129 (2001). [8] D. R. Smith and D. Schurig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 077405-1 (2003); D. Schurig and D. R. Smith, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2215 (2003). [9] Y. Zhang, B. Fluegel and A. Mascarenhas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 157404, (2003). [10] Z. F. Lin and S. T. Chui, unpublished.

  6. Unit-Sphere Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Applied to Anisotropic and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel, N.

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of brittle materials under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This methodology has been extended to predict the multiaxial strength response of transversely isotropic brittle materials, including polymer matrix composites (PMCs), by considering (1) flaw-orientation anisotropy, whereby a preexisting microcrack has a higher likelihood of being oriented in one direction over another direction, and (2) critical strength, or K (sub Ic) orientation anisotropy, whereby the level of critical strength or fracture toughness for mode I crack propagation, K (sub Ic), changes with regard to the orientation of the microstructure. In this report, results from finite element analysis of a fiber-reinforced-matrix unit cell were used with the unit-sphere model to predict the biaxial strength response of a unidirectional PMC previously reported from the World-Wide Failure Exercise. Results for nuclear-grade graphite materials under biaxial loading are also shown for comparison. This effort was successful in predicting the multiaxial strength response for the chosen problems. Findings regarding stress-state interactions and failure modes also are provided.

  7. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Mondy, Lisa A. (Cedar Crest, NM); Guell, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  8. Cryogenic microwave anisotropic artificial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, Frank

    This thesis addresses analysis and design of a cryogenic microwave anisotropic wave guiding structure that isolates an antenna from external incident fields from specific directions. The focus of this research is to design and optimize the radome's constituent material parameters for maximizing the isolation between an interior receiver antenna and an exterior transmitter without significantly disturbing the transmitter antenna far field characteristics. The design, characterization, and optimization of high-temperature superconducting metamaterials constitutive parameters are developed in this work at X-band frequencies. A calibrated characterization method for testing arrays of split-ring resonators at cryogenic temperature inside a TE10 waveguide was developed and used to back-out anisotropic equivalent material parameters. The artificial material elements (YBCO split-ring resonators on MgO substrate) are optimized to improve the narrowband performance of the metamaterial radome with respect to maximizing isolation and minimizing shadowing, defined as a reduction of the transmitted power external to the radome. The optimized radome is fabricated and characterized in a parallel plate waveguide in a cryogenic environment to demonstrate the degree of isolation and shadowing resulting from its presence. At 11.12 GHz, measurements show that the HTS metamaterial radome achieved an isolation of 10.5 dB and the external power at 100 mm behind the radome is reduced by 1.9 dB. This work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating a structure that provides good isolation between two antennas and low disturbance of the transmitter's fields.

  9. Anisotropic Magnetism in Field-Structured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert A.; Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy; Venturini, Eugene

    1999-06-24

    Magnetic field-structured-composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g. rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chain-like particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheet-like particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCS of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material.

  10. Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Langley Research Center researchers invented an advanced polymer, a chemical compound formed by uniting many small molecules to create a complex molecule with different chemical properties. The material is a thermoplastic polyimide that resists solvents. Other polymers of this generic type are soluble in solvents, thus cannot be used where solvents are present. High Technology Services (HTS), Inc. licensed technology and is engaged in development and manufacture of high performance plastics, resins and composite materials. Techimer Materials Division is using technology for composite matrix resins that offer heat resistance and protection from radiation, electrical and chemical degradation. Applications of new polymer include molding resins, adhesives and matrix resins for fiber reinforced composites.

  11. Composite material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stacy A. Hutchens; Jonathan Woodward; Barbara R. Evans; Hugh M. ONeill

    2012-01-01

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft

  12. Composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  13. Transverse waves in anisotropic elastic materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. T. Ting

    2006-01-01

    With few exceptions, a transverse wave can propagate in an anisotropic elastic material along certain directions only. Equations that allow us to compute the direction n, the polarization vector a and the wave speed c are presented for a general anisotropic elastic material. In contrast to longitudinal waves, the directions along which a transverse wave can propagate are not finite

  14. Anisotropic Decomposition of Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Bajar, Sean; Yulga, Brian; Yang, Wenge; Hooks, Daniel (UNLV); (CIW); (LANL)

    2008-01-17

    Using a white x-ray synchrotron beam, we have dynamically studied radiation-induced decomposition in single crystalline PETN and TATB. By monitoring the integrated intensity of selected diffraction spots via a CCD x-ray camera as a function of time, we have found that the decomposition rate varies dramatically depending upon the orientation of the crystalline axes relative to polarized x-ray beam and for differing diffracting conditions (spots) within the same crystalline orientation. We suggest that this effect is due to Compton scattering of the polarized x-rays with electron clouds that is dependent upon their relative orientation. This novel effect may yield valuable insight regarding anisotropic detonation sensitivity in energetic materials such as PETN.

  15. Anisotropic decomposition of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Bajar, Sean; Yulga, Brian [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center and Department of Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV USA, 89154-4002 (United States); Yang Wenge [HP-CAT, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Hooks, Daniel [Dynamic Experimentation Division (DE-9), Los Alamo National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-12-12

    Using a white x-ray synchrotron beam, we have dynamically studied radiation-induced decomposition in single crystalline PETN and TATB. By monitoring the integrated intensity of selected diffraction spots via a CCD x-ray camera as a function of time, we have found that the decomposition rate varies dramatically depending upon the orientation of the crystalline axes relative to polarized x-ray beam and for differing diffracting conditions (spots) within the same crystalline orientation. We suggest that this effect is due to Compton scattering of the polarized x-rays with electron clouds that is dependent upon their relative orientation. This novel effect may yield valuable insight regarding anisotropic detonation sensitivity in energetic materials such as PETN.

  16. ULTRASONIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Boro Djordjevic

    With increased use of composite materials in critical structural applications it is more important than ever to independently assure structural integrity. Complexity of the advanced composite materials including layered and bonded structures represents challenges in developing optimized ultrasonic tests. Traditional ultrasonic NDT methods are inappropriate and often misleading when applied to anisotropic and nonhomogeneous composite materials. In advanced technology applications

  17. Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Composites are lighter and stronger than metals. Aramid fibers like Kevlar and Nomex were developed by DuPont Corporation and can be combined in a honeycomb structure which can give an airplane a light, tough structure. Composites can be molded into many aerodynamic shapes eliminating rivets and fasteners. Langley Research Center has tested composites for both aerospace and non-aerospace applications. They are also used in boat hulls, military shelters, etc.

  18. Anisotropic magnetostrictive metal-polymer composites for functional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, T. Yu.; Zholudev, S. I.; Il'inykh, I. A.; Novakova, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    New metal-polymer composites based on mechanochemically synthesized magnetostrictive Fe-Ga phase particles with dimensions of up to 2 ?m dispersed and spatially oriented in a polymer matrix have been studied. The polymer matrix for spatial anisotropic stabilization of particles was represented by modified polyurethane (PU). An increase in the magnetostrictive effect was achieved by directed orientation of particles in a magnetic field applied during polymerization of the PU matrix. The spatial anisotropy of the composite has been studied by the methods of conversion Mössbauer spectroscopy with resonant X-ray detection and scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that the mechanochemical synthesis is an effective method of obtaining particles with microstress-enhanced magnetostriction. The use of these particles for the formation of a functional elastomer composite provides a material with significant magnetostrictive effect, which can be several-fold increased due to orientation of particles in an applied magnetic field. The obtained anisotropic magnetostrictive composite is a promising material for the creation of smart functional components of positioning systems, attenuators, and sensors.

  19. Aeroelastic tailoring of composite materials 

    E-print Network

    Rogers, Jesse Byron

    1979-01-01

    LIST OF FIGURES IiiTRODUCTI ON ST!!UCTURAL RESPONSE Deformation of Uniformly Stressed Isotropic and Anisotropic Plates Characterization of Composite Laminates . Effect of Material Parameters APPLICATIONS Aircraft Propellers Ship Propell rs... com- pliances with laminate rotation 39 15 Variation of (A) extensional ard (8) bending compliances with 0' ply rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 16 Incremental aerodynamic forces on a typical blade element 43 17 Propeller velocity...

  20. On the description of anisotropic damage in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yang; Boehler, J. P.

    1991-11-01

    A general anisotropic damage theory of cracked laminates is formulated here. The deformation of composite laminates is composed of matrix elastic strains, pseudo-elastic damage strains due to cracking and permanent damage strains due to interlaminar slip. The surface of damage initiation is constructed according to the concept of linear elastic fracture mechanics for the virgin material. After the initial damage, a pesudo-elastic damage can be used to describe the damage behaviour if interlaminar slip is negligible. Damage evolution, load induced anisotropy and interlaminar intralaminar interaction for composite laminates are examined; the latter can perturb the normality structure of damage strain rate. Explicit expressions are given for pseudo-elastic (or secant) moduli of the damaging composite laminates, under a non-interacting assumption imposed on the cracks between different families.

  1. Composite Materials Handbook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From the US Army Research Laboratory, Materials Sciences Corporation, and University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials, the Composite Materials Handbook provides the "information and guidance necessary to design and fabricate end items from composite materials." Along with current information on the material properties of these composite materials, the handbook also includes data development and usage guidelines. The information has been divided into three areas: polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites. The Polymer Matrix Composites Handbook (three volumes including Guidelines for Characterization of Structural Materials; Material Properties; and Materials Usage, Design, and Analysis) and the Metal Matrix Composites Handbook (one volume, .pdf) are available here. The Ceramic Matrix Composites Handbook has yet to be completed. Users may also download Quick Composites Data in spreadsheet format.

  2. Wave propagation and impact in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Anisotropic waves in composites are considered, taking into account wave speeds, wave surfaces, flexural waves in orthotropic plates, surface waves, edge waves in plates, and waves in coupled composite plates. Aspects of dispersion in composites are discussed, giving attention to pulse propagation and dispersion, dispersion in rods and plates, dispersion in a layered composite, combined material and structural dispersion, continuum theories for composites, and variational methods for periodic composites. The characteristics of attenuation and scattering processes are examined and a description is given of shock waves and impact problems in composites. A number of experiments are also reported.

  3. Thermographic Imaging of Defects in Anisotropic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Y. A.; Winfree, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    Composite materials are of increasing interest to the aerospace industry as a result of their weight versus performance characteristics. One of the disadvantages of composites is the high cost of fabrication and post inspection with conventional ultrasonic scanning systems. The high cost of inspection is driven by the need for scanning systems which can follow large curve surfaces. Additionally, either large water tanks or water squirters are required to couple the ultrasonics into the part. Thermographic techniques offer significant advantages over conventional ultrasonics by not requiring physical coupling between the part and sensor. The thermographic system can easily inspect large curved surface without requiring a surface following scanner. However, implementation of Thermal Nondestructive Evaluations (TNDE) for flaw detection in composite materials and structures requires determining its limit. Advanced algorithms have been developed to enable locating and sizing defects in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). Thermal Tomography is a very promising method for visualizing the size and location of defects in materials such as CFRP. However, further investigations are required to determine its capabilities for inspection of thick composites. In present work we have studied influence of the anisotropy on the reconstructed image of a defect generated by an inversion technique. The composite material is considered as homogeneous with macro properties: thermal conductivity K, specific heat c, and density rho. The simulation process involves two sequential steps: solving the three dimensional transient heat diffusion equation for a sample with a defect, then estimating the defect location and size from the surface spatial and temporal thermal distributions (inverse problem), calculated from the simulations.

  4. Designing chromonic mesogens for the fabrication of anisotropic optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam-Chang, Suk-Wah; Huang, Liming; Gyan, Aryal; Seo, Wonewoo; Mahinay, Delfin; Iverson, Isaac K.

    2008-02-01

    Perylene monoimides and diimides have applications as luminescent materials and in organic photovoltaic devices as chromophores and conducting materials. Materials in which these compounds are oriented in a preferred direction will possess useful anisotropic properties that are not attainable from materials in which the compounds are randomly oriented. Anisotropic materials of these compounds can be prepared by taking advantage of the unique properties of chromonic liquid crystals. In this paper we describe the principles for designing perylene monoimides and diimides with desired optical properties and chromonic liquid-crystalline properties. In addition, we demonstrate the fabrication of anisotropic optical materials via organization of these compounds into a lyotropic chromonic liquidcrystalline phase.

  5. Anisotropic Cloth Modeling for Material Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingmin; Pan, Zhigengx; Mi, Qingfeng

    Physically based cloth simulation has been challenging the graphics community for more than three decades. With the developing of virtual reality and clothing CAD, it has become the key technique of virtual garment and try-on system. Although it has received considerable attention in computer graphics, due to its flexible property and realistic feeling that the textile engineers pay much attention to, there is not a successful methodology to simulate cloth both in visual realism and physical accuracy. We present a new anisotropic textile modeling method based on physical mass-spring system, which models the warps and wefts separately according to the different material fabrics. The simulation process includes two main steps: firstly the rigid object simulation and secondly the flexible mass simulation near to be equilibrium. A multiresolution modeling is applied to enhance the tradeoff fruit of the realistic presentation and computation cost. Finally, some examples and the analysis results show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. Mechanics of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, G.J. (Inst. Center for Composite Materials and Structures, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (US)); Laws, N. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (US))

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the following papers: crack growth resistance of TiB{sub 2} particulate/SiC matrix composite; constitutive relations of flexible composites under elastic deformation; determination of two kinds of composite plasticity: inclusions plastic vs. matrix plastic; 3-D analysis of transient interlaminar thermal stress of laminated composites; effect of seawater on the fracture toughness of pultruded rods; evaluation of new failure criterion for fibrous composite materials; and bridged cracks in fiber-reinforced composites.

  7. The Features of Self-Assembling Organic Bilayers Important to the Formation of Anisotropic Inorganic Materials in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talham, Daniel R.; Adair, James H.

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing need for inorganic anisotropic particles in a variety of materials science applications. Structural, optical, and electrical properties can be greatly augmented by the fabrication of composite materials with anisotropic microstructures or with anisotropic particles uniformly dispersed in an isotropic matrix. Examples include structural composites, magnetic and optical recording media, photographic film, certain metal and ceramic alloys, and display technologies including flat panel displays. While considerable progress has been made toward developing an understanding of the synthesis of powders composed of monodispersed, spherical particles, these efforts have not been transferred to the synthesis of anisotropic nanoparticles. The major objective of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of the growth of anisotropic particles at organic templates, with emphasis on the chemical and structural aspects of layered organic assemblies that contribute to the formation of anisotropic inorganic particles.

  8. Composite material dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  10. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  11. Tough Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (compiler); Johnson, N. J. (compiler); Teichman, L. A. (compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries are presented which address composite material behavior and performance improvement. Topic areas include composite fracture toughness and impact characterization, constituent properties and interrelationships, and matrix synthesis and characterization.

  12. A New Nonlinear Anisotropic Model for Soft Magnetic Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Lin; P. Zhou; Z. Badics; W. N. Fu; Q. M. Chen; Z. J. Cendes

    2005-01-01

    An accurate and efficient nonlinear anisotropic model for soft magnetic materials is developed. In this model, the cross effects of the magnetic field components in different principle directions are decoupled by introducing an equivalent magnitude of the magnetic field in each principle direction based on an anisotropic characterization of the energy density. Only B- H curves in the principal directions

  13. A new nonlinear anisotropic model for soft magnetic materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Lin; P. Zhou; Z. Badics; W. N. Fu; Q. M. Chen; Z. J. Cendes

    2006-01-01

    An accurate and efficient nonlinear anisotropic model for soft magnetic materials is developed. In this model, the cross effects of the magnetic field in the different principle directions are decoupled by introducing an equivalent magnetic field magnitude in each principle direction. This equivalence is based on an anisotropic characterization of the energy density. Only B-H curves in the principal directions

  14. Nano-composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  15. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  16. Optical composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Beecroft, L.L.; Ober, C.K.; Barber, D.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Optical quality composite materials can be useful for many applications. This work concerns optical quality composite films constructed from very small (<100 nm) particles of optically functional material embedded in a matrix of the same refractive index (RI). The particles impart their optical properties, while the matrix allows for processing of films. The initial optical composite studied contained Cr-forsterite (Cr-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), a tunable solid state laser material in the attractive near-IR regime (1167-1345 nm). Small Cr-forsterite particles were synthesized by firing preceramic dispersion polymerization beads, and were embedded in unusually high RI polymeric matrix materials. Work to make optical amplification measurements is underway. This composite concept can be extended to other optically interesting materials.

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  18. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  19. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  20. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  2. Strength of composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. F. Egorov; P. S. Kislyi; P. A. Verkhovodov

    1979-01-01

    1.A study was made of the strength of ZrN-Al2O3 composite materials produced by solid- and liquid-phase sintering in argon and nitrogen. It is shown that the strength of composites sintered in nitrogen is such less than that of composites sintered in argon, which is linked with the formation of new phases at boundaries between dissimilar phases and with a weakening

  3. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  4. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  5. Mechanics of Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Jones

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of composites is traditionally evaluated on both microscopic and macroscopic scale to take into account inhomogeneity. Micromechanics attempts to quantify the interactions of fiber and matrix (reinforcement and resin) on a microscopic scale on par with the diameter of a single fiber. Macromechanics treats composites as homogeneous materials, with mechanical properties representative of the laminate as a

  6. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  7. Group velocity of cylindrical guided waves in anisotropic laminate composites.

    PubMed

    Glushkov, Evgeny; Glushkova, Natalia; Eremin, Artem; Lammering, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    An explicit expression for the group velocity of wave packets, propagating in a laminate anisotropic composite plate in prescribed directions, is proposed. It is based on the cylindrical guided wave asymptotics derived from the path integral representation for wave fields generated in the composites by given localized sources. The expression derived is theoretically confirmed by the comparison with a known representation for the group velocity vector of a plane guided wave. Then it is experimentally validated against laser vibrometer measurements of guided wave packets generated by a piezoelectric wafer active sensor in a composite plate. PMID:24437754

  8. Resin composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ilie, N; Hickel, R

    2011-06-01

    This paper surveys the most important developments in resin-based dental composites and focuses on the deficits (e.g. polymerization shrinkage) and strengths of the materials and their clinical implications. Moreover, differences between composite categories, such as hybrid, nanohybrid, microfilled, packable, ormocer-based, silorane-based, polyacid-modified composites (compomers) and flowable composites are highlighted, especially in view of their mechanical behaviour. In addition to the classical dimethacrylate-based composites, special attention is given to alternative monomers, such as siloranes, ormocers or high-molecular-weight dimethacrylate monomers (e.g. dimer acid-based dimethacrylates and tricyclodecane (TCD)-urethane), analysing their advantages, behaviour and abilities. Finally, the paper attempts to establish the needs and wishes of clinicians for further development of resin-based composites. PMID:21564116

  9. Investigation of the anisotropic nature of laser-generated ultrasound in zinc and unidirectional carbon epoxy composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David H. Hurley; James B. Spicer; James W. Wagner; Todd W. Murray

    1998-01-01

    Laser generation of ultrasound in carbon epoxy composites provides an ultrasonic signature which is difficult to interpret owing to the elastic anisotropic and inhomogeneous nature of these materials. In the present work, a line source representation of laser-generated ultrasound in materials exhibiting transverse isotropy is presented. The bounding plane of the half-space is assumed to be the plane of isotropy.

  10. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  11. A General Theory of Strength for Anisotropic Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. Tsai; Edward M. Wu

    1971-01-01

    An operationally simple strength criterion for anisotropic materials is developed from a scalar function of two strength tensors. Differing from existing quadratic approximations of failure surfaces, the present theory satisfies the invariant requirements of coordinate transforma tion, treats interaction terms as independent components, takes into account the difference in strengths due to positive and negative stresses, and can be specialized

  12. A radiative transfer framework for rendering materials with anisotropic structure

    E-print Network

    Bala, Kavita

    A radiative transfer framework for rendering materials with anisotropic structure Expanded The radiative transfer framework that underlies all current rendering of volumes is limited to scattering media simulations. We begin with a generalized radiative transfer equation, derived from scattering by oriented non

  13. Classifications of surface waves in anisotropic elastic materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. T. Ting; D. M. Barnett

    1997-01-01

    Surface waves in an anisotropic elastic material can be classified according to the number of distinct eigenvalues and the number of independent eigenvectors of the 6 × 6 real matrix N(?). There are six groups under this classification. Surface waves can also be classified according to the number of partial waves in the solution and the form of each partial

  14. Analysis of a Curved Interfacial Crack Between Viscoelastic Foam and Anisotropic Composites Under Antiplane Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Heoung Jae; Park, Sang Hyun

    The analysis of curved interfacial crack between viscoelastic foam and anisotropic composites was conducted under antiplane shear loading applied at infinity. In the analysis, in order to represent viscoelastic behavior of foam, the Kelvin-Maxwell model was incorporated and Laplace transform was applied to treat the viscoelastic characteristics of foam. The curved interfacial crack problem was reduced to a Hilbert problem and a closed-form asymptotic solution was derived. The stress intensity factors in the vicinity of the interfacial crack tip were predicted by considering both anisotropic characteristics of composites and viscoelastic properties of foam. It was found from the analysis that the stress intensity factor was governed by material properties such as shear modulus and relaxation time, and increased with the increase in the curvature as well as the ratio of stiffness coefficients of composite materials. It was also observed that the effect of fiber orientation in the composite materials on the stress intensity factor decreased with the increase in the difference in stiffness coefficients between foam and composite.

  15. Composite electric contact materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkara, J.; Kowalczyk, J.

    1985-12-01

    Two-phase composite materials, i.e., a high-melting component combined with a material exhibiting good electrical and thermal properties find a wide range of application for the manufacture of small- and medium-load relays and switches. Composite contacts can be used in air circuit-breakers (W-Ag, Ag-Ni), oil circuit-breakers (W-Cu, Mo-Cn), vacuum-type switches (W-CuSb, CuCr), and also switches operating in an atmosphere of SF sub 6 (W-Cu). Present-day trends aimed at increasing operating reliability and extending the service life of electrical equipment are finding their expression in efforts being made to modify the classical composites with a veiw to imparting new properties to them by suitably changing their composition and structure. These trends are also aimed at reducing the consumption of noble metals and of strategically important ones. Modern materials engineering and metallurgical technologies are being used, including isostatic sintering or explosive forming. Owing to the high activity of the constituents, all processes are conducted under high vacuum or in pure reducing atmospheres.

  16. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  17. Homogenization of the Maxwell equations in an anisotropic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensson, Gerhard

    2003-04-01

    This paper contains an overview of the homogenization of anisotropic materials at fixed frequency using the concept of two-scaled convergence. The homogenized electric and magnetic parameters, the relative permittivity, and the relative permeability are found by suitable averages of the solution of a local problem in the unit cell. A comparison between the exact homogenization method presented in this paper and the traditional mixture formulae, which are based on physical arguments, is made.

  18. An artificially anisotropic thermoelectric material with semiconducting and superconducting layers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Pshenai-Severin; Yu. I. Ravich; M. V. Vedernikov

    2000-01-01

    The thermoelectric parameters of an artificially anisotropic material composed of semiconducting and superconducting layers\\u000a are considered. The transverse thermoelectric figure of merit and the sensitivity of a sensor responding to small heat fluxes\\u000a are calculated. The use of high-temperature superconductor layers appreciably changes the optimal geometry of the layered\\u000a structure (layer inclination angle and thickness ratio) compared with normal conductors.

  19. Novel Anisotropic Magnetoelectric Effect on ?-FeO(OH)/P(VDF-TrFE) Multiferroic Composites.

    PubMed

    Martins, P; Larrea, A; Gonçalves, R; Botelho, G; Ramana, E V; Mendiratta, S K; Sebastian, V; Lanceros-Mendez, S

    2015-06-01

    The past decade has witnessed increased research effort on multiphase magnetoelectric (ME) composites. In this scope, this paper presents the application of novel materials for the development of anisotropic magnetoelectric sensors based on ?-FeO(OH)/P(VDF-TrFE) composites. The composite is able to precisely determine the amplitude and direction of the magnetic field. A new ME effect is reported in this study, as it emerges from the magnetic rotation of the ?-FeO(OH) nanosheets inside the piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) polymer matrix. ?-FeO(OH)/P(VDF-TrFE) composites with 1, 5, 10, and 20 ?-FeO(OH) filler weight percentage in three ?-FeO(OH) alignment states (random, transversal, and longitudinal) have been developed. Results have shown that the modulus of the piezoelectric response (10-24 pC·N(-1)) is stable at least up to three months, the shape and magnetization maximum value (3 emu·g(-1)) is dependent on ?-FeO(OH) content, and the obtained ME voltage coefficient, with a maximum of ?0.4 mV·cm(-1)·Oe(-1), is dependent on the incident magnetic field direction and intensity. In this way, the produced materials are suitable for innovative anisotropic sensor and actuator applications. PMID:25950199

  20. Direct Imaging of Anisotropic Material Properties using Photorefractive Laser Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Schley, Robert Scott; Watson, Scott Marshall

    1999-07-01

    Anisotropic properties of materials can be determined by measuring the propagation of elastic waves in different directions. A laser imaging approach is presented that utilizes the adaptive property of photorefractive materials to produce a real-time measurement of the antisymmetric Lamb or flexural traveling wave mode displacement and phase. Continuous excitation is employed and the data is recorded and displayed in all directions simultaneously at video camera frame rates. Fourier transform of the data produces an image of the wave slowness in all planar directions. The results demonstrate imaging of microstructural isotropy and anisotropy and stress induced ansiotropy in plates.

  1. Direct Imaging of Anisotropic Material Properties using Photorefractive Laser Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Telschow; R.S. Schley; S.M. Watson; V.A. Deason

    1999-06-01

    Anisotropic properties of materials can be determined by measuring the propagation of elastic waves in different directions. A laser imaging approach is presented that utilizes the adaptive property of photorefractive materials to produce a real-time measurement of the antisymmetric Lamb or flexural traveling wave mode displacement and phase. Continuous excitation is employed and the data is recorded and displayed in all directions simultaneously at video camera frame rates. Fourier transform of the data produces an image of the wave slowness in all planar directions. The results demonstrate imaging of microstructural isotropy and anisotropy and stress induced ansiotropy in plates.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in anisotropic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.C. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The specific focus on anisotropic materials in the research was addressed in a manner which was primarily analytical. All of the experiments involving materials with substantial elastic or plastic anisotropy indicated that the materials in question exhibited a level of acoustoelastic response which was at or below the limit for useful stress evaluation. Nevertheless, the analysis performed indicates that if an experimental system is built which allows determination of the velocity variation roughly an order of magnitude more precisely than is possible with the system used in this work, the complete state of residual stress may be obtained, despite the presence of anisotropy. This report consists of a detailed description of the technique and experimental system proposed for the evaluation of residual stress states. The underlying analytical developments are reviewed, and a numerical investigation into the application of this approach for anisotropic materials is presented. It is shown that an accurate assessment of the complete residual stress state may be obtained even in cases of extreme anisotropy. Finally, an experimental investigation of the technique is presented in which the experimentally determined stress state is compared with that predicted numerically. It is shown that the two estimates of stress agree well for the material involved. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A new macroscopically anisotropic pressure dependent yield function for metal matrix composite based on strain gradient plasticity for the microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Reza; Nyvang Legarth, Brian; Niordson, Christian F.

    2013-04-01

    Metal matrix composites with long aligned elastic fibers are studied using an energetic rate independent strain gradient plasticity theory with an isotropic pressure independent yield function at the microscale. The material response is homogenized to obtain a conventional macroscopic model that exhibits anisotropic yield properties with a pressure dependence. At the microscale free energy includes both elastic strains and plastic strain gradients, and the theory demands higher order boundary conditions in terms of plastic strain or work conjugate higher order tractions. The mechanical response is investigated numerically using a unit cell model with periodic boundary conditions containing a single fiber deformed under generalized plane strain conditions. The homogenized response can be modeled by conventional plasticity with an anisotropic yield surface and a free energy depending on plastic strain in addition to the elastic strain. Hill's classical anisotropic yield criterion is extended to cover the composite such that hydrostatic pressure dependency, Bauschinger stress and size-effects are considered. It is found that depending on the fiber volume fraction, the anisotropic yield surface of the composite is inclined compared to a standard pressure independent yield surfaces. The evolution of the macroscopic yield surface is investigated by quantifying both anisotropic hardening (expansion) and kinematic hardening (translation), where the coefficients of anisotropy and the Bauschinger stress are extracted.

  4. Theoretical buckling loads of boron/aluminum and graphite/resin fiber composite anisotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical results are presented for the buckling of anisotropic plates. The plates are subjected to simple and combined in-plane loading. The plates are made from fiber composite material of boron/aluminum or high-modulus graphite/resin. The results are presented in nondimensional form as buckling load against fiber orientation angle for various plate aspect ratios. The results indicate that buckling loads of boron/aluminum plates are independent of fiber direction if the plate aspect ratios are greater than about 1, and moderately dependent when this ratio is less than about 1. In addition, the results indicate that the buckling loads are independent of aspect ratio for plates with aspect ratios greater than about 2. Boron/ aluminum composite plates can resist buckling loads more efficiently than graphite/resin composites on a specific buckling stress basis. The numerical algorithm and a listing of the computer code used to obtain the results are included.

  5. An In-Depth Tutorial on Constitutive Equations for Elastic Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth tutorial on the constitutive equations for elastic, anisotropic materials is presented. Basic concepts are introduced that are used to characterize materials, and notions about how anisotropic material deform are presented. Hooke s law and the Duhamel-Neuman law for isotropic materials are presented and discussed. Then, the most general form of Hooke s law for elastic anisotropic materials is presented and symmetry requirements are given. A similar presentation is also given for the generalized Duhamel-Neuman law for elastic, anisotropic materials that includes thermal effects. Transformation equations for stress and strains are presented and the most general form of the transformation equations for the constitutive matrices are given. Then, specialized transformation equations are presented for dextral rotations about the coordinate axes. Next, concepts of material symmetry are introduced and criteria for material symmetries are presented. Additionally, engineering constants of fully anisotropic, elastic materials are derived from first principles and the specialized to several cases of practical importance.

  6. Mechanics of composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Dvorak; N. Laws

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the following papers: crack growth resistance of TiBâ particulate\\/SiC matrix composite; constitutive relations of flexible composites under elastic deformation; determination of two kinds of composite plasticity: inclusions plastic vs. matrix plastic; 3-D analysis of transient interlaminar thermal stress of laminated composites; effect of seawater on the fracture toughness of pultruded rods; evaluation of new failure criterion for

  7. Simulation of vertical Bridgman growth of benzene, a material with anisotropic solid-phase thermal conductivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hanjie Lee; Arne J. Pearlstein

    2000-01-01

    Many materials grown by Bridgman solidification have anisotropic solid-phase thermal conductivities. To date, computational simulation of directional solidification of these materials has accounted for conduction heat transfer in the melt and solid, and for phase change. We develop a computational model for steady axisymmetric Bridgman solidification of anisotropic materials that includes buoyancy-driven convection and shrinkage flow in the melt, and

  8. Composite materials: science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The properties and applications of composite materials are examined in an introductory textbook for senior and graduate engineering students. Chapters are devoted to glass, B, C, organic, ceramic, and metallic fibers; polymer, ceramic, and metallic matrix materials; polymer-matrix composites; MMCs; ceramic-matrix composites; CFRPs; and multifilament superconducting composites. Consideration is given to the micromechanics of composites, macromechanical characteristics, strength, fracture, fatigue, and design problems. Diagrams, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are included, and a set of problems is given for each chapter.

  9. Composite material heat pipe radiator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nelson J. Gernert; David B. Sarraf; Richard J. Guenther

    1996-01-01

    Organic matrix composite material is recognized for its significant strength to weight ratio when compared to metal and consequently was investigated for reducing the mass of heat pipes for future space missions. The particular heat pipe that was constructed and tested was made from an organic matrix composite material applied to a linear of titanium tubing spun to foil thickness

  10. Sitall-base composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. I. Beloborodov; A. I. Yuga; N. D. Nazarenko; L. F. Kolesnichenko; N. I. Vlasko

    1976-01-01

    1.The feasibility is demonstrated of producing Sitall-base porous skeletons.2.Impregnation of a porous skeleton with a suspension of PTFE and graphite enables a composite material to be obtained possessing excellent antifriction properties.3.The presence of a metallic filler in such a composite material increases its load-carrying capacity.

  11. Method of undercut anisotropic etching of semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, H.E.; Block, B.

    1986-07-15

    This patent describes a method for undercut anisotropic etching of an etch stopped layer portion of a (110) face of diamond cubic semiconductor material, to form beam or bridge structures, the etch stopped layer portion which is to be undercut having a pair of opposing side edges, the steps of: orienting the pair of opposing side edges of the etch stopped layer portion which is to be undercut at an angle to the most nearly parallel one of the )111) traces on the (110) face being etched, so that the oriented side edges will be undercut from the sides; and contacting the (110) face being etched with an isotropic etchant for the semiconductive material so as to essentially completely undercut the etch stopped layer portion from both of the side edges in a direction toward the opposing side edge.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  13. Composite Materials: Sticks and Glue

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stoebe, Thomas G.

    This learning activity will provide a good example of "the effect on strength and stiffness of a material when it is manufactured as a composite." Popsicle sticks will be used to demonstrate the difference between singular materials and composite materials. Students will be able to see the added benefits of using composite materials. This activity would be suitable for elementary school through college level students, with each grade level gaining different educational benefits. The lesson should take from 5 to 20 minutes, depending on grade level. This document will serve as a framework for instructors and may be downloaded in PDF format.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  15. Composite materials: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, analysis and fabrication techniques for boron-aluminum composite-structure technology is presented and a new method of joining different laminated composites without mechanical fasteners is proposed. Also discussed is a low-cost procedure for rigidifying expanded honeycomb tubing and piping simulations. A brief note on patent information is added.

  16. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  17. Fabrication, testing, and analysis of anisotropic carbon/glass hybrid composites: volume 1: technical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Kyle K. (Wetzel Engineering, Inc. Lawrence, Kansas); Hermann, Thomas M. (Wichita state University, Wichita, Kansas); Locke, James (Wichita state University, Wichita, Kansas)

    2005-11-01

    Anisotropic carbon/glass hybrid composite laminates have been fabricated, tested, and analyzed. The laminates have been fabricated using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Five fiber complexes and a two-part epoxy resin system have been used in the study to fabricate panels of twenty different laminate constructions. These panels have been subjected to physical testing to measure density, fiber volume fraction, and void fraction. Coupons machined from these panels have also been subjected to mechanical testing to measure elastic properties and strength of the laminates using tensile, compressive, transverse tensile, and in-plane shear tests. Interlaminar shear strength has also been measured. Out-of-plane displacement, axial strain, transverse strain, and inplane shear strain have also been measured using photogrammetry data obtained during edgewise compression tests. The test data have been reduced to characterize the elastic properties and strength of the laminates. Constraints imposed by test fixtures might be expected to affect measurements of the moduli of anisotropic materials; classical lamination theory has been used to assess the magnitude of such effects and correct the experimental data for the same. The tensile moduli generally correlate well with experiment without correction and indicate that factors other than end constraints dominate. The results suggest that shear moduli of the anisotropic materials are affected by end constraints. Classical lamination theory has also been used to characterize the level of extension-shear coupling in the anisotropic laminates. Three factors affecting the coupling have been examined: the volume fraction of unbalanced off-axis layers, the angle of the off-axis layers, and the composition of the fibers (i.e., carbon or glass) used as the axial reinforcement. The results indicate that extension/shear coupling is maximized with the least loss in axial tensile stiffness by using carbon fibers oriented 15{sup o} from the long axis for approximately two-thirds of the laminate volume (discounting skin layers), with reinforcing carbon fibers oriented axially comprising the remaining one-third of the volume. Finite element analysis of each laminate has been performed to examine first ply failure. Three failure criteria--maximum stress, maximum strain, and Tsai-Wu--have been compared. Failure predicted by all three criteria proves generally conservative, with the stress-based criteria the most conservative. For laminates that respond nonlinearly to loading, large error is observed in the prediction of failure using maximum strain as the criterion. This report documents the methods and results in two volumes. Volume 1 contains descriptions of the laminates, their fabrication and testing, the methods of analysis, the results, and the conclusions and recommendations. Volume 2 contains a comprehensive summary of the individual test results for all laminates.

  18. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  19. Recycling of composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Buggy; L. Farragher; W. Madden

    1995-01-01

    An economic survey of composite manufacturing was carried out to help to identify suitable fibre\\/resin systems for recycling trials. Three separate recycling strategies were also adopted. The first of these was the re-use of in-process polyester\\/glass prepreg offcuts, which were quantified and then reprocessed using a simple pressing technique. Three different panel types were pressed and subjected to comparative physical

  20. Ski Technology And Composite Materials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    The following resource is from Lessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. Students will learn the basic engineering issues related to ski design. They will learn about composite materials and polymer materials. Also, students will create and test a composite material.

  1. Nanophase and Composite Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This talk will focus on accomplishments, current developments, and future directions of our work on composite optical materials for microgravity science and space exploration. This research spans the order parameter from quasi-fractal structures such as sol-gels and other aggregated or porous media, to statistically random cluster media such as metal colloids, to highly ordered materials such as layered media and photonic bandgap materials. The common focus is on flexible materials that can be used to produce composite or artificial materials with superior optical properties that could not be achieved with homogeneous materials. Applications of this work to NASA exploration goals such as terraforming, biosensors, solar sails, solar cells, and vehicle health monitoring, will be discussed.

  2. Finite-element modeling of layered, anisotropic composite plates and shells: A review of recent research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Finite element papers published in the open literature on the static bending and free vibration of layered, anisotropic, and composite plates and shells are reviewed. A literature review of large-deflection bending and large-amplitude free oscillations of layered composite plates and shells is also presented. Non-finite element literature is cited for continuity of the discussion.

  3. High-temperature composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. L. Pilipovskii; L. G. Vishnevskii; T. V. Grudina; L. N. Pereselentseva

    1996-01-01

    In the second half of the 60's the development of composite materials extremely necessary in service under conditions of intense short-term action of high-temperature gas flows which bear a significant quantity of condensed phase was started in the Institute of Material Science under the leadership of I. N. Frantsevich and then D. M. Karpinos. These materials must possess high erosion-

  4. The isotropic and anisotropic interactions in metal-organic framework materials (MOFs) were investigated by magnetic

    E-print Network

    The isotropic and anisotropic interactions in metal-organic framework materials (MOFs) were investigated by magnetic methods and High-Field Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, respectively. The systems on the anisotropic Cu-Cu exchange interactions and its abnormal magnitude could be correlated with the trigonally

  5. Composite materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawal, Suraj P.; Misra, Mohan S.; Wendt, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to: generate mechanical, thermal, and physical property test data for as-fabricated advanced materials; design and fabricate an accelerated thermal cycling chamber; and determine the effect of thermal cycling on thermomechanical properties and dimensional stability of composites. In the current program, extensive mechanical and thermophysical property tests of various organic matrix, metal matrix, glass matrix, and carbon-carbon composites were conducted, and a reliable database was constructed for spacecraft material selection. Material property results for the majority of the as-fabricated composites were consistent with the predicted values, providing a measure of consolidation integrity attained during fabrication. To determine the effect of thermal cycling on mechanical properties, microcracking, and thermal expansion behavior, approximately 500 composite specimens were exposed to 10,000 cycles between -150 and +150 F. These specimens were placed in a large (18 cu ft work space) thermal cycling chamber that was specially designed and fabricated to simulate one year low earth orbital (LEO) thermal cycling in 20 days. With this rate of thermal cycling, this is the largest thermal cycling unit in the country. Material property measurements of the thermal cycled organic matrix composite laminate specimens exhibited less than 24 percent decrease in strength, whereas, the remaining materials exhibited less than 8 percent decrease in strength. The thermal expansion response of each of the thermal cycled specimens revealed significant reduction in hysteresis and residual strain, and the average CTE values were close to the predicted values.

  6. Fracturing of ductile anisotropic multilayers: influence of material strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Griera, A.; Llorens, M.-G.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures in rocks deformed under dominant ductile conditions typically form simultaneously with viscous flow. Material strength plays a fundamental role on fracture development in such cases, since fracture propagation can be strongly reduced by the high energy absorption of the material. Additionally, the degree and nature of anisotropy can influence the orientation and type of resulting fractures. In this study, four plasticine multilayer models have been deformed under coaxial boundary conditions to investigate the influence of strength and anisotropy on the formation of fracture networks. The experiments were made of different mixtures and presented two types of anisotropy: composite and composite-intrinsic. The transition from non-localised deformation to systems where fracture networks control deformation accommodation is determined by the ability of the material to dissipate the external work and relax the elastic strain during loading, either by viscous flow or by coeval flow and failure. Tension cracks grow in experiments with composite anisotropy, giving rise to a network of shear fractures when they collapse and coalesce with progressive deformation. The presence of an additional intrinsic anisotropy enhances the direct nucleation of shear fractures, whose propagation and final length depend on the rigidity of the medium. Material strength increases the fracture maximum displacement (dmax) to fracture length (L) ratio, and the resulting values are significantly higher than those from fractures in elastic-brittle rocks. This is associated with the low propagation rates of fractures in rocks undergoing ductile deformation.

  7. Fiber composite materials technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, T.T.

    1980-10-23

    The FY1980 technical accomplishments from the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the Fiber Composite Materials Technology Development Task fo the MEST project are summarized. The task is divided into three areas: Engineering data base for flywheel design (Washington University will report this part separately), new materials evaluation, and time-dependent behavior of Kevlar composite strands. An epoxy matrix was formulated which can be used in composites for 120/sup 0/C service with good processing and mechanical properties. Preliminary results on the time-dependent properties of the Kevlar 49/epoxy strands indicate: Fatigue loading, as compared to sustained loading, drastically reduces the lifetime of a Kevlar composie; the more the number of on-off load cycles, the less the lifetime; and dynamic fatigue of the Kevlar composite can not be predicted by current damage theories such as Miner's Rule.

  8. Fracture problems in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1972-01-01

    A series of fracture problems in composite materials are identified, their methods of solution are briefly discussed, and some sample results are presented. The main problem of interest is the determination of the stress state in the neighborhood of localized imperfections such as cracks and inclusions which may exist in the composite. Particular emphasis is placed on the evaluation of quantities such as the stress intensity factors, the power of the stress singularity, and the strain energy release rate, which may be used directly or indirectly in connection with an appropriate fracture criterion for the prediction of fracture initiation and propagation load levels. The topics discussed include a crack in layered composites, a crack terminating at and going through a bi-material interface, a penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced elastic matrix, and inclusion problems in bonded materials.

  9. Energy and phase velocity considerations required for attenuation and velocity measurements of anisotropic composites.

    PubMed

    Carroll, N L; Humphrey, V F; Smith, J D

    2002-05-01

    Viscoelastic fibre-reinforced composite materials have a number of possible advantages for use in underwater acoustic applications. In order to exploit these materials it is important to be able to measure their complex stiffness matrix in order to determine their acoustic response. Ultrasonic transmission measurements on parallel-sided samples, employing broadband pulsed transducers at 2.25 MHz and an immersion method, have been used to determine the viscoelastic properties of a glass-reinforced composite with uniaxially aligned fibres. The composite measured was constructed from Cytecfiberite's CYCOM 919 E-glass. The theory of acoustic propagation in anisotropic materials shows that the direction of energy propagation is, in general, different from that given by Snell's Law. At 15 degrees incidence, Snell's Law implies a refracted angle of 40 +/- 2 degrees, whereas the energy direction is observed to be 70 +/- 2 degrees. Despite this, the experimental data indicates that the position of the receiving transducer has relatively little effect on the apparent phase velocity measured. The phase velocities measured at positions determined from the refracted angle and energy direction are 3647 and 3652 +/- 50 m s(-1), respectively. However, the amplitude of the received signal, and hence estimate of attenuation, is highly sensitive to the receiver position. This indicates that the acoustic Poynting vector must be considered in order to precisely determine the correct position of the receiving transducer for attenuation measurements. The beam displacement for a 17.6 mm sample at 15 degrees incidence is 9.5 and 40 mm by Snell's Law and Poynting's Theorem, respectively. Measured beam displacements have been compared with predictions derived from material stiffness coefficients. These considerations are important in recovering the complex stiffness matrix. PMID:12159995

  10. Composite material impregnation unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    This memorandum presents an introduction to the NASA multi-purpose prepregging unit which is now installed and fully operational at the Langley Research Center in the Polymeric Materials Branch. A description of the various impregnation methods that are available to the prepregger are presented. Machine operating details and protocol are provided for its various modes of operation. These include, where appropriate, the related equations for predicting the desired prepreg specifications. Also, as the prepregger is modular in its construction, each individual section is described and discussed. Safety concerns are an important factor and a chapter has been included that highlights the major safety features. Initial experiences and observations for fiber impregnation are described. These first observations have given great insight into the areas of future work that need to be addressed. Future memorandums will focus on these individual processes and their related problems.

  11. Impact response of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivasan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Composite materials composed of carbon fibers and resin matrices offer great promise in reducing the weight of aerospace structures. However they remain extremely vulnerable to out of plane impact loads, which lead to severe losses in strength and stiffness. The results of an experimental program, undertaken to investigate the low velocity impact damage tolerance of composite materials is presented. The objectives were to identify key neat resin/composite properties that lead to enhancement of composite impact damage tolerance and to find a small scale test that predicts compression after impact properties of panels. Five materials were selected for evaluation. These systems represented different classes of material behavior such as brittle epoxy, modified epoxies, and amorphous and semicrystalling thermoplastics. The influence of fiber properties on the impact performance was also studied in one material, i.e., in polyether ether ketone (PEEK). Several 24 and 48 ply quasi-isotropic and 24 ply orthotropic laminates were examined using an instrumented drop weight impactor. Correlations with post impact compression behavior were made.

  12. Computation of Anisotropic Bi-Material Interfacial Fracture Parameters and Delamination Creteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, W-T.; Wang, L.; Atluri, S. N.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the recent developments in methodologies for the evaluation of the integrity and durability of composite structures, including i) the establishment of a stress-intensity-factor based fracture criterion for bimaterial interfacial cracks in anisotropic materials (see Sec. 2); ii) the development of a virtual crack closure integral method for the evaluation of the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for a bimaterial interfacial crack (see Sec. 3). Analytical and numerical results show that the proposed fracture criterion is a better fracture criterion than the total energy release rate criterion in the characterization of the bimaterial interfacial cracks. The proposed virtual crack closure integral method is an efficient and accurate numerical method for the evaluation of mixed-mode stress intensity factors.

  13. Joining of polymer composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Magness, F.H.

    1990-11-01

    Under ideal conditions load bearing structures would be designed without joints, thus eliminating a source of added weight, complexity and weakness. In reality the need for accessibility, repair, and inspectability, added to the size limitations imposed by the manufacturing process and transportation/assembly requirements mean that some minimum number of joints will be required in most structures. The designer generally has two methods for joining fiber composite materials, adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening. As the use of thermoplastic materials increases, a third joining technique -- welding -- will become more common. It is the purpose of this document to provide a review of the available sources pertinent to the design of joints in fiber composites. The primary emphasis is given to adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening with information coming from documentary sources as old as 1961 and as recent as 1989. A third, shorter section on composite welding is included in order to provide a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject.

  14. Hugoniot Analysis of Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Garg; J. W. Kirsch

    1971-01-01

    A generalized set of conservation equations (i.e., the Hugoniot relations) across a disturbance propagating through a composite material with a steady velocity are derived within the framework of the Theory of Inter acting Continua. By providing a rational basis for comparison, the analysis clarifies the differences between the earlier studies in this field. In addition, the present development of the

  15. ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS HEAT BRIDGES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. B. Shopen; V. A. Golovanevskiy; O. A. Kivirenko

    Understanding heat transfer properties of advanced composite materials (CM) structures is gaining increasing importance in industries such as medicine and cryogenics, aerospace and electronics where structures made from advanced CM are being used as heat bridges. The main goal in such applications of advanced CM structures is achieving maximum load bearing capacity while maintaining heat transfer rate at a predetermined

  16. Durability of polymer composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liu Liu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine structural durability of advanced composite materials under critical loading conditions, e.g., combined thermal and mechanical loading and shear fatigue loading. A thermal buckling model of a burnt column, either axially restrained or under an axial applied force was developed. It was predicted that for a column exposed to the high heat flux

  17. New wear resistant composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Angers, R.; Champagne, B.; Fiset, M.; Chollet, P.

    1983-01-01

    A composite material consisting of WC-Co particles in a steel matrix was fabricated by sintering mixtures of WC-Co particles and a steel powder and infiltrating the sintered pieces with a copper alloy. Its wear resistance and mechanical properties were studied as a function of the content in WC-Co particles and other characteristics of the composite material microstructure. Infiltration provided a simple means to obtain a strong cohesion between WC-Co particles and the steel matrix. An effective matrix protection against wear is obtained with relatively low additions of particles especially with a silica abrasive which is soft with respect to cemented carbide. The experimental results show that this material has good mechanical properties and wear resistance. Depending upon abrasion resistance, wear losses are reduced up to 10 times by a 30 vol% addition of cemented carbide particles.

  18. Computational modeling of composite material fires

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander L. Brown; Kenneth L. Erickson; Joshua Allen Hubbard; Amanda B. Dodd

    2010-01-01

    Composite materials behave differently from conventional fuel sources and have the potential to smolder and burn for extended time periods. As the amount of composite materials on modern aircraft continues to increase, understanding the response of composites in fire environments becomes increasingly important. An effort is ongoing to enhance the capability to simulate composite material response in fires including the

  19. An Improved Method for Ray Tracing Through Curved Inhomogeneities in Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Rathore; N. N. Kishore; P. Munshi

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasonic NDE of anisotropic materials, due to its inherent complexity, demands a stringent approach to determine wave propagation path in presence of inhomogeneities. In addition to developing inspection procedures, the ray path information needs to be integrated with the tomographic reconstruction algorithm of composite materials. The present study proposes a method to identify inhomogeneity boundaries using edge detection approach and

  20. Continuum Damage Mechanics, Anisotropy and Damage Deactivation for Brittle Materials Like Concrete and Ceramic Composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Chaboche; P. M. Lesne; J. F. Maire

    1995-01-01

    The main lines of a Continuum Damage Mechanics Modelling are reviewed, for applications to brittle materials treated as elastic damageable ones.The proposed damage models consider in the same framework the cases of initially isotropic materials like concrete and anisotropic composites.Attention is focused on the damage deactivation effects and on the possibility to describe irreversible strains directly associated to the damaging

  1. Fracture problems in composite materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1972-01-01

    In this paper a series of fracture problems in composite materials are identified, their methods of solution are briefly discussed, and some sample results are presented. The main problem of interest is the determination of the stress state in the neighborhood of localized imperfections such as cracks and inclusions which may exist in the composite. Particular emphasis is placed on the evaluation of quantities such as the stress intensity factors, the power of the stress singularity, and the strain energy release rate, which may be used directly or indirectly in connection with an appropriate fracture criterion for the prediction of fracture initiation and propagation load levels.

  2. 3-D voltage model for detection of sound radiated from anisotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobkis, O. I.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    The elastic behavior of anisotropic composite materials has been characterized experimentally by employing a 3-D transducer voltage model to calculate signals in sound radiation experiments using either air or liquid coupling. It is found that with sound air-coupled propagation along material symmetry directions, integration over the incident-plane angle alone is sufficient to predict the transducer voltage accurately, where the dependence of the diffraction integral on the out-of-incident-plane angle is evaluated asymptotically. In general, material directions, however, a full 3-D transducer voltage calculation is generally necessary to account for out-of-plane, angle-dependent variations in the scattering coefficients that yield asymmetrical dependence on the out-of-plane angle. Modeling these effects is especially critical to an accurate determination of viscoelastic material properties. In symmetry directions the real parts of the elastic stiffness are much less sensitive to 3-D beam effects. In liquid-coupled experiments we show that out-of-plane coupling from 3-D beam effects can be used to infer accurately C[44], the stiffness related to the slow shear wave, a completely counterintuitive result. The reason lies in the residual coupling to SH waves along symmetry directions and the high radiation damping of water, the immersion liquid.

  3. Hamiltonian system based Saint Venant solutions for multi-layered composite plane anisotropic plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weian Yao; Haitian Yang

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents Hamiltonian system based Saint Venant solutions for the problem of multi-layered composite plane anisotropic plates. A mixed energy variational principle is proposed, and dual equations are derived in the symplectic space. The schemes of separation of variables and eigenfunction expansion, instead of the traditional semi-inverse method, are implemented, and compatibility conditions at interfaces are formulated by dual

  4. Laser ceramics with rare-earth-doped anisotropic materials.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Jun; Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori

    2010-11-01

    The fabrication of laser-grade anisotropic ceramics by a conventional sintering process is not possible owing to optical scattering at randomly oriented grain boundaries. In this Letter, we report the first (to our knowledge) realization of transparent anisotropic ceramics by using a new crystal orientation process based on large magnetic anisotropy induced by 4f electrons. By slip casting in a 1.4 T magnetic field and subsequent heat treatments, we could successfully fabricate laser-grade calcium fluorapatite ceramics with a loss coefficient of 1.5 cm(-1). PMID:21042362

  5. On the interaction between an edge dislocation and a coherent precipitate in anisotropic materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kolling; R. Mueller; D. Gross

    2007-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to investigate the interaction between an edge dislocation and a misfitting precipitate in an anisotropic material. The technique is based on the concept of configurational (material) forces in linear elasticity. After briefly discussing the theory of configurational forces, a generalized balance equation is obtained to calculate the material forces on the defects under consideration. Utilizing

  6. Transverse thermal conductance of thermosetting composite materials during their cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Jeffrey D.; Covert, Eugene E.

    1994-04-01

    The transverse thermal conductance of thermosetting advanced composite materials during their cure was modeled analytically and then investigated experimentally. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy was used for the experiments. A model for the effective transverse conductivity of a material with cylinders arranged in rectangular order, first derived by Lord Rayleigh, was modified to account for the possible effects of a fiber/resin contact resistance and for the transversely anisotropic behavior of the composites' thermal conductivity. A model was derived that accounts for the effect of resin heat generation on the measured thermal conductivity of an uncured thermosetting composite. These models were investigated experimentally using a guarded hot plate apparatus to measure the thermal conductivity of the graphite/epoxy laminates as a function of independent cure variables. Good agreement was found between the models and the experimental data.

  7. Microstrip antennas on\\/in anisotropic material layers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hung-Yu Yang; Jesse A. Castaneda; Akifumi Nakatani

    1992-01-01

    Accurate fullwave analyses of microstrip dipoles on multi-layer substrates with generalized anisotropic permittivity and permeability have been developed. The solution to the problem of microstrip dipoles on\\/in gyrotropic substrates has been obtained. The potential of electronically shaped, scanned, and gain enhanced element factors with ferrite substrates has been theoretically demonstrated. The scattering and radiation problems were solved. The use of

  8. An anisotropic gradient damage model for quasi-brittle materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen Kuhl; Ekkehard Ramm; René de Borst

    2000-01-01

    An anisotropic continuum damage model based on the microplane concept is elaborated. Scalar damage laws are formulated on several individual microplanes representing the planes of potential failure. These uniaxial constitutive laws can be cast into a fourth-order damage formulation such that anisotropy of the overall constitutive law is introduced in a natural fashion. Strain gradients are incorporated in the constitutive

  9. Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A family of aerogel-matrix composite materials having thermal-stability and mechanical- integrity properties better than those of neat aerogels has been developed. Aerogels are known to be excellent thermal- and acoustic-insulation materials because of their molecular-scale porosity, but heretofore, the use of aerogels has been inhibited by two factors: (1) Their brittleness makes processing and handling difficult. (2) They shrink during production and shrink more when heated to high temperatures during use. The shrinkage and the consequent cracking make it difficult to use them to encapsulate objects in thermal-insulation materials. The underlying concept of aerogel-matrix composites is not new; the novelty of the present family of materials lies in formulations and processes that result in superior properties, which include (1) much less shrinkage during a supercritical-drying process employed in producing a typical aerogel, (2) much less shrinkage during exposure to high temperatures, and (3) as a result of the reduction in shrinkage, much less or even no cracking.

  10. Method of determining load in anisotropic non-crystalline materials using energy flux deviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H. (inventor); Kriz, Ronald D. (inventor); Fitting, Dale W. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ultrasonic wave is applied to an anisotropic sample material in an initial direction and the intensity of the ultrasonic wave is measured on an opposite surface of the sample material by two adjacent receiving points located in an array of receiving points. A ratio is determined between the measured intensities of two adjacent receiving points, the ratio being indicative of an angle of flux deviation from the initial direction caused by an unknown applied load. This determined ratio is then compared to a plurality of ratios of a similarly tested, similar anisotropic reference material under a plurality of respective, known load conditions, whereby the load applied to the particular anisotropic sample material is determined. A related method is disclosed for determining the fiber orientation from known loads and a determined flux shift.

  11. A study of interface crack branching in dissimilar anisotropic bimaterial composites including thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renfu

    The interface crack branching phenomena, including thermal effects, has been investigated by using complex variable method and Stroh's dislocation theory, extended to thermo-elasticity in matrix notation. As one of the most catastrophic failure modes in structures like laminated and sandwich composites in aerospace and marine construction, thin film in electronic packaging, rotators in high speed engine of aircraft and reactor in nuclear power station, the study of interface crack branching has become a topic not only having theoretical importance, but also having practical significance. A unified approach is presented to address the thermoelastic interface crack problems in dissimilar anisotropic bimaterial composites, and a compact closed form solution is formulated by analytical continuation principle of complex analysis. Employing the contour integral method, an explicit solution to the interaction between the dislocations and the interface crack is obtained. By modeling the branched portion as a continuous distribution of the dislocations, the thermoelastic interface crack branching problem is then converted to a set of semi-coupled singular integral equations and solved by Gauss-Jacobi integration schemes. The influence of material property mismatches between the two constituents and the thermal loading effects on the interface crack branching are demonstrated by extensive numerical simulation. Some useful criteria for predicting the interface crack branching growth and guidance for optimal composites design are suggested. Further, a contact model to eliminate the overlapping between the two surfaces of an interface crack is also proposed and some new parameters which could influence the interpenetrating phenomena are also discovered. The technique to extend the current method to three dimensional problems is also outlined. Furthermore, the C++ source code has been implemented to manipulate the complicated complex operations for numerically solving the singular integral equations in complex matrix form.

  12. Properties of composite materials for cryogenic applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B Schutz

    1998-01-01

    Composite materials are used in a wide variety of cryogenic applications because of their unique and highly tailorable properties. These cryogenic applications of composites may be, for the sake of discussion, classified as support structures, vessels, or electrical insulation. Examples of these applications are presented, with a brief discussion of the critical material properties associated with each application. Composite material

  13. Nonintrusive interfacial characterization of advanced composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renee M. Kent

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the fiber matrix interface plays the dominant role in the mechanical behavior of advanced composite materials. Engineering and control of the interface is paramount to producing the properties for desired mechanical performance of the ultimate composite structure. This is particularly critical for advanced composites (metal matrix composites, ceramic matrix composites) which are currently being investigated

  14. Boundary integral equation formulation for Interface cracks in anisotropic materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Berger; V. K. Tewary

    1997-01-01

    We present a boundary integral formulation for anisotropic interface crack problems based on an exact Green's function. The\\u000a fundamental displacement and traction solutions needed for the boundary integral equations are obtained from the Green's function.\\u000a The traction-free boundary conditions on the crack faces are satisfied exactly with the Green's function so no discretization\\u000a of the crack surfaces is necessary. The

  15. Anisotropic Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Various Kinds of Metal Fiber Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruki, Naoto; Horibe, Akihiko; Nakashima, Keigo

    2013-12-01

    Recently, metal fiber materials were made by laminating metal fibers with a diameter of about 30 ?m to 300 ?m. Since the almost metal fibers were oriented in the horizontal direction (the major axis of the fiber), these metal fiber materials are estimated to be anisotropic with an effective thermal conductivity. However, there is little quantitative data on the anisotropic effective thermal conductivity of the various kinds of metal fiber materials. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anisotropic effective thermal conductivity of various metal fiber materials experimentally and theoretically. In order to measure the horizontal and vertical effective thermal conductivities of these metal fiber materials, new measurement devices were developed. As a result, it is found that the anisotropic effective thermal conductivity of the various metal fiber materials was confirmed, and the horizontal and vertical effective thermal conductivities of these metal fiber materials depend on the bulk density or porosity, Young's modulus, the fiber length, and fiber diameter. And a dimensionless correlation equation for predicting the vertical and horizontal effective thermal conductivities of the various kinds of metal fiber materials was derived in terms of various dimensionless parameters.

  16. Optical response of a strongly anisotropic thin film as a nonmagnetic negative phase velocity material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, P. H.; Martínez, G.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Azucena-Coyotecatl, H.; Díaz-Hernández, J.

    2007-05-01

    We study the optical response of a strongly anisotropic nonmagnetic material. As a first case, it is considered an anisotropic nonmagnetic thin film (medium 2) sandwiched between medium 1 of refraction index n1 and medium 3 of refraction index n3. As a second case, the anisotropic thin film and medium 3 are interchanged. These geometries correspond to the Kretchmann [E. Kretschmann and H. Raether, Z. Naturforsch. A 23, 2135 (1968); E. Kretschmann, Z. Phys. 241, 313 (1971)] and Otto [A. Otto, Z. Phys. 216, 398 (1968)] attenuated total reflectivity arrays, respectively. Our main goal is to obtain a negative phase velocity propagation. To achieve this we choose an index of refraction n1>1 and show how the appropriate angle of incidence allows us to induce a negative phase velocity nonmagnetic material. We focused our attention in two distinct regions that emerge in the reflectivity curves when varying the angle of incidence. In the first region, the minima of the reflectivity are interpreted in terms of the coupling of light with the modes at the interface between the anisotropic material and the medium with refraction index n3. In the second region, the structure of the reflectivity is due to the propagation of light in the highly anisotropic material, with negative phase velocity.

  17. Specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements for anisotropic and random macroscopic composites of cobalt nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, N R; Duan, H; Liang, J; Iannacchione, G S

    2008-12-01

    We report simultaneous specific heat (c(p)) and thermal conductivity (?) measurements for anisotropic and random macroscopic composites of cobalt nanowires (Co NWs), from 300 to 400 K. Anisotropic composites of Co NW consist of nanowires grown within the highly ordered, densely packed array of parallel nanochannels in anodized aluminum oxide. Random composites are formed by drop-casting a thin film of randomly oriented Co NWs, removed from the anodized aluminum oxide host, within a calorimetric cell. The specific heat measured with the heat flow parallel to the Co NW alignment ([Formula: see text]) and that for the random sample (c(p)(R)) deviate strongly in temperature dependence from that measured for bulk, amorphous, powder cobalt under identical experimental conditions. The thermal conductivity for random composites (?(R)) follows a bulk-like behavior though it is greatly reduced in magnitude, exhibiting a broad maximum near 365 K indicating the onset of boundary-phonon scattering. The thermal conductivity in the anisotropic sample ([Formula: see text]) is equally reduced in magnitude but increases smoothly with increasing temperature and appears to be dominated by phonon-phonon scattering. PMID:21836319

  18. The M-Integral for Computing Stress Intensity Factors in Generally Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warzynek, P. A.; Carter, B. J.; Banks-Sills, L.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a capability for computing stress intensity factors in generally anisotropic materials. These objectives have been met. The primary deliverable of this project is this report and the information it contains. In addition, we have delivered the source code for a subroutine that will compute stress intensity factors for anisotropic materials encoded in both the C and Python programming languages and made available a version of the FRANC3D program that incorporates this subroutine. Single crystal super alloys are commonly used for components in the hot sections of contemporary jet and rocket engines. Because these components have a uniform atomic lattice orientation throughout, they exhibit anisotropic material behavior. This means that stress intensity solutions developed for isotropic materials are not appropriate for the analysis of crack growth in these materials. Until now, a general numerical technique did not exist for computing stress intensity factors of cracks in anisotropic materials and cubic materials in particular. Such a capability was developed during the project and is described and demonstrated herein.

  19. Composite material heat pipe radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Guenther, Richard J.; Hurlbert/, Kathryn Miller

    1996-03-01

    Organic matrix composite material is recognized for its significant strength to weight ratio when compared to metal and consequently was investigated for reducing the mass of heat pipes for future space missions. The particular heat pipe that was constructed and tested was made from an organic matrix composite material applied to a linear of titanium tubing spun to foil thickness (0.076 mm). The thin liner transitioned to heavier-walled ends which allowed the tubing to be sealed using conventional welding. More specifically, the heat pipe was 1.14 m long, 24 mm in diameter and had a mass of 0.165 kg. Water was the working fluid. The heat pipe was tested in a Thermacore thermal vacuum chamber under hot and cold wall operating conditions. The heat load dissipated ranged from 10 to 60 watts. Heat pipe operating temperatures varied from 278 K to 403 K. After testing, the heat pipe was delivered to NASA JSC where future thermal vacuum chamber tests are planned.

  20. Anisotropic wetting characteristics versus roughness on machined surfaces of hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yande; Shu, Liming; Natsu, Wataru; He, Fuben

    2015-03-01

    Anisotropic wetting of machined surfaces is widely applied in industries which can be greatly affected by roughness and solid's chemical properties. However, there has not been much work on it. A free-energy thermodynamic model is presented by analyzing geometry morphology of machined surfaces (2-D model surfaces), which demonstrates the influence of roughness on anisotropic wetting. It can be concluded that the energy barrier is one of the main reasons for the anisotropic wetting existing in the direction perpendicular to the lay. In addition, experiments in investigating anisotropic wetting, which was characterized by the static contact angle and droplet's distortion, were performed on machined surfaces with different roughness on hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials. The droplet's anisotropy found on machined surfaces increased with mean slope of roughness profile Kr. It indicates that roughness on anisotropic wetting on hydrophilic materials has a stronger effect than that on hydrophobic materials. Furthermore, the contact angles predicted by the model are basically consistent with the experimentally ones.

  1. The anisotropic diffusion of water in Kevlar-epoxy composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc T. Aronhime; Shoshana Neumann; Gad Marom

    1987-01-01

    The diffusion of water into unidirectional Kevlar fibre reinforced epoxy resins was studied as a function of fibre orientation and, for unidirectional (0°) composites, as a function of volume fraction (Vf). As the angle increased from 0 to 90°, the diffusivity increased dramatically; i.e. as more and more fibre-ends were exposed to the shorter diffusion path, the diffusivity increased. The

  2. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  3. Simulation of ultrasonic array imaging of composite materials with defects.

    PubMed

    Humeida, Yousif; Pinfield, Valerie J; Challis, Richard E; Wilcox, Paul D; Li, Chuan

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasonic transducer arrays are extensively used for the nondestructive evaluation of materials for aerospace and other applications. However, their use with composites requires some technique development because of reflections at the layer boundaries and the effects of attenuation. When used in full matrix capture mode, algorithms such as the total focusing method (TFM) must be applied to obtain the image. In composite materials, improvement to the algorithm is required to include the effects of material anisotropy (affecting wave speed) and optimum aperture limits to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and location detection for a defect in the material. This paper presents simulations of the ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials with and without a simulated defect. A kernel model for plane wave propagation in the material is combined with an angular spectrum decomposition (for finite transducer elements) and transducer frequency response, to model the full array signals. Inclusion of the defect is through its far-field scattering response. The model facilitates the study of imaging algorithm development by identification of the effects of anisotropy, signal-to-noise ratio, and aperture limit. An analytical method for the calculation of the effective group velocity in the composite at low frequency is demonstrated, permitting rapid calculation of time delay laws in practice. PMID:24658724

  4. Principal surface wave velocities in the point focus acoustic materials signature V(z) of an anisotropic solid.

    PubMed

    Every, A G; Deschamps, M

    2003-09-01

    This paper deals with the point focus beam (PFB) acoustic materials signature V(z) of an anisotropic solid, and in particular how it tends to be dominated by a limited number of principal surface rays. These rays are associated with propagation directions in which the Rayleigh wave (RW), pseudo-surface acoustic wave (PSAW) or a lateral wave slowness has an extremum. The phenomenon is interpreted in terms of the complex azimuthally averaged reflectance function of the surface, and also explained on the basis of a ray model. We illustrate the phenomenon with a number of examples, pertaining to the surfaces of single crystal copper and a carbon-fibre epoxy composite. In the case of copper, which has a much larger acoustic impedance than the water couplant, the oscillations in V(z) are dominated by principal RW and PSAW, whereas for the composite there is no RW or pseudo-SAW to be discerned with acoustic microscopy (AM), and V(z) is dominated by principal lateral waves. The utility of PFB AM in the study of anisotropic solids is further elaborated with examples showing how V(z) is sensitive to surface orientation, and how V(z) is affected by the presence of a surface over layer. The phenomena examined in this paper expand the scope for determining materials characteristics, such as elastic constants, crystallographic orientation, residual stress and over layer properties, from PFB V(z) measurements. PMID:12919694

  5. Warm Forming of Aluminum Alloys using a Coupled ThermoMechanical Anisotropic Material Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nader Abedrabbo; Farhang Pourboghrat; John E. Carsley

    2005-01-01

    Temperature-dependant anisotropic material models for two types of automotive aluminum alloys (5754-O and 5182-O) were developed and implemented in LS-Dyna as a user material subroutine (UMAT) for coupled thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) of warm forming of aluminum alloys. The anisotropy coefficients of the Barlat YLD2000 plane stress yield function for both materials were calculated for the range of temperatures

  6. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    polymeric composites composed of fibers (graphite, Kevlar,by Cape Composites, had intermediate modulus graphite fibersFiber and Resin on the Vibration Damping of Composites Reinforced wit Fiberglass, Graphite, and

  7. Composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Samuels, William D.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2004-04-20

    The composite material and methods of making the present invention rely upon a fully dense monolayer of molecules attached to an oxygenated surface at one end, and an organic terminal group at the other end, which is in turn bonded to a polymer. Thus, the composite material is a second material chemically bonded to a polymer with fully dense monolayer there between.

  8. Nonlinear Dynamic Properties of Layered Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, Igor V.; Topol, Heiko; Weichert, Dieter [Institute of General Mechanics, RWTH Aachen University, Termplergraben 64, Aachen, D-52062 (Germany); Danishevs'kyy, Vladyslav V. [Prydniprovs'ka State Academy of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Dnipropetrovs'k, Chernishevs'kogo 24a, UA-49600 (Ukraine)

    2010-09-30

    We present an application of the asymptotic homogenization method to study wave propagation in a one-dimensional composite material consisting of a matrix material and coated inclusions. Physical nonlinearity is taken into account by considering the composite's components as a Murnaghan material, structural nonlinearity is caused by the bonding condition between the components.

  9. A unified multiaxial fatigue damage model for isotropic and anisotropic materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yongming Liu; Sankaran Mahadevan

    2007-01-01

    A unified multiaxial fatigue damage model based on a characteristic plane approach is proposed in this paper, integrating both isotropic and anisotropic materials into one framework. Compared with most available critical plane-based models for multiaxial fatigue problem, the physical basis of the characteristic plane does not rely on the observations of the fatigue crack in the proposed model. The cracking

  10. An anisotropic model of damage for brittle materials with different behavior in tension and compression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Zolochevsky; E. Yeseleva; W. Ehlers

    2005-01-01

    The article outlines a continuum damage mechanics model for elastic deformation associated with the appearance and growth of parallel penny-shaped microcracks in brittle materials. The model is able to describe simultaneously the anisotropic nature of damage and the difference between the damaging processes under tensile and compressive loading types. Constitutive equation and damage evolution equations are developed on the basis

  11. Modeling the Propagation of Elastic Waves in Generally Anisotropic Materials and Austenitic Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, G. D.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Temple, J. A. G.

    2008-02-01

    The inspection of welds composed of austenitic steels is difficult because these materials tend to form large, elongated anisotropic grains whose specific structure within welds is unknown. These grains are responsible for beam-steering of ultrasound. The paper presents software developed to predict wave interaction at an interface between generally anisotropic media and to trace rays through a previously published model of a multipass metal arc weld. Results involving a crack defect are compared to those of finite element simulations and reasons for differences are discussed.

  12. Morphology and microstructure of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivansan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Lightweight continuous carbon fiber based polymeric composites are currently enjoying increasing acceptance as structural materials capable of replacing metals and alloys in load bearing applications. As with most new materials, these composites are undergoing trials with several competing processing techniques aimed at cost effectively producing void free consolidations with good mechanical properties. As metallic materials have been in use for several centuries, a considerable database exists on their morphology - microstructure; and the interrelationships between structure and properties have been well documented. Numerous studies on composites have established the crucial relationship between microstructure - morphology and properties. The various microstructural and morphological features of composite materials, particularly those accompanying different processing routes, are documented.

  13. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  14. NASA technology utilization survey on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leeds, M. A.; Schwartz, S.; Holm, G. J.; Krainess, A. M.; Wykes, D. M.; Delzell, M. T.; Veazie, W. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    NASA and NASA-funded contractor contributions to the field of composite materials are surveyed. Existing and potential non-aerospace applications of the newer composite materials are emphasized. Economic factors for selection of a composite for a particular application are weight savings, performance (high strength, high elastic modulus, low coefficient of expansion, heat resistance, corrosion resistance,), longer service life, and reduced maintenance. Applications for composites in agriculture, chemical and petrochemical industries, construction, consumer goods, machinery, power generation and distribution, transportation, biomedicine, and safety are presented. With the continuing trend toward further cost reductions, composites warrant consideration in a wide range of non-aerospace applications. Composite materials discussed include filamentary reinforced materials, laminates, multiphase alloys, solid multiphase lubricants, and multiphase ceramics. New processes developed to aid in fabrication of composites are given.

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN BIAXIAL ANISOTROPIC LEFT-HANDED MATERIALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Ding; Liang Chen; H. Liang

    2007-01-01

    Abstract—This paper investigates the characteristics of electromag- netic wave propagation in biaxially anisotropic left-handed materials (BA-LHMs) theoretically and numerically. We discuss under what con- ditions the anomalous refraction or reflection will occur at the interface when a plane wave passes from one isotropic right-handed material into another BA-LHM. Meanwhile the refraction angle of the wave vector and that of the

  16. Clues for biomimetics from natural composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Shaul; Meirovitch, Sigal; Sharon, Sigal; Heyman, Arnon; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspired material systems are derived from different living organisms such as plants, arthropods, mammals and marine organisms. These biomaterial systems from nature are always present in the form of composites, with molecular-scale interactions optimized to direct functional features. With interest in replacing synthetic materials with natural materials due to biocompatibility, sustainability and green chemistry issues, it is important to understand the molecular structure and chemistry of the raw component materials to also learn from their natural engineering, interfaces and interactions leading to durable and highly functional material architectures. This review will focus on applications of biomaterials in single material forms, as well as biomimetic composites inspired by natural organizational features. Examples of different natural composite systems will be described, followed by implementation of the principles underlying their composite organization into artificial bio-inspired systems for materials with new functional features for future medicine. PMID:22994958

  17. Composite materials and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Kevin L [Kennewick, WA; Wood, Geoffrey M [North Saanich, CA

    2011-05-17

    A method for forming improved composite materials using a thermosetting polyester urethane hybrid resin, a closed cavity mold having an internal heat transfer mechanism used in this method, and the composite materials formed by this method having a hybrid of a carbon fiber layer and a fiberglass layer.

  18. Stress distribution in antifriction composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. V. Zabolotnyi

    1979-01-01

    The optimum shape of hard inclusions in a composite material, irrespective of the magnitude of load and mode of its application to the surface, is a spheroid or ellipsoid of revolution. The characteristic linear size of a hard inclusion should be greater than the calculated diameter of a single spot of contact. If a composite material is to exhibit high

  19. Advanced composite materials: a strong growth industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lees

    1987-01-01

    Advanced composites represent a material form that will see significant growth in structural applications. The authors notes that Du Pont sees a broad opportunity for these materials and proceeds to review reasons for the company's optimism as well as their approach to this technology. Substitution of composites for metals is shown graphically since 1960 and projected to 2025. Price reductions

  20. V(z) curves of layered anisotropic materials for the line-focus acoustic microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.C.; Kim, J.O.; Achenbach, J.D. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States))

    1993-08-01

    V(z) curves for a line-focus acoustic microscope have been calculated in terms of the characteristic functions of the acoustic lens and the reflectance function of the fluid-loaded specimen. More accurate expressions for the characteristic functions of the acoustic lens are presented by taking account of attenuation in the coupling fluid, the angular dependence of transmission by the antireflection coating on the lens surface, and by making a better estimate of the focal length. The reflectance function has been calculated for anisotropic layers deposited on anisotropic substrates. The calculated V(z) curves have been compared with measurements for isotropic and anisotropic materials, and layered anisotropic materials. The surface acoustic wave velocities obtained from the theoretical and the measured V(z) curves have been compared for the full range of directions of wave propagation. The comparisons of V(z) curves and surface acoustic wave velocities show excellent agreement between theoretical and experimental results. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tab.

  1. Composite Dielectric Materials for Electrical Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.

    1999-04-25

    Composites that consist of a dielectric host containing a particulate conductor as a second phase are of interest for electrical switching applications. Such composites are "smart" materials that can function as either voltage or current limiters, and the difference in fimction depends largely upon whether the dielectric is filled to below or above the percolation threshold. It also is possible to combine current and voltage limiting in a single composite to make a "super-smart" material.

  2. New textile composite materials development, production, application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhailov, Petr Y.

    1993-01-01

    New textile composite materials development, production, and application are discussed. Topics covered include: super-high-strength, super-high-modulus fibers, filaments, and materials manufactured on their basis; heat-resistant and nonflammable fibers, filaments, and textile fabrics; fibers and textile fabrics based on fluorocarbon poylmers; antifriction textile fabrics based on polyfen filaments; development of new types of textile combines and composite materials; and carbon filament-based fabrics.

  3. Continuation of tailored composite structures of ordered staple thermoplastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron

    1992-01-01

    The search for the cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising approaches is the conversion of a planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. A framework was established which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. Predictions for the effective viscosities of a hyper-anisotropic medium consisting of collimated, discontinuous fibers suspended in viscous matrix were extended to capture the characteristics of typical polymers including non-Newtonian behavior and temperature dependence. In addition, the influence of fiber misorientation was also modeled by compliance averaging to determine ensemble properties for a given orientation distribution. A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams such as those used in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during manufacturing processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing radial and tangential gradients in material properties. Two analysis procedures are used to solve the beam problems. The first method uses separate two-dimensional elasticity solutions for the stresses in the flange and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring that forces and displacements match section boundaries. The second method uses an approximate Rayleigh-Ritz technique to find the solutions for more complex beams. Analyses are performed for curved beams of various cross-sections loaded in pure bending and with a uniform distributed load. Preliminary results show that the geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. The role of heterogeneity is larger in beams with a small average radius-to-depth ration, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radii. Results of the anlysis are in the form of stresses and displacements and are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  4. Anisotropic deformation of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, R. W. L.

    2013-09-01

    Zr-2.5Nb alloy is used for the pressure tubes in CANDU® reactor fuel channels. In reactor, the pressure tube normally operates at 300 °C and experiences a primary coolant fluid internal pressure of approximately 10 MPa. Manufacturing and processing procedures generate an anisotropic state in the pressure tube which makes the tube stronger in the hoop (transverse) direction than in the axial (longitudinal) direction. This anisotropy condition is present for temperatures less than 500 °C. During postulated accident conditions where the material temperature could reach 1000 °C, it might be assumed that the high temperature and subsequent phase change would reduce the inherent anisotropy, and thus affect the deformation behaviour (ballooning) of the pressure tube. From constant-load, rapid-temperature-ramp, uniaxial deformation tests, the deformation rate in the longitudinal direction of the tube behaves differently than the deformation rate in the transverse direction of the tube. This anisotropic mechanical behaviour appears to persist at temperatures up to 1000 °C. This paper presents the results of high-temperature deformation tests using longitudinal and transverse specimens taken from as-received Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes. It is shown that the anisotropic deformation behaviour observed at high temperatures is largely due to the stable crystallographic texture of the ?-Zr phase constituent in the material that was previously observed by neutron diffraction measurements during heating at temperatures up to 1050 °C. The deformation behaviour is also influenced by the phase transformation occurring at high temperatures during heating. The effects of texture and phase transformation on the anisotropic deformation of as-received Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material are discussed in the context of the tube ballooning behaviour. Because of the high temperatures in postulated accident scenarios, any irradiation damage will be annealed from the pressure tube material and thus the unirradiated material results presented in this paper are also applicable to irradiated pressure tubes.

  5. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    PubMed

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles ??[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. PMID:23290584

  6. Flame-retardant composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of eight different graphite composite panels fabricated using four different resin matrices and two types of graphite reinforcement are described. The resin matrices included: VPSP/BMI, a blend of vinylpolystyryl pyridine and bismaleimide; BMI, a bismaleimide; and phenolic and PSP, a polystyryl pyridine. The graphite fiber used was AS-4 in the form of either tape or fabric. The properties of these composites were compared with epoxy composites. It was determined that VPSP/BMI with the graphite tape was the optimum design giving the lowest heat release rate.

  7. Electric-field distribution near current contacts of anisotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slot, E.; van der Zant, H. S.; Thorne, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the nonuniformity of the electric field near lateral current contacts of the charge-density-wave materials NbSe3 and o-TaS3. In this contact geometry, the electric field increases considerably near a current contact. Fitting our data to an existing model yields values for the conduction anisotropy and a characteristic longitudinal length scale. This length scale is on the same order as the mesoscopic phenomena in charge-density-wave devices.

  8. A new method for calculation of elastic properties of anisotropic material by constant pressure molecular dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kailiang Yin; Dinghui Zou; Jing Zhong; Duanjun Xu

    2007-01-01

    A new method based on constant pressure molecular dynamics (MD) with the software package Materials Studio (MS) was developed to calculate the anisotropic elastic properties of 1,3,5-tri-amino-2,4,6-tri-nitrobenzene (TATB) which is a typical and widely studied explosive molecular and its single crystal is a typical triclinic lattice. Key points of the method are introduced. Firstly, a P1 periodic super cell of

  9. An extensometer for low-cycle fatigue tests on anisotropic materials at elevated temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Raske; W. F. Burke

    1979-01-01

    An extensometer for axial strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests on anisotropic structural materials at temperatures up to 816 degrees C is described. The unique features of this extensometer are that it is designed to be supported by counter weights when attached to a uniform-gauge specimen, and that the probe tips are held in place by friction. Results of tests on austenitic

  10. A 3D displacement measurement methodology for anisotropic porous cellular foam materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rémi Guastavino; Peter Göransson

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new testing methodology for three dimensional (3D) full-field displacement mapping at the surface of elastic materials under static loading, here with a special focus on macroscopic behaviour of an anisotropic porous cellular foam. Three displacement components on four adjacent surfaces are estimated for cubic samples of the foam using a dual-camera 3D image correlation system. The

  11. Machining of Sitall-base composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. F. Kolesnichenko; N. D. Nazarenko; A. I. Yuga; N. I. Vlasko; F. D. Ivashov; L. L. Sukhikh; G. A. Sedlyar

    1976-01-01

    Investigations have shown that in the grinding of Sitall with an abrasive tool removal of material is slow owing to poor heat transfer from the cutting zone and the high hardness of Sitall. By contrast, use of diamond disks in the grinding of Sitall-base composite materials enables high rates of material removal to be attained with a good surface finish.

  12. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  13. Methods of determining loads and fiber orientations in anisotropic non-crystalline materials using energy flux deviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H. (inventor); Kriz, Ronald D. (inventor); Fitting, Dale W. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic wave is applied to an anisotropic sample material in an initial direction and an angle of flux deviation of the ultrasonic wave front is measured from this initial direction. This flux deviation angle is induced by the unknown applied load. The flux shift is determined between this flux deviation angle and a previously determined angle of flux deviation of an ultrasonic wave applied to a similar anisotropic reference material under an initial known load condition. This determined flux shift is then compared to a plurality of flux shifts of a similarly tested, similar anisotropic reference material under a plurality of respective, known load conditions, whereby the load applied to the particular anisotropic sample material is determined. A related method is disclosed for determining the fiber orientation from known loads and a determined flux shift.

  14. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Watkins, Casey N.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight-saving potential for aerospace applications in propellant and oxidizer tanks. This application for oxygen tanks presents the challenge of being oxygen compatible in addition to complying with the other required material characteristics. This effort reports on the testing procedures and data obtained in examining and selecting potential composite materials for oxygen tank usage. Impact testing of composites has shown that most of these materials initiate a combustion event when impacted at 72 ft-lbf in the presence of liquid oxygen, though testing has also shown substantial variability in reaction sensitivities to impact. Data for screening of 14 potential composites using the Bruceton method is given herein and shows that the 50-percent reaction frequencies range from 17 to 67 ft-lbf. The pressure and temperature rises for several composite materials were recorded to compare the energy releases as functions of the combustion reactions with their respective reaction probabilities. The test data presented are primarily for a test pressure of 300 psia in liquid oxygen. The impact screening process is compared with oxygen index and autogenous ignition test data for both the composite and the basic resin. The usefulness of these supplemental tests in helping select the most oxygen compatible materials is explored. The propensity for mechanical impact ignition of the composite compared with the resin alone is also examined. Since an ignition-free composite material at the peak impact energy of 72 ft-lbf has not been identified, composite reactivity must be characterized over the impact energy level and operating pressure ranges to provide data for hazard analyses in selecting the best potential material for liquid tank usage.

  15. LIQUID PHASE SINTERED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Yankee; G. M. Janowski; B. J. Pletka

    1990-01-01

    Iron-base and aluminum-base composite materials reinforced with various ceramic particulates have been fabricated via powder metallurgy and liquid phase sintering. The advantage of this manufacturing route is that conventional powder metallurgy processing equipment can be used to fabricate metal matrix\\/ceramic composites. Furthermore, this approach makes it possible to manufacture these composites to near-net-shape. A number of matrix\\/ceramic combinations have been

  16. Resin impregnation during the manufacturing of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of resin-impregnation processes during the manufacturing of composite materials was performed. A formulation of the problem was accomplished using ideas taken from the theory of flow through anisotropic porous media. A treatment of the resin-impregnation front that exists during impregnation processes was also suggested. Using these ideas, a methodology for simulating two-dimensional isothermal resin-impregnation processes under conditions of specified injection rate or specified applied pressure was developed. Special attention was directed at the simulation of resin-transfer modeling and resin film stacking/compression modeling processes. Due to the geometrical complexity of the situations to be modeled, the computational technique of boundary-fitted coordinate systems encompassing numerical grid generation was chosen. It was found that the simulation of impregnation under specified applied-pressure loading conditions is much more involved than that of the specified resin injection rate conditions.

  17. NASA Thermographic Inspection of Advanced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott

    2004-01-01

    As the use of advanced composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community, the need for a quantitative, rapid, in situ inspection technology has become a critical concern throughout the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over an extended period of time to determine the effects of various load conditions. Additionally, the detection and characterization of defects such as delaminations, is of great concern. This paper will present the application of infrared thermography to characterize various composite materials and show the advantages of different heat source types. Finally, various analysis methodologies used for quantitative material property characterization will be discussed.

  18. Composite Materials for Wind Power Turbine Blades

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Povl Brøndsted; Hans Lilholt; Aage Lystrup

    2005-01-01

    Renewable energy resources, of which wind energy is prominent, are part of the solution to the global energy problem. Wind turbine and the rotorblade concepts are reviewed, and loadings by wind and gravity as important factors for the fatigue performance of the materials are considered. Wood and composites are discussed as candidates for rotorblades. The fibers and matrices for composites

  19. Powder Metallurgy Composite Materials Strengthened with Fibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suren G. Agbalyan

    2001-01-01

    The extrusion dynamics of high-strength powder metallurgy composite materials was studied. The extrusion parameters for porous compacts of copper fibers and Cu ? Mo composites were optimized. It was shown that orientation of fibers is possible only when they are sufficiently widely dispersed in the powder matrix and also when the fiber length is much greater than its diameter l

  20. Automotive applications for advanced composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deutsch

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of nonaerospace applications for advanced composite materials with special emphasis on the automotive applications. The automotive industry has to satisfy exacting requirements to reduce the average fuel consumption of cars. A feasible approach to accomplish this involves the development of composites cars with a total weight of 2400 pounds and a fuel consumption of 33 miles

  1. Self-healing structural composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Kessler; N. R. Sottos; S. R. White

    2003-01-01

    A self-healing fiber-reinforced structural polymer matrix composite material is demonstrated. In the composite, a microencapsulated healing agent and a solid chemical catalyst are dispersed within the polymer matrix phase. Healing is triggered by crack propagation through the microcapsules, which then release the healing agent into the crack plane. Subsequent exposure of the healing agent to the chemical catalyst initiates polymerization

  2. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardenheier, R.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques of acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials is described. It is highly sensitive, quasi-nondestructive testing method that indicates the origin and behavior of flaws in such materials when submitted to different load exposures. With the use of sophisticated signal analysis methods it is possible the distinguish between different types of failure mechanisms, such as fiber fracture delamination or fiber pull-out. Imperfections can be detected while monitoring complex composite structures by acoustic emission measurements.

  4. Composite materials with improved phyllosilicate dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-09-14

    The present invention provides phyllosilicates edge modified with anionic surfactants, composite materials made from the edge modified phyllosilicates, and methods for making the same. In various embodiments the phyllosilicates are also surface-modified with hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) modifying agents, polymeric hydrotropes, and antioxidants. The invention also provides blends of edge modified phyllosilicates and semicrystalline waxes. The composite materials are made by dispersing the edge modified phyllosilicates with polymers, particularly polyolefins and elastomers.

  5. Shear fractures in anisotropic ductile materials: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Analogue models have been used to investigate the influence of planar mechanical anisotropy on the orientation of shear fractures in an elastoviscous-brittle material. Multilayered models consisting of a mixture of plasticine, vaseline and preferentially-oriented paper flakes have been coaxially deformed for this purpose. The evolution of the orientation, length and connectivity of fracture sets has been systematically analysed with progressive coaxial deformation. The experimental results show that the orientation of fractures with respect to the deformation axes depends on the orientation of transverse anisotropy. Two symmetrical sets of shear fractures are formed in models with layering parallel to the extension axis X, while the fracture network is asymmetrical with respect to the deformation axes for cases with oblique anisotropy. The average dihedral angles between fracture sets are higher than 100°, with the obtuse bisector between the two sets oriented perpendicular to layers. The stress fields calculated from fracture data differ from the boundary conditions applied by the deformation apparatus. This misorientation is related to the degree of anisotropy. In models with high oblique anisotropy both fracture arrays rotate in a dextral sense together with layers towards the X-axis, indicating that the presence of a strong anisotropy controls their evolution with progressive deformation.

  6. Anisotropic material synthesis by capillary flow in a fluid stripe

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Matthew J.; Piraino, Francesco; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Rasponi, Marco; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple bench-top technique to produce centimeter long concentration gradients in biomaterials incorporating soluble, material, and particle gradients. By patterning hydrophilic regions on a substrate, a stripe of prepolymer solution is held in place on a glass slide by a hydrophobic boundary. Adding a droplet to one end of this “pre-wet” stripe causes a rapid capillary flow that spreads the droplet along the stripe to generate a gradient in the relative concentrations of the droplet and pre-wet solutions. The gradient length and shape are controlled by the pre-wet and droplet volumes, stripe thickness, fluid viscosity and surface tension. Gradient biomaterials are produced by crosslinking gradients of prepolymer solutions. Demonstrated examples include a concentration gradient of cells encapsulated in three dimensions (3D) within a homogeneous biopolymer and a constant concentration of cells encapsulated in 3D within a biomaterial gradient exhibiting a gradient in cell spreading. The technique employs coated glass slides that may be purchased or custom made from tape and hydrophobic spray. The approach is accessible to virtually any researcher or student and should dramatically reduce the time required to synthesize a wide range of gradient biomaterials. Moreover, since the technique employs passive mechanisms it is ideal for remote or resource poor settings. PMID:21684595

  7. Composite materials: composition, properties and clinical applications. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, Brigitte; Strub, Matthias; Jeger, Franziska; Stadler, Oliver; Lussi, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Various composite materials are available today for direct restorative techniques. The most well-known materials are the hybrid composites. This technology, based on methacrylates and different types of filler coupled with silanes, has been continuously improved. Disadvantages such as polymerisation shrinkage, bacterial adhesion and side effects due to monomer release still remain. The aim of material development is to eliminate or at least reduce these negative factors by adapting the individual components of the material. With ormocers, the methacrylate has been partially replaced by an inorganic network. According to recent studies, the biocompatibility was not improved in all cases. The development of compomer was an attempt to combine the positive properties of glassionomers with composite technology. This has only partially succeeded, because the fluoride release is low. In an in-situ study, a caries protective effect could be shown at least in the first days following filling placement with concurrent extra-oral demineralisation. By replacing the chain-monomers in the composite matrix by ring-shaped molecules, a new approach to reduce polymerisation shrinkage was investigated. A new group of materials, the siloranes, has been developed. Siloranes are hydrophobic and need to be bonded to the dental hard tissue using a special adhesive system. Long-term clinical studies are still needed to prove the superiority of this new group of materials over modern hybrid composites. PMID:21243545

  8. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  9. Graphene-based Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Mohammad Ali

    We investigated the mechanical properties, such as fracture toughness (KIc), fracture energy (GIc), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), Young¡¦s modulus (E), and fatigue crack propagation rate (FCPR) of epoxy-matrix composites with different weight fractions of carbon-based fillers, including graphene platelets (GPL), graphene nanoribbons (GNR), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), and fullerenes (C60). Only ˜0.125 wt.% GPL was found to increase the KIc of the pure epoxy by ˜65% and the GIc by ˜115%. To get similar improvement, CNT and nanoparticle epoxy composites required one to two orders of magnitude greater weight fraction of nanofillers. Moreover, ˜0.125% wt.% GPL also decreased the fatigue crack propagation rate in the epoxy by ˜30-fold. The E value of 0.1 wt.% GPL/epoxy nanocomposite was ˜31% larger than the pure epoxy while there was only an increase of ˜3% for the SWNT composites. The UTS of the pristine epoxy was improved by ˜40% with GPLs in comparison with ˜14% enhancement for the MWNTs. The KIc of the GPL nanocomposite enhanced by ˜53% over the pristine epoxy compared to a ˜20% increase for the MWNT-reinforced composites. The results of the FCPR tests for the GPL nanocomposites showed a different trend. While the CNT nanocomposites were not effective enough to suppress the crack growth at high values of the stress intensity factor (DeltaK), the reverse behavior is observed for the GPL nanocomposites. The advantage of the GPLs over CNTs in terms of mechanical properties enhancement is due to their enormous specific surface area, enhanced adhesion at filler/epoxy interface (because of the wrinkled surfaces of GPLs), as well as the planar structure of the GPLs. We also show that unzipping of MWNTs into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) enhances the load transfer effectiveness in epoxy nanocomposites. For instance, at ˜0.3 wt.% of fillers, the Young's modulus (E) of the epoxy nanocomposite with GNRs increased by ˜30% compared to their MWNTs counterpart. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) for ˜0.3 wt.% GNR composites showed ˜22% enhancement compared to the MWNT composites at the same loading fraction of fillers (at ˜0.3 wt.%). Our results show that unzipping effect can be used to transform carbon nanotubes into graphene nanoribbons, which are far more effective than the baseline nanotube as a nanofiller in nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of fullerence (C60) epoxy nanocomposites at different loading fractions (wt.%) of fullerene fillers in the pristine epoxy was also studied. Fullerene (C60) fillers demonstrated good potential to improve the mechanical properties of epoxy composites. However the required C60 loading fractions were ˜1% which are still an order of magnitude higher than that for graphene platelets (˜0.1%). This again illustrates the superiority of graphene as a structural reinforcement additive for epoxy polymers at low nanofiller loadings. While the main focus of this work has been on epoxy polymers, initial results with ceramic matrix and metal (aluminum) matrix composites were also generated. These results demonstrate that GPL are highly effective in enahncing the fracture properties of silicon nitride ceramics. The fracture toughness of the baseline silicon nitride matrix increased by ˜235% (from ˜2.8 to ˜6.6 MPa.m1/2) at ˜1.5% GPL volume fraction. However the results were disappointing for aluminim matrix composites. Compared to the pure aluminum, the graphene-aluminum composites showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler. These results indicate that Graphene Platelets (GPL) show strong potential as a nanofiller for epoxy nanocomposites and can provide a performance comparable to other forms of nanofillers at a significantly lower nanofiller loading fraction.

  10. High temperature composite materials and magnetodielectric composites for microwave application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Thanh Ba

    In the part I, we investigated the microstructures, mechanical properties, and oxidation behavior of hot pressed BN in the presence of sintering additives Al2O3, Y2O3 and SiO2. BN platelets size in the sintered samples grew from ˜5 to ˜30 times for the use of all three oxides, and the use of Al2O3 and Y2O3, correspondingly. The excessive growth of BN platelets in samples containing Al2O3 and Y2O 3 caused them to misalign which, in turn, resulted in its low relative density (92.0%). The use of SiO2 mitigated this grain growth so that BN platelets aligned better to gain a higher relative density (99.5%). Flexural strength and elastic modulus of BN were proportional to their densities. Oxidation experiments conducted at 1200°C in flowing dry air showed borate glass droplets were formed on all of oxidized BN samples. The addition of SiO2 resulted in the formation of a glass layer before the appearance of these glass droplets. The presence of glass droplets was a result of the poor wetting of liquid B2O3 on BN and the dominance of the formation of B2O3 to its evaporation. Their size evolution described the "breadth figure" theory, similar to the formation of water droplets on a flat surface from the saturated water vapor air. Substructures observed inside the glass droplets contained high and consistent Al:Y atomic ratio (5:7) in all samples. The evaporation of B2O 3 isolated Al2O3, Y2O3 in the form of immiscible liquid phase to borate. In the part II, we investigated the formulation of equivalent permittivity and permeability with isotropic and anisotropic Co2Z-polymer composition. These two properties of isotropic Co2Z-LDPE/Co2Z-Silicone composites increased with Co2Z composition. However, their permittivity was always higher than that of their permeability. Permittivity and permeability of anisotropic Co2Z-Silicone composites were split into high and low values along the parallel and perpendicular directions to the alignment direction of Co2Z particles. The separation at 20 vol% Co2Z was strongest, attained 46% anisotropy so that its parallel permeability approached closer to that of its perpendicular permittivity. However, the low permittivity of Co2Z required a higher electric field to increase its particles' alignment.

  11. Nondestructive measurements of complex tensor permittivity of anisotropic materials using a waveguide probe system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.W.; Chen, K.M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Qian, J. [Nanjing Univ. (China). Dept. of Electronic Science and Engineering] [Nanjing Univ. (China). Dept. of Electronic Science and Engineering

    1996-07-01

    A nondestructive measurement of electromagnetic (EM) properties of anisotropic materials using an open-ended waveguide probe has been conducted. Two coupled electric field integral equations (EFIEs) for the aperture electric field are derived and solved numerically by employing the method of moments (MoM). After the determination of the aperture electric field, the reflection coefficient of the incident wave can be expressed in terms of the EM parameters of the material. Then, the EM parameters of the material layer can be inversely determined if the reflection coefficient of the incident wave is experimentally measured. A series of experiments has been conducted using the waveguide probe system constructed at MSU electromagnetics laboratory. The inverse results of the EM properties of various materials are presented. Finally, the effects of material parameters on the probe input admittance that cause problems in the measurement are analyzed.

  12. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  13. Nonmetallic materials and composites at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, G.; Evans, D.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents articles by leading scientists who explore the cryogenic behavior of such materials as epoxies, polyethylenes, polymers, various composites, and glasses. Examines the thermal and dielectric properties of these materials, as well as their elasticity, cohesive strength, resistance to strain and fracturing, and applications. Topics include thermal properties of crystalline polymers; thermal conductivity in semicrystalline polymers; ultrasonic absorption in polymethylmethacrylate; radiation damage in thin sheet fiberglass; epoxide resins; dynamic mechanical properties of poly (methacrylates); dielectric loss due to antioxidants in polyolefins; fracture measurements on polyethylene in comparison with epoxy resins; fatigue testing of epoxide resins; lap testing of epoxide resins; thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of non-metallic composite materials; nonlinear stresses and displacements of the fibers and matrix in a radially loaded circular composite ring; the strain energy release rate of glass fiber-reinforced polyester composites; charpy impact testing of cloth reinforced epoxide resin; nonmetallic and composite materials as solid superleaks; carbon fiber reinforced expoxide resins; standardizing nonmetallic composite materials.

  14. Interfacial interaction and adhesion in composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Y. Yee; E. C. Martin

    1984-01-01

    The interfacial interaction of composites plays an important role in the properties of material such as structural materials, solid propellants, and explosives. To study the interfacial interaction, surface and interfacial free energies were investigated. The wettability of solids was determined by the Wilhelmy plate method using a series of reference liquids. The surface free energies of these solids were calculated

  15. Structured Piezoelectric Composites: Materials and Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Van den Ende

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric effect, which causes a material to generate a voltage when it deforms, is very suitable for making integrated sensors, and (micro-) generators. However, conventional piezoelectric materials are either brittle ceramics or certain polymers with a low thermal stability, which limits their practical application to certain specific fields. Piezoelectric composites, which contain an active piezoelectric (ceramic) phase in a

  16. NASA Thermographic Inspection of Advanced Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Elliott Cramer

    As the use of advanced composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community, the need for a quantitative, rapid, in situ inspection technology has become a critical concern throughout the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over an extended period of time to determine the effects of various load conditions. Additionally, the

  17. Study on the anisotropic photonic band gaps in three-dimensional tunable photonic crystals containing the epsilon-negative materials and uniaxial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) for three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PCs) composed of the anisotropic positive-index materials (the uniaxial materials) and the epsilon-negative (ENG) materials with body-centered-cubic (bcc) lattices are theoretically studied by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method, which are the uniaxial materials spheres inserted in the epsilon-negative materials background. The anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) and one flatbands region can be achieved in first irreducible Brillouin zone. The influences of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, the electronic plasma frequency, the dielectric constant of ENG materials and the damping factor on the properties of anisotropic PBGs for such 3D PCs are studied in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in such 3D PCs with bcc lattices composed of the ENG materials and uniaxial materials, and the complete PBGs can be obtained compared to the conventional 3D PCs containing the isotropic materials. The calculated results also show that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above except for the damping factor. Introducing the uniaxial materials into 3D PCs containing the ENG materials can obtain the larger complete PBGs as such 3D PCs with high symmetry, and also provides a way to design the tunable devices.

  18. Measurement of anisotropic fracture energies in periodic templated silica/polymer composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Richman, E. K.; Kirsch, B. L.; Senter, R.; Tolbert, S. H.; Gupta, V.

    2008-10-01

    We report measurements of the fracture energies of hexagonal honeycomb structured silica/polymer composite films that were produced through an evaporation induced self-assembly process. These films exhibit large anisotropy with their hexagonal pore axes aligned with the dip-coating direction. The experimental strategy included depositing films onto a flexible Kapton substrate and then straining them, in situ, under a microscope. To study the effect of the anisotropic microstructure on the fracture energy, cracks were propagated both parallel and perpendicular to the cylindrical pore axis directions. For both cases, the geometries of the evolving crack patterns with loading were micrographically recorded and the desired energy release rates were calculated using a two-dimensional steady-state channeling crack model. The model was implemented using the ANSYS finite element program. The experimental observations showed significant inelastic film deformation prior to crack propagation. These deformations were fully captured in the model, with properties obtained directly from the experiments. The calculated energy release rates were 12.3±0.5 J/m2 for the parallel direction and 6.7±0.5 J/m2 for the perpendicular direction. These numbers are significantly larger than the bulk silica value of roughly 4 J/m2, indicating the role of the local nanostructure in blunting and deflecting the crack tips. Experimental validation of the highly anisotropic energy release rates was obtained through transmission electron microscopy images of fractured films.

  19. Warm Forming of Aluminum Alloys using a Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Anisotropic Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abedrabbo, Nader; Pourboghrat, Farhang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 (United States); Carsley, John E. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States)

    2005-08-05

    Temperature-dependant anisotropic material models for two types of automotive aluminum alloys (5754-O and 5182-O) were developed and implemented in LS-Dyna as a user material subroutine (UMAT) for coupled thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) of warm forming of aluminum alloys. The anisotropy coefficients of the Barlat YLD2000 plane stress yield function for both materials were calculated for the range of temperatures 25 deg. C-260 deg. C. Curve fitting was used to calculate the anisotropy coefficients of YLD2000 and the flow stress as a function of temperature. This temperature-dependent material model was successfully applied to the coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of stretching of aluminum sheets and results were compared with experiments.

  20. Fe-nanoparticle coated anisotropic magnet powders for composite permanent magnets with enhanced properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, M.; Liu, J. F.; Bonder, M. J.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2008-04-01

    Utilizing the chemical reduction of FeCl2 with NaBH4 in the presence of 2:17 Sm-Co powders, we synthesized composite Sm(Co0.699Fe0.213Cu0.064Zr0.024)7.4/nano-Fe anisotropic hard magnetic powders. The average particle size of the hard magnetic core powder was 21?m while the soft magnetic Fe nanoparticles deposited uniformly on the core powder had a particle size smaller than 100nm. Different reaction protocols, such as immersion of the hard magnetic core powder in each reagent, the use of microemulsion (micelle) technique, or doubling the weight ratio of FeCl2 to core powder, led to different degrees of magnetic coupling of the hard and soft magnetic components of the composite powder. A reaction time of 180s led to deposition of 3.5wt% Fe nanoparticles and improved magnetic properties of the composite powder compared to the uncoated Sm(Co0.699Fe0.213Cu0.064Zr0.024)7.4 powder. The respective magnetic hysteresis parameters were 4?M18kOe=11.3kG, 4?Mr=11kG, and Hci>20kOe with a smooth demagnetization curve.

  1. Easy fabrication and resistivity-temperature behavior of an anisotropically conductive carbon nanotube-polymer composite.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Yi-Chuan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Li, Sha-Ni; Zhang, Xiao-Na

    2010-01-21

    An easy fabrication method comprising a slit die extrusion-hot stretch-quench process was used to make carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with anisotropically conductive polymer composite (ACPC). CNTs were first premixed with polycarbonate (PC) by coagulation and then melt mixed with polyethylene (PE). During extrusion, the CNT/PC/PE composite was subjected to hot stretching to make the CNT/PC phase form in situ an oriented conductive fibril assembly in the PE matrix. Finally the aligned CNT/PC short fibrils were quenched to preserve their structure. The resultant CNT/PC/PE composite exhibited strong anisotropy in conductivity. This method has the advantages of giving a highly oriented structure with good control of electrical anisotropy as well as the ability to be fabricated in a high rate manner. Temperature-resistivity behavior was investigated by observing the resistivity during isothermal treatment (IT) as well as nonisothermal treatment (NIT). Percolation behavior was seen in the isolated direction during the first IT at 180 degrees C. This was a result of a disordering-induced conductive network. In addition, the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect attenuated with IT duration. This was seen in contrast to the remaining negative temperature coefficient (NTC). The unique evolution of PTC and NTC effects originated from the ACPC's special conductive network. It can be seen that this is composed of the originally connected "intrinsic pathway" and isolated "potential pathway". PMID:20030304

  2. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  3. Computational modeling of composite material fires.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alexander L.; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Hubbard, Joshua Allen; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2010-10-01

    Composite materials behave differently from conventional fuel sources and have the potential to smolder and burn for extended time periods. As the amount of composite materials on modern aircraft continues to increase, understanding the response of composites in fire environments becomes increasingly important. An effort is ongoing to enhance the capability to simulate composite material response in fires including the decomposition of the composite and the interaction with a fire. To adequately model composite material in a fire, two physical model development tasks are necessary; first, the decomposition model for the composite material and second, the interaction with a fire. A porous media approach for the decomposition model including a time dependent formulation with the effects of heat, mass, species, and momentum transfer of the porous solid and gas phase is being implemented in an engineering code, ARIA. ARIA is a Sandia National Laboratories multiphysics code including a range of capabilities such as incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, energy transport equations, species transport equations, non-Newtonian fluid rheology, linear elastic solid mechanics, and electro-statics. To simulate the fire, FUEGO, also a Sandia National Laboratories code, is coupled to ARIA. FUEGO represents the turbulent, buoyantly driven incompressible flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and combustion. FUEGO and ARIA are uniquely able to solve this problem because they were designed using a common architecture (SIERRA) that enhances multiphysics coupling and both codes are capable of massively parallel calculations, enhancing performance. The decomposition reaction model is developed from small scale experimental data including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) in both nitrogen and air for a range of heating rates and from available data in the literature. The response of the composite material subject to a radiant heat flux boundary condition is examined to study the propagation of decomposition fronts of the epoxy and carbon fiber and their dependence on the ambient conditions such as oxygen concentration, surface flow velocity, and radiant heat flux. In addition to the computational effort, small scaled experimental efforts to attain adequate data used to validate model predictions is ongoing. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the progress of the capability for a typical composite material and emphasize the path forward.

  4. School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering Composites Materials and Engineering Center

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    program, classroom teaching in the area of mechanical or materials engineering, and serviceSchool of Mechanical and Materials Engineering and Composites Materials and Engineering Center and Materials Engineering (MME) in collaboration with the Composites Materials and Engineering Center (CMEC

  5. Design, fabrication and characterization of a monolithic focusing piezoceramic transducer for an anisotropic material.

    PubMed

    Souris, Fabien; Grucker, Jules; Garroum, Nabil; Leclercq, Arnaud; Isac, Jean-Michel; Dupont-Roc, Jacques; Jacquier, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Piezoceramic transducers shaped as spherical caps are widely used to focus ultrasound waves in isotropic materials. For anisotropic materials, the sound wave surface is not spherical and the transducer surface should be adjusted to reproduce a portion of this wave surface to focus the emitted sound properly. In this article, we show how to design such a transducer and how to fabricate it in lab on a standard machine from a rod of raw piezo ceramic material. The main features of its electrical impedance response are well reproduced by a numerical model, allowing the identification of most of its vibrational modes. We finally measured the sound field emitted by such a transducer and found its focusing efficiency similar to that of spherical caps in isotropic media. PMID:24985837

  6. Thermal expansion properties of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Kural, M. H.; Mackey, G. B.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal expansion data for several composite materials, including generic epoxy resins, various graphite, boron, and glass fibers, and unidirectional and woven fabric composites in an epoxy matrix, were compiled. A discussion of the design, material, environmental, and fabrication properties affecting thermal expansion behavior is presented. Test methods and their accuracy are discussed. Analytical approaches to predict laminate coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) based on lamination theory and micromechanics are also included. A discussion is included of methods of tuning a laminate to obtain a near-zero CTE for space applications.

  7. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques Applied to the Quantitative Characterization of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1997-01-01

    In this Progress Report, we describe our further development of advanced ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods applied to the characterization of anisotropic materials. We present images obtained from experimental measurements of ultrasonic diffraction patterns transmitted through water only and transmitted through water and a thin woven composite. All images of diffraction patterns have been included on the accompanying CD-ROM in the JPEG format and Adobe TM Portable Document Format (PDF), in addition to the inclusion of hardcopies of the images contained in this report. In our previous semi-annual Progress Report (NAG 1-1848, December, 1996), we proposed a simple model to simulate the effect of a thin woven composite on an insonifying ultrasonic pressure field. This initial approach provided an avenue to begin development of a robust measurement method for nondestructive evaluation of anisotropic materials. In this Progress Report, we extend that work by performing experimental measurements on a single layer of a five-harness biaxial woven composite to investigate how a thin, yet architecturally complex, material interacts with the insonifying ultrasonic field. In Section 2 of this Progress Report we describe the experimental arrangement and methods for data acquisition of the ultrasonic diffraction patterns upon transmission through a thin woven composite. We also briefly describe the thin composite specimen investigated. Section 3 details the analysis of the experimental data followed by the experimental results in Section 4. Finally, a discussion of the observations and conclusions is found in Section 5.

  8. Frictional Ignition Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Steve; Rosales, Keisa; Robinson, Michael J.; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The space flight community has been investigating lightweight composite materials for use in propellant tanks for both liquid and gaseous oxygen for space flight vehicles. The use of these materials presents some risks pertaining to ignition and burning hazards in the presence of oxygen. Through hazard analysis process, some ignition mechanisms have been identified as being potentially credible. One of the ignition mechanisms was reciprocal friction; however, test data do not exist that could be used to clear or fail these types of materials as "oxygen compatible" for the reciprocal friction ignition mechanism. Therefore, testing was performed at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to provide data to evaluate this ignition mechanism. This paper presents the test system, approach, data results, and findings of the reciprocal friction testing performed on composite sample materials being considered for propellant tanks.

  9. Testing of NCSX Composite Coil Material Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, Thomas; Jurczynski, Stephan; Chrzanowski, James [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States)

    2005-05-15

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is now in design and requires 18 modular coils that are constructed to a highly complex geometry. The modular coil conductors are designed as a composite of a fine gauge stranded copper cable shaped to the required geometry and vacuum impregnated with a resin. These composite conductors exhibit unique material properties that must be determined and verified through testing. The conductor material properties are necessary for design modeling and performance validation. This paper will present the methods used to test and measure the coil conductor material properties, the unique challenges in measuring these complex materials at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures and the results of those tests.

  10. Ground exposure of composite materials for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Residual strength results are presented on four composite material systems that were exposed for three years at locations on the North American Continent. The exposure locations are near the areas where Bell Model 206L Helicopters, that are in a NSA/U.S. Army sponsored flight service program, are flying in daily commercial service. The composite systems are: (1) Kevlar-49 fabric/F-185 epoxy; (2) Kevlar-49 fabric/LRF-277 epoxy; (3) Kevlar-49 fabric/CE-306 epoxy; and (4) T-300 Graphite/E-788 epoxy. All material systems exhibited good strength retention in compression and short beam shear. The Kevlar-49/LRF-277 epoxy retained 88 to 93 percent of the baseline strength while the other material systems exceeded 95 percent of baseline strength. Residual tensile strength of all materials did not show a significant reduction. The available moisture absorption data is also presented.

  11. Describing isotropic and anisotropic out-of-plane deformations in thin cubic materials by use of Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Akilian, Mireille; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2006-01-01

    Isotropic and anisotropic out-of-plane deformations induced by thin-film residual stress on thin cubic materials are studied. By transforming the compliance tensor, an analytical expression can be derived for the biaxial stiffness modulus for all directions in any given cubic crystal plane. A modified Stoney's equation, including both isotropic and anisotropic terms, can be formulated to predict the anisotropic out-of-plane deformation. The isotropic and anisotropic deformations are then described using the Zernike polynomials U21 and U22, respectively. Experimental results from (100) and (110) silicon wafers confirm the model by quantitatively comparing the changes in Z21 and Z22 coefficients due to thin-film stress.

  12. Early Fatigue Damage Detection in Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Nevadunsky; J. J. Lucas; M. J. Salkind

    1975-01-01

    Detection of early fatigue damage in composite materials by nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques has been demonstrated for ±45° Glass\\/Epoxy, and ±45°\\/0° Graphite\\/Glass\\/Epoxy. Dynamic axial modulus and temperature were monitored continuously with a correlation between temperature rise and modulus decrease observed. The modulus decrease and temperature rise are indicative of irreversible damage in these materials.Torsional modulus measurements and coin tap tests

  13. Anisotropic Diffusion of Light in a Strongly Scattering Material Patrick M. Johnson,1,2,* Boris P. J. Bret,1,

    E-print Network

    Lagendijk, Ad

    Anisotropic Diffusion of Light in a Strongly Scattering Material Patrick M. Johnson,1,2,* Boris P transport in strongly scattering materials underlies such diverse subjects as Anderson localization of light to be the strongest random scatterer of light in the visible regime with weak absorption [9,10]. In this Letter, we

  14. Strength of anisotropic wood and synthetic materials. [plywood, laminated wood plastics, glass fiber reinforced plastics, polymeric film, and natural wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using general formulas for determining the strength of different anisotropic materials is considered, and theoretical formulas are applied and confirmed by results of tests on various nonmetallic materials. Data are cited on the strength of wood, plywood, laminated wood plastics, fiber glass-reinforced plastics and directed polymer films.

  15. Rediscovering black phosphorus as an anisotropic layered material for optoelectronics and electronics.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fengnian; Wang, Han; Jia, Yichen

    2014-01-01

    Graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are the two major types of layered materials under intensive investigation. However, the zero-bandgap nature of graphene and the relatively low mobility in TMDCs limit their applications. Here we reintroduce black phosphorus (BP), the most stable allotrope of phosphorus with strong intrinsic in-plane anisotropy, to the layered-material family. For 15-nm-thick BP, we measure a Hall mobility of 1,000 and 600 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) for holes along the light (x) and heavy (y) effective mass directions at 120 K. BP thin films also exhibit large and anisotropic in-plane optical conductivity from 2 to 5 ?m. Field-effect transistors using 5 nm BP along x direction exhibit an on-off current ratio exceeding 10(5), a field-effect mobility of 205 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1), and good current saturation characteristics all at room temperature. BP shows great potential for thin-film electronics, infrared optoelectronics and novel devices in which anisotropic properties are desirable. PMID:25041752

  16. Rediscovering black phosphorus as an anisotropic layered material for optoelectronics and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fengnian; Wang, Han; Jia, Yichen

    2014-07-01

    Graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are the two major types of layered materials under intensive investigation. However, the zero-bandgap nature of graphene and the relatively low mobility in TMDCs limit their applications. Here we reintroduce black phosphorus (BP), the most stable allotrope of phosphorus with strong intrinsic in-plane anisotropy, to the layered-material family. For 15-nm-thick BP, we measure a Hall mobility of 1,000 and 600?cm2?V-1?s-1 for holes along the light (x) and heavy (y) effective mass directions at 120?K. BP thin films also exhibit large and anisotropic in-plane optical conductivity from 2 to 5??m. Field-effect transistors using 5?nm BP along x direction exhibit an on-off current ratio exceeding 105, a field-effect mobility of 205?cm2?V-1?s-1, and good current saturation characteristics all at room temperature. BP shows great potential for thin-film electronics, infrared optoelectronics and novel devices in which anisotropic properties are desirable.

  17. Composite materials for rail transit systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Guerdal, Zafer; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The potential is explored for using composite materials in urban mass transit systems. The emphasis was to identify specific advantages of composite materials in order to determine their actual and potential usage for carbody and guideway structure applications. The literature was reviewed, contacts were made with major domestic system operators, designers, and builders, and an analysis was made of potential composite application to railcar construction. Composites were found to be in use throughout the transit industry, usually in secondary or auxiliary applications such as car interior and nonstructural exterior panels. More recently, considerable activity has been initiated in the area of using composites in the load bearing elements of civil engineering structures such as highway bridges. It is believed that new and improved manufacturing refinements in pultrusion and filament winding will permit the production of beam sections which can be used in guideway structures. The inherent corrosion resistance and low maintenance characteristics of composites should result in lowered maintenance costs over a prolonged life of the structure.

  18. Characterization of self-healing composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin John Ford

    2006-01-01

    Damage occurs in almost every composite material in the form of microcracks that develop in the epoxy matrix that binds the fibers together. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign have recently developed a method to reverse the effects of, or heal, damage in the epoxy matrix. Their in-situ self-healing system uses embedded microcapsules and a catalyst that trigger

  19. Computer aided design of multifunctional composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Kafarov; I. N. Dorokhov; A. Ramirez; N. I. Kafarova

    1996-01-01

    This paper deal with a multicriterion compromise problem of production of a multifunctional material on the basis of a stochastic composite with several mutually distributed phases. A formal technique for solving this problem is proposed based on the methods of topological feedback, mathematical morphology, percolation theory, and the theory of discrete phase mappings. By way of illustration, this formal technique

  20. Plastic working of laminated composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. V. Voronov; D. G. Devoino

    1982-01-01

    Plastic working can be successfully employed for increasing the strength of the joint in a laminated composite material whose components react with each other during high-speed cladding, with the formation of brittle intermetallic compouds. At the same time, by suitable choice of reduction and mismatch, it is possible to produce straight bimetallic strips by rolling them with mismatched peripheral roll

  1. Mechanical properties of some composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Golovin; V. S. Zuev

    1976-01-01

    It is commonly believed that steels and alloys based on heat-resistant metals have low damping properties and limited endurance. However, the development of new composite materials (based on these metals) with heterogeneous structure, consisting of a rigid matrix and soft inclusions, has made it possible to obtain alloys with special properties. Sintering and impregnation are particularly important during production of

  2. Moisture Absorption and Desorption of Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Hung Shen; George S. Springer

    1976-01-01

    Expressions are presented for the moisture distribution and the mois ture content as a function of time of one dimensional homogeneous and composite materials exposed either on one side or on both sides to humid air or to water. The results apply during both moisture absorption and desorption when the moisture content and the temperature of the environ ment are

  3. Composite materials in flexible multibody systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Augusta Neto; Jorge A. C. Ambrósio; Rogério P. Leal

    2006-01-01

    In this work the flexible multibody dynamics formulations of complex models are extended to include elastic components made of laminated composite materials. The only limitation for the deformation of a structural member is that it must be elastic and linear when described in a body fixed frame. A finite element model for each flexible body is obtained such that the

  4. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS 1 Introduction

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    are injected by a low viscosity resin. During this process, we have to pay particular attention to the void materials can be elaborated by Liquid Composite Molding (LCM), a family of processes where fibrous preforms flow rates. Liquid is injected in the T- shaped junction by two syringe compressors in setting two

  5. Quantitative ultrasonic testing of acoustically anisotropic materials with verification on austenitic and dissimilar weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, C.; Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.

    2012-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, the material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality in safety related applications. For example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance, is made of this material. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The "Sampling Phased Array" technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with fast image reconstruction techniques based on synthetic focusing algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priori, a novel phase adjustment technique called "Reverse Phase Matching" is implemented. By taking into account the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the weld structure, a ray tracing algorithm for modeling the acoustic wave propagation and calculating the sound propagation time is applied. This technique can be utilized for 2D and 3D real time image reconstruction. The "Gradient Constant Descent Method" (GECDM), an iterative algorithm, is implemented, which is essential for examination of inhomogeneous anisotropic media having unknown properties (elastic constants). The Sampling Phased Array technique with Reverse Phase Matching extended by GECDM-technique determines unknown elastic constants and provides reliable and efficient quantitative flaw detection in the austenitic welds. The validation of ray-tracing algorithm and GECDM-method is performed by number of experiments on test specimens with artificial as well as natural material flaws. A mechanized system for ultrasonic testing of stainless steel and dissimilar welds is developed. The system works on both conventional and Sampling Phased Array techniques. The new frontend ultrasonic unit with optical data link allows the 3D visualization of the inspection results in real time.

  6. Autophagous spacecraft composite materials for orbital propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash; Upschulte, Bernard L.; Gelb, Alan H.; Green, B. David; Lester, Dean M.; Wallace, Ingvar; Starrett, W. David; Marshall, David W.

    2002-07-01

    We are developing structural polymer composite materials that can be converted into fuels and combusted with oxidizers for orbital propulsion of spacecraft. We have identified candidate materials and demonstrated sustained combustion with nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) as an oxidizer. To improve reaction chemistry we have evaluated several energetic additives. Detailed material compatibility tests were conducted to identify stable combinations of structural polymer and energetic additives. We have also demonstrated sustained combustion of structural polymeric materials with embedded additives and NTO. In the next phase of research, we plan to investigate hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer. Samples of composites comprising thin metallic facesheets, structural polymer propellant matrix, and metallic mesh reinforcements (that also serve as electrical heaters/igniters for pyrolysis) were fabricated and their mechanical properties were measured. Concept of a spacecraft structural stringer, which also functions as a thruster, was developed using the composite material formulation. Both all solid and hybrid stringer-thruster designs have been developed. Prototype stringer-thrusters will be fabricated and tested in Phase II.

  7. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  8. Elementary damping properties in braided composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Bernard L.; Sadler, Robert; Silverberg, Larry

    1994-05-01

    This paper investigates the damping level trends of three-dimensionally braided composites as a function of matrix material, fiber-matrix interface, fiber braid angle, fiber volume, and axial fiber tow size. With knowledge of such trends, designers may increase the structural damping in a 3-D braided composite component, thereby reducing component vibration, shock response, and fatigue. The logarithmic decrements of the fundamental mode response of cantilevered, 3-D braided composite beam specimens were calculated for comparison. Although the logarithmic decrements of two specimens, differing only in their matrix materials (Tactix 123 and Epon 828), were essentially identical, both were considerably larger than that for steel. The value for the decrement of these two composite specimens' response was taken as a reference. Altering the nature of the fiber-matrix interface by lubricating the fibers before specimen consolidation greatly increased the damping relative to the baseline. Trends of increasing damping were measured with both increasing fiber braid angle and fiber volume. Finally, increasing levels of damping are reported for decreases in axial fiber tow size. Explanations for these trends, based on the possible microscopic and macroscopic nature of the braided composites, are offered.

  9. Aluminum composite materials for multichip modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, M. K.; Hunt, W. H.; Sawtell, R. R.

    1992-07-01

    In the intensive materials development activities for electronic packaging and thermal management applications, the subclass of materials in which SiC particles reinforce aluminum alloy matrices has emerged as one with an especially attractive combination of physical properties, manufacturing flexibility, and cost. One benefit of these materials is the ability to tailor the physical properties through the selection of both reinforcement and alloy variables to match the thermal expansion coefficient of other electronic materials. In addition, the manufacturing flexibility of the various processes allows for shape complexity as well as selective reinforcement placement in the component to optimize system producibility. Finally, because raw materials are inherently inexpensive and low-cost production routes have been identified, aluminum composites may offer a range of cost-effective solutions to emerging problems in electronic packaging and thermal-management applications.

  10. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  11. Conductor-polymer composite electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Kurtz, S.R.; Smyrl, W.H.; Zeigler, J.M.

    1984-06-13

    A conductive composite material useful as an electrode, comprises a conductor and an organic polymer which is reversibly electrochemically dopable to change its electrical conductivity. Said polymer continuously surrounds the conductor in intimate electrical contact therewith and is prepared by electrochemical growth on said conductor or by reaction of its corresponding monomer(s) on said conductor which has been pre-impregnated or pre-coated with an activator for said polymerization. Amount of the conductor is sufficient to render the resultant composite electrically conductive even when the polymer is in an undoped insulating state.

  12. Dielectric breakdown model for composite materials.

    PubMed

    Peruani, F; Solovey, G; Irurzun, I M; Mola, E E; Marzocca, A; Vicente, J L

    2003-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of dielectric breakdown in composite materials. The dielectric breakdown model was generalized to describe dielectric breakdown patterns in conductor-loaded composites. Conducting particles are distributed at random in the insulating matrix, and the dielectric breakdown propagates according to new rules to take into account electrical properties and particle size. Dielectric breakdown patterns are characterized by their fractal dimension D and the parameters of the Weibull distribution. Studies are carried out as a function of the fraction of conducting inhomogeneities, p. The fractal dimension D of electrical trees approaches the fractal dimension of a percolation cluster when the fraction of conducting particles approximates the percolation limit. PMID:16241318

  13. A novel hybrid finite element model for modeling anisotropic composites Changyong Cao a

    E-print Network

    Qin, Qinghua

    layers (or laminae) of the laminates consist of high-modulus, high-strength fibers in a polymeric, metallic, or ceramic matrix material. On one hand, the fiber and matrix in each lamina can be treated to be further extended to analyze composite laminates easily. & 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1

  14. Compression Testing of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of existing test methods, which were developed primarily for laminates made of unidirectional prepreg tape, to textile composites is an area of concern. The issue is whether the values measured for the 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit materials are accurate representations of the true material response. This report provides a review of efforts to establish a compression test method for textile reinforced composite materials. Experimental data have been gathered from several sources and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of a variety of test methods. The effectiveness of the individual test methods to measure the material's modulus and strength is determined. Data are presented for 2-D triaxial braided, 3-D woven, and stitched graphite/epoxy material. However, the determination of a recommended test method and specimen dimensions is based, primarily, on experimental results obtained by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for 2-D triaxially braided materials. They evaluated seven test methods: NASA Short Block, Modified IITRI, Boeing Open Hole Compression, Zabora Compression, Boeing Compression after Impact, NASA ST-4, and a Sandwich Column Test.

  15. SAFT Applied to Anisotropic and Attenuative Materials Using Sparse Array Data and Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, Martin; Rieder, Hans

    2007-03-01

    Improved SAFT imaging methodologies are discussed for the inspection of composite materials and coarse-grained polycrystalline materials. The problem of unfavourable beam fields of conventional transducers, which occurs for specific elastic material properties, is solved by using a two-dimensional array for beam focusing and steering. Additionally, redundant sets of rf-data are acquired and used for image reconstruction by exciting the transmit and receive elements, respectively, in variable subsets, revealing the promising potential of sparse array applications.

  16. Propagation of plane waves in an anisotropic material For the case of a dielectric material, in the absence of free charges, the ME have the form

    E-print Network

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Propagation of plane waves in an anisotropic material For the case of a dielectric material, in the absence of free charges, the ME have the form 00)( 0 B.E P (1) xx )( 0 2 0 P EB0BE t c of the bound charges to the presence of the electromagnetic wave Equation (1) is also typically expressed

  17. Multifunctional composite materials for catalysis and chemical mechanical planarization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cecil A. Coutinho

    2009-01-01

    Composite materials formed from two or more functionally different materials offer a versatile avenue to create a tailored material with well defined traits. Within this dissertation research, multi-functional composites were synthesized based on organic and inorganic materials. The functionally of these composites was experimentally tested and a semi-empirical model describing the sedimentation behavior of these particles was developed. This first

  18. Research Progress on Intercalation Composite Materials based on Kaolin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pan Xiaobing; Li Yanfeng; Liu Gang; Men Xuehu

    2004-01-01

    Kaolin is a nonmetal resource with abundant storage, and it would be changed into one of organic\\/inorganic composite materials by means of intercalating modification. Comparing with general composite materials, intercalation composite material is formed by intercalating one or more layers either organic molecules or polymers into inorganic materials with stratum shape, its mechanical properties could be modified markedly. The characteristics

  19. Identification of composite materials elastic moduli from Lamb wave velocities measured with single sided, contactless ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, Bernard; Castaings, Michel; Tretout, Hervé; Voillaume, Hubert

    2001-04-01

    The identification of the elastic properties of composite materials is done from measured phase velocities of Lamb waves. In the purpose to set up an industrial, contactless and single-sided access device for in service inspection of aircrafts, air-coupled, capacitive transducers are used to generate and receive Lamb waves which are sensitive to material properties. The set of phase velocities corresponding to at least three modes over a large frequency domain, is used as data to recover the elastic moduli through a minimization algorithm. The system is tested for anisotropic composite materials made of epoxy matrix reinforced by glass or carbon fibers.

  20. Stressed environmental degradation of automotive composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, J.M.; Meyer, L.J. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States); Houston, D.Q.; Hagerman, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The degradation of mechanical properties due to exposure to various automotive environments during constant stress or constant strain loading is investigated. Two composites are studied. Each is a polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand E-glass mat, manufactured by the SRIM process. Novel fixtures apply tensile loads to dogbone-specimens while exposed to automotive fluids. After 300 hours, the specimens are tensile tested to failure in air. The effects of five fluids: distilled water, windshield washer fluid, brake fluid, gasoline, and sulfuric acid are examined on the first material. Extensive testing of both materials in distilled water gives a good comparison of the two materials and the effects of loading. Degradation in mechanical properties typically increases with stress level but is independent of the type of loading. This result is discussed in terms of damage and deformation mechanisms in the material.

  1. Novel Cryogenic Insulation Materials: Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan

    2001-01-01

    New insulation materials are being developed to economically and reliably insulate future reusable spacecraft cryogenic tanks over a planned lifecycle of extreme thermal challenges. These insulation materials must prevent heat loss as well as moisture and oxygen condensation on the cryogenic tanks during extended groundhold, must withstand spacecraft launch conditions, and must protect a partly full or empty reusable cryogenic tank from significant reentry heating. To perform over such an extreme temperature range, novel composites were developed from aerogels and high-temperature matrix material such as Space Shuttle tile. These materials were fabricated and tested for use both as cryogenic insulation and as high-temperature insulation. The test results given in this paper were generated during spacecraft re-entry heating simulation tests using cryogenic cooling.

  2. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  3. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  4. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.

    1980-09-16

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium are described. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  5. Mechanics Methodology for Textile Preform Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    NASA and its contractors have completed a program to develop a basic mechanics underpinning for textile composites. Three major deliverables were produced by the program: 1. A set of test methods for measuring material properties and design allowables; 2. Mechanics models to predict the effects of the fiber preform architecture and constituent properties on engineering moduli, strength, damage resistance, and fatigue life; and 3. An electronic data base of coupon type test data. This report describes these three deliverables.

  6. Evolution of the effective moduli for anisotropic granular materials during pure shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Imole, O. I.; Magnanimo, V.; Luding, S.

    2013-06-01

    We analyze the behavior of a frictionless dense granular packing sheared at constant volume. Goal is to predict the evolution of the effective moduli along the loading path. Because of the structural anisotropy that develops in the system, volumetric and deviatoric stresses and strains are cross coupled via four distinct quantities, the classical bulk and shear moduli and two anisotropy moduli. Here, by means of numerical simulation, we apply small perturbations to various equilibrium states that previously experienced different pure shear strains and investigate the effect of the microstructure (2nd rank fabric tensor) on the elastic bulk response. Besides the expected dependence of the bulk modulus on the isotropic fabric, we find that both the isotropic density of contacts and the (deviatoric) orientational anisotropy affect the anisotropy moduli. Interestingly, the shear modulus of the material depends also on the actual stress state, along with the (isotropic and anisotropic) contact configuration.

  7. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  8. Impact of solids on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronson, Arturo; Maldonado, Jerry; Chern, Tzong; Martinez, Francisco; Mccord-Medrano, Johnnie; Roschke, Paul N.

    1987-01-01

    The failure modes of composite materials as a result of low velocity impact were investigated by simulating the impact with a finite element analysis. An important facet of the project is the modeling of the impact of a solid onto cylindrical shells composed of composite materials. The model under development will simulate the delamination sustained when a composite material encounters impact from another rigid body. The computer equipment was installed, the computer network tested, and a finite element method model was developed to compare results with known experimental data. The model simulated the impact of a steel rod onto a rotating shaft. Pre-processing programs (GMESH and TANVEL) were developed to generate node and element data for the input into the three dimensional, dynamic finite element analysis code (DYNA3D). The finite element mesh was configured with a fine mesh near the impact zone and a coarser mesh for the impacting rod and the regions surrounding the impacting zone. For the computer simulation, five impacting loads were used to determine the time history of the stresses, the scribed surface areas, and the amount of ridging. The processing time of the computer codes amounted from 1 to 4 days. The calculated surface area were within 6-12 percent, relative error when compated to the actual scratch area.

  9. Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Frank Trang

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Zoya

    Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Materials by Frank Trang B.S., University of California entitled: Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Materials written by Frank Trang has been approved.D., Electrical Engineering) Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Materials Thesis directed by Professor

  10. Wavelength Invariant Bi/In Thermal Resist As A Si Anisotropic Etch Masking Layer And Direct Write Photomask Material

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    Wavelength Invariant Bi/In Thermal Resist As A Si Anisotropic Etch Masking Layer And Direct Write which form an etch resistant material at ~7 mJ/cm2 laser exposures with near wavelength invariance from and developed Bi/In resist etches slower than silicon dioxide in alkaline-based silicon etchants TMAH, KOH

  11. Industry to Education Technical Transfer Program & Composite Materials. Composite Materials Course. Fabrication I Course. Fabrication II Course. Composite Materials Testing Course. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massuda, Rachel

    These four reports provide details of projects to design and implement courses to be offered as requirements for the associate degree program in composites and reinforced plastics technology. The reports describe project activities that led to development of curricula for four courses: composite materials, composite materials fabrication I,…

  12. Use of advanced composite materials for innovative building design solutions/

    E-print Network

    Lau, Tak-bun, Denvid

    2009-01-01

    Advanced composite materials become popular in construction industry for the innovative building design solutions including strengthening and retrofitting of existing structures. The interface between different materials ...

  13. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic C-scan image in acoustically homogeneous and layered anisotropic materials using three dimensional ray tracing method.

    PubMed

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy; Hoehne, Christian; Prager, Jens; Rethmeier, Michael; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic C-scan images in homogeneous and layered anisotropic austenitic materials is of general importance for understanding the influence of anisotropy on wave fields during ultrasonic non-destructive testing and evaluation of these materials. In this contribution, a three dimensional ray tracing method is presented for evaluating ultrasonic C-scan images quantitatively in general homogeneous and layered anisotropic austenitic materials. The directivity of the ultrasonic ray source in general homogeneous columnar grained anisotropic austenitic steel material (including layback orientation) is obtained in three dimensions based on Lamb's reciprocity theorem. As a prerequisite for ray tracing model, the problem of ultrasonic ray energy reflection and transmission coefficients at an interface between (a) isotropic base material and anisotropic austenitic weld material (including layback orientation), (b) two adjacent anisotropic weld metals and (c) anisotropic weld metal and isotropic base material is solved in three dimensions. The influence of columnar grain orientation and layback orientation on ultrasonic C-scan image is quantitatively analyzed in the context of ultrasonic testing of homogeneous and layered austenitic steel materials. The presented quantitative results provide valuable information during ultrasonic characterization of homogeneous and layered anisotropic austenitic steel materials. PMID:24008174

  14. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO)

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  15. Theoretical and experimental investigation of anisotropic damage in textile-reinforced composite structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Hufenbach; R. Böhm; L. Kroll; A. Langkamp

    2004-01-01

    In the present work, a phenomenological plane-stress damage-mechanics-based model for textile-reinforced composites is presented and its predictive capability is evaluated by carrying out a series of experimental tests. Damage variables are introduced to describe the evolution of the damage state and, as a subsequence, the degradation of material stiffness. For calculating the nonlinear stress and strain distribution of complexly loaded

  16. Characterization of the pneumatic behavior of carbon\\/epoxy composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cho-Liang Tsai; Yun Du

    2001-01-01

    The anisotropic nature of composite materials and environmental effects always make the behavior of composite materials more complicated than that of conventional materials. Applications of composite materials, including containers, boats, aircraft and aerospace structures, etc, must take into consideration several important environmental effects like hygric and thermal effects. A composite engineer should be familiar with the hygrothermal behavior of composite

  17. Existence of anti-plane shear surface waves in anisotropic elastic half-space with depth-dependent material properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. T. Ting

    2010-01-01

    It is known that an anti-plane shear surface wave does not exist in anisotropic elastic half-space x2?0 when the material is homogeneous. For a functionally graded material for which the elastic stiffness C44, C45, C55 and the mass density ? depend on the depth x2 of the half-space, an anti-plane shear surface wave may exist. Exact solutions for four cases

  18. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product morphology and properties. The use of an in situ liquid infiltration technique and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e., solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g., volatility and thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized composite materials is discussed. Conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment to take advantage of the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport is also examined. 10 refs.

  19. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-02-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  20. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product morphology and properties. The use of an in situ liquid infiltration technique and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e., solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g., volatility and thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized composite materials is discussed. Conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment to take advantage of the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport is also examined.

  1. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  2. Anisotropically structured magnetic aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiligtag, Florian J.; Airaghi Leccardi, Marta J. I.; Erdem, Derya; Süess, Martin J.; Niederberger, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture.Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Digital photographs of dispersions and gels with different water-to-ethanol ratios; magnetic measurements of an anatase aerogel containing 0.25 mol% Fe3O4 nanoparticles; XRD patterns of the iron oxide and titania nanoparticles. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04694c

  3. Estimating Weibull parameters for composite materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. Y.

    1972-01-01

    This paper deals with the statistical analysis of strength and fracture of materials in general, with application to fiber composites. The 'weakest link' model is considered in a fairly general form, and the resulting equations are demonstrated by using a Weibull distribution for flaws. This distribution appears naturally in a variety of problems, and therefore additional attention is devoted to analysis and statistical estimation connected with this distribution. Special working charts are included to facilitate interpretation of observed data and estimation of parameters. Implications of the size effect are considered for various kinds of flaw distributions. The paper describes failure and damage in a fiber-reinforced systems.

  4. Localisation of shear fracture networks in anisotropic materials: influence of strain rate and material strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Griera, A.

    2009-04-01

    This contribution presents an experimental study of deformation localisation and the formation of fracture networks in elastoviscoplastic layered materials under pure shear boundary conditions. The mechanical properties of the analogue mixtures, which are made of plasticine, have been used to analyse the transition from models in which deformation is accommodated by homogeneous viscous flow to systems controlled by a few active faults. Two series of experiments have been studied: (a) the same material was deformed at different strain rates and (b) four materials with different mechanical properties were deformed at a fixed strain rate. The results show that strain rate and viscous ductility define a change on the degree of deformation localisation and the geometry of fracture networks. The increase of deformation also produces changes on the mechanical behaviour of the systems and the type of deformation. Localisation of fracture networks is enhanced when strain rate is increased. Moreover, there is a progressive increment in the relationship between fracture displacement and fracture length related to the strain rate applied to the system. This experimental observation is also corroborated by a series of simple finite element linear elastoviscous simulations. In these models, a horizontal inclusion within a matrix simulates a pre-existing fracture. The displacement along this fracture is tracked at all times using some selected nodes located at the two walls. The results indicate that there is a dependency of fracture displacements on the strain rate. A deviation between shear strains registered by fractures and the one applied by the boundary conditions is also detected, especially at low strain. The degree of localisation and the nucleation of shear fractures also depend strongly on the viscous ductility and strength of the analogue material. The raise of the material stiffness causes an increase of the length of fractures and displacements along them. This fact must be associated to the competition between the viscous stress relaxation of the material related to ductile flow and the brittle behaviour associated to the propagation of fractures. When the dominant process is ductile flow the material is able to relax the deviatoric stress at fault tips and the propagation of fractures is inhibited. The presented models are illustrative examples of the transition between brittle and ductile behaviour.

  5. Self-focusing and soliton formation in media with anisotropic nonlocal material response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Zozulya; D. Z. Anderson; A. V. Mamaev; M. Saffman

    1996-01-01

    We investigate self-focusing in bulk media with anisotropic nonlocal photorefractive response. Analytical results demonstrate the possibility of the existence of anisotropic soliton solutions. Self-focusing of Gaussian beams and their convergence to elliptically shaped soliton solutions is investigated theoretically and demonstrated experimentally.

  6. Some strength properties of graphite-zirconium carbide composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. S. Dergunova; A. N. Shurshakov; G. D. Posos'eva; L. N. Lutsenko

    1972-01-01

    1.Some factors influencing the strength of composite materials were examined.2.A study was made of the strength properties of graphite-zirconium carbide and graphite-zirconium carbide-zirconium composite materials having varying structures and compositions. It was found that, at 2500‡C, the tensile strength of TsG-25 type composite material is 30% higher than that of dense VPP constructional graphite.3.It was established that, by varying the

  7. Method for preparing dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.; Felten, John J.

    2004-11-23

    The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense beads of dielectric materials with selected compositions, which are incorporated into a polymeric matrix for use in capacitors, filters, and the like. A porous, generally spherical bead of hydrous metal oxide containing titanium or zirconium is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid bead having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel bead may be washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) at elevated temperature and pressure to convert the bead into a mixed hydrous titanium- or zirconium-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. Alternatively, the gel bead may be made by coprecipitation. This mixed oxide bead is then washed, dried and calcined to produce the desired (BaTiO.sub.3, PbTiO.sub.3, SrZrO.sub.3) structure. The sintered beads are incorporated into a selected polymer matrix. The resulting dielectric composite material may be electrically "poled" if desired.

  8. Piezoelectric Nanoparticle-Polymer Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, William Ray

    Herein we demonstrate that efficient piezoelectric nanoparticle-polymer composite materials can be synthesized and fabricated into complex microstructures using sugar-templating methods or optical printing techniques. Stretchable foams with excellent tunable piezoelectric properties are created by incorporating sugar grains directly into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixtures containing barium titanate (BaTiO3 -- BTO) nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by removal of the sugar after polymer curing. Porosities and elasticity are tuned by simply adjusting the sugar/polymer mass ratio and the electrical performance of the foams showed a direct relationship between porosity and the piezoelectric outputs. User defined 2D and 3D optically printed piezoelectric microstructures are also fabricated by incorporating BTO nanoparticles into photoliable polymer solutions such as polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and exposing to digital optical masks that can be dynamically altered. Mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the optically printed composite is enhanced by chemically altering the surface of the BTO nanoparticles with acrylate groups which form direct covalent linkages with the polymer matrix under light exposure. Both of these novel materials should find exciting uses in a variety of applications including energy scavenging platforms, nano- and microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS), sensors, and acoustic actuators.

  9. Eikonal equation for a general anisotropic or chiral medium: application to a negative-graded index-of-refraction lens with an anisotropic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, Claudio G.; Koltenbah, Benjamin E. C.; Greegor, Robert B.; Lam, Tai A.; Tanielian, Minas H.

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the numerical simulation of a graded refractive index (GRIN) lens with a general anisotropic medium and compare it with an equivalent nongraded positive-index-of-refraction-material (PIM) lens with an isotropic medium. To evaluate lens performance, we developed a modified eikonal equation valid for the most general form of an anisotropic or chiral medium. Our approach is more comprehensive than previous work in this area and is obtained from the dispersion relation of Maxwell's equations in the eikonal approximation. The software developed for the numerical integration of the modified eikonal equation is described. Subsequently, a full finite-difference time-dependent simulation was performed to verify the validity of the eikonal calculations. The performance of the GRIN lens is found to be improved over the equivalent PIM one. The GRIN lens is also five to ten times lighter than the equivalent PIM. A GRIN lens operating at 15 GHz is now under fabrication at Boeing, and the experimental results of this lens will be reported in a forthcoming paper.

  10. Thermophysical Analysis of High Modulus Composite Materials for Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Sung

    2009-01-01

    High modulus composite materials are used extensively in aerospace vehicles mainly for the purpose of increasing strength and reducing weight. However, thermal properties have become essential design information with the use of composite materials in the thermal design of spacecraft and spacecraft electronics packages. This is because the localized heat from closely packed devices can lead to functional failure of the aerospace system unless the heat is dissipated. In this study, thermal responses of high modulus advanced materials are considered for aerospace thermal design. The advanced composite material is composed of a continuous high modulus pitch based fiber and epoxy resin. In order to compare this advanced composite material with conventional aerospace composite materials, the thermophysical analysis of both materials was performed. The results include thermal conductivity measurements of composite materials and various thermal analytical techniques with DSC, TGA, TMA and DMA.

  11. Hybrid finite elements of anisotropic shells and their application to the study of the thermal warping behavior of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremenko, S. Iu.

    1992-12-01

    Variational equations of the mixed type and a refined version of the Timoshenko shell theory are used to construct hybrid finite elements for shallow anisotropic shells of double curvature which can be used for the analysis of plates and shells over a wide thickness range. The elements are used to investigate the effect of layer alternation on the thermal warping behavior of glass- and carbon-fiber composite laminates; the calculations are carried out on an IBM PC/AT computer. For homogeneous and layered shells, the existence of a critical curvature corresponding to the maximum warpage of the shell under heating is demonstrated.

  12. Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service

    E-print Network

    ), Fuel Cell Technologies Office, to discuss issues associated with polymer and composite materials used1 Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service MEETING PROCEEDINGS Polymer This report1 describes the results from an information-sharing meeting on the use of polymer and composite

  13. Structural Health Monitoring of Smart Composite Material by Acoustic Emission

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Structural Health Monitoring of Smart Composite Material by Acoustic Emission S. Masmoudia , A. El fabricated in E-glass fibre/epoxy with a unidirectional play laminate. The composite specimens with sensors composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health monitoring systems

  14. The production and application of metal matrix composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Kaczmar; K. Pietrzak; W. W?osi?ski

    2000-01-01

    The production methods and properties of metal matrix composite materials reinforced with dispersion particles, platelets, non-continuous (short) and continuous (long) fibres are discussed in this paper. The most widely applied methods for the production of composite materials and composite parts are based on casting techniques such as the squeeze casting of porous ceramic preforms with liquid metal alloys and powder

  15. Optimisation of a multiphase intermetallic metal metal composite material

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Optimisation of a multiphase intermetallic metal ± metal composite material J. D. Robson, N to as metal ± metal composites (MeMeCs). In these materials the strong but brittle b and b9 phases act. Duvauchelle, A. Lugan, J. Street, and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia Metal ± metal composites (MeMeCs) manufactured

  16. Thermal expansion of two-phase texturized composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. F. Kozlova; V. B. Rabkin

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies were made of the effects of temperature and composition on the thermal expansion of deformed (texturized) Mo-Cu two-phase composite materials, whose component phases differ markedly in their properties. The anisotropy of thermal expansion of such composite materials was investigated, and it was established that their volume expansion shows very little variation with deformation. It is demonstrated

  17. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Runping Shi; Chengyong Wang

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre\\/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher

  18. Anisotropic material model and wave propagation simulations for shocked pentaerythritol tetranitrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2010-05-01

    An anisotropic continuum material model was developed to describe the thermomechanical response of unreacted pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) single crystals to shock wave loading. Using this model, which incorporates nonlinear elasticity and crystal plasticity in a thermodynamically consistent tensor formulation, wave propagation simulations were performed to compare to experimental wave profiles [J. J. Dick and J. P. Ritchie, J. Appl. Phys. 76, 2726 (1994)] for PETN crystals under plate impact loading to 1.2 GPa. Our simulations show that for shock propagation along the [100] orientation where deformation across shear planes is sterically unhindered, a dislocation-based model provides a good match to the wave profile data. For shock propagation along the [110] direction, where deformation across shear planes is sterically hindered, a dislocation-based model cannot account for the observed strain-softening behavior. Instead, a shear cracking model was developed, providing good agreement with the data for [110] and [001] shock orientations. These results show that inelastic deformation due to hindered and unhindered shear in PETN occurs through mechanisms that are physically different. In addition, results for shock propagation normal to the (101) crystal plane suggest that the primary slip system identified from quasistatic indentation tests is not activated under shock wave loading. Overall, results from our continuum simulations are consistent with a previously proposed molecular mechanism for shock-induced chemical reaction in PETN in which the formation of polar conformers, due to hindered shear, facilitates the development of ionic reaction pathways.

  19. Fabrication of single-crystalline microspheres with high sphericity from anisotropic materials.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shinya; Inaba, Kazuhiro; Iida, Takuya; Ishihara, Hajime; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Ashida, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Microspheres with high sphericity exhibit unique functionalities. In particular, their high symmetry makes them excellent omnidirectional optical resonators. As such perfect micrometre-sized spheres are known to be formed by surface tension, melt cooling is a popular method for fabricating microspheres. However, it is extremely difficult to produce crystalline microspheres using this method because their surfaces are normally faceted. Only microspheres of polymers, glass, or ceramics have been available, while single-crystalline microspheres, which should be useful in optical applications, have been awaiting successful production. Here we report the fabrication of single-crystalline semiconductor microspheres that have surfaces with atomic-level smoothness. These microspheres were formed by performing laser ablation in superfluid helium to create and moderately cool a melt of the anisotropic semiconductor material. This novel method provides cooling conditions that are exceptionally suited for the fabrication of single-crystalline microspheres. This finding opens a pathway for studying the hidden mechanism of anisotropy-free crystal growth and its applications. PMID:24898213

  20. Fabrication of single-crystalline microspheres with high sphericity from anisotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Shinya; Inaba, Kazuhiro; Iida, Takuya; Ishihara, Hajime; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Ashida, Masaaki

    2014-06-01

    Microspheres with high sphericity exhibit unique functionalities. In particular, their high symmetry makes them excellent omnidirectional optical resonators. As such perfect micrometre-sized spheres are known to be formed by surface tension, melt cooling is a popular method for fabricating microspheres. However, it is extremely difficult to produce crystalline microspheres using this method because their surfaces are normally faceted. Only microspheres of polymers, glass, or ceramics have been available, while single-crystalline microspheres, which should be useful in optical applications, have been awaiting successful production. Here we report the fabrication of single-crystalline semiconductor microspheres that have surfaces with atomic-level smoothness. These microspheres were formed by performing laser ablation in superfluid helium to create and moderately cool a melt of the anisotropic semiconductor material. This novel method provides cooling conditions that are exceptionally suited for the fabrication of single-crystalline microspheres. This finding opens a pathway for studying the hidden mechanism of anisotropy-free crystal growth and its applications.

  1. Viscoelastic models for polymeric composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Harstad, E.N. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, J.C. Jr. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)]|[Wright Laboratory, Armament Directorate, Eglin AFB, Florida 32542 (United States); Maudlin, P.J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1996-05-01

    An improved model of the mechanical properties of the explosive contained in conventional munitions is needed to accurately simulate performance and accident scenarios in weapons storage facilities. A specific class of explosives can be idealized as a mixture of two components: energetic crystals randomly suspended in a polymeric matrix (binder). Strength characteristics of each component material are important in the macroscopic behavior of the composite (explosive). Of interest here is the determination of an appropriate constitutive law for a polyurethane binder material. A Taylor Cylinder impact test, and uniaxial stress tension and compression tests at various strain rates, have been performed on the polyurethane. Evident from time resolved Taylor Cylinder profiles, the material undergoes very large strains ({gt}100{percent}) and yet recovers its initial configuration. A viscoelastic constitutive law is proposed for the polyurethane and was implemented in the finite element, explicit, continuum mechanics code EPIC. The Taylor Cylinder impact experiment was simulated and the results compared with experiment. Modeling improvements are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Method for preparing polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1990-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein. The composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  3. Application of IDT Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Windmill Turbine Blades Made of Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalladega, V.; Na, J. K.; Druffner, C.

    2011-06-01

    Interdigital transducers (IDT) generate and receive ultrasonic surface waves without the complexity involved with secondary devices such as angled wedges or combs. The IDT sensors have been successfully applied for the NDE of homogeneous materials like metals in order to detect cracks and de-bond. However, these transducers have not been yet adapted for complex and anisotropic materials like fiber-reinforced composites. This work presents the possibility of using IDT sensors for monitoring structural damages in wind turbine blades, typically made of fiberglass composites. IDT sensors with a range of operating frequency between 250 kHz and 1 MHz are initially tested on representative composite test panels for ultrasonic surface wave properties including beam spread, propagation distance and effect of material's anisotropy. Based on these results, an optimum frequency range for the IDT sensor is found to be 250-500 kHz. Subsequently, IDT sensors with operating frequency 500 kHz are used to detect and quantify artificial defects created in the composite test samples. Discussions are made on the interaction of ultrasonic fields with these defects along with the effects of fiber directionality and composite layer stacking.

  4. Investigation of anisotropic photonic band gaps in three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals containing the uniaxial material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the dispersive properties of three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) composed of anisotropic dielectric (the uniaxial material) spheres immersed in homogeneous magnetized plasma background with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered. The equations for calculating the anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and two flatbands regions can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field on the dispersive properties of the 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in 3D MPPCs with fcc lattices and the complete PBGs can be found compared to the conventional 3D MPPCs doped by the isotropic material. The bandwidths of PBGs can be tuned by introducing the magnetized plasma into 3D PCs containing the uniaxial material. It is also shown that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field, respectively. The locations of flatbands regions cannot be manipulated by any parameters except for the plasma frequency and external magnetic field. Introducing the uniaxial material can obtain the complete PBGs as the 3D MPPCs with high symmetry and also provides a way to design the tunable devices.

  5. Investigation of anisotropic photonic band gaps in three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals containing the uniaxial material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China) [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China)] [China; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, the dispersive properties of three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) composed of anisotropic dielectric (the uniaxial material) spheres immersed in homogeneous magnetized plasma background with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered. The equations for calculating the anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and two flatbands regions can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field on the dispersive properties of the 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in 3D MPPCs with fcc lattices and the complete PBGs can be found compared to the conventional 3D MPPCs doped by the isotropic material. The bandwidths of PBGs can be tuned by introducing the magnetized plasma into 3D PCs containing the uniaxial material. It is also shown that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field, respectively. The locations of flatbands regions cannot be manipulated by any parameters except for the plasma frequency and external magnetic field. Introducing the uniaxial material can obtain the complete PBGs as the 3D MPPCs with high symmetry and also provides a way to design the tunable devices.

  6. Surface Waves in Anisotropic Elastic Materials for Which the Matrix N(v) is Extraordinary Degenerate, Degenerate, or Semisimple

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. T. Ting

    1997-01-01

    The 6 × 6 real matrix N(v) for anisotropic elastic materials under a two-dimensional steady-state motion with speed v is extraordinary degenerate when N(v) has three identical complex eigenvalues p but has only one associated eigenvector. It has been an open question if such an N(v) exists for surface waves. In this paper we first modify the solution for ordinary

  7. Anisotropic Thermal and Electrical Properties of Thin Thermal Interface Layers of Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Bekyarova, Elena B.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are crucial components of high density electronics and the high thermal conductivity of graphite makes this material an attractive candidate for such applications. We report an investigation of the in-plane and through-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of thin thermal interface layers of graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) based composites. The in-plane electrical conductivity exceeds its through-plane counterpart by three orders of magnitude, whereas the ratio of the thermal conductivities is about 5. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the anisotropy in the transport properties is due to the in-plane alignment of the GNPs which occurs during the formation of the thermal interface layer. Because the alignment in the thermal interface layer suppresses the through-plane component of the thermal conductivity, the anisotropy strongly degrades the performance of GNP-based composites in the geometry required for typical thermal management applications and must be taken into account in the development of GNP-based TIMs.

  8. Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1993-01-01

    Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  9. Fiber optics in composite materials: materials with nerves of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measures, Raymond M.

    1990-08-01

    A Fiber Optic BasedSmart Structure wiipossess a structurally integrated optical microsensor system for determining its state. This built-in sensor system should, in real-time, be able to: evaluate the strain or deformation of a structure, monitor if its vibrating or subject to excessive loads, check its temperature and warn of the appearance of any hot spots. In addition a Smart Structure should maintain a vigilant survelliance over its structural integrity. The successful development of Smart StructureTechnolgy could lead to: aircraft that are safer, lighter, more efficient, easier to maintain and to service; pipelines, pressure vessels and storage tanks that constantly monitor their structuralintegrity and immediately issue an alert ifany problem is detected; space platforms that check forpressure leaks, unwanted vibration, excess thermal buildup, and deviation from some preassigned shape.This technology is particularly appropriate for composite materials where internal damage generated by: impacts, manufacturing flaws, excessive loading or fatigue could be detected and assessed. In service monitoring of structural loads, especially in regions like wing roots of aircraft, could be ofconsiderable benefit in helping to avoid structural overdesign and reduce weight. Structurally imbedded optical fibers sensors might also serve to monitor the cure state of composite thermosets during their fabrication and thereby contribute to improved quality control of these products.

  10. Developing polymer composite materials: carbon nanotubes or graphene?

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuemei; Sun, Hao; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-10-01

    The formation of composite materials represents an efficient route to improve the performances of polymers and expand their application scopes. Due to the unique structure and remarkable mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical and catalytic properties, carbon nanotube and graphene have been mostly studied as a second phase to produce high performance polymer composites. Although carbon nanotube and graphene share some advantages in both structure and property, they are also different in many aspects including synthesis of composite material, control in composite structure and interaction with polymer molecule. The resulting composite materials are distinguished in property to meet different applications. This review article mainly describes the preparation, structure, property and application of the two families of composite materials with an emphasis on the difference between them. Some general and effective strategies are summarized for the development of polymer composite materials based on carbon nanotube and graphene. PMID:23813859

  11. Paper #1547 Presented at the International Congress on Ultrasonics, Vienna, April 9 -13, 2007, Session S04: Non-destructive evaluation of anisotropic materials

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Session S04: Non-destructive evaluation of anisotropic materials - 1 - Non-destructive diagnosis transducers, and a numerical system and computing and recording the projections. When performing non-destructive

  12. Tungsten-based composite materials for fusion reactor shields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Greenspan; Y. Karni

    1985-01-01

    Composite tungsten-based materials were recently proposed for the heavy constituent of compact fusion reactor shields. These composite materials will enable the incorporation of tungsten - the most efficient nonfissionable inelastic scattering (as well as good neutron absorbing and very good photon attenuating) material - in the shield in a relatively cheap way and without introducing voids (so as to enable

  13. Composite materials with metallic matrix and ceramic porous filler

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. I. Bakarinova; V. K. Portnoi

    1995-01-01

    Composite materials with a reduced density reinforced with hollow corundum particles can be of interest as damping and abrasive materials for decreasing the mass of a structure. Methods for mixing powders and their hot pressing are suggested in order to produce such composite materials without fracture of the brittle hollow particles of the filler.

  14. High-porosity powder-fiber composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Kostornov; N. E. Fedorova; L. I. Chernyshev

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility is demonstrated of substantially reducing volume changes during the sintering of high-porosity materials by the addition of fibers to a powder mixture. The mechanism of sintering of powder-fiber composites containing more than 25% of fibers is similar to the mechanism of sintering of pure fiber materials. The mechanical properties of permeable composite materials are determined by the fiber

  15. Natural frequency and damping behavior of composite materials

    E-print Network

    Duggan, Matthew Brace

    1990-01-01

    . The goal is to be able to control and predict the vibration and damping of a composite structure in the design phase. 2. REVIEW OF LITERATURE Many models of composite plates have been proposed, but the effects of the stacking sequence, material system... to gain a data base for static and dynamic response of composite components. This project focuses on the vibration and damping characterization of composites in the presence of damage. The effects of selection of material system, size, stacking...

  16. Hybrid nanocolloids with programmed three-dimensional shape and material composition.

    PubMed

    Mark, Andrew G; Gibbs, John G; Lee, Tung-Chun; Fischer, Peer

    2013-09-01

    Tuning the optical, electromagnetic and mechanical properties of a material requires simultaneous control over its composition and shape. This is particularly challenging for complex structures at the nanoscale because surface-energy minimization generally causes small structures to be highly symmetric. Here we combine low-temperature shadow deposition with nanoscale patterning to realize nanocolloids with anisotropic three-dimensional shapes, feature sizes down to 20 nm and a wide choice of materials. We demonstrate the versatility of the fabrication scheme by growing three-dimensional hybrid nanostructures that contain several functional materials with the lowest possible symmetry, and by fabricating hundreds of billions of plasmonic nanohelices, which we use as chiral metafluids with record circular dichroism and tunable chiroptical properties. PMID:23793159

  17. Elastic Coupling Effects in Tapered Sandwich Panels with Laminated Anisotropic Composite Facings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Senthil S. Vel; Vincent Caccese; Huyue Zhao

    2005-01-01

    A newly developed theory for the analysis of tapered sandwich panels with laminated anisotropic facings is presented. Unlike sandwich panels of uniform depth, the response of tapered sandwich panels is counterintuitive. For example, prior studies have demonstrated that a tapered cantilever sandwich beam having constant dimensions at the clamped edge and subjected to a tip load has an optimum taper

  18. Shape memory materials and hybrid composites for smart systems: Part II Shape-memory hybrid composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. G. Wei; R. Sandstrom; S. Miyazaki

    1998-01-01

    By hybridizing or incorporating shape-memory materials with other functional materials or structural materials, smart composites can be fabricated which may utilize the unique functions or properties of the individual bulk materials to achieve multiple responses and optimal properties, or, to tune their properties to adapt to environmental changes. A variety of shape-memory hybrid composites have been designed and manufactured, with

  19. Millimeter-wave imaging of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.; Lepper, M.J.

    1993-09-01

    This work addresses the application and evaluates the potential of mm-wave imaging in the W-band (75-110 GHz) using samples of low-loss dielectric and composite materials with artificial defects. The initial focus is on the measurement of amplitude changes in the back scattered and forward-scattered fields. The c-scan system employs a focused beam antenna to provide spatial resolution of about one wavelength. A plane-wave model is used to calculate the effective reflection (or transmission) coefficient of multilayer test sample geometry. Theoretical analysis is used to optimize the measurement frequency for higher image contrast and to interpret the experimental results. Both reflection and transmission images, based on back scattered and forward-scattered powers, were made with Plexiglas and Kevlar/epoxy samples containing artificially introduced defects such as subsurface voids and disbonds. The results clearly indicate that mm-wave imaging has high potential for non-contact interrogation of low-loss materials.

  20. A multiphase approach for modelling the shock response of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, C. T.; Schumacher, S. C.; Ruggirello, K. P.; Alexander, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    The shock response of unidirectional fiber reinforced composite materials is inherently anisotropic due to their microstructural geometric configuration. Unlike typical elastic-plastic materials, composite materials form the observed two-wave structure under longitudinal shocks due to a precursor wave travelling through the fibers ahead of a bulk wave in the resin constituent. The nature of this response presents a problem in traditional hydrocode frameworks where each cell or material point tracks only a single velocity field. This paper outlines an adaptation of the Baer and Nunziato multi-phase model in CTH where a mixture rule is used to determine the velocity field of each constituent (fiber and matrix) of the composite material. The model modifies the momentum exchange term to represent the frictional drag forces between the fiber and matrix constituents, while assuming no mass or energy exchange. The momentum drag model is dependent not only upon the pressure difference between the constituents but also the directional dependence of the shock response. Finally, the model is implemented and the sensitivity of the solution to the interaction parameters demonstrated.

  1. Possibility of obtaining monolithic composite materials based on niobium carbide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Ploshkin; I. Yu. Ul'yanina; V. P. Filonenko

    1984-01-01

    1.Specimens of composite material based on niobium carbide obtained by hydrostatic pressing had minimum porosity compared with specimens obtained by the normal powder metallurgy method.2.Basic phases of the composite material consisting of copper and niobium carbide are uniformly distributed throughout the specimen cross section and they do not react with each other under any conditions.3.The composite material obtained exhibits sufficient

  2. New Micro Structural Design Concept for Polycrystalline Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. RYBJANETS; A. V. NASEDKIN; A. V. TURIK

    2004-01-01

    A new concept of microstructural designing of polymer-free polycrystalline composite materials is offered. The concept based on controllable substitution during composite formation of separate crystallites making a polycrystal by pores, crystallites with other composition and\\/or structure or amorphous substances with preliminary FEM modeling of polycrystalline composite properties. A line of precursor small-scale production technologies and polycrystalline composites with unique and

  3. POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE-BASED SELF-HEALING COMPOSITE AND COATING MATERIALS

    E-print Network

    Braun, Paul

    POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE-BASED SELF-HEALING COMPOSITE AND COATING MATERIALS BY SOO HYOUN CHO B-healing polymers by introducing tin catalyzed polycondensation of hydroxyl end- functionalized polydimethylsiloxane

  4. ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF URANIUM REFERENCE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, B; Borg, L; Williams, R; Brennecka, G; Hutcheon, I

    2009-09-03

    Uranium isotopic compositions of a variety of U standard materials were measured at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and are reported here. Both thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and multi-collector inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) were used to determine ratios of the naturally occurring isotopes of U. Establishing an internally coherent set of isotopic values for a range of U standards is essential for inter-laboratory comparison of small differences in {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, as well as the minor isotopes of U. Differences of {approx} 1.3{per_thousand} are now being observed in {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U in natural samples, and may play an important role in understanding U geochemistry where tracing the origin of U is aided by U isotopic compositions. The {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U ratios were measured with a TRITON TIMS using a mixed {sup 233}U-{sup 236}U isotopic tracer to correct for instrument fractionation. this tracer was extremely pure and resulted in only very minor corrections on the measured {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U ratios of {approx} 0.03. The values obtained for {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U are: IRMM184 = 137.698 {+-} 0.020 (n = 15), SRM950a = 137.870 {+-} 0.018 (n = 8), and CRM112a = 137.866 {+-} 0.030 (n = 16). Uncertainties represent 2 s.d. of the population. The measured value for IRMM184 is in near-perfect agreement with the certified value of 137.697 {+-} 0.042. However, the U isotopic compositions of SRM950a and CRM112a are not certified. Minor isotopes of U were determined with a Nu Plasma HR MC-ICPMS and mass bias was corrected by sample/standard bracketing to IRMM184, using its certified {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U ratio. Thus, the isotopic compositions determined using both instruments are compatible. The values obtained for {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U are: SRM950a = (7.437 {+-} 0.043) x 10{sup -3} (n = 18), and CRM112a = (7.281 {+-} 0.050) x 10{sup -3} (n = 16), both of which are in good agreement with published values. The value for {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U in SRM950a was determined to be (8.48 {+-} 2.63) x 10{sup -6}, whereas {sup 236}U was not detected in CRM112a. They are currently obtaining the U isotopic composition of CRM129a. Preliminary results suggest that the {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U ratio is within error, but slightly lower than the certified value of 137.71.

  5. (Proceedings of the 5th Technical Conference on Composite Materials, American Society of Composites,

    E-print Network

    Nairn, John A.

    ]s. The first material system was supplied by DuPont and consisted of AvimidR K Polymer/IM6 graphite fiber(Proceedings of the 5th Technical Conference on Composite Materials, American Society of Composites, East Lansing, Michigan, June 11-14, 1990). Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Composite Microcracking

  6. Attaching Strain Gages to Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B.; Clemons, J. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III; White, W.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane adhesive bonds strain gages reliably to graphite/epoxy composites. Adhesive easy to apply, used over wide temperature range (ambient to cryogenic), and applied in short time. Tests on gages bonded to composite with adhesive demonstrated reliability of attachment.

  7. Low-frequency surface-acoustic-wave considerations for ceramic-matrix composite-material characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bashyam, M.

    1991-01-01

    Various traditional surface-acoustic-wave techniques are explored along with an innovative line-focus-beam acoustic-lens system for measurement of anisotropic characteristics of Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) materials. A systematic and unified approach to material characterization is effectuated by studying the influence of fiber fraction, anisotropy, and inhomogeneities such as porosity, micro-cracking, and delamination on the propagation characteristics and attenuation of surface acoustic waves from various CMC specimens, whose fiber fraction varied between 30 and 50%. This is corroborated by various experiments using a line-source technique in contact mode, oblique-incidence technique in immersion mode, and high-aperture spherically and cylindrically focused transducer techniques. A low-frequency acoustic-microscopy technique is developed by measuring the local perturbation of the Rayleigh surface-wave velocities for imaging small variations in the near-surface characteristics of CMC specimen. A novel approach to material characterization is demonstrated, by using the directional acoustic microscopy in the low-frequency range. This proved to be more sensitive to anisotropic measurements than the traditional high-frequency acoustic microscope.

  8. Some functional properties of composite material based on scrap tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesuma, Renate; Malers, Laimonis

    2013-09-01

    The utilization of scrap tires still obtains a remarkable importance from the aspect of unloading the environment from non-degradable waste [1]. One of the most prospective ways for scrap tires reuse is a production of composite materials [2] This research must be considered as a continuation of previous investigations [3, 4]. It is devoted to the clarification of some functional properties, which are considered important for the view of practical applications, of the composite material. Some functional properties of the material were investigated, for instance, the compressive stress at different extent of deformation of sample (till 67% of initial thickness) (LVS EN 826) [5] and the resistance to UV radiation (modified method based on LVS EN 14836) [6]. Experiments were realized on the purposefully selected samples. The results were evaluated in the correlation with potential changes of Shore C hardness (Shore scale, ISO 7619-1, ISO 868) [7, 8]. The results showed noticeable resistance of the composite material against the mechanical influence and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The correlation with the composition of the material, activity of binder, definite technological parameters, and the conditions supported during the production, were determined. It was estimated that selected properties and characteristics of the material are strongly dependent from the composition and technological parameters used in production of the composite material, and from the size of rubber crumb. Obtained results show possibility to attain desirable changes in the composite material properties by changing both the composition and technological parameters of examined material.

  9. Multifunctional Structural Materials for Monitoring and Vibration Plenary Talk: ASME 3-24 Multifunctional Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Plenary Talk: ASME 3-24 Multifunctional Composite Materials Wednesday, 1-1:30 pmMultifunctional Structural Materials for Monitoring and Vibration Damping. November 14, 2012 Abstract Multifunctional structural materials in the form

  10. Spray-assisted layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly of anisotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Souvik; Suarez Martinez, Pilar; Kavarthapu, Avanti; Lutkenhaus, Jodie

    2015-03-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly has gained tremendous interest as it allows one to incorporate a large variety of molecules with nano-scale precision and very good reproducibility. In addition to charged polymers, the technique has become extremely popular to fabricate tailor-made thin films containing anisotropic nanomaterials (e.g., graphene oxide sheets). The challenge is that a standard protocol to fabricate ``all-polyelectrolyte'' LbL films may not necessarily give rise to satisfactory film growth when applied to LbL assembly where one of the adsorbing components is an anisotropic nanomaterial. Therefore, in this contribution, we combine polymers and anisotropic nanomaterials via dip- and spray-assisted LbL assembly and investigate the effect of charge density, exfoliation, concentration etc. of the components on the growth behavior and the film quality. The end result is a conformal, pin-hole free coating on model substrates (glass, silicon, metal) over a large area.

  11. Improved Damage Resistant Composite Materials Incorporating Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Jeffrey S. N.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    Metallic shape memory alloys (SMA) such as nitinol have unique shape recovery behavior and mechanical properties associated with a material phase change that have been used in a variety of sensing and actuation applications. Recent studies have shown that integrating nitinol-SMA actuators into composite materials increases the composite material's functionality. Hybrid composites of conventional graphite/epoxy or glass/epoxy and nitinol-SMA elements can perform functions in applications where monolithic composites perform inadequately. One such application is the use of hybrid composites to function both in load bearing and armor capacities. While monolithic composites with high strength-to-weight ratios function efficiently as loadbearing structures, because of their brittle nature, impact loading can cause significant catastrophic damage. Initial composite failure modes such as delamination and matrix cracking dissipate some impact energy, but when stress exceeds the composite's ultimate strength, fiber fracture and material perforation become dominant. One of the few methods that has been developed to reduce material perforation is hybridizing polymer matrix composites with tough kevlar or high modulus polyethynylene plies. The tough fibers increase the impact resistance and the stiffer and stronger graphite fibers carry the majority of the load. Similarly, by adding nitinol-SMA elements that absorb impact energy through the stress-induced martensitic phase transformation, the composites' impact perforation resistance can be greatly enhanced. The results of drop-weight and high velocity gas-gun impact testing of various composite materials will be presented. The results demonstrate that hybridizing composites with nitinol-SMA elements significantly increases perforation resistance compared to other traditional toughening elements. Inspection of the composite specimens at various stages of perforation by optical microscope illustrates the mechanisms by which perforation is initiated. Results suggest that the out-of-plane transverse shear properties of the composite and nitinol elements have a significant effect on the perforation resistance. Applications that can utilize the hybrid composites effectively will also be presented with the experimental studies.

  12. Elastoplastic analysis of thermal cycling: layered materials with compositional gradients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. E. Giannakopoulos; S. Suresh; M. Finot; M. Olsson

    1995-01-01

    Elastopllastic analyses are presented for the cyclic thermal response in multi-layered materials which comprise layers of fixed compositions of a metal and a ceramic, and a compositionally graded interface. Analytical solutions for the characteristic temperature at which the onset of thermally induced plastic deformation occurs are derived for the layered composite. Solutions for the evolution of curvature and thermal strains,

  13. Controlled intermittent interfacial bond concept for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, T. U.; Atkins, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Concept will enhance fracture resistance of high-strength filamentary composite without degrading its tensile strength or elastic modulus. Concept provides more economical composite systems, tailored for specific applications, and composite materials with mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, fracture strain, and fracture toughness, that can be optimized.

  14. The group velocity variation of Lamb wave in fiber reinforced composite plate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang-Ho Rhee; Jeong-Ki Lee; Jung-Ju Lee

    2007-01-01

    Experimentally measured Lamb wave group velocities in composite materials with anisotropic characteristics are not the same as the theoretical group velocities which is calculated with the Lamb wave dispersion equation. This discrepancy arises from the fact that the angle between the group velocity direction and the phase velocity direction in anisotropic materials exists. Wave propagation in a composite material with

  15. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  16. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, Howard L. (San Carlos, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  17. Characterization and prediction of abrasive wear of powder composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Veinthal; P. Kulu; J. Pirso; H. Käerdi

    2009-01-01

    Composite materials produced by powder metallurgy provide a solution in many engineering applications where materials with high abrasion and erosion resistance are required. The actual wear behaviour of the material is associated with many external factors (particle size, velocity, angularity, etc.) and intrinsic material properties (hardness, toughness, Young modulus, etc.). Hardness and toughness properties of such tribomaterials are highly dependent

  18. Characterization of a High Strain Composite Material I. Maqueda

    E-print Network

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    and developed a high-strain composite material consisting of car- bon fibers embedded in a silicone matrixCharacterization of a High Strain Composite Material I. Maqueda and S. Pellegrino California) to provide elastically foldable connections. In this case the stored strain energy in the tape springs

  19. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon---carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  20. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  1. CFRP\\/titanium hybrid material for improving composite bolted joints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Kolesnikov; L. Herbeck; A. Fink

    2008-01-01

    The structural joining remains an essential challenge for the development of composite aerospace structures: every structural interconnection means a disturbance of an optimized structure resulting in an increase in overall structural weight. The lightweight potential of advanced, high-performance fiber composite materials is affected more strongly by mechanical fastening techniques than by conventional metallic materials due to the low shear and

  2. Industry technology assessment of graphite-polymide composite materials. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An assessment of the current state of the art and the future prospects for graphite polyimide composite material technology is presented. Presentations and discussions given at a minisymposium of major issues on the present and future use, availability, processing, manufacturing, and testing of graphite polyimide composite materials are summarized.

  3. Intelligent signal processing for damage detection in composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Staszewski

    2002-01-01

    Signal processing is an important element of any structural health monitoring system. The paper addresses the importance of intelligent signal processing for damage identification in composite materials. After an initial discussion as to what constitutes the overall signal processing, a number of examples of damage detection in composite materials are presented for illustration. These include: data denoising techniques, feature extraction

  4. Research on damage detection of composite materials based on RBFNN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Xiaoma; Sun Qingzhen

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic method based on hybrid algorithm RBFNN for damage identification of composite materials was proposed. By using wavelet series, the features of signals were extracted and input to hybrid algorithm RBFNN for training the network and identifying the damages. Finally, the experiment results show that this method can exactly identify the faults of composite materials.

  5. Damage detection in composite materials using frequency response methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seth S. Kessler; S. Mark Spearing; Mauro J. Atalla; Carlos E. S. Cesnik; Constantinos Soutis

    2002-01-01

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the in situ detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to graphite\\/epoxy specimens containing representative damage modes. Changes in natural frequencies

  6. The right circular polarized waves in the three-dimensional anisotropic dispersive photonic crystals consisting of the magnetized plasma and uniaxial material as the Faraday effects considered

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng, E-mail: hanlor@163.com, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China) [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China)] [China; Liu, Shao-Bin, E-mail: hanlor@163.com, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Tang, Yi-Jun [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhen, Jian-Ping [Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China)] [Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, the properties of the right circular polarized (RCP) waves in the three-dimensional (3D) dispersive photonic crystals (PCs) consisting of the magnetized plasma and uniaxial material with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, which the homogeneous anisotropic dielectric spheres (the uniaxial material) immersed in the magnetized plasma background, as the Faraday effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is parallel to the external magnetic field at any time). The equations for calculating the anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) for the RCP waves in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and a flatbands region can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, anisotropic dielectric filling factor, plasma frequency, and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the properties of first two anisotropic PBGs for the RCP waves are investigated in detail, respectively. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in fcc lattices at U and W points, and the complete PBGs for the RCP waves can be achieved compared to the conventional 3D dispersive PCs composed of the magnetized plasma and isotropic material. It is also shown that the first two anisotropic PBGs can be tuned by those parameters as mentioned above. Those PBGs can be enlarged by introducing the uniaxial material into such 3D PCs as the Faraday effects are considered.

  7. Conducting polyaniline composite: a reusable sensor material for aqueous ammonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarswati Koul; R Chandra; S. K Dhawan

    2001-01-01

    The present paper reports about polyaniline–(acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene) composite film as a sensor material for aqueous ammonia. The resistance change of the composite film on exposure to different concentrations of aqueous ammonia shows its utility as a sensor material. The composite film on exposure to 10?4 and 10?5N aqueous ammonia shows a well-defined response behaviour and this aspect has been utilized in

  8. NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle Technologies: A Composite Materials Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Cook, Steve; Effinger, Mike; Smith, Dennis; Swint, Shayne

    1999-01-01

    A materials overview of the NASA's Earth-to-Orbit Space Transportation Program is presented. The topics discussed are: Earth-to-Orbit Goals and Challenges; Space Transportation Program Structure; Generations of Reusable Launch Vehicles; Space Transportation Derived Requirements; X 34 Demonstrator; Fastrac Engine System; Airframe Systems; Propulsion Systems; Cryotank Structures; Advanced Materials, Fabrication, Manufacturing, & Assembly; Hot and Cooled Airframe Structures; Ceramic Matrix Composites; Ultra-High Temp Polymer Matrix Composites; Metal Matrix Composites; and PMC Lines Ducts and Valves.

  9. Chromatographic behavior of silica-polymer composite molecularly imprinted materials.

    PubMed

    Tóth, B; László, K; Horvai, G

    2005-12-23

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) have recently been prepared inside the pores of silica based HPLC packing materials. Detailed physical and chromatographic characterization of such a silica-MIP composite material is presented. The chromatographic peak shape obtained with the uniformly sized spherical silica-MIP composite is mainly determined by the nonlinear adsorption isotherm. Comparison of the composite with the conventional sieved and grinded bulk MIP is therefore based on the nonlinear isotherm and not on retention factors and plate numbers. PMID:16188268

  10. Modeling and simulation of manufacturing processes of advanced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo I.; Springer, George S.

    Models for autoclave curing of thermosetting matrix composites are briefly described along with models of manufacturing process models for thermoplastic matrix composites. These models can be used to obtain optimum cure cycles of composite materials. They are particularly useful since the cure cycle must be modified to account for the effect of internal heat generation at the thickness of composite laminate changes. They can be indispensable tools in finding appropriate rules for optimum cure cycles via expert systems.

  11. Advances in thermoplastic matrix composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Newaz, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Accounts are given of the development status of thermoplastic composite processing methods, as well as their current thermal and mechanical behavior and delamination properties. Attention is given to the thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers, pultrusion-process modeling, the high temperature behavior of graphite/PEEK, the thermal conductivity of composites for electronic packaging, a FEM analysis of mode I and II thermoplastic-matrix specimens, and reinforcements' resin-impregnation behavior during thermoplastic composite manufacture. Also discussed are the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/PEEK for structural applications, moisture-content mechanical property effects in PPS-matrix composites, the interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites, and thermoplastic composite delamination growth under elevated temperature cyclic loading.

  12. Environmental effects on composite materials. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    The present collection of papers, each of which has previously been abstracted in International Aerospace Abstracts, discusses the accelerated environmental testing of composites, moisture solubility and diffusion in epoxy and epoxy-glass composites, the influence of internal and external factors affecting moisture absorption in polymer composites, long-tern moisture absorption in graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminates, the effect of UV light on Kevlar 49-reinforced composites, and temperature and moisture induced deformation in composite sandwich panels. Also discussed are the orthotropic thermoelastic problem of uniform heat flow distributed by a central crack, the effect of microcracks on composite laminate thermal expansion, the stress analysis of wooden structures exposed to elevated temperatures, and the deflection of plastic beams at elevated temperatures.

  13. Finite anisotropic elasticity and material frame indifference from a nonequilibrium thermodynamics perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Hütter; Theo A. Tervoort

    2008-01-01

    A closed set of Eulerian evolution equations for nonisothermal finite isotropic and anisotropic elastic behavior is derived using nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In particular, it is shown that to describe the state of elastic deformation, the deformation gradient F is preferred as internal variable to the more well-known left and right Cauchy-Green strain tensors. With the energy and entropy functions being frame

  14. Recent progress of smart composite material in HIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Yu, Kai; Liu, Yanju

    2009-12-01

    Recent progresses of smart composite material in our ongoing research are presented in this paper. In recent years, shape memory polymers (SMPs) and electroactive polymers (EAPs) attract more and more attention in the world. In our researching work, different kinds of reinforcement are embedded into SMPs and EAPs to form smart composite materials, aiming to improve the properties or strengthen the materials. Based on the unique properties of SMP based smart composite materials, primary application in the deployable morphing wing are also studied, which provide meaningful guidance for further researching works in this area.

  15. Recent progress of smart composite material in HIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Yu, Kai; Liu, Yanju

    2010-03-01

    Recent progresses of smart composite material in our ongoing research are presented in this paper. In recent years, shape memory polymers (SMPs) and electroactive polymers (EAPs) attract more and more attention in the world. In our researching work, different kinds of reinforcement are embedded into SMPs and EAPs to form smart composite materials, aiming to improve the properties or strengthen the materials. Based on the unique properties of SMP based smart composite materials, primary application in the deployable morphing wing are also studied, which provide meaningful guidance for further researching works in this area.

  16. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Judithann Ruth (Columbia, MD)

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures thereof. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  17. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K. (editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  18. Predictive rendering of composite materials: a multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T.; Callet, P.; da Graça, F.; Paljic, A.; Porral, P.; Hoarau, R.

    2015-03-01

    Predictive rendering of material appearance means going deep into the understanding of the physical interaction between light and matter and how these interactions are perceived by the human brain. In this paper we describe our approach to predict the appearance of composite materials by relying on the multi-scale nature of the involved phenomena. Using recent works on physical modeling of complex materials, we show how to predict the aspect of a composite material based on its composition and its morphology. Specifically, we focus on the materials whose morphological structures are defined at several embedded scales. We rely on the assumption that when the inclusions in a composite material are smaller than the considered wavelength, the optical constants of the corresponding effective media can be computed by a homogenization process (or analytically for special cases) to be used into the Fresnel formulas.

  19. Wear resistance of composite materials. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wear resistance of composite materials. References discuss polymer, ceramic and metal composites. Tribological testing and failure analyses are included. (Contains a minimum of 200 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  1. SOFC ANODE MATERIALS Most common SOFC anode materials are Ni-YSZ composites

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    MATERIALS SOFC ANODE MATERIALS OVERVIEW Most common SOFC anode materials are Ni-YSZ composites for the anode of a reversible SOFC · Develop a novel sol-gel process for synthesis of SYT · Use the novel sol for use in reversible SOFC anodes · Manufacture composite SYT anodes (with LDC, LSGMC) and test them

  2. Functional ceria–salt-composite materials for advanced ITSOFC applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bin Zhu

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports our current material research and development for advanced intermediate temperature (IT, 400–700°C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The materials reported in this work are based on ceria–salt-composites, which have super function, e.g. displaying ionic conductivity of 0.01–1Scm?1 in the IT region. They are functional ceramic materials for advanced ITSOFC applications. When these new composites are used as

  3. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ival O. Salyer; Charles W. Griffen

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal\\/g; the composition is useful in making molded and\\/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall

  4. Automobile leaf springs from composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. A. Al-Qureshi

    2001-01-01

    The automobile industry has shown increased interest in the replacement of steel springs with fiberglass reinforced composite leaf springs. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present a general study on the analysis, design and fabrication of composite springs. From this viewpoint, the suspension spring of a compact car, “a jeep” was selected as a prototype.A single leaf, variable

  5. ADVANCEMENTS IN ENGINEERED COMPOSITE SANDWICH CORE MATERIALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric J. Lang

    Results are presented for product and design innova tions involving TYCOR ® fiber-reinforced- foam (FRF) core technology for composite sandwich construction. Low-cost FRF core-preforms used with infusion molding processes provide light, stiff composite sandwich panels and structures. Product design innovations were tested that provide more balanced primary (\\

  6. Effect of the porosity on the fracture surface roughness of sintered materials: from anisotropic to isotropic self-affine scaling.

    PubMed

    Cambonie, T; Bares, J; Hattali, M L; Bonamy, D; Lazarus, V; Auradou, H

    2015-01-01

    To unravel how the microstructure affects the fracture surface roughness in heterogeneous brittle solids like rocks or ceramics, we characterized the roughness statistics of postmortem fracture surfaces in homemade materials of adjustable microstructure length scale and porosity, obtained by sintering monodisperse polystyrene beads. Beyond the characteristic size of disorder, the roughness profiles are found to exhibit self-affine scaling features evolving with porosity. Starting from a null value and increasing the porosity, we quantitatively modify the self-affine scaling properties from anisotropic (at low porosity) to isotropic (for porosity >10%). PMID:25679627

  7. The Materials Chemistry of Atomic Oxygen with Applications to Anisotropic Etching of Submicron Structures in Microelectronics and the Surface Chemistry Engineering of Porous Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, S.L.; Leger, L.J.; Wu, C.; Cross, J.B.; Jurgensen, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); [Bell Telephone Labs., Inc., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Neutral atomic oxygen is the most abundant component of the ionospheric plasma in the low Earth orbit environment (LEO; 200 to 700 kilometers altitude) and can produce significant degradation of some spacecraft materials. In order to produce a more complete understanding of the materials chemistry of atomic oxygen, the chemistry and physics of O-atom interactions with materials were determined in three radically different environments: (1) The Space Shuttle cargo bay in low Earth orbit (the EOIM-3 space flight experiment), (2) a high-velocity neutral atom beam system (HVAB) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and (3) a microwave-plasma flowing-discharge system at JSC. The Space Shuttle and the high velocity atom beam systems produce atom-surface collision energies ranging from 0.1 to 7 eV (hyperthermal atoms) under high-vacuum conditions, while the flowing discharge system produces a 0.065 eV surface collision energy at a total pressure of 2 Torr. Data obtained in the three different O-atom environments referred to above show that the rate of O-atom reaction with polymeric materials is strongly dependent on atom kinetic energy, obeying a reactive scattering law which suggests that atom kinetic energy is directly available for overcoming activation barriers in the reaction. General relationships between polymer reactivity with O atoms and polymer composition and molecular structure have been determined. In addition, vacuum ultraviolet photochemical effects have been shown to dominate the reaction of O atoms with fluorocarbon polymers. Finally, studies of the materials chemistry of O atoms have produced results which may be of interest to technologists outside the aerospace industry. Atomic oxygen `spin-off` or `dual use` technologies in the areas of anisotropic etching in microelectronic materials and device processing, as well as surface chemistry engineering of porous solid materials are described.

  8. Modeling of self-healing composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Dementsov

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis modeling approaches have been considered to describe healing process in self-healing materials. These materials can partially restore their mechanical properties as microcracks develop inside the material. The interest in modeling of self-healing materials comes from recent experiments [1] that show possible perspective applications in many fields of industry. Following the idea of bio-materials that can heal its

  9. Nondestructive inspection and evaluation of composite-material flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Reifsnider, K.L.; Boyd, D.M.; Kulkarni, S.V.

    1982-02-24

    It has been demonstrated that flywheels made from composite materials are capable of storing energy with a significantly higher energy density than those made from conventional metals. Since composite materials are also very durable and inherently safer for such applications, it would appear that they will play a major role in flywheel energy-storage systems. This report addresses the question of how flywheels made from composite materials can be inspected with nondestructive test methods to establish their initial quality and their subsequent integrity during service. A variety of methods is discussed in the context of special requirements for the examination of composite flywheel structures and the results of several example nondestructive evaluations before and after spin testing are presented. Recommendations for general nondestructive testing and evaluation of composite-material flywheels are made.

  10. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  11. Extremely anisotropic boundary conditions and their optical applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Alù; Nader Engheta

    2010-01-01

    We discuss here the design of artificial nanoparticles, surfaces and composite materials that may realize extremely anisotropic boundary conditions, with values not easily attainable in natural optical materials. We apply the closed-form analytical solution available in the case of an individual nanosphere composed of two conjoined hemispheres with opposite permittivity in order to show that it may be possible to

  12. Nano composite phase change materials microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qingwen

    MicroPCMs with nano composite structures (NC-MicroPCMs) have been systematically studied. NC-MicroPCMs were fabricated by the in situ polymerization and addition of silver NPs into core-shell structures. A full factorial experiment was designed, including three factors of core/shell, molar ratio of formaldehyde/melamine and NPs addition. 12 MicroPCMs samples were prepared. The encapsulated efficiency is approximately 80% to 90%. The structural/morphological features of the NC-MicroPCMs were evaluated. The size was in a range of 3.4 mu m to 4.0 mu m. The coarse appearance is attributed to NPs and NPs are distributed on the surface, within the shell and core. The NC-MicroPCMs contain new chemical components and molecular groups, due to the formation of chemical bonds after the pretreatment of NPs. Extra X-ray diffraction peaks of silver were found indicating silver nano-particles were formed into an integral structure with the core/shell structure by means of chemical bonds and physical linkages. Extra functionalities were found, including: (1) enhancement of IR radiation properties; (2) depression of super-cooling, and (3) increase of thermal stabilities. The effects of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy) arising from the silver nano-particles were observed. The Raman scattering intensity was magnified more than 100 times. These effects were also exhibited in macroscopic level in the fabric coatings as enhanced IR radiation properties were detected by the "Fabric Infrared Radiation Management Tester" (FRMT). "Degree of Crystallinity" (DOC) was measured and found the three factors have a strong influence on it. DOC is closely related to thermal stability and MicroPCMs with a higher DOC show better temperature resistance. The thermal regulating effects of the MicroPCMs coatings were studied. A "plateau regions" was detected around the temperature of phase change, showing the function of PCMs. Addition of silver nano-particles to the MicroPCMs has a positive influence on it. NC-MicroPCMs with introducing silver nano particles into the MicroPCMs structure, have shown excellent multifunctional thermal properties and thermal stabilities that are far beyond those of the conventional MicroPCMs. The novel NC-MicroPCMs can be used to develop advanced smart materials and products with prosperous and promising applications in a number of industries.

  13. Investigation of transmitted, reflected, and absorbed powers of periodic and aperiodic multilayered structures composed of bi-anisotropic metamaterial slab and conventional material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasar, Ugur Cem; Barroso, Joaquim José; Kaya, Yunus; Karacali, Tehvit; Ertugrul, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate transmitted, reflected, and absorbed powers in forward and backward directions of periodic and aperiodic multilayered structures composed of bi-anisotropic metamaterial (MM) slab and conventional material. Aperiodic multilayered structure is realized by a change in thickness of any bi-anisotropic MM slab or of any conventional material. From this analysis, we note the following key results. First, identical (non-identical) forward and backward transmitted (reflected and absorbed) powers are observed for the analyzed periodic and aperiodic multilayered structures due to reciprocity (reflection-asymmetry) of bi-anisotropic MM slabs. Second, thickness-resonance phenomenon of conventional materials produces some peaks in the transmitted powers of periodic multilayered structures aside from the resonance frequency region of bi-anisotropic MM slabs. Third, each thickness-resonance frequency splits into many frequencies upon increasing the number of sections of periodic multilayered structures (no splitting when number of periods is one). Fourth, while the effect of changing the thickness of any bi-anisotropic MM slab within the aperiodic multilayered structure has no considerable effect around the resonance region of bi-anisotropic MM slabs (resonance of resonating structures such as MM slabs does not change with thickness), the same change in thickness of the conventional material drastically alters forward/backward reflected and absorbed powers aside from the resonance region of bi-anisotropic MM slabs (thickness-resonance totally depends on the value of thickness of conventional materials). The outcomes presented here can be particularly useful for propagation-related applications requiring cascade connection of various MM slabs.

  14. Characterization and performance of a self-healing composite material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Richard Kessler

    2002-01-01

    The development of a self-healing polymer-matrix composite material that possesses the ability to heal cracks autonomically is described. The system uses a monomer repair agent, dicyclopentadiene (DCPD), which is stored in an epoxy matrix by dispersing microcapsules containing the liquid repair agent throughout the matrix. When the material is damaged, cracks propagate through the material and break open the microcapsules,

  15. Networks of channels for self-healing composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bejan; S. Lorente; K.-M. Wang

    2006-01-01

    This is a fundamental study of how to vascularize a self-healing composite material so that healing fluid reaches all the crack sites that may occur randomly through the material. The network of channels is built into the material and is filled with pressurized healing fluid. When a crack forms, the pressure drops at the crack site and fluid flows from

  16. Preparation and properties of multifunctional nylon 6 composite material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lai Chiu-Chun; Jen Chyi-Wen; Chang Yuh-Shyang; Huang Kuo-Shien

    2011-01-01

    We considered polyamide 6 as a base material for a composite and added improved tourmaline and carbon fiber to manufacture a material that could release negative ions and resist electromagnetic waves. Through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analyses, we verified that the improved tourmaline could disperse homogeneously in the base material, whose thermal properties improved as the content of

  17. Mechanical performance of woodfibre–waste plastic composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krishnan Jayaraman; Debes Bhattacharyya

    2004-01-01

    Plastic products used for packaging are often discarded after a single use resulting in an inexhaustible supply of waste polymeric materials. The stiffness and strength of polymeric materials have been known to improve with the addition of lignocellulosic fibres available in abundance in nature. Hence, composite materials containing natural fibres and waste plastics would result in the reduction of solid

  18. Genetic optimization of two-material composite laminates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent Grosset; Satchi Venkataraman; Raphael T. Haftka

    This paper describes the optimization of a composite laminate made from two materials. The use of two materials in the laminates design can offer improved designs, as it is possible to combine the desirable properties of the two materials. In this paper, we consider the use of graphite-epox y, which has high stiffness properties, but is expensive, and glass-epoxy, which

  19. Solid freeform fabrication of highly loaded composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvignier, Chad William

    Composites are known for their unique blend of modulus, strength, and toughness. This study focuses on two types of composites; organic-inorganic hybrids and the mineralization of highly swollen polymer gels. Both of these composite systems mimic the biological process of composite formation, known as biomineralization. Biomineralization allows for the control of the precipitating phase through an interaction with the organic matrix. This allows higher volume fractions of inorganic material than can be achieved by many traditional processing techniques. Solid freeform fabrication is a processing method that builds materials by the sequential addition of thin layers. As long as the material can easily be converted from a liquid to a solid, it should be amenable for this processing technique. Freeform fabrication has three distinctions from traditional processing techniques that may enable the formation of composite materials with improved mechanical properties. These are the sequential addition of layers, which allows a layer by layer influence of chemistry, the ability to form complex geometries, and finally, extrusion freeform fabrication has been shown to align fibers due to the extrusion of the slurry through a needle. Cracking and shrinkage still play a major role in forming solid parts. The use of an open mesh structure in combination with proper materials selection allowed the formation of highly loaded composite materials without cracking. The modulus values of these materials ranged from 0.1 GPa to 6.0 GPa. The mechanical properties of these materials were modeled.

  20. Composite material application for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heubner, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on improving engine thrust-to-weight ratios to provide improved payload capabilities, weight reductions achievable by the use of composites have become attractive. Of primary significance is the weight reduction offered by composites, although high temperature properties and cost reduction were also considered. The potential for application of composites to components of Earth-to-orbit hydrocarbon engines and orbit-to-orbit LOX/H2 engines was assessed. The components most likely to benefit from the application of composites were identified, as were the critical technology areas where developed would be required. Recommendations were made and a program outlined for the design, fabrication, and demonstration of specific engine components.

  1. Composite materials with integrated embedded sensing networks

    E-print Network

    Schaaf, Kristin Leigh

    2008-01-01

    Beam Interlaminar Shear Strength of G-10CR Glass-Cloth/Epoxyshort-beam shear strength. Glass/epoxy composite materialsepoxy adhesive at ambient laboratory conditions. Property Tensile strength Shear strength

  2. Microthermodynamics analysis of the shape memory effect in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.G.; Lagoudas, D.C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The shape memory effect and pseudoelasticity due to phase transformation in shape memory alloy (SMA) composites is modeled using a two part procedure. First, phenomenological constitutive equations are proposed for the monolithic polycrystalline SMA material. The equations are of the generalized standard material type, in which the response is given by a convex free energy function and a dissipation potential. Second, a micromechanics analysis of a SMA composite material is performed to derive its free energy, transformation strain rate, and Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Specific results are given for a Nitinol SMA fiber/elastomer matrix composite.

  3. Preparation of composite materials in space. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.

    1973-01-01

    A study to define promising materials, significant processing criteria, and the related processing techniques and apparatus for the preparation of composite materials in space was conducted. The study also established a program for zero gravity experiments and the required developmental efforts. The following composite types were considered: (1) metal-base fiber and particle composites, including cemented compacts, (2) controlled density metals, comprising plain and reinforced metal foams, and (3) unidirectionally solidified eutectic alloys. A program of suborbital and orbital experiments for the 1972 to 1978 time period was established to identify materials, processes, and required experiment equipment.

  4. Advanced composites: Fabrication processes for selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note is based on present state of the art for epoxy and polyimide matrix composite fabrication technology. Boron/epoxy and polyimide and graphite/epoxy and polyimide structural parts can be successfully fabricated. Fabrication cycles for polyimide matrix composites have been shortened to near epoxy cycle times. Nondestructive testing has proven useful in detecting defects and anomalies in composite structure elements. Fabrication methods and tooling materials are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of different tooling materials. Types of honeycomb core, material costs and fabrication methods are shown in table form for comparison. Fabrication limits based on tooling size, pressure capabilities and various machining operations are also discussed.

  5. Comparison of self repair in various composite matrix materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    In a comparison of self repair in graphite composites (for airplane applications) versus epoxy and vinyl ester composites (for building structures or walls) 1 the type of damage that the fiber/matrix is prone to experience is a prime factor in determining which materials self repair well and 2 the flow of energy during damage determines what kinds of damage that can be self repaired well. 1) In brittle composites, repair was successful throughout the composite due to matrix cracking which allowed for optimum chemical flow, whereas in toughened composites that did not crack, the repair chemical flows into a few layers of the composite. 2) If the damage energy is stopped by the composite and goes laterally, it causes delamination which will be repaired; however if the damage energy goes through the composite as with a puncture, then there will be limited delamination, less chemical release and less self repair.

  6. Friction Composites: Traditions and New Solutions (Review). Part 2. Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Viktor M. Kryachek

    2005-01-01

    Success in research, production and testing of composite materials is considered. Fields of their practical application are discussed. New methods for forming friction components and coatings on them are analyzed. It is shown that the main research in the field of friction materials is concentrated on composites with metal, ceramic, and carbon matrices.

  7. Composite materials for thermal energy storage: enhancing performance through microstructures.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-05-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. PMID:24591286

  8. Health, safety and environmental requirements for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazer, Kathleen A.

    1994-01-01

    The health, safety and environmental requirements for the production of composite materials are discussed. The areas covered include: (1) chemical identification for each chemical; (2) toxicology; (3) industrial hygiene; (4) fire and safety; (5) environmental aspects; and (6) medical concerns.

  9. Composite materials with self-contained wireless sensing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Kristin; Kim, Robert; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2010-04-01

    The increasing demand for in-service structural health monitoring, particularly in the aircraft industry, has stimulated efforts to integrate self sensing capabilities into materials and structures. This work presents efforts to develop structural composite materials which include networks of sensors with decision-making capabilities that extend the functionality of the composite materials to be information-aware. Composite panels are outfitted with networks of self-contained wireless sensor modules which can detect damage in composite materials via active nondestructive testing techniques. The wireless sensor modules will communicate with one another and with a central processing unit to convey the sensor data while also maintaining robustness and the ability to self-reconfigure in the event that a module fails. Ultimately, this research seeks to create an idealized network that is compact in size, cost efficient, and optimized for low power consumption while providing a sufficient data transfer rate to a local host.

  10. Damage detection in composite materials by FBGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, Jose M.; Munoz, Pedro; Pintado, J. M.; Guemes, Alfredo

    2004-06-01

    Embedded fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are sensitive to changes of near strain fields in a composite host monolithic structure, typical of aircraft airframes. FBGs have been embedded in different configurations (a typical position is the skin -- stiffener interface in a monolithic structure) for detecting events associated to damage occurrence. Thus, it is possible to think in FBGs not only as strain sensors, in a classical load monitoring configuration, but as a part of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system in composite structures dimensioned following damage tolerance criteria.

  11. Thermal expansion behaviour of thermoplastic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, J.A.; Simms, I.J.; Farrow, G.J.; Jackson, D.; Wostenholm, G. (Imperial Chemical Industries, PLC, Materials Research Centre, Wilton (England) Salford Univ. (England))

    1990-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of a number of commercially available and experimental continuous fiber-reinforced PEEK composites is assessed. The thermal expansion characteristics of Hercules AS4 reinforced PEEK (APC-2/AS4, ICI Fiberite) are reported in some detail, and it is shown that behavior is both reasonable and predictable. Further, it is found that repeated thermal cycling between -160 C and +120 C has no effect on the behavior of unidirectional laminates, and that the inherent characteristics of the composite are likely to promote such insensitivity. 16 refs.

  12. Review of low-velocity impact properties of composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. O. W. Richardson; M. J. Wisheart

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of low-velocity impact responses of composite materials. First the term ‘low-velocity impact’ is defined and major impact-induced damage modes are described from onset of damage through to final failure. Then, the effects of the composite's constituents on impact properties are discussed and post-impact performance is assessed in terms of residual strength.

  13. Polymer?Nanoparticle Composites: Preparative Methods and Electronically Active Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. K. Sudeep; Todd Emrick

    2007-01-01

    The field of nanoparticle?polymer composites is attractive from the standpoint of integrating the key features of both polymers and nanoparticles into hybrid or composite materials. Nanocomposites geared towards electronic and photophysical targets comprise an intriguing subset of the field, and benefit from interdisciplinary efforts in nanoparticle and polymer synthesis, along with methodology that provides the dispersion, orientation, and\\/or the assembly

  14. Damage detection in composite materials using identification techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. Soeiro; P. Hajela

    1993-01-01

    The present paper describes an approach for damage detection in composite structures that has its basis in methods of system identification. Response of a damaged structure differs from predictions obtained from a mathematical model of the original structure, where such a model is typically a finite-element representation of the structure. In the present work, which deals with composite materials, two

  15. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

  16. Tribological Properties of Composite Materials Based on Refractory Titanium Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Evtushok; O. N. Grigor'ev; A. D. Kostenko; G. L. Zhunkovskii; V. A. Kotenko; P. V. Mazur

    2005-01-01

    The tribological properties have been examined for composite materials based on binary titanium-chromium boride and titanium nitride under conditions of dry friction over a wide speed range (1–25 m\\/sec). The materials have good tribological properties, which exceed by almost an order of magnitude those of known materials. Specifications are formulated for materials promising for high-speed friction units. A necessary condition

  17. Resistance fail strain gage technology as applied to composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Existing strain gage technologies as applied to orthotropic composite materials are reviewed. The bonding procedures, transverse sensitivity effects, errors due to gage misalignment, and temperature compensation methods are addressed. Numerical examples are included where appropriate. It is shown that the orthotropic behavior of composites can result in experimental error which would not be expected based on practical experience with isotropic materials. In certain cases, the transverse sensitivity of strain gages and/or slight gage misalignment can result in strain measurement errors.

  18. Corrosion of composite materials subjected to periodic wetting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. H. Maksymovych; O. V. Filipovs'kyi; V. S. Baranets'kyi; S. M. Kudlak

    1996-01-01

    To demonstrate the danger of corrosion processes induced in composite materials by periodic wetting in corrosive media, we\\u000a develop a special software-controlled compact installation for accelerated corrosion tests. By using this installation, we\\u000a study the corrosion resistance of composite materials based on M40 aluminum alloy and reinforced with boron fibers. It is\\u000a determined both by the state of the surface

  19. Structural stability of reinforced nickel-base composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. N. Frantsevich; D. M. Karpinos; V. A. Bespyatyi

    1969-01-01

    1.Stress-rupture tests were carried out on reinforced specimens of composite materials consisting of an alloyed matrix and tungsten or molybdenum fibers at temperatures of 900 and 950°C.2.A technique is proposed for studying the character of rupture of composite materials, consisting in dissolving the specimen matrix after testing and grading the fiber fragments by length. The most frequently encountered fiber-fragment length

  20. Introduction to Composite Materials for Engineers and Technicians

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stuart, William Joseph

    This learning module will help instructors explain composite materials specifically for engineers and technicians. Students will learn the structure and advantages of composite materials as well as the basic processing procedures involved in their creation. It will serve as a one-lecture introduction and would be appropriate for students at the high school or college level. This document will serve as a framework for instructors and may be downloaded in PDF format.

  1. Composite Materials for Radiation Shielding During Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Watts, J.; Adams, J. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Minimizing radiation exposure from the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment during deep space missions is essential to human health and sensitive instrument survivability. Given the fabrication constraints of space transportation vehicles protective shielding is, consequently, a complicated materials issue. These concerns are presented and considered in view of some novel composite materials being developed/suggested for GCR shielding applications. Advantages and disadvantages of the composites will be discussed as well as the need for coordinated testing/evaluation and modeling efforts.

  2. An analysis of delamination in composite material notched tensile beams

    E-print Network

    Tangirala, Prema Kumar

    1991-01-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF DELAMINATION IN COMPOSITE MATERIAL NOTCHED TENSILE BEAMS A Thesis by PREMA KUMAR TANGIRALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN ANALYSIS OF DELAMINATION IN COMPOSITE MATERIAL NOTCHED TENSILE BEAMS A Thesis by PREMA KUMAR TANGIRALA Approved as to style and content by: H A. Hogan (Chair of Committee...

  3. Theories of failure of filament wound-case composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.

    1986-07-01

    The appropriate failure criterion for composite materials is perhaps one of the most contentious issues in the field. A critical review of the main theories is presented. It is suggested that the tensor polynominal theory, with a modification for normal stress interaction, be adopted. The failure envelopes for the composite materials being studied for the construction of the casing of the solid rocket booster motor of the US Space Shuttle are obtained using this theory. 14 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  4. New composite thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Dresselhaus; G. Chen; Z. F. Ren; G. Dresselhaus; A. Henry; J.-P. Fleurial

    2009-01-01

    The concept of using nanostructured composite materials to enhance the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit ZT relative\\u000a to that for their counterpart homogeneous alloyed bulk crystalline materials of similar chemical composition is presented\\u000a in general terms. Specific applications are made to the Si-Ge and Bi2-?xSbxTe3 systems for use in high-temperature power generation and cooling applications. The scientific advantages of the

  5. DAMAGE DETECTION IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS USING FREQUENCY RESPONSE METHODS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seth S. Kessler; S. Mark Spearing; Mauro J. Atalla; Carlos E. S. Cesnik; Constantinos Soutis

    2001-01-01

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the in-situ detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to graphite\\/epox y specimens containing representative damage modes. Changes in natural frequencies

  6. Damage detection in composite materials using Lamb wave methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seth S. Kessler; S. Mark Spearing; Constantinos Soutis

    2002-01-01

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for in situ damage detection of composite materials. Experimental results are presented for the application of Lamb wave techniques to quasi-isotropic graphite\\/epoxy test specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and

  7. Statistical analysis and interpolation of compositional data in materials science.

    PubMed

    Pesenson, Misha Z; Suram, Santosh K; Gregoire, John M

    2015-02-01

    Compositional data are ubiquitous in chemistry and materials science: analysis of elements in multicomponent systems, combinatorial problems, etc., lead to data that are non-negative and sum to a constant (for example, atomic concentrations). The constant sum constraint restricts the sampling space to a simplex instead of the usual Euclidean space. Since statistical measures such as mean and standard deviation are defined for the Euclidean space, traditional correlation studies, multivariate analysis, and hypothesis testing may lead to erroneous dependencies and incorrect inferences when applied to compositional data. Furthermore, composition measurements that are used for data analytics may not include all of the elements contained in the material; that is, the measurements may be subcompositions of a higher-dimensional parent composition. Physically meaningful statistical analysis must yield results that are invariant under the number of composition elements, requiring the application of specialized statistical tools. We present specifics and subtleties of compositional data processing through discussion of illustrative examples. We introduce basic concepts, terminology, and methods required for the analysis of compositional data and utilize them for the spatial interpolation of composition in a sputtered thin film. The results demonstrate the importance of this mathematical framework for compositional data analysis (CDA) in the fields of materials science and chemistry. PMID:25547365

  8. DISLOCATION MECHANICS ASPECTS OF ENERGETIC MATERIAL COMPOSITES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Armstrong

    The dislocation mechanics based properties of solid energetic materials, particularly, of high explosives, are of particular interest in connection with issues of intrinsic chemical stability and with their fast chemical decomposition when employed as propellants or in explosive formulations. The ballistic impact and shock-associated plasticity responses of such materials present great experimental and model challenges for establishment of predictable performances.

  9. A self-healing thermosetting composite material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Hayes; F. R. Jones; K. Marshiya; W. Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Strategies for the repair or replacement of thermosetting composite components are essential for their safe operation in many applications. To achieve this, complex repair strategies are often employed, requiring gross manual intervention. This is appropriate for extensive damage, but for minor damage can prove inefficient and not worthwhile given the damage that the repair process often inflicts on the structure.

  10. http://jtc.sagepub.com Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA ABSTRACT: Wood flour (WF) and talc-filled polylactic acid (PLA biodegradable synthetic polymers are aliphatic polyesters such as polylactic acid (PLA), polyglycolic acids (PGA/Talc-filled Polylactic Acid Composites: Effect of Filler Content and Coupling Treatment SUN-YOUNG LEE,1, * IN-AEH KANG,1

  11. Advanced AE Techniques in Composite Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been successfully used to evaluate damage mechanisms in laboratory testing of composite coupons. An example is presented in which the initiation of transverse matrix cracking was monitored. In these tests, broad band, high fidelity acoustic sensors were used to detect signals which were then digitized and stored for analysis. Analysis techniques were based on plate mode wave propagation characteristics. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. This technique also allows much more precise source location than conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. To apply Modal AE concepts to the interpretation of AE on larger composite specimens or structures, the effects of modal wave propagation over larger distances and through structural complexities must be well characterized and understood. To demonstrate these effects, measurements of the far field, peak amplitude attenuation of the extensional and flexural plate mode components of broad band simulated AE signals in large composite panels are discussed. These measurements demonstrated that the flexural mode attenuation is dominated by dispersion effects. Thus, it is significantly affected by the thickness of the composite plate. Furthermore, the flexural mode attenuation can be significantly larger than that of the extensional mode even though its peak amplitude consists of much lower frequency components.

  12. Damage detection in composite materials by FBGs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose M. Menendez; Pedro Munoz; J. M. Pintado; Alfredo Guemes

    2004-01-01

    Embedded fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are sensitive to changes of near strain fields in a composite host monolithic structure, typical of aircraft airframes. FBGs have been embedded in different configurations (a typical position is the skin -- stiffener interface in a monolithic structure) for detecting events associated to damage occurrence. Thus, it is possible to think in FBGs not only

  13. Delamination durability of composite materials for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Delamination is the most commonly observed failure mode in composite rotorcraft dynamic components. Although delamination may not cause immediate failure of the composite part, it often precipitates component repair or replacement, which inhibits fleet readiness, and results in increased life cycle costs. A fracture mechanics approach for analyzing, characterizing, and designing against delamination will be outlined. Examples of delamination problems will be illustrated where the strain energy release rate associated with delamination growth was found to be a useful generic parameter, independent of thickness, layup, and delamination source, for characterizing delamination failure. Several analysis techniques for calculating strain energy release rates for delamination from a variety of sources will be outlined. Current efforts to develop ASTM standard test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness and developing delamination failure criteria will be reviewed. A technique for quantifying delamination durability due to cyclic loading will be presented. The use of this technique for predicting fatigue life of composite laminates and developing a fatigue design philosophy for composite structural components will be reviewed.

  14. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J. (Richland, WA); Antoniak, Zen I. (Richland, WA); Prater, John T. (Chapel Hill, NC); DeSteese, John G. (Kennewick, WA)

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  15. The composite materials handbook (MIL handbook 17). Volume 2: Materials properties

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    The Composite Materials Handbook (MIL Handbook 17) is THE source for data and usage guidelines for current and emerging polymer matrix composite materials. It provides you with the tools you will need to design and fabricate end items from polymer matrix composite materials and offers guidelines for how these data should be generated and used. The Handbook is a comprehensive guide of composites technology and engineering, an area that is advancing and changing rapidly. Data obtained and selected according to Volume 1 are published in Volume 2.

  16. Soft network composite materials with deterministic and bio-inspired designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kyung-In; Chung, Ha Uk; Xu, Sheng; Lee, Chi Hwan; Luan, Haiwen; Jeong, Jaewoong; Cheng, Huanyu; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Jung Woo; Kim, Jeonghyun; Cho, Moongee; Miao, Fuxing; Yang, Yiyuan; Jung, Han Na; Flavin, Matthew; Liu, Howard; Kong, Gil Woo; Yu, Ki Jun; Rhee, Sang Il; Chung, Jeahoon; Kim, Byunggik; Kwak, Jean Won; Yun, Myoung Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Song, Young Min; Paik, Ungyu; Zhang, Yihui; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2015-03-01

    Hard and soft structural composites found in biology provide inspiration for the design of advanced synthetic materials. Many examples of bio-inspired hard materials can be found in the literature; far less attention has been devoted to soft systems. Here we introduce deterministic routes to low-modulus thin film materials with stress/strain responses that can be tailored precisely to match the non-linear properties of biological tissues, with application opportunities that range from soft biomedical devices to constructs for tissue engineering. The approach combines a low-modulus matrix with an open, stretchable network as a structural reinforcement that can yield classes of composites with a wide range of desired mechanical responses, including anisotropic, spatially heterogeneous, hierarchical and self-similar designs. Demonstrative application examples in thin, skin-mounted electrophysiological sensors with mechanics precisely matched to the human epidermis and in soft, hydrogel-based vehicles for triggered drug release suggest their broad potential uses in biomedical devices.

  17. Fast, Contactless Monitoring of the Chemical Composition of Raw Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, O.; Stoyanov, Zh.; Stoyanov, B.; Nadoliisky, M.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    A technique to monitor chemical composition of materials during manufacturing of ceramic products, in particular - of bricks, is investigated. The technique of monitoring is likely to offset environmental pollution and save energy. For this purpose, we use the Surface photo charge effect, which is generated for each solid body interacting with electromagnetic field. The measurement is express and can be performed in-situ in production conditions. The experimental work has shown that different samples of the investigated materials with different compositions produce different signals specific to each sample. For the same material, the signal varies with the change in chemical composition. More specifically, it is shown that for the material from which the bricks are fired, the signal is a function of the percentage of coal sludge. The results indicate that the characterization technique as a viable technique for control of incoming raw materials.

  18. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  19. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2014-03-18

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  20. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  1. Bearing material. [composite material with low friction surface for rolling or sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A composite material is described which will provide low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact and is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C. The composite is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure, a fluoride salt component which provides lubrication and, lastly, a glass component which not only provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  2. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  3. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  4. Composition and process for making an insulating refractory material

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, A.; Swansiger, T.G.

    1998-04-28

    A composition and process are disclosed for making an insulating refractory material. The composition includes calcined alumina powder, flash activated alumina powder, an organic polymeric binder and a liquid vehicle which is preferably water. Starch or modified starch may also be added. A preferred insulating refractory material made with the composition has a density of about 2.4--2.6 g/cm{sup 3} with reduced thermal conductivity, compared with tabular alumina. Of importance, the formulation has good abrasion resistance and crush strength during intermediate processing (commercial sintering) to attain full strength and refractoriness.

  5. Advanced composites: Environmental effects on selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects that expected space flight environment has upon the mechanical properties of epoxy and polyimide matrix composites were analyzed. Environmental phenomena covered water immersion, high temperature aging, humidity, lightning strike, galvanic action, electromagnetic interference, thermal shock, rain and sand erosion, and thermal/vacuum outgassing. The technology state-of-the-art for graphite and boron reinforced epoxy and polyimide matrix materials is summarized to determine the relative merit of using composites in the space shuttle program. Resin matrix composites generally are affected to some degree by natural environmental phenomena with polyimide resin matrix materials less affected than epoxies.

  6. Method and apparatus for gripping uniaxial fibrous composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Hurwitz, F. I. (inventors)

    1984-01-01

    A strip specimen is cut from a unidirectional strong, brittle fiber composite material, and the surfaces of both ends of the specimen are grit blasted. The specimen is then placed between metal load transfer members having grit blasted surfaces. Sufficient compressive stress is applied to the load transfer members to prevent slippage during testing at both elevated temperatures and room temperatures. The need for adhesives, load pads, and other secondary composite processing is eliminated. This gripping system was successful in tensile testing, creep rupture testing, and fatigue testing uniaxial composite materials at 316 C.

  7. Metal oxide composite dosimeter method and material

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of measuring a radiation dose wherein a radiation responsive material consisting essentially of metal oxide is first exposed to ionizing radiation. The metal oxide is then stimulating with light thereby causing the radiation responsive material to photoluminesce. Photons emitted from the metal oxide as a result of photoluminescence may be counted to provide a measure of the ionizing radiation.

  8. Fused silica as a composite nanostructured material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. K. Miloslavsky; E. D. Makovetsky; L. A. Ageev; K. S. Beloshenko

    2009-01-01

    A method for calculating the refractive index of optical fused silica by applying the model of effective permittivity of composite\\u000a homogeneous media is proposed and realized. The calculation was performed using the tabular data of the refractive index of\\u000a crystalline ? quartz and the ratio of the quartz glass and ? quartz densities. It was suggested that fused silica contains

  9. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product

  10. Synthesis of aluminium nitride/boron nitride composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, T.D. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry); Gonsalves, K.E. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Strutt, P.R. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1993-04-01

    Aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite was synthesized by using boric acid, urea, and aluminum chloride (or aluminum lactate) as the starting compounds. The starting materials were dissolved in water and mixed homogeneously. Ammonolysis of this aqueous solution resulted in the formation of a precomposite gel, which converted into the aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite on further heat treatment. Characterization of both the precomposite and the composite powders included powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of the composite revealed that the aluminum nitride phase had a hexagonal structure, and the boron nitride phase a turbostratic structure.

  11. Surface characteristics of resin composite materials after finishing and polishing.

    PubMed

    St Germain, Henry; Samuelson, Bart A

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study determined the surface roughness (Ra) and absolute gloss (AG) values for 2 resin composites: a microhybrid and a microfill. Eight groups (n = 4) of each resin composite were prepared, along with 4 controls (Mylar strip) for the 2 resin composites. After finishing with a medium polishing disc, the specimens from each resin composite material were subjected to 7 polishing procedures, and Ra measurements and AG values were determined. Two-way ANOVA and Fisher's LSD multiple comparisons revealed significant differences (P ? 0.05). For both materials, the control group produced the lowest Ra values and highest AG values, and the medium polishing disc produced the highest Ra values and lowest AG values. Of the 2 resin composites, the microhybrid had lower mean Ra and higher mean AG than the microfill for the majority of the polishing procedures. Pearson's r correlation coefficient (P ? 0.001) indicated an inverse linear relationship between Ra and AG. PMID:25734283

  12. Bijel - a novel composite material from colloids on liquid-liquid interfaces 

    E-print Network

    Herzig, Eva M

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials generally consist of different components which individually exhibit an entirely different material behaviour than within the composite. Here, two immiscible liquids are stabilised with solid particles ...

  13. Structurally integrated fiber optic damage assessment system for composite materials.

    PubMed

    Measures, R M; Glossop, N D; Lymer, J; Leblanc, M; West, J; Dubois, S; Tsaw, W; Tennyson, R C

    1989-07-01

    Progress toward the development of a fiber optic damage assessment system for composite materials is reported. This system, based on the fracture of embedded optical fibers, has been characterized with respect to the orientation and location of the optical fibers in the composite. Together with a special treatment, these parameters have been tailored to yield a system capable of detecting the threshold of damage for various impacted Kevlar/epoxy panels. The technique has been extended to measure the growth of a damage region which could arise from either impact, manufacturing flaws, or static overloading. The mechanism of optical fiber fracture has also been investigated. In addition, the influence of embedded optical fibers on the tensile and compressive strength of the composite material has been studied. Image enhanced backlighting has been shown to be a powerful and convenient method of assessing internal damage to translucent composite materials. PMID:20555570

  14. Carbon-carbon composites: Emerging materials for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1989-01-01

    An emerging class of high temperature materials called carbon-carbon composites are being developed to help make advanced aerospace flight become a reality. Because of the high temperature strength and low density of carbon-carbon composites, aerospace engineers would like to use these materials in even more advanced applications. One application of considerable interest is as the structure of the aerospace vehicle itself rather than simply as a protective heat shield as on Space Shuttle. But suitable forms of these materials have yet to be developed. If this development can be successfully accomplished, advanced aerospace vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and other hypersonic vehicles will be closer to becoming a reality. A brief definition is given of C-C composites. Fabrication problems and oxidation protection concepts are examined. Applications of C-C composites in the Space Shuttle and in advanced hypersonic vehicles as well as other applications are briefly discussed.

  15. Olivine Composite Cathode Materials for Improved Lithium Ion Battery Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.M.; Vaughey, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Composite cathode materials in lithium ion batteries have become the subject of a great amount of research recently as cost and safety issues related to LiCoO2 and other layered structures have been discovered. Alternatives to these layered materials include materials with the spinel and olivine structures, but these present different problems, e.g. spinels have low capacities and cycle poorly at elevated temperatures, and olivines exhibit extremely low intrinsic conductivity. Previous work has shown that composite structures containing spinel and layered materials have shown improved electrochemical properties. These types of composite structures have been studied in order to evaluate their performance and safety characteristics necessary for use in lithium ion batteries in portable electronic devices, particularly hybrid-electric vehicles. In this study, we extended that work to layered-olivine and spinel-olivine composites. These materials were synthesized from precursor salts using three methods: direct reaction, ball-milling, and a coreshell synthesis method. X-ray diffraction spectra and electrochemical cycling data show that the core-shell method was the most successful in forming the desired products. The electrochemical performance of the cells containing the composite cathodes varied dramatically, but the low overpotential and reasonable capacities of the spinel-olivine composites make them a promising class for the next generation of lithium ion battery cathodes.

  16. Development of ductile magnesium composite materials using titanium as reinforcement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. F. Hassan; M. Gupta

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, elemental and titanium particulate reinforced magnesium materials were synthesized using an innovative disintegrated melt deposition technique followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural characterization of the composite samples showed reasonably uniform distribution of titanium particulates in the matrix material, strong interfacial integrity of magnesium matrix with titanium particulates, and the presence of minimal porosity. Physical property characterization revealed

  17. On Low-Velocity Impact Testing of Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter O. Sjoblom; J. Timothy Hartness; Tobey M. Cordell

    1988-01-01

    The importance of understanding the response of structural composites to impact cannot be overstated. This understanding includes both the impact phenomena themselves and the influence of materials properties on the impact response. This paper presents the need for instrumented testing to optimize our understanding of the impact event, especially the response of the impacted material. The conclusion is drawn that

  18. Data analysis techniques for impact tests of composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Svenson; M. W. Hargrave; B. S. Ye; L. C. Bank

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses data analysis techniques for instrumented impact tests conducted on glass fiber composite materials. For this study, a drop weight tower has been instrumented with an accelerometer and computer data acquisition system. From the acceleration data obtained, load, energy, velocity, and displacement are calculated in a spreadsheet environment. The resulting data from multiple tests for each material type

  19. Topological design of structures and composite materials with multiobjectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niek de Kruijf; Shiwei Zhou; Qing Li; Yiu-Wing Mai

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of heat conduction in both structural and material designs in two dimensions. The former attempts to find the optimal structures with the maximum stiffness and minimum resistance to heat dissipation and the latter to tailor composite materials with effective thermal conductivity and bulk modulus attaining their upper limits like Hashin–Shtrikman and Lurie–Cherkaev bounds. In the

  20. Insertion loss of sound waves through composite acoustic window materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ji-Hye Lee; Byoung-Nam Kim; Ku-Kyun Shin; Suk Wang Yoon

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the insertion loss of sound waves through composite acoustic window materials for sonar dome applications, and examined the influence of dome shape on the sonar performance. The insertion loss of sound waves through acoustic window materials was experimentally measured as a function of frequency at normal incidence. The insertion loss was also theoretically estimated with three- and

  1. Fibre-Optic Impact Damage Detection Of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measures, R. M.; Glossop, N. D. W.; Lymer, J.; Dubois, S.; Tsaw, W.; West, J.; Tennyson, R. C.

    1988-09-01

    The development of a fibre-optic based damage assessment system for composite material structures requires a base of knowledge that to date is not available in the literature. We report on several advances that will contribute towards the development of "structurally imbedded fibre optic damage evaluation" (SIFODE) technology. These include: devising a special surface treatment that allows control of the damage sensitivity of the optical fibres, determining their optimum orientation with respect to the material fibres in the adjacent plies and their depth in regard to an impact surface. The influence of the imbedded optical fibres on the strength and impact resistance of the composite material has also been investigated.

  2. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Griffen, Charles W. (Mason, OH)

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  3. Emissivity Results on High Temperature Coatings for Refractory Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Lewis, Ronald K.; Rodriguez, Alvaro C.; Milhoan, James D.; Koenig, John R.

    2007-01-01

    The directional emissivity of various refractory composite materials considered for application for reentry and hypersonic vehicles was investigated. The directional emissivity was measured at elevated temperatures of up to 3400 F using a directional spectral radiometric technique during arc-jet test runs. A laboratory-based relative total radiance method was also used to measure total normal emissivity of some of the refractory composite materials. The data from the two techniques are compared. The paper will also compare the historical database of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon emissivity measurements with emissivity values generated recently on the material using the two techniques described in the paper.

  4. Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E. (compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains presentations and abstracts from the Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures jointly sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center, Virginia Tech, and the Institute for Mechanics and Materials at the University of California, San Diego, and held at NASA Langley on November 15-16, 1993. Workshop attendees represented NASA, other government research labs, the aircraft/rotorcraft industry, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the state-of-technology in scaling effects in composite materials and to provide guidelines for future research.

  5. The damage, repair and design of fiber composite structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Fa-De Jack.

    1992-01-01

    Three aspects of the repair of fiber reinforced composite materials were examined in this study. First, the in-plane compression damage of four typical fiber composite materials was studied, and different repair strategies were explored. Second, an optimum composite sheet design for least damaged by buckling and easiest to repair was studied. Third, anhydride-cured epoxy adhesive and E-glass fibers/vinyl ester matrix, which is critical to the quality of the repair, was investigated. For none of the four typical fiber composite materials subjected to in-plane compression do all of the load carrying fibers break, and those do are usually in easily removal layers. Moreover, the behavior of each material was relatively consistent. As a result, a new repair strategy is proposed in which nor more of the load-carrying fibers are removed from the damage zone than are broken. For the two laminated materials, a transition in failure mode form tensile to shear was found as the effective gage length of the specimen decreased. This suggests that the composite structure can be designed to relieve the applied can be designed to relieve the applied load in desired locations and with benign failure modes. In the second part, ten composite materials with different fiber stacking sequences were subjected to in-plane compression. Three failure modes were dominant: shear, delamination buckling, and flexural failure. The volume of damage occurring in the 0[degrees]-fiber plies decreased lamination buckling failure. With respect to the amount of damage and repair strength recovery, it is best to have the composite structure designed to fail in delamination buckling when failure is inevitable. In the third part, model system were used to simulate the interfacial region between adhesive and adherent. These involved curing the adhesive against FTIR-ATR plate and against adherent material ground to a fine powder to greatly increase its surface area.

  6. Composite materials based on wastes of flat glass processing.

    PubMed

    Gorokhovsky, A V; Escalante-Garcia, J I; Gashnikova, G Yu; Nikulina, L P; Artemenko, S E

    2005-01-01

    Glass mirrors scrap and poly (vinyl) butiral waste (PVB) obtained from flat glass processing plants were investigated as raw materials to produce composites. The emphasis was on studying the influence of milled glass mirror waste contents on properties of composites produced with PVB. The characterization involved: elongation under rupture, water absorption, tensile strength and elastic modulus tests. The results showed that the composite containing 10 wt% of filler powder had the best properties among the compositions studied. The influence of the time of exposure in humid atmosphere on the composite properties was investigated. It was found that the admixture of PVB iso-propanol solution to the scrap of glass mirrors during milling provided stabilization of the properties of the composites produced. PMID:16009308

  7. Composite Materials with Viscoelastic Stiffness Greater Than Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, T.; Kochmann, D.; Stone, D.; Lakes, R. S.

    2007-02-01

    We show that composite materials can exhibit a viscoelastic modulus (Young's modulus) that is far greater than that of either constituent. The modulus, but not the strength, of the composite was observed to be substantially greater than that of diamond. These composites contain barium-titanate inclusions, which undergo a volume-change phase transformation if they are not constrained. In the composite, the inclusions are partially constrained by the surrounding metal matrix. The constraint stabilizes the negative bulk modulus (inverse compressibility) of the inclusions. This negative modulus arises from stored elastic energy in the inclusions, in contrast to periodic composite metamaterials that exhibit negative refraction by inertial resonant effects. Conventional composites with positive-stiffness constituents have aggregate properties bounded by a weighted average of constituent properties; their modulus cannot exceed that of the stiffest constituent.

  8. Composite materials with viscoelastic stiffness greater than diamond.

    PubMed

    Jaglinski, T; Kochmann, D; Stone, D; Lakes, R S

    2007-02-01

    We show that composite materials can exhibit a viscoelastic modulus (Young's modulus) that is far greater than that of either constituent. The modulus, but not the strength, of the composite was observed to be substantially greater than that of diamond. These composites contain bariumtitanate inclusions, which undergo a volume-change phase transformation if they are not constrained. In the composite, the inclusions are partially constrained by the surrounding metal matrix. The constraint stabilizes the negative bulk modulus (inverse compressibility) of the inclusions. This negative modulus arises from stored elastic energy in the inclusions, in contrast to periodic composite metamaterials that exhibit negative refraction by inertial resonant effects. Conventional composites with positive-stiffness constituents have aggregate properties bounded by a weighted average of constituent properties; their modulus cannot exceed that of the stiffest constituent. PMID:17272714

  9. Investigation of Lamb elastic waves in anisotropic multilayered composites applying the Green's matrix.

    PubMed

    Karmazin, Alexander; Kirillova, Evgenia; Seemann, Wolfgang; Syromyatnikov, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a numerical study of dispersion characteristics of some symmetric and antisymmetric composites modelled as multilayered packets of layers with arbitrary anisotropy of each layer. The authors introduce a subsidiary boundary problem of three-dimensional elasticity theory for the system of partial differential equations describing the harmonic oscillations of the composite caused by a surface load. The problem reduces to a boundary problem for ordinary differential equations by employing the Fourier transform. An algorithm of constructing the Fourier transform of the Green's matrix of the given boundary problem is presented. The wave numbers of Lamb waves propagating in composites, their phase velocity surfaces and group wave surfaces are presented through the poles of the transform of the Green's matrix. The authors obtain the dispersion curves for different directions and frequencies and investigate the dispersion curves and surfaces of wave numbers, phase velocities and group wave surfaces for various composites. The numerical results are then compared with the results obtained by applying other methods. PMID:20580389

  10. Probing disease-related proteins with fluorogenic composite materials.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Peng; Zang, Yi; James, Tony D; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong

    2015-07-01

    Construction of composite materials based on the self-assembly of fluorescently labeled biomolecules with a variety of micro- or nano-quenching materials (by the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer mechanism) for the fluorogenic recognition of disease-related proteins has become a dynamic research topic in the field of fluorescence recognition. Here we summarize the recent progress on the composition of fluorescence dye-labeled biomolecules including sugars, peptides and nucleotides with organic (graphene and carbon nanotubes) and inorganic (gold nanoparticles) materials. Their application in the fluorescence detection of proteins and enzymes on both the molecular and cellular levels is discussed. Perspectives are proposed with respect to the future directions of employing these composite materials in the recognition of pathological proteins. PMID:25474366

  11. Light weight polymer matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J. (inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix is layed up, cured, and thermally aged at about 750 F in the presence of an inert gas. The heat treatment improves the structural integrity and alters the electrical conductivity of the materials. In the preferred embodiment PMR-15 polyimides and Celion-6000 graphite fibers are used.

  12. A grammatical approach to customization of shape and composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Soumitra

    With the increasing use of composite materials in Mechanical and Aerospace industries, an approach is required to facilitate designing of components using composite materials, while ensuring customization of the shape such a way that multiple design goals for the components are satisfied. Existing design methods may be used in some cases, where the component shape and loadings are simple. While a significant amount of research has been conducted to study the properties of composite materials, little attention has been paid to find out a design approach such that (1) the user requirements in the very general form may be used directly and as the input for the design, (2) the best possible composite material are selected to meet multiple desired functions, and (3) shape variation is analyzed in order to enable mass customization of the design. Thus an approach is required that will be able to handle both the shape and the material in order to design a load bearing component using composite materials. In this research the focus is to develop a design approach that will consider the user requirements for a composite component in its very general form and generate component shape and material details in a systematic order so that the designed component can withstand a given loading condition. Consequently, the Primary Research Question is: How to simultaneously explore shape and composite materials during the design of a product to meet multiple property and functional goals? The wide range of properties, covered by various fiber-matrix combinations, along with their directional property characteristics, maximizes the flexibility of the designers, while designing composite material products. Meeting multiple property goals, however, complicates the design process as both the composite material selection and the component shape formation becomes highly intricate with the loading conditions and a number of matrix calculations needs to be performed to determine theoretical value of composite material properties. A grammar is a formal definition of a language written in transformational form. To address these issues, in this research a grammatical approach is developed that will generate a shape grammar to perform shape optimization, and then incorporate a composite material selection system and loading analysis techniques of Solid Mechanics in order to design load bearing components of irregular shape. The approach will be able to consider the user requirements in the very general text form, convert them to the design requirements for the component, generate optimized shape based on multiple design constraints, perform the complete design work, and generate the component. The major contributions include: (1) generating a shape grammar to represent functions of the load bearing component such a way that mass-customization of shape is possible, (2) developing a composite material customization system in order to satisfy directional property requirements, and (3) introducing a unique laminate design approach in order to satisfy design property requirements at the critical cross-sections locally that can result in highly efficient design compared to conventional design method. Verification of the approach will focus on its application to simultaneously explore shapes and customization of composite materials.

  13. Material Damping Analysis of a Smart Hybrid Composite Lamina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vijayan Baburaj; Yuji Matsuzaki

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses an analytical approach to evaluate the inherent material Specific Damping Capacity (SDC) of a smart hybrid fiber reinforced polymer composite lamina. Analytical equations for the material specific damping capacity have been derived by assuming a linear viscoelastic material property for the constituent fiber-matrix system. The damping properties corresponding to all the six in-plane and out-of-plane applied stresses

  14. Ultrasonic Monitoring of Material Degradation in FRP Composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olajide D. Dokun; Laurence J. Jacobs; Rami M. Haj-Ali

    2000-01-01

    This research uses laser ultrasonic techniques to monitor a (directly measurable) ultrasonic prop- erty—frequency-dependent Rayleigh wave velocity (material dispersion)—and then relates changes in this acoustic property to changes in the material's properties (such as stiffness) that characterize damage. The subject material system is a thick, glass-reinforced, vinylester (thermosetting) fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite. Laser ultrasonics is an ideal methodology to monitor

  15. Composite materials research and education program: The NASA-Virginia Tech composites program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Major areas of study include: (1) edge effects in finite width laminated composites subjected to mechanical, thermal and hygroscopic loading with temperature dependent material properties and the influence of edge effects on the initiation of failure; (2) shear and compression testing of composite materials at room and elevated temperatures; (3) optical techniques for precise measurement of coefficients of thermal expansion of composites; (4) models for the nonlinear behavior of composites including material nonlinearity and damage accumulation and verification of the models under biaxial loading; (5) compressive failure of graphite/epoxy plates with circular holes and the buckling of composite cylinders under combined compression and torsion; (6) nonlinear mechanical properties of borsic/aluminum, graphite/polyimide and boron/aluminum; (7) the strength characteristics of spliced sandwich panels; and (8) curved graphite/epoxy panels subjected to internal pressure.

  16. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling composite materials.

  17. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling composite materials.

  18. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  19. Acoustic emission from composite materials. [nondestructive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visconti, I. C.; Teti, R.

    1979-01-01

    The two basic areas where the acoustic emission (AE) technique can be applied are materials research and the evaluation of structural reliability. This experimental method leads to a better understanding of fracture mechanisms and is an NDT technique particularly well suited for the study of propagating cracks. Experiments are described in which acoustic emissions were unambiguously correlated with microstructural fracture mechanisms. The advantages and limitations of the AE technique are noted.

  20. Accelerated hygrothermal stabilization of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    Experimentation validated a simple moisture conditioning scheme to prepare Gr/Ep composite parts for precision applications by measuring dimensional changes over 90 days. It was shown that an elevated temperature moisture conditioning scheme produced a dimensionally stable part from which precision structures could be built/machined without significant moisture induced dimensional changes after fabrication. Conversely, that unconditioned Gr/Ep composite panels exhibited unacceptably large dimensional changes (i.e., greater than 125 ppM). It was also shown that time required to produce stable parts was shorter, by more than an order of magnitude, employing the conditioning scheme than using no conditioning scheme (46 days versus 1000+ days). Two final use environments were chosen for the experiments: 50% RH/21C and 0% RH/21C. Fiberite 3034K was chosen for its widespread use in aerospace applications. Two typical lay-ups were chosen, one with low sensitivity to hygrothermal distortions and the other high sensitivity: [0, {plus_minus} 45, 90]s, [0, {plus_minus} 15, 0]s. By employing an elevated temperature, constant humidity conditioning scheme, test panels achieved an equilibrium moisture content in less time, by more than an order of magnitude, than panels exposed to the same humidity environment and ambient temperature. Dimensional changes, over 90 days, were up to 4 times lower in the conditioned panels compared to unconditioned panels. Analysis of weight change versus time of test coupons concluded that the out-of-autoclave moisture content of Fiberite 3034K varied between 0.06 and 0.1%.

  1. Fabrication of a nanostructured gold-polymer composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K.; Witcomb, M.; Scurrell, M.

    2006-07-01

    A facile synthesis route is described for the preparation of a poly-(o-aminophenol)-gold nanoparticle composite material by polymerization of o-aminophenol (AP) monomer using HAuCl4 as the oxidant. The synthesis was carried out in a methanol medium so that it could serve a dual solvent role, a solvent for both the AP and the water solution of HAuCl4. It was found that oxidative polymerization of AP leads to the formation of poly-AP with a diameter of 50±10nm, while the reduction of AuCl4- results in the formation of gold nanoparticles (˜ 2nm). The gold nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed and highly stabilized throughout the macromolecular chain that formed a uniform metal-polymer composite material. The resultant composite material was characterized by means of different techniques, such as UV-vis, IR and Raman spectroscopy, which offered the information about the chemical structure of polymer, whereas electron microscopy images provided information regarding the morphology of the composite material and the distribution of the metal particles in the composite material.

  2. Ultrasonic evaluation of anisotropic damage in multiaxially textile-reinforced thermoplastic composites made from hybrid yarns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Hufenbach; R. Böhm; A. Langkamp; L. Kroll; T. Ritschel

    2006-01-01

    The basic damage and failure models of multiaxially reinforced composites with a thermoplastic matrix are presented and verified.\\u000a Within the framework of continuum damage mechanics, a phenomenological model is introduced, where the damage is defined as\\u000a a change in the elasticity tensor. For damage identification, a specific ultrasonic device was developed. A combination of\\u000a an immersion set-up and a contact

  3. Probabilistic fatigue life prediction of metallic and composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yibing

    Fatigue is one of the most common failure modes for engineering structures, such as aircrafts, rotorcrafts and aviation transports. Both metallic materials and composite materials are widely used and affected by fatigue damage. Huge uncertainties arise from material properties, measurement noise, imperfect models, future anticipated loads and environmental conditions. These uncertainties are critical issues for accurate remaining useful life (RUL) prediction for engineering structures in service. Probabilistic fatigue prognosis considering various uncertainties is of great importance for structural safety. The objective of this study is to develop probabilistic fatigue life prediction models for metallic materials and composite materials. A fatigue model based on crack growth analysis and equivalent initial flaw size concept is proposed for metallic materials. Following this, the developed model is extended to include structural geometry effects (notch effect), environmental effects (corroded specimens) and manufacturing effects (shot peening effects). Due to the inhomogeneity and anisotropy, the fatigue model suitable for metallic materials cannot be directly applied to composite materials. A composite fatigue model life prediction is proposed based on a mixed-mode delamination growth model and a stiffness degradation law. After the development of deterministic fatigue models of metallic and composite materials, a general probabilistic life prediction methodology is developed. The proposed methodology combines an efficient Inverse First-Order Reliability Method (IFORM) for the uncertainty propogation in fatigue life prediction. An equivalent stresstransformation has been developed to enhance the computational efficiency under realistic random amplitude loading. A systematical reliability-based maintenance optimization framework is proposed for fatigue risk management and mitigation of engineering structures.

  4. Modeling the thermal properties and processing of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchumani, R.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacture of partially cured, thermoset matrix composite systems is modeled. A generalized analysis, applicable to almost all the fiber-resin systems encountered in practice, is carried out in terms of four key dimensionless groups formed of the process and the product parameters - (1) the Damkohler number (K(sub o)) which is a relative measure of the conduction and the reaction time scales, (2) the dimensionless activation energy (E(sub o)), (3) the adiabatic reaction temperature (B(sub o)) which represents the temperature rise potential in the composite due to the heat of the cure reaction, and (4) the Biot number (B(sub i)) which characterizes the post-cure convective cooling of the composite product. Optimal cure cycles which yield a homogeneous cure in the composite, are obtained as a function of the dimensionless parameters. Design plots for the optimal cure temperature and duration are presented. Their use in practical situations is illustrated in the context of a commercially available graphite-epoxy prepreg from Hercules, which is widely used in the aerospace industry. The thermal properties of the composite namely, the transient thermal diffusivity and the steady state thermal conductivity, are essential parameters in the process modeling studies, as well for the design of composite materials for several high temperature applications. Transient heat conduction in fibrous composites is investigated with the aim of devising a criterion for the validity of the analysis of composite materials as homogeneous media having the effective thermal properties. A homogeneity criterion based on the composite thickness is derived in terms of the fiber volume fraction and the fiber diameter. The criterion, which is the first of its kind for fibrous composites, is valid in the practical range of composite parameters. An analytical means for evaluating the effective thermal diffusivity is also presented.

  5. A new ferromagnetic hysteresis model for soft magnetic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidari?, Bogomir; Miljavec, Damijan

    2011-01-01

    A new ferromagnetic hysteresis model for soft magnetic composite materials based on their specific properties is presented. The model relies on definition of new anhysteretic magnetization based on the Cauchy-Lorentz distribution describing the maximum energy state of magnetic moments in material. Specific properties of soft magnetic composite materials (SMC) such as the presence of the bonding material, different sizes and shapes of the Fe particles, level of homogeneity of the Fe particles at the end of the SMC product treatment, and achieved overall material density during compression, are incorporated in both the anhysteretic differential magnetization susceptibility and the irreversible differential magnetization susceptibility. Together they form the total differential magnetization susceptibility that defines the new ferromagnetic hysteresis model. Genetic algorithms are used to determine the optimal values of the proposed model parameters. The simulated results show good agreement with the measured results.

  6. Grained composite materials prepared by combustion synthesis under mechanical pressure

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D. (Davis, CA); Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  7. Global/local finite element analysis of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Vidussoni, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation for performing global/local finite element analysis in composite materials is described. An example of such an analysis of a composite plate with a central circular hole is presented. Deformed finite element grids and interlaminar normal stress distributions are presented to aid understanding of the plate response. Such distribution at the plate edge is shown to be basically unaffected, although transverse displacements of the edge were slightly different from an analysis of a similar plate with no hole.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Textile Composite Materials Using Moire Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The viability as an efficient aircraft material of advanced textile composites is currently being addressed in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. One of the expected milestones of the program is to develop standard test methods for these complex material systems. Current test methods for laminated composites may not be optimum for textile composites, since the architecture of the textile induces nonuniform deformation characteristics on the scale of the smallest repeating unit of the architecture. The smallest repeating unit, also called the unit cell, is often larger than the strain gages used for testing of tape composites. As a result, extending laminated composite test practices to textiles can often lead to pronounced scatter in material property measurements. It has been speculated that the fiber architectures produce significant surface strain nonuniformities, however, the magnitudes were not well understood. Moire interferometry, characterized by full-field information, high displacement sensitivity, and high spatial resolution, is well suited to document the surface strain on textile composites. Studies at the NASA Langley Research Center on a variety of textile architectures including 2-D braids and 3-D weaves, has evidenced the merits of using moire interferometry to guide in test method development for textile composites. Moire was used to support tensile testing by validating instrumentation practices and documenting damage mechanisms. It was used to validate shear test methods by mapping the full-field deformation of shear specimens. Moire was used to validate open hole tension experiments to determine the strain concentration and compare then to numeric predictions. It was used for through-the-thickness tensile strength test method development, to verify capabilities for testing of both 2-D and 3-D material systems. For all of these examples, moire interferometry provided vision so that test methods could be developed with less speculation and more documentation.

  9. Properties of laminated steel-silver composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. P. Maiboroda

    1974-01-01

    1.The tensile strength sv (130 kg mm2) and microhardness HV (350 kg\\/mm2) of 08kp steel-Ag multilayer composite materials (MCM) substantially exceed both sv and HV of alloy mixtures of the same composition (65 and 150 kg\\/mm2, respectively) and sv and HV of 08kp steel (90 and 180–200 kg\\/mm2, respectively).2.The gain in strength ?sv due to the work-hardening induced by rolling

  10. Progress in very lightweight optics using graphite fiber composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter C. Chen; Timo T. Saha; Andrew M. Smith; Robert C. Romeo

    1998-01-01

    We report progress in the fabrication of very low areal density (< 5 kg\\/m2) optical mirrors using space-flight-qualified graphite-fiber-reinforced cyanate ester composite materials. Previous attempts have been thwarted by fiber print-through at the surface. We find that the problem can be successfully overcome if the composite is processed to leave a very thin layer of resin at the surface. Results

  11. Biotransformation of an uncured composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Clement J.; Glass, Michael J.; Cheslack, Brian; Pryor, Robert; Tran, Duan K.; Bowers-Irons, Gail

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of biologically degrading prepreg wastes was studied. The work was conducted with the intention of obtaining baseline data that would facilitate the achievement of two long-range goals. These goals are: (1) the biological remediation of the hazardous components in the prepreg wastes, and (2) providing the potential for recycling the prepreg waste fibers. The experiments examined a prepreg that employs an bismaleimide resin system. Initial results demonstrated an obvious deterioration of the prepreg material when incubated with several bacterial strains. The most active cultures were identified as a mixture of 'Bacillus cereus' and 'Pseudomonas sp'. Gas chromatography analyses revealed seven primary compounds in the resin mixture. Biotransformation studies, using the complete prepreg material, demonstrated on obvious loss of all seven organic compounds. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses resulted in structure assignments for the two primary components of the resin. Both were analogs of Bisphenol A; one being bismaleimide, and the other being Bisphenol A containing a diglycidyl moiety. The 'diglycidyl analog' was purified using thin-layer chromatography and the biotransformation of this compound (at 27 ug/ml bacterial culture) was monitored. After a seven-day incubation, approximately 40% of the organic compound was biotransformed. These results demonstrate the biotransformation of the prepreg resin and indicate that biological remediation of the prepreg wastes is feasible.

  12. Thermal radiation transmission through composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucks, Richard B.

    1995-06-01

    On 10 June 1993, the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) Field Command at White Sands Missile Range conducted a Thermal Radiation Simulator (TRS) test for the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) during project MINOR UNCLE. The NSWC was interested in measuring the radiant thermal energy absorbed by a fiberglass panel during a simulated nuclear weapon event. The resultant thermocouple data showed an unusual initial high-temperature rise and fall, followed by the expected conductive heating. The initial transient was theorized to be the result of thermal radiation transmitted through the panel. To investigate this theory, NSWC prepared several more panels of different thicknesses, preinstrumented with thermocouples and strain gages for testing with a U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) TRS. ARL also provided additional instrumentation to measure thermal radiation on the front surface as well as behind the panel. The results showed that there was direct heating of the rear of the composite panel by thermal radiation. The quantity of heat transmission through the panel and the point of ignition of the front surface of the panel were determined. Smoke and charring of the front surface protected the panel from further heating and possible destruction.

  13. Composite material fabrication techniques. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B J; Paulauskas, F L [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Miller, J; Parzych, W [Metters Industries, Inc. (United States)

    1996-09-30

    This report describes a low cost method of fabricating components for mockups and training simulators used in the transportation industry. This technology was developed jointly by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Metters Industries, Incorporated (MI) as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) ORNL94-0288 sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Economic Impace and Diversity Minority Business Technology Transfer Consortium. The technology involves fabricating component replicas from fiberglass/epoxy composites using a resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The original components are used as masters to fabricate the molds. The molding process yields parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still parts that duplicate the significant dimensional requirements of the original component while still providing adequate strength and stiffness for use in training simulators. This technology permits MI to overcome an acute shortage in surplus military hardware available to them for use in manufacturing training simulators. In addition, the cost of the molded fiberglass components is expected to be less than that of procuring the original components from the military.

  14. Pin bearing evaluation of LTM25 composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes pin bearing evaluations of LTM25 composite materials. Northrop Grumman Corporation conducted pin bearing testing and fabricate two panels from composite materials that cure at low temperatures. These materials are being incorporated into Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS) to reduce manufacturing costs since they allow the use of low-cost tooling and facilities. Two composite prepreg product forms were evaluated; MR50/LTM25 unidirectional tape, batch 2881vd and CFS003/LTM25 woven cloth, batch 2216. Northrop Grumman fabricated, machined, and tested specimens to determine the bearing strength in accordance with MIL-HDBK-17D, Volume 1, Section 7.2.4. Quasi-isotropic laminates from the two product forms were fabricated for these tests. In addition, 2 quasi-isotropic panels of dimensions 12 in. x 28 in. were fabricated (one each from the two product forms), inspected, and shipped to NASA Langley for further evaluation.

  15. Composite materials applied to the E-ELT structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajuelo, Eugenio; Gómez, José Ramón; Ronquillo, Bernardo; Brunetto, Enzo; Koch, Fran

    2008-07-01

    The upper part of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) altitude structure is one of the most critical areas of the telescope's structure. This part hosts sensitive optical elements of the telescope. Its structural performance has a major impact on the whole system. The most critical requirements are low optical path obscuration, high static and dynamic performance (high specific modulus), high mechanical safety (high specific strength), low wind cross section and low weight. Composite materials are ideally suited to meet these requirements. This study is carried out in order to quantify the relative advantage of composite material over mild steel, in terms of performance and costs. The mechanical behavior of the steel structure can be easily improved with a structure manufactured with composite materials. This structure is significantly lighter than the steel one and reduces relative displacements between primary and secondary mirror. Consequently, optical performance is improved, assembly process is simplified and transport cost is reduced.

  16. Effects of thermal cycling on composite materials for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal and mechanical properties of composite materials that are candidates for space structures are briefly described. The results from a thermal analysis of the orbiting Space Station Freedom is used to define a typical thermal environment and the parameters that cause changes in the thermal history. The interactions of this environment with composite materials are shown and described. The effects of this interaction on the integrity as well as the properties of GR/thermoset, Gr/thermoplastic, Gr/metal and Gr/glass composite materials are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the interaction that are critical to precision spacecraft. Finally, ground test methodology are briefly discussed.

  17. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  18. Design of anisotropic plates for improved damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerdal, Zafer

    1986-01-01

    An analytical study is presented showing the effects of the notch tip geometry on the location and direction of crack growth from an existing notch in a unidirectional fibrous composite modeled as a homogeneous, anisotropic, elastic material. Anisotropic elasticity and the normal stress ratio theory are used to study crack growth from elliptical notches in unidirectional composites. Sharp cracks, circular holes, and ellipses are studied under far-field tension and shear loading. The capabilities of a previously developed design code was upgraded to handle more generalized plate geometries and laminates under a more generalized loading and boundary conditions. Discussion of the developments of the design code is presented.

  19. Brazing of sheet composite materials with aluminium matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorunov, V. F.; Kuchuk-Iatsenko, V. S.; Dykhno, I. S.; Kasatkina, N. V.

    The technique of brazing composite sheets with an aluminum matrix is investigated for Al matrices with either stainless steel or boron fibers. Brazing is compared to other joining techniques, and the relationship between heating and pressure levels is studied by characterizing the joint qualities microscopically. Solder composition is similarly analyzed, and brazing recommendations are given for ranges of joint sizes. Calculations of the temperature fields for the brazing of these composite materials yield specific-heat input data. Optimal brazing modes thus derived for the Al-matrix composites yield joints free of the intermetallide phases that degrade the performance of brazed structures. The tensile strength of the optimized joints is shown to be good relative to the strength of the original composites with Al matrices.

  20. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  1. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  2. Damage-tolerant composite materials produced by stitching carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    NASA-Langley has undertaken the investigation of composite damage-tolerance enhancement and fabrication economies-maximization via reinforcement-stitching, in combination with resin transfer molding. Attention is given to results obtained by an experimental evaluation of composites tailored for damage tolerance by stitching layers of dry carbon-fiber fabric with closely-spaced threads, in order to furnish through-the-thickness reinforcement. Various stitching patterns and thread materials have been evaluated, using flat-plate specimens; blade-stiffened structural elements have been fabricated and tested. The results presented indicate that stitched laminates furnish damage tolerance performance comparable to that of more expensive, toughened-matrix composites.

  3. Delamination, durability and damage tolerance of laminated composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    Research exploring the role of delamination on the durability and damage tolerance of advanced composite materials is reviewed. Recent studies on the characterization of composite delamination are summarized. Recent analytical solutions for interlaminar stresses and strain energy release rates associated with common sources of delamination are also reviewed. The role of delamination in low velocity impact, residual compression strength, and in fatigue is highlighted. Delamination is shown to be the common damage mode observed in all of these problems. A Damage Threshold/Fail-safety concept for addressing composite damage tolerance is discussed.

  4. Effective thermal conductivity of a thin, randomly oriented composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Niemann, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thicknesses. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relative low thermal conductivity. The results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between the filler and matrix thermal conductivities.

  5. Thermal design of composite material high temperature attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation has been made of the thermal aspects of utilizing advanced filamentary composite materials as primary structures on the shuttle vehicle. The technical objectives of this study are to: (1) establish and design concepts for maintaining material temperatures within allowable limits at TPS attachments and or penetrations applicable to the space shuttle; and (2) verify the thermal design analysis by testing selected concepts. Specific composite materials being evaluated are boron epoxy, graphite/epoxy, boron polyimide, and boron aluminum; graphite/polyimide has been added to this list for property data identification and preliminary evaluation of thermal design problems. The TPS standoff to composite structure attachment over-temperature problem is directly related to TPS maximum surface temperature. To provide a thermally comprehensive evaluation of attachment temperature characteristics, maximum surface temperatures of 900 F, 1200 F, 1800 F, 2500 F and 3000 F are considered in this study. This range of surface temperatures and the high and low maximum temperature capability of the selected composite materials will result in a wide range of thermal requirements for composite/TPS standoff attachments.

  6. Fungal degradation of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, J. D.; Lu, C.; Mitchell, R.; Thorp, K.; Crasto, A.

    1997-01-01

    As described in a previous report, a fungal consortium isolated from degraded polymeric materials was capable of growth on presterilized coupons of five composites, resulting in deep penetration into the interior of all materials within five weeks. Data describing the utilization of composite constituents as nutrients for the microflora are described in this article. Increased microbial growth was observed when composite extract was incubated with the fungal inoculum at ambient temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic observation of carbon fibers incubated with a naturally developed population of microorganisms showed the formation of bacterial biofilms on the fiber surfaces, suggesting possible utilization of the fiber chemical sizing as carbon and energy sources. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor the phenomena occurring at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Significant differences were observed between inoculated and sterile panels of the composite materials. A progressive decline in impedance was detected in the inoculated panels. Several reaction steps may be involved in the degradation process. Initial ingress of water into the resin matrix appeared to be followed by degradation of fiber surfaces, and separation of fibers from the resin matrix. This investigation suggested that composite materials are susceptible to microbial attack by providing nutrients for growth.

  7. Highly explosive nanosilicon-based composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, D.; Diener, J.; Gross, E.; Künzner, N.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kovalev, D.

    2005-06-01

    We present a highly explosive binary system based on porous silicon layers with their pores filled with solid oxidizers. The porous layers are produced by a standard electrochemical etching process and exhibit properties that are different from other energetic materials. Its production is completely compatible with the standard silicon technology and full bulk silicon wafers can be processed and therefore a large number of explosive elements can be produced simultaneously. The application-relevant parameters: the efficiency and the long-term stability of various porous silicon/oxidizer systems have been studied in details. Structural properties of porous silicon, its surface termination, the atomic ratio of silicon to oxygen and the chosen oxidizers were optimized to achieve the highest efficiency of the explosive reaction. This explosive system reveals various possible applications in different industrial fields, e.g. as a novel, very fast airbag igniter.

  8. Fracture toughness of fibrous composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Laminates with various proportions of 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg plies were fabricated from T300/5208 and T300/BP-907 graphite/epoxy prepreg tape material. The fracture toughness of each laminate orientation or lay-up was determined by testing center-cracked specimens, and it was also predicted with the general fracture-toughness parameter. The predictions were good except when crack-tip splitting was large, at which time the toughness and strengths tended to be underpredicted. By using predictions, a parametric study was also made of factors that influence fracture toughness. Fiber and matrix properties as well as lay-up were investigated. Without crack-tip splitting, fracture toughness increases in proportion to fiber strength and fiber volume fraction, increases linearly with E(22)/E(11), is largest when the modulus for non-0 deg fibers is greater than that of 0 deg fibers, and is smallest for 0(m)/90(p)(s) lay-ups. (The E(11) and E(22) are Young's moduli of the lamina parallel to and normal to the direction of the fibers, respectively). For a given proportion of 0 deg plies, the most notch-sensitive lay-ups are 0(m)/90(p)(s) and the least sensitive are 0(m)/45(n)(s) and alpha(s). Notch sensitivity increases with the proportion of 0 deg plies and decreases with alpha. Strong, tough matrix materials, which inhibit crack-tip splitting, generally lead to minimum fracture toughness.

  9. Self-healing bentonite sheet material composite drainage structure

    SciTech Connect

    Harriett, T.D.

    1988-03-29

    A composite drainage structure capable of directing water longitudinally away from a potential area of water flow and incapable of transverse water penetration is described comprising: drainage means for receiving water and channeling the water to a predetermined area; channel means disposed between the first and second sheet materials of the drainage means for channeling water longitudinal within the drainage means to the predetermined area; and a cohesive layer of a water-swellable clay composition secured to the water-impermeable layer of sheet material.

  10. Nondestructive inspection and evaluation of composite-material flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D M; Maxfield, B W; Kulkarni, S V; Schwarber, A J

    1982-02-24

    Several composite panels and flywheel designs were evaluated in support of the Mechanical Energy Storage Technology (MEST) project. Conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology was used on the panels and flywheels. All flywheels and panels were radiographed and, where practical, were also inspected using ultrasonic techniques. The results provided information about the structural features of flywheels and materials. This information is useful for the quality control of fabrication procedures. The detection of apparent flaws in fabrication cannot be related to the ultimate strength until failure mechanisms in composite materials have been fully defined. Therefore, the location of detected flaws should be recorded for later comparison with dynamic and destructive evaluations.

  11. Physical properties of three packable resin-composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, W P; Latta, M A; Shaddy, R S; Stanislav, C M

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated selected physical properties of three packable resin composites (Alert, SureFil and Solitaire) and compared them to two conventional hybrid materials (Prodigy and Z-100). The specific properties investigated were diametral tensile strength, transverse strength, elastic modulus and fracture toughness. Following photopolymerization, specimens for each composite material were stored in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 35 days. A one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were employed for each property to determine whether significant differences occurred with respect to specific restorative materials. All materials had statistically similar diametral tensile strengths. Alert had the highest mean fracture toughness and elastic modulus but had a low mean transverse-strength value. SureFil exhibited good mean physical property values compared to both the conventional and packable materials. Solitaire had low mean fracture toughness, transverse strength and elastic modulus values, which could cause concern regarding use in posterior restorations. The packable resin composites tested had a wide range of mean values for the physical properties investigated. Generally, Alert and SureFil were superior to Solitaire and comparable to the hybrid materials Prodigy and Z-100, but clear discrimination among performance of these materials requires clinical testing. PMID:11203839

  12. Graphene and carbon nanofiber nanopaper for multifunction composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunxia; Lu, Haibao; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-04-01

    The new structures and multifunctional materials is that it can achieve some other special functions while it has ability to carry, such as wave-transparent, absorbing, anti-lightning, anti-heat, anti-nuclear etc. It represents the direction of future development of structural materials. And graphene is the one of two-dimensional atomic crystal free substance only found in the existence and shows great importance for fundamental studies and technological applications due to its unique structure and a wide range of unusual properties. It exhibits great promise for potential applications in chemistry, materials, and many other technological fields. In this paper, we prepare nanopaper through physical vapor deposition (PVD) with a variety in the weight ratio between graphene and nanofiber. Then prepare composite materials with nanopaper and T300/AG80 prepreg by the meaning of autoclave molding. The morphology of nanopaper was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). And the electrical properties and the EMI shielding performances of these nanocomposites have been investigated experimentally by and four-point probe measurement and vector network analyzer. The experimental results indicate that the composites made from graphene and nanofiber nanopaper have highly electric capability, and the EMI shielding value of composites were all up to -15dB. In the same time the conductivity and the EMI shielding performances were improved with increasing the ratio of graphene in nanopaper. We tested the mechanical properties of composite materials at the same time. The average strength of composite materials is about 2000MPa, the elastic modulus is 130GPa above. We are sure that it can be used as the load-bearing structural material which has a multi-functional performance in the aviation field.

  13. A thermodynamical constitutive model for shape memory materials. Part II. The SMA composite material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James G. Boyd; Dimitris C. Lagoudas

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological SMA equations developed in Part I are used in this second paper to derive the free energy and dissipation of a SMA composite material. The derivation consists of solving a boundary value problem formulated over a mesoscale representative volume element, followed by an averaging procedure to obtain the macroscopic composite constitutive equations. Explicit equations are derived for the

  14. Experimental determination of material constants of a hybrid composite laminate

    SciTech Connect

    Ihekweazu, S.N.; Lari, S.B.; Unanwa, C.O. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of the experimental study that was conducted in order to determine the material properties of a hybrid composite laminate made from Fiberite material MXM-7714/120 (a fabric prepreg consisting of woven Kevlar{reg_sign} 49 reinforcement impregnated with Fiberite 250 F (121 C) curing 7714 epoxy resin) and HYE-2448AIE (a 250 F (121 C) curing epoxy resin impregnated unidirectional graphite tape). First, each of the materials that comprise the hybrid laminate was fabricated separately according to ASTM-D-3039 specification in order to determine their material properties. The materials were then hybridized and the properties were determined. Data from this experiment reveal that a new class of material that can meet desired specifications can be created through hybridization. The data also revealed that the properties of the materials bonded together as a hybrid complement the properties of the constituent members of the hybrid.

  15. Measurement by LASER-Generated Ultrasound of Four Stiffness Coefficients of an Anisotropic Material at Elevated Temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Audoin; C. Bescond

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves are generated through a composite material by means of a noncontact technique. It uses a Nd:Yag LASER for the generation and an interferometric probe for the detection of acoustic waveforms. From a suitable set of experimental data, an inversion scheme is used for the recovering of four stiffness coefficients. They characterize the elasticity in a principal plane of

  16. Compositional Analysis of Water-Soluble Materials in Corn Stover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shou-Feng Chen; Richard A. Mowery; Christopher J. Scarlata; C. Kevin Chambliss

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is one of the leading feedstock candidates for commodity-scale biomass-to-ethanol processing. The composition of water-soluble materials in corn stover has been determined with greater than 90% mass closure in four of five representative samples. The mass percentage of water-soluble materials in tested stover samples varied from 14 to 27% on a dry weight basis. Over 30 previously unknown

  17. Damorheology: Creep-fatigue interaction in composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osiroff

    1990-01-01

    The interaction mechanisms of time dependent material behavior and cyclic damage during fatigue loading of fiber reinforced composite laminates are addressed. A new term, damorheology, was coined to describe such physical behavior. The lamina was chosen as the building block and a cross ply laminate configuration was the selected test case. The chosen material system is the Radel X\\/T65-42 thermoplastic

  18. Structure and properties of aluminum bronze-lead composite material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. S. Voropaev; G. Y. Kalutskii

    1999-01-01

    The effect of sintering regime on the structure and properties of aluminum bronze-lead composite material is studied by experiment.\\u000a It is established that in order to prepare material with a uniform lead distribution and high mechanical properties the sintering\\u000a duration should not exceed 5 min. More prolonged heat treatment leads to redistribution of lead with formation of a coarse-grained\\u000a structure

  19. Material degradation assessment for stiffened composite shells using metamodelling approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaspars Kalnins; Rolands Rikards; Janis Auzins

    The intense interest coming from the aerospace industry indicates the need of safe exploitation of composite materials in\\u000a stiffened shell structures. Since stiffened shells are far most consumed structural component, it is important to study the\\u000a behaviour of material degradation to evaluate the safe design guidelines. Moreover, current numerical procedures cannot simulate\\u000a the collapse of stiffened shells with sufficient reliability

  20. Transverse thermal conductance of thermosetting composite materials during their cure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey D. Farmer; Eugene E. Covert

    1994-01-01

    The transverse thermal conductance of thermosetting advanced composite materials during their cure was modeled analytically and then investigated experimentally. AS4\\/3501-6 graphite\\/epoxy was used for the experiments. A model for the effective transverse conductivity of a material with cylinders arranged in rectangular order, first derived by Lord Rayleigh, was modified to account for the possible effects of a fiber\\/resin contact resistance

  1. Transverse thermal conductance of thermosetting composite materials during their cure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Farmer; E. E. Covert

    1993-01-01

    The transverse thermal conductance of thermosetting advanced composite materials during their cure was modeled analytically and then investigated experimentally. AS4\\/3501-6 graphite\\/epoxy was used for the experiments. A model for the effective transverse conductivity of a material with cylinders arranged in rectangular order, first derived by Lord Rayleigh was modified to account for the possible effects of a fiber\\/resin contact resistance

  2. Fire characteristics of cored composite materials for marine use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas A. Dembsey; Jonathan R. Barnett

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents results from Cone Calorimeter testing of two types of cored composite materials used in shipbuilding: a GRP\\/Balsa-cored sandwich and a GRP\\/PVC foam-cored sandwich. The observed phenomena of delamination, melting and charring of the core materials, and edge effects are discussed in the context of how they affect test results. The “standard” ignition data analysis method specified in

  3. Novel Microstructures for Polymer-Liquid Crystal Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magda, Jules J.

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of interface-dominated composite materials that contain a liquid crystalline (LC) phase in intimate contact with an isotropic phase. For example, polymer- dispersed liquid crystals, used in the fabrication of windows with switchable transparency, consist of micron size LC droplets dispersed in an isotropic polymer matrix. Many other types of liquid crystal composite materials can be envisioned that might have outstanding optical properties that could be exploited in novel chemical sensors, optical switches, and computer displays. This research project was based on the premise that many of these potentially useful LC composite materials can only be fabricated under microgravity conditions where gravity driven flows are absent. In the ground-based research described below, we have focused on a new class of LC composites that we call thermotropic- lyotropic liquid crystal systems (TLLCs). TLLCs consist of nanosize droplets of water dispersed in an LC matrix, with surfactants at the interface that stabilize the structure. By varying the type of surfactant one can access almost an infinite variety of unusual LC composite microstructures. Due to the importance of the interface in these types of systems, we have also developed molecular simulation models for liquid crystals at interfaces, and made some of the first measurements of the interfacial tension between liquid crystals and water.

  4. Describing isotropic and anisotropic out-of-plane deformations in thin cubic materials by use of

    E-print Network

    in {110} crystal planes for cubic materials. Using Stoney's equation, curvature measurements along out-of-plane deformations induced by thin-film residual stress on thin cubic materials are studied for all directions in any given cubic crystal plane. A modified Stoney's equation, including both

  5. Structure of boundaries in composite materials obtained using explosive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Krokhalev, A. V.; Grinberg, B. A.

    2013-11-01

    We have presented the results of studying the fine structure of interphase boundaries for a number of composite materials obtained by methods of explosive welding and explosive compacting of powder mixtures. Joints of different metals (titanium-low-carbon steel, copper-tantalum) and metals with refractory carbides (chromium carbide-titanium) have been investigated. Under welding, pairs differed from each other by the type of interaction. It has been found that, in these composites, interphase boundaries exhibit a final thickness on the order of 200 nm, throughout which the composition of the material changes gradually from a composition that corresponds to one of the components of the composite to a composition that corresponds to the second component. It has been shown that the structure of interphase boundaries is complex. With the limited solubility of components along boundaries, two fairly thick crystalline interlayers are detected, the total thickness of which is equal to the total thickness of the boundary; between the interlayers, there is a thin (to 5-7 nm in thickness) interlayer with a crystalline or amorphous structure.

  6. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  7. Fractography of modern engineering materials: Composites and metals, Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, J.E.; Gilbertson, L.N. (eds.)

    1993-01-01

    This book contains the manuscripts of eleven papers that were presented at the Second Symposium on Fractography of Modern Engineering Materials held in May 1992. The numerous advances in materials science in the six year period following the First Symposium dictated this second meeting. Not only had new materials been developed in the intervening years, but understanding of older materials had also progressed. Similarly, advances in the technology and the techniques of fractography had occurred. The objective of the symposium was to extend the colloquy on fractography to include these many advances. The paper may be divided into three sections: Unique Fractographic Techniques; Metallic Materials; Polymeric and Composite Materials. The section titles reflect the diversity of materials discussed in the meeting. The range of materials included cross-linked polyethylene, AISI 52100 steel, 2024 aluminum, and a variety of organic and metal matrix fibrous composites. The case studies presented also covered a wide range. They included failure investigations of an antenna used in deep space exploration and chemical storage tanks. Advances in the techniques of fractography were also reflected in a number of presentations; quantitative techniques and expert systems were also subjects of presentations. A short precis of each paper is included here to assist the readers in identifying works of particular interest.

  8. Mishap risk control for advanced aerospace/composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Although advanced aerospace materials and advanced composites provide outstanding performance, they also present several unique post-mishap environmental, safety, and health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on some of the unique hazards and concerns associated with these materials when damaged by fire, explosion, or high-energy impact. Additionally, recommended procedures and precautions are addressed as they pertain to all phases of a composite aircraft mishap response, including fire-fighting, investigation, recovery, clean-up, and guidelines are general in nature and not application-specific. The goal of this project is to provide factual and realistic information which can be used to develop consistent and effective procedures and policies to minimize the potential environmental, safety, and health impacts of a composite aircraft mishap response effort.

  9. Data-mined similarity function between material compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lusann; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2013-12-01

    A new method for assessing the similarity of material compositions is described. A similarity measure is important for the classification and clustering of compositions. The similarity of the material compositions is calculated utilizing a data-mined ionic substitutional similarity based upon the probability with which two ions will substitute for each other within the same structure prototype. The method is validated via the prediction of crystal structure prototypes for oxides from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database, selecting the correct prototype from a list of known prototypes within five guesses 75% of the time. It performs particularly well on the quaternary oxides, selecting the correct prototype from a list of known prototypes on the first guess 65% of the time.

  10. The behavior of sandwich structures of isotropic and composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Vinson

    1999-01-01

    The Behavior of Sandwich Structures of Isotropic and Composite Materials provides a unique presentation of mathematics, descriptions and analysis of techniques in the growing field of sandwich structures. Everything is covered, from a background of sandwich structures, to thermoelastic problems of sandwich structures, sandwich shell theory and much more. This test is ideal for the engineer-in-training, as well as the

  11. Optimal experimental design for estimating thermal properties of composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Taktak; J. V. Beck; E. P. Scott

    1993-01-01

    Design of optimal transient experiments is needed for the efficient estimation of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of composite materials. One criterion for optimal experiments is the minimization of the area (or volume) of the confidence region. The experimental designs are transient and involve both finite and semi-finite geometries with finite duration heating. Two cases are considered for the

  12. Tungsten filament as reinforcement for heat resistant composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. M. Fonshtein; G. N. Tikhomirova; V. F. Kotov; V. I. Shvarts

    1971-01-01

    Fine tungsten filament is a promising reinforcement for composite materials. This is due to the good properties of alloys based on tungsten - high recrystallizatio n temperature, high strength and modulus of elasticity in a fairly wide temperature range, and, particularly valuable, deformability of a continuous filament with a diameter from a few microns to several millimeters. Thin filaments are

  13. NASA Composite Materials Development: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Pipes, R. Byron; Johnston, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Composite materials have emerged as the materials of choice for increasing the performance and reducing the weight and cost of military, general aviation, and transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. Major advancements have been made in the ability to design, fabricate, and analyze large complex aerospace structures. The recent efforts by Boeing and Airbus to incorporate composite into primary load carrying structures of large commercial transports and to certify the airworthiness of these structures is evidence of the significant advancements made in understanding and use of these materials in real world aircraft. NASA has been engaged in research on composites since the late 1960 s and has worked to address many development issues with these materials in an effort to ensure safety, improve performance, and improve affordability of air travel for the public good. This research has ranged from synthesis of advanced resin chemistries to development of mathematical analyses tools to reliably predict the response of built-up structures under combined load conditions. The lessons learned from this research are highlighted with specific examples to illustrate the problems encountered and solutions to these problems. Examples include specific technologies related to environmental effects, processing science, fabrication technologies, nondestructive inspection, damage tolerance, micromechanics, structural mechanics, and residual life prediction. The current state of the technology is reviewed and key issues requiring additional research identified. Also, grand challenges to be solved for expanded use of composites in aero structures are identified.

  14. Making Composite-Material Parts At Moderate To High Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    Composite-material (matrix/fiber) structural components manufactured at moderate to high rates in production-line-style processes, according to proposal. In method, production lines largely automated and takes advantage of fact matrix resins cured by electron beams in addition to heat. Net result reductions in production times and costs.

  15. Development of a pultruded composite material highway guardrail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. C Bank; T. R Gentry

    2001-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials are being used to develop products for use as highway appurtenances, such as, sign supports, luminaire supports and guardrails (crash barriers). These structures, that are located alongside highways and roads, are subjected to vehicular impacts and must be designed to be ‘crashworthy’ to ensure the safety of the driving public. This paper reviews an ongoing

  16. Composite materials for roller electrodes in electromechanical treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Ya. Pavlikov; G. G. Gnesin; A. A. Flis; V. D. Valentinov; B. M. Politov

    1989-01-01

    Electromechanical treatment with roller electrodes produced from a tungsten-base composite material with additions of copper and alloy elements made it possible to increase the wear resistance of gas turbine engine parts operating under conditions of sliding friction. Such parts are, for example, reducer bearing pillow block housings made of alloy steels, pinion shafts for oil pump drives, spindles of metal

  17. Numerical Simulation of Delamination Growth in Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. P. Camanho; D. R. Ambur

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The use of decohesion elements for the simulation of delamination in composite materials is reviewed The test methods available to measure the interfacial fracture toughness used in the formulation of decohesion elements are described initially After a brief presentation of the virtual crack closure technique, the technique most widely used to simulate delamination growth, the formulation of interfacial decohesion

  18. Energy Harvesting Devices Using Macro-fiber Composite Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyun Jeong Song; Young-Tai Choi; Norman M. Wereley; Ashish S. Purekar

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the experimental validation of a design methodology for an energy harvesting device utilizing macro-fiber composite (MFC) materials. The energy harvesting device is composed of a cantilever beam with MFC elements, a tip mass, a rectifier, and an electrical resistance. A theoretical model of the energy harvesting device was developed for the estimation of generated power, voltage, and

  19. Genetic optimization of two-material composite laminates Laurent Grosset

    E-print Network

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Genetic optimization of two-material composite laminates Laurent Grosset , Satchi Venkataraman@aero.ufl.edu) Post-Doctoral Associate (satchi@aero.ufl.edu) Distinguished Professor, Fellow AIAA (haftka & Engineering Science, University of Florida, P.O.Box 116250, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Satchi Venkataraman

  20. Impact damage detection of composite materials by fiber Bragg gratings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zoran Djinovic; Michael Scheerer; Milos Tomic

    2011-01-01

    Usage of fiber-optic Bragg gratings (FBG) for strain measurement is well-known technique in structural health monitoring (SHM). However, this technique based on shift of spectral peak, suffers from different spurious signals, particularly caused by thermal effect. We present here a method for impact damage detection of composite materials based on FBG without thermal disturbance. This method is based on the

  1. Development of rice husks-plastics composites for building materials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nak-Woon; Mori, Ippei; Ohama, Yoshihiko

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new effective recycling method for rice husks and waste expanded polystyrene is developed by using a combination of both wastes. A styrene solution of waste expanded polystyrene is used as a binder for rice husks-plastics composites. The composites are prepared with various mix proportions by a hot press molding method, and tested for apparent density, water absorption, expansion in thickness, and dry and wet flexural strengths. From the test results, the apparent density of the composites is increased with increasing binder content and filler-binder ratio. Their flexural strength and wet flexural strengths reach maximums at a binder content of 30.0% and a filler-binder ratio of 1.0. Their water absorption and expansion in thickness are decreased with increasing binder content and filler-binder ratio. Since the composites have a high flexural strength and water resistance, their uses as building materials are expected. PMID:16256327

  2. A new representation for the strain energy of anisotropic elastic materials with application to damage evolution in brittle materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Elata; M. B. Rubin

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a new representation of the strain energy of an elastic material using twenty-one scalar measures of strain. These measures are associated with material line elements which are directed along the six axes of symmetry of a regular icosahedron, and they include: six measures of axial strain and fifteen measures of the angular strain. When the

  3. Technical Program General Abstracts: Materials Processing and

    E-print Network

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    and Manufacturing Division: Session I Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, TMS Materials plastic deformation and the resulting anisotropic material properties. 8:50 AM Corrosion Performance of Al of the multimodal distribution on the corrosion behavior of Al/ SiCp composites was investigated. Composites with 0

  4. Simulation of perforation and penetration in metal matrix composite materials using coupled viscoplastic damage model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Babur Deliktas; George Z. Voyiadjis; Anthony N. Palazotto

    2009-01-01

    In the first part of the two companion papers, theoretical formulation of the multiscale micromechanical constitutive model that couples the anisotropic damage mechanism with the viscoplastic deformation is presented. In the second part of these companion papers the numerical simulation of the computational aspects of the theory are elaborated. The perforation and penetration problem of metal matrix composites (MMCs) due

  5. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques Applied to the Quantitative Characterization of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1997-01-01

    In this Progress Report, we describe our recent developments of advanced ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods applied to the characterization of anisotropic materials. We present images obtained from experimental measurements of ultrasonic diffraction patterns for a thin woven composite in an immersion setup. In addition, we compare apparent signal loss measurements of the thin woven composite for phase-sensitive and phase-insensitive detection methods. All images of diffraction patterns have been included on the accompanying CD-ROM in the Adobe(Trademark) Portable Document Format (PDF). Due to the extensive amount of data, however, hardcopies of only a small representative selection of the images are included within the printed report. This Progress Report presents experimental results that support successful implementation of single element as well as one and two-dimensional ultrasonic array technologies for the inspection of textile composite structures. In our previous reports, we have addressed issues regarding beam profiles of ultrasonic pressure fields transmitted through a water reference path and transmitted through a thin woven composite sample path. Furthermore, we presented experimental results of the effect of a thin woven composite on the magnitude of an insonifying ultrasonic pressure field. In addition to the study of ultrasonic beam profiles, we consider issues relevant to the application of single-element, one-dimensional, and two-dimensional array technologies towards probing the mechanical properties of advanced engineering composites and structures. We provide comparisons between phase-sensitive and phase-insensitive detection methods for determination of textile composite structure parameters. We also compare phase-sensitive and phase-insensitive - - ---- ----- apparent signal loss measurements in an effort to study the phenomenon of phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture single-element receiver. Furthermore, in this Progress Report we extend our work on ultrasonic beam profile issues through investigation of the phase fronts of the pressure field. In Section H of this Progress Report we briefly describe the experimental arrangement and methods for data acquisition of the ultrasonic diffraction patterns upon transmission through a thin woven composite. Section III details the analysis of the experimental data followed by the experimental results in Section IV. Finally, a discussion of the observations and conclusions is found in Section V.

  6. Investigation of low velocity impact damage on filamentary composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of an investigation of the effect of low velocity impact on the residual modulus and residual strength of flat filamentary composite materials. Theoretical analysis of composite materials indicates that the modulus of the material must decrease as impact damage increases. This decrease must also correlate to the decrease in residual strength. This study attempts to verify these hypotheses. Graphite/epoxy laminates (AS4/3501-6) of various fiber orientations (8 (0 deg), 2 (+ or - 45 deg)sub 8) were impacted using a falling weight impact tester. Impact energies ranged from 0.42 to 1.55 ft-lb, with impact velocities from 2.03 to 3.98 ft/sec. The results show that there is a reduction in residual modulus of the plate as the impact energy increases.

  7. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  8. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  9. Composite materials. Volume 1: Properties, non-destructive testing, and repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1997-01-01

    This book provides a practical overview of the different types, properties, applications and design implementations of the latest composite materials. It describes important composite families, including metals, ceramics, polymers and other engineered materials; shows how each type of composite may be designed, manufactured, strengthened, and repaired; introduces composite modeling techniques; and explains the major industrial applications for composites. Primary markets

  10. Percolation modeling of self-damaging of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Privman, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    We propose the concept of autonomous self-damaging in “smart” composite materials, controlled by activation of added nanosize “damaging” capsules. Percolation-type modeling approach earlier applied to the related concept of self-healing materials, is used to investigate the behavior of the initial material's fatigue. We aim at achieving a relatively sharp drop in the material's integrity after some initial limited fatigue develops in the course of the sample's usage. Our theoretical study considers a two-dimensional lattice model and involves Monte Carlo simulations of the connectivity and conductance in the high-connectivity regime of percolation. We give several examples of local capsule-lattice and capsule-capsule activation rules and show that the desired self-damaging property can only be obtained with rather sophisticated “smart” material's response involving not just damaging but also healing capsules.

  11. Test Report: Direct and Indirect Lightning Effects on Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning tests were performed on composite materials as a part of an investigation of electromagnetic effects on the materials. Samples were subjected to direct and remote simulated lightning strikes. Samples included various thicknesses of graphite filament reinforced plastic (GFRP), material enhanced by expanded aluminum foil layers, and material with an aluminum honeycomb core. Shielding properties of the material and damage to the sample surfaces and joints were investigated. Adding expanded aluminum foil layers and increasing the thickness of GFRP improves the shielding effectiveness against lightning induced fields and the ability to withstand lightning strikes. A report describing the lightning strike tests performed by the U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center, Redstone Arsenal, AL, STERT-TE-E-EM, is included as an appendix.

  12. Femtosecond pulse visible laser processing of fibre composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Jörg; Kautek, Wolfgang

    1996-10-01

    A first investigation on the ablation of composite materials like carbon and silicon-carbide reinforced alumo- and borosilicate glasses by 300 fs laser pulses (620 nm) in comparison to experiments with 17 ns pulse excimer laser (308 nm) treatment is presented. In all composites, femtosecond laser scans with a fluence of less than 2 J cm -2 produce well defined cuts with smooth side walls in contrast to the nanosecond laser result where extremely incongruent ablation is observed. Visible lasers should not be applicable because SiC and the glasses are practically transparent. Visible subpicosecond pulses of high intensity in the TW cm -2 range allow multi-photon absorption accompanied by incubation phenomena. The morphology of the groove edges reveal the contrasting ablation thresholds and rates of the fibre and glass materials. The ablation thresholds of the transparent components, i.e. the glass matrices and SiC, are about one order of magnitude greater than that of carbon which is ˜ 0.15 J cm -2. Incubation effects are important for the absorption mechanisms in the transparent materials. When a critical number of pulses has not been reached at the SiC-glass composites, only the glass is preferentially ablated, and the fibres remain intact. This is in contrast to the C-glass composites where the ablation behaviour is opposite.

  13. Development of a novel regenerated cellulose composite material.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Rasike; Vongsanga, Kylie; Wang, Xungai; Byrne, Nolene

    2015-05-01

    We report for the first time on a new natural composite material achieved by blending cotton and duck feather using an ionic liquid. The addition of duck feather was found to improve the elasticity, strain at break, by 50% when compared to regenerated cellulose alone. This is a significant finding since regenerated cotton using ionic liquids often suffers from poor elasticity. The improved elasticity is likely due to the regenerated duck feather maintaining its helical structure. The new regenerated cellulose composites were characterized using a combination of dynamic mechanical analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25659713

  14. A constitutive model for anisotropic materials based on Neuber’s rule

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland Mücke; Otto-Ernst Bernhardi

    2003-01-01

    Phenomenological approaches to fatigue damage prediction often rely on the assessment of local stress–strain concentrations in structural components. To avoid complex plastic analysis in fatigue assessment, approximate constitutive models have been developed to evaluate the local inelastic response of the material and which allow for an adequate lifetime prediction in a competitive time. One of these approximate methods is the

  15. Cyanide Bridged Molecular Magnetic Materials with Anisotropic Transition Metal Ions: Investigation of Bistable Magnetic Phenomena 

    E-print Network

    Avendano, Carolina

    2011-08-08

    , with the highest ordering temperature being observed for the K+ analog which exhibits a TC of 28.5 K. The phenomenon of linkage isomerism reported for PB analogs and other molecular materials that incorporate the [Cr(CN)6]3- ion wherein the CN ligand reverses its...

  16. Surface waves in an exponentially graded, general anisotropic elastic material under the influence of gravity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. T. Ting

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper Destrade [1] studied surface waves in an exponentially graded orthotropic elastic material. He showed that the quartic equation for the Stroh eigenvalue p is, after properly modified, a quadratic equation in p2 with real coefficients. He also showed that the displacement and the stress decay at different rates with the depth x2 of the half-space. Vinh

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks in conductive composite materials.

    PubMed

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leo G J; de With, G Bert

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive composite materials can be used for a wide range of applications because they combine the advantages of a specific polymeric material (e.g., thermal and mechanical properties) with the electrical properties of conductive filler particles. However, the overall electrical behaviour of these composite materials is usually much below the potential of the conductive fillers, mainly because by mixing two different components, new interfaces and interphases are created, changing the properties and behaviours of both. Our goal is to characterize and understand the nature and influence of these interfaces on the electrical properties of composite materials. We have improved a technique based on the use of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water, followed by coating glass substrates, and drying and removing the CMC with a nitric acid treatment. We used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques to characterize the SWCNT films, and developed an in situ resistance measurement technique to analyse the influence of both the individual components and the mixture of an epoxy/amine system on the electrical behaviour of the SWCNTs. The results showed that impregnating a SWCNT network with a polymer is not the only factor that affects the film resistance; air exposure, temperature, physical and chemical properties of the individual polymer components, and also the formation of a polymeric network, can all have an influence on the macroscopic electrical properties of the initial SWCNT network. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the effects that each of the components can have on each other before trying to prepare an efficient polymer composite material. PMID:25430670

  18. Influence of gas composition and the mask materials on the etch profile of dry-etched structures in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwesinger, Norbert; Hotovy, Ivan; Saendig, Torsten; Pelzus, Alexander

    1996-09-01

    In the field of micromachining dry etching processes of silicon are getting more and more important in view of applications. By means of RIE processes it is possible to achieve structures with a very high aspect ratio. This is interesting especially in comparison with the well known but expensive LIGA technique. Unfortunately the anisotropy of the profile in silicon depends strongly on different process conditions. Therefore experiments were carried out with variations in the gas composition, the plasma power and the mask materials. All investigations were made in a 310-type machine from STS. The gas composition was made of SF6, O2 and CHF3. The flow rate of these gases was varied in a wide range. The power of the plasma was hanged from 75W up to 600W at a frequency of 13,56MHz. Aluminium, copper, nickel and chromium were used as masking materials. The width of the patterns was in a range of > 20 micrometers. In contradiction to results known from literature it was not simple to achieve structures with vertical sidewalls. Using aluminium as materials, the sidewalls were rounded independent of the power and the composition of the gas. In some cases a small redeposition was observable at the bottom of the structures. A kind of microgas was observed, too. Copper showed high etch rates in some gas compositions and at defined power conditions. Therefore a complete removing of the masking layer was observed in some cases. Some material was redeposited in the transition zone between the sidewalls and the bottom. The structures showed rounded edges and no vertical sidewalls. A higher redeposition rate was found using nickel as masking material. Unfortunately this redeposition occurred at the bottom of the structures. This is measurable in a decrease of the etch rate. The structures are rounded with a kind of vertical sidewalls. Anisotropic structures with vertical sidewalls were observed with chromium as mask layer. The anisotropic etch behavior with a high aspect ratio was achieved only in a small range of the gas composition and the plasma power.

  19. Explorations in the application of nanotechnology to improve the mechanical properties of composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheng Yang

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents the research achievements on the design, preparation, characterization, and analysis of a series of composite materials. By studying the interface interaction of the composite materials using nanotechnology, we developed composite materials that achieve satisfactory mechanical properties in two classes of materials. Durable press (DP) natural textiles are important consumer products usually achieved by erosslinking the molecules in

  20. Analytical yield criterion for an anisotropic material containing spherical voids and exhibiting tension–compression asymmetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel B. Stewart; Oana Cazacu

    A significant difference between the behavior in tension versus compression is obtained at the polycrystal level if either twinning or non-Schmid effects are contributors to the plastic deformation at the single crystal level. Examples of materials that exhibit tension–compression asymmetry include hexagonal close-packed (HCP) polycrystals and intermetallics (e.g., molybdenum compounds). Despite recent progress in modeling their yield behavior in the