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Sample records for anisotropic gle model

  1. Model Simulations of Medium Time Scale Ionization Due to Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles (GLE59 and GLE in the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishev, Alexander; Velinov, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles (SEP) could cause an excess of ionization in the atmosphere, specifically in polar and sub-polar regions. This effect is observed mainly in the middle atmosphere. The ionization effect could be strong at short time scales during major ground level enhancements (GLE)s of GCR. However, for the aims of recent atmospheric physics and atmospheric chemistry studies, namely the influence on the minor constituents and aerosols, it is important to derive the medium time scale ionization effect at various altitudes above the sea level. GLE 70 on December of 13, 2006 is the third strongest event of the previous solar cycle 23. The ionization effect in the Earth atmosphere is obtained for various latitudes on the basis of a full Monte Carlo simulation of CR induced atmospheric cascade at several altitudes, namely 35 km, 25 km, 15 km and 8 km above the sea level. Here we adopt previously reported ion production rate profiles obtained with Monte Carlo simulation of atmospheric cascade performed with the CORSIKA 6.990 code using FLUKA 2011 and QGSJET II hadron generators. A realistic winter atmospheric model is assumed. The 24-h ionization effect is computed for the sub-polar and polar regions, where it is expected to be the maximal effect of the planetary distribution on the Earth. Thus studied precipitation of energetic particles (GCR and SEP) is important and should be included in chemistry-climate models. Similar computations are performed for GLE 59 the so-called Bstille day event on 14 July 2000.

  2. Neutron multiplicity recordings during GLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eduard, Vashenyuk; Leonid, Schur; Balabin, Yuri; Gvozdevsky, Boris

    A neutron multiplicity can give the information on a spectrum of primary solar protons and its variations during ground level enhancements (GLE). Such rare events are detected by ground based neutron monitors. With the help of the multiplicity recorder designed in PGI the variations of multiplicities during the GLE of December 13, 2006 on the neutron monitor in Barentsburg (Spitsbergen) have been studied. The neutron monitor in Barentsburg (18-NM-64) was put into operation on April, 2003. The recently developed data acquisition system is based on a PC equipped with two extension cards. One of them is ADLINK PCI-7233H, which is a high-speed 32-channel digital input card. The other is ADLINK PCI-8554, 12-channel counter/timer card. The specially written collecting program runs continuously. It captures the data registered by the two cards and stores the data to the hard disk. The PCI-7233H card registers pulses from all 18 channels of the neutron monitor and intervals between them. PCI-8554 card counts pulses from atmospheric pressure and temperature sensors. On the basis of this device the multiplicity recorder is realized to register the count rates on multiplicities (2-10). During the GLE on 13 December, 2006 significant increase of the count rates of multiplicities from 2 up to 5 was detected. The multiplicity spectrum changes are compared with the solar proton spectrum dynamics during event. The spectra of relativistic solar protons were derived by modeling technique from the worldwide neutron monitor network.

  3. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  4. On the prediction of GLE events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Marlon; Reyes, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    A model for predicting the occurrence of GLE events is presented. This model uses the UMASEP scheme based on the lag-correlation between the time derivatives of soft X-ray flux (SXR) and near-earth proton fluxes (Núñez, 2011, 2015). We extended this approach with the correlation between SXR and ground-level neutron measurements. This model was calibrated with X-ray, proton and neutron data obtained during the period 1989-2015 from the GOES/HEPAD instrument, and neutron data from the Neutron Monitor Data Base (NMDB). During this period, 32 GLE events were detected by neutron monitor stations. We consider that a GLE prediction is successful when it is triggered before the first GLE alert is issued by any neutron station of the NMDB network. For the most recent 16 years (2015-2000), the model was able to issue successful predictions for the 53.8% (7 of 13 GLE events), obtaining a false alarm ratio (FAR) of 36.4% (4/11), and an average warning time of 10 min. For the first years of the evaluation period (1989-1999), the model was able to issue successful predictions for the 31.6% (6 of 19 GLE events), obtaining a FAR of 33.3% (3/9), and an AWT of 17 min. A preliminary conclusion is that the model is not able to predict the promptest events but the more gradual ones. The final goal of this project, which is now halfway through its planned two-year duration, is the prediction of >500 MeV events. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under agreement No 637324.

  5. A GLE multi-block model for the evaluation of seismic displacements of slopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, V.; Cascone, E.; Biondi, G.

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes a multi-block displacement model for the evaluation of seismic permanent displacements of natural slopes with slip surface of general shape. A rigorous limit equilibrium method of stability analysis is considered and an application to an ideal clay slope is presented including the effect of excess pore pressure build-up on the displacement response.

  6. Anisotropic models for compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Ray, Saibal; Dayanandan, Baiju

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper we obtain an anisotropic analog of the Durgapal and Fuloria (Gen Relativ Gravit 17:671, 1985) perfect fluid solution. The methodology consists of contraction of the anisotropic factor with the help of both metric potentials and . Here we consider the same as Durgapal and Fuloria (Gen Relativ Gravit 17:671, 1985) did, whereas is as given by Lake (Phys Rev D 67:104015, 2003). The field equations are solved by the change of dependent variable method. The solutions set mathematically thus obtained are compared with the physical properties of some of the compact stars, strange star as well as white dwarf. It is observed that all the expected physical features are available related to the stellar fluid distribution, which clearly indicates the validity of the model.

  7. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  8. Anisotropic invariance in minisuperspace models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Sabido, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce invariance under anisotropic transformations to cosmology. This invariance is one of the key ingredients of the theory of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point put forward by Hořava. We find that this new symmetry in the minisuperspace introduces characteristics to the model that can be relevant in the ultraviolet regime. For example, by canonical quantization we find a Schrödinger-type equation which avoids the problem of frozen time in quantum cosmology. For simple cases we obtain solutions to this quantum equation in a Kantowski–Sachs (KS) minisuperspace. At the classical level, we study KS and Friedmann–Robertson–Walker cosmologies, obtaining modifications to the solutions of general relativity that can be relevant in the early Universe.

  9. Modeling of anisotropic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Menzel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Biological soft tissues exhibit non-linear complex properties, the quantification of which presents a challenge. Nevertheless, these properties, such as skin anisotropy, highly influence different processes that occur in soft tissues, for instance wound healing, and thus its correct identification and quantification is crucial to understand them. Experimental and computational works are required in order to find the most precise model to replicate the tissues' properties. In this work, we present a wound healing model focused on the proliferative stage that includes angiogenesis and wound contraction in three dimensions and which relies on the accurate representation of the mechanical behavior of the skin. Thus, an anisotropic hyperelastic model has been considered to analyze the effect of collagen fibers on the healing evolution of an ellipsoidal wound. The implemented model accounts for the contribution of the ground matrix and two mechanically equivalent families of fibers. Simulation results show the evolution of the cellular and chemical species in the wound and the wound volume evolution. Moreover, the local strain directions depend on the relative wound orientation with respect to the fibers.

  10. Evolution of multidimensional flat anisotropic cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, A. ); Demianski, M. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics , Universita di Roma I, La Sapienza, Rome ); Ivanov, P.; Polnarev, A.G. )

    1993-07-15

    We study the dynamics of a flat multidimensional anisotropic cosmological model filled with an anisotropic fluidlike medium. By an appropriate choice of variables, the dynamical equations reduce to a two-dimensional dynamical system. We present a detailed analysis of the time evolution of this system and the conditions of the existence of spacetime singularities. We investigate the conditions under which violent, exponential, and power-law inflation is possible. We show that dimensional reduction cannot proceed by anti-inflation (rapid contraction of internal space). Our model indicates that it is very difficult to achieve dimensional reduction by classical means.

  11. Modeling of anisotropic hardening of sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Fusahito; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Uemori, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    To describe the evolution of anisotropy of sheet metals, in terms of both r-values and stresses, the present paper proposes anisotropic hardening models, where the shape of yield surface changes with increasing plastic strain. In this framework of modeling, any types of yield functions are able to be used. The evolution of anisotropy is expressed by updating the yield function as an interpolation between two yield functions defined at two different effective plastic strains. In this paper, two types of interpolation models, i.e., nonlinear interpolation model and piecewise interpolation model are presented. These models are validated by comparing the experimental data on 3003-O aluminum sheet (after Hu, Int J Plasticity 23, 620-639, 2007). To describe the Bauschinger effect, the combined anisotropic-kinematic hardening model is formulated based on Yoshida-Uemori kinematic hardening model.

  12. Modelling Fracture Propagation in Anisotropic Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Baotang; Siren, Topias; Rinne, Mikael

    2015-05-01

    Anisotropic rock mass is often encountered in rock engineering, and cannot be simplified as an isotropic problem in numerical models. A good understanding of rock fracturing processes and the ability to predict fracture initiation and propagation in anisotropic rock masses are required for many rock engineering problems. This paper describes the development of the anisotropic function in FRACOD—a specialized fracture propagation modelling software—and its recent applications to rock engineering issues. Rock anisotropy includes strength anisotropy and modulus anisotropy. The level of complexity in developing the anisotropic function for strength anisotropy and modulus anisotropy in FRACOD is significantly different. The strength anisotropy function alone does not require any alteration in the way that FRACOD calculates rock stress and displacement, and therefore is relatively straightforward. The modulus anisotropy function, on the other hand, requires modification of the fundamental equations of stress and displacement in FRACOD, a boundary element code, and hence is more complex and difficult. In actual rock engineering, the strength anisotropy is often considered to be more pronounced and important than the modulus anisotropy, and dominates the stability and failure pattern of the rock mass. The modulus anisotropy will not be considered in this study. This paper discusses work related to the development of the strength anisotropy in FRACOD. The anisotropy function has been tested using numerical examples. The predicted failure surfaces are mostly along the weakest planes. Predictive modelling of the Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment was made. The model suggests that spalling is very sensitive to the direction of anisotropy. Recent observations from the in situ experiment showed that shear fractures rather than tensile fractures occur in the holes. According to the simulation, the maximum tensile stress is well below the tensile strength, but the maximum

  13. Some analytical models of anisotropic strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Over the years of the concept of local isotropy has become a too stringent condition in modeling relativistic self-gravitating objects. Taking local anisotropy into consideration, in this work, some analytical models of relativistic anisotropic charged strange stars have been developed. The Einstein-Maxwell gravitational field equations have been solved with a particular form of one of the metric potentials. The radial pressure and the energy density have been assumed to follow the usual linear equation of state of strange quark matter, the MIT bag model.

  14. Chromo-natural model in anisotropic background

    SciTech Connect

    Maleknejad, Azadeh; Erfani, Encieh E-mail: eerfani@ipm.ir

    2014-03-01

    In this work we study the chromo-natural inflation model in the anisotropic setup. Initiating inflation from Bianchi type-I cosmology, we analyze the system thoroughly during the slow-roll inflation, from both analytical and numerical points of view. We show that the isotropic FRW inflation is an attractor of the system. In other words, anisotropies are damped within few e-folds and the chromo-natural model respects the cosmic no-hair conjecture. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the slow-roll limit, the anisotropies in both chromo-natural and gauge-flation models share the same dynamics.

  15. Anisotropic Cloth Modeling for Material Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingmin; Pan, Zhigengx; Mi, Qingfeng

    Physically based cloth simulation has been challenging the graphics community for more than three decades. With the developing of virtual reality and clothing CAD, it has become the key technique of virtual garment and try-on system. Although it has received considerable attention in computer graphics, due to its flexible property and realistic feeling that the textile engineers pay much attention to, there is not a successful methodology to simulate cloth both in visual realism and physical accuracy. We present a new anisotropic textile modeling method based on physical mass-spring system, which models the warps and wefts separately according to the different material fabrics. The simulation process includes two main steps: firstly the rigid object simulation and secondly the flexible mass simulation near to be equilibrium. A multiresolution modeling is applied to enhance the tradeoff fruit of the realistic presentation and computation cost. Finally, some examples and the analysis results show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Simple Models for Polymeric and Anisotropic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Martin

    We hope that the complexity of the world is neither in contrast with the simplicity of the basic laws of physics [1] nor with the simple physical models to be reviewed or proposed in the following. However, physical phenomena occurring in complex materials cannot be encapsulated within a single numerical paradigm. In fact, they should be described within hierarchical, multi-level numerical models in which each sub-model is responsible for different spatio-temporal behavior and passes out the averaged parameters to the model, which is next in the hierarchy (Fig. 1.1). Polymeric liquids far from equilibrium belong to the class of anisotropic liquids.1 This monograph is devoted to the understanding of the anisotropic properties of polymeric and complex fluids such as viscoelastic and orientational behavior of polymeric liquids, the rheological properties of ferrofluids and liquid crystals subjected to external fields, based on the architecture of their molecular constituents. The topic is of considerable concern in basic research for which models should be as simple as possible, but not simpler. Certainly, it is also of technological relevance. Statistical physics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics are challenged by the desired structure-property relationships. Experiments such as static and dynamic light and neutron scattering, particle tracking, flow birefringence etc. together with rheological measurements have been essential to adjust or test basic theoretical concepts, such as a ‘linear stressoptic rule’ which connects orientation and stress, or the effect of molecular weight, solvent conditions, and external field parameters on shape, diffusion, degradation, and alignment of molecules.

  17. Relativistic Modelling of Stable Anisotropic Super-Dense Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Jasim, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present article we have obtained new set of exact solutions of Einstein field equations for anisotropic fluid spheres by using the Herrera et al. [1] algorithm. The anisotropic fluid solutions so obtained join continuously to the Schwarzschild exterior solution across the pressure-free boundary. It is observed that most of the new anisotropic solutions are well-behaved and are used to construct the super-dense star models such as neutron stars and pulsars.

  18. Constitutive modeling of inelastic anisotropic material response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A constitutive equation was developed to predict the inelastic thermomechanical response of single crystal turbine blades. These equations are essential for developing accurate finite element models of hot section components and contribute significantly to the understanding and prediction of crack initiation and propagation. The method used was limited to unified state variable constitutive equations. Two approaches to developing an anisotropic constitutive equation were reviewed. One approach was to apply the Stouffer-Bodner representation for deformation induced anisotropy to materials with an initial anisotropy such as single crystals. The second approach was to determine the global inelastic strain rate from the contribution of the slip in each of the possible crystallographic slip systems. A three dimensional finite element is being developed with a variable constitutive equation link that can be used for constitutive equation development and to predict the response of an experiment using the actual specimen geometry and loading conditions.

  19. A realizable EDQNM model for anisotropic scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lance; Ulitsky, Mark

    1999-11-01

    As noted in the previous talk and abstract, the direct application of the edqnm formalism to two scalars with different diffusivities leads to a scalar covariance spectrum that violates the Cauchy-Schwartz inequality. This can be remedied by eliminating the explicit dependence of the eddy damping time scales on the molecular diffusivities, which can be shown to be unphysical at short times. Here we present an extension of this idea to anisotropic scalars. Anisotropy in this case results from uniform mean gradients of the scalar concentration in one direction. The approach we take is similar to the one described in Herr, Wang and Collins (Phys. Fluids 8:1588, 1996), except we substitute the modified eddy damping coefficients derived earlier for the isotropic scalar. The resulting edqnm model yields a realizable covariance spectrum for all times and for all combinations of the scalar diffusivities we considered. Several example calculations will be presented.

  20. MOSSFRAC: An anisotropic 3D fracture model

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W C; Levatin, J L

    2006-08-14

    Despite the intense effort for nearly half a century to construct detailed numerical models of plastic flow and plastic damage accumulation, models for describing fracture, an equally important damage mechanism still cannot describe basic fracture phenomena. Typical fracture models set the stress tensor to zero for tensile fracture and set the deviatoric stress tensor to zero for compressive fracture. One consequence is that the simple case of the tensile fracture of a cylinder under combined compressive radial and tensile axial loads is not modeled correctly. The experimental result is a cylinder that can support compressive radial loads, but no axial load, whereas, the typical numerical result is a cylinder with all stresses equal to zero. This incorrect modeling of fracture locally also has a global effect, because material that is fracturing produces stress release waves, which propagate from the fracture and influence the surrounding material. Consequently, it would be useful to have a model that can describe the stress relief and the resulting anisotropy due to fracture. MOSSFRAC is a material model that simulates three-dimensional tensile and shear fracture in initially isotropic elastic-plastic materials, although its framework is also amenable to initially anisotropic materials. It differs from other models by accounting for the effects of cracks on the constitutive response of the material, so that the previously described experiment, as well as complicated fracture scenarios are simulated more accurately. The model is implemented currently in the LLNL hydrocodes DYNA3D, PARADYN, and ALE3D. The purpose of this technical note is to present a complete qualitative description of the model and quantitative descriptions of salient features.

  1. Anisotropic multicluster model in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gijón, A.; Gálvez, F. J.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Buendía, E.

    2016-06-01

    Multicluster models consider that the nucleons can be moving around different centers in the nuclei. These models have been widely used to describe light nuclei but always considering that the mean field is composed of isotropic harmonic oscillators with different centers. In this work, we propose an extension of these models by using anisotropic harmonic oscillators. The strengths of these oscillators, the distance among the different centers and the disposition of the nucleons inside every cluster are free parameters which have been fixed using the variational criterion. All the one-body and two-body matrix elements have been analytically calculated. Only a numerical integration on the Euler angles is needed to carry out the projection on the values of the total spin of the state and its third component. We have studied the ground state and the first excited states of 8Be, 12C and 10Be getting good results for the energies. The disposition of the nucleons in the different clusters have also been analyzed by using projection on the different Cartesian planes getting much more information than when the radial one-body density is used.

  2. Anisotropic model-based SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chad; Gunther, Jake; Moon, Todd

    2013-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collections that integrate over a wide range of aspect angles hold the potentional for improved resolution and fosters improved scene interpretability and target detection. However, in practice it is difficult to realize the potential due to the anisotropic scattering of objects in the scene. The radar cross section (RCS) of most objects changes as a function of aspect angle. The isotropic assumption is tacitly made for most common image formation algorithms (IFA). For wide aspect scenarios one way to account for anistropy would be to employ a piecewise linear model. This paper focuses on such a model but it incorporates aspect and spatial magnitude filters in the image formation process. This is advantageous when prior knowledge is available regarding the desired targets' RCS signature spatially and in aspect. The appropriate filters can be incorporated into the image formation processing so that specific targets are emphasized while other targets are suppressed. This is demonstrated on the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) GOTCHA1 data set to demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach.

  3. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  4. Anisotropic stress and stability in modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Kunz, Martin

    2011-03-15

    The existence of anisotropic stress of a purely geometrical origin seems to be a characteristic of higher order gravity models, and has been suggested as a probe to test these models observationally, for example, in weak lensing experiments. In this paper, we seek to find a class of higher order gravity models of f(R,G) type that would give us a zero anisotropic stress and study the consequences for the viability of the actual model. For the special case of a de Sitter background, we identify a subclass of models with the desired property. We also find a direct link between anisotropic stress and the stability of the model as well as the presence of extra degrees of freedom, which seems to be a general feature of higher order gravity models. Particularly, setting the anisotropic stress equal to zero for a de Sitter background leads to a singularity that makes it impossible to reach the de Sitter evolution.

  5. Anisotropic distributions in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Xiao, Kai; Feng, Zhao; Liu, Feng; Snellings, Raimond

    2016-03-01

    With a multiphase transport (AMPT) model we investigate the relation between the magnitude, fluctuations, and correlations of the initial state spatial anisotropy ɛn and the final state anisotropic flow coefficients vn in Au+Au collisions at √{s NN}=200 GeV. It is found that the relative eccentricity fluctuations in AMPT account for the observed elliptic flow fluctuations, both are in agreement with the elliptic flow fluctuation measurements from the STAR collaboration. In addition, the studies based on two- and multiparticle correlations and event-by-event distributions of the anisotropies suggest that the elliptic-power function is a promising candidate of the underlying probability density function of the event-by-event distributions of ɛn as well as vn. Furthermore, the correlations between different order symmetry planes and harmonics in the initial coordinate space and final state momentum space are presented. Nonzero values of these correlations have been observed. The comparison between our calculations and data will, in the future, shed new insight into the nature of the fluctuations of the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions.

  6. Deformation modeling and constitutive modeling for anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    A study of deformation mechanisms in the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 was conducted. Monotonic and cyclic tests were conducted from 20 to 1093 C. Both (001) and near-(123) crystals were tested, at strain rates of 0.5 and 50 percent/minute. The deformation behavior could be grouped into two temperature regimes: low temperatures, below 760 C; and high temperatures, above 820 to 950 C depending on the strain rate. At low temperatures, the mechanical behavior was very anisotropic. An orientation dependent CRSS, a tension-compression asymmetry, and anisotropic strain hardening were all observed. The material was deformed by planar octahedral slip. The anisotropic properties were correlated with the ease of cube cross-slip, as well as the number of active slip systems. At high temperatures, the material was isotropic, and deformed by homogeneous gamma by-pass. It was found that the temperature dependence of the formation of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults was responsible for the local minimum in the CRSS of this alloy at 400 C. It was proposed that the cube cross-slip process must be reversible. This was used to explain the reversible tension-compression asymmetry, and was used to study models of cross-slip. As a result, the cross-slip model proposed by Paidar, Pope and Vitek was found to be consistent with the proposed slip reversibility. The results were related to anisotropic viscoplastic constitutive models. The model proposed by Walter and Jordan was found to be capable of modeling all aspects of the material anisotropy. Temperature and strain rate boundaries for the model were proposed, and guidelines for numerical experiments were proposed.

  7. Dbp5, Gle1-IP6 and Nup159

    PubMed Central

    Folkmann, Andrew W.; Noble, Kristen N.; Cole, Charles N.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is a stepwise process involving distinct cellular processes including transcription, mRNA (mRNA) processing, mRNA export, and translation. As mRNAs are being synthesized, proteins associate with the RNA to form messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). Previous studies have demonstrated that the RNA-binding protein composition of these mRNPs is dynamic, changing as the mRNP moves through the different steps of gene expression, and playing a critical role in these events. An important step during this maturation process occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) where the export protein Gle1 bound to inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) spatially activates the ATP-hydrolysis and mRNP-remodeling activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5. Recent work from our laboratory and others has provided important insights into the function and regulation of Dbp5. These include a more detailed explanation of the mechanism of Dbp5 RNP remodeling, the role of Gle1-IP6 in stimulating Dbp5 ATPase activity, and the identification of a novel paradigm for regulation of Dbp5 by Nup159. Based on in vitro biochemical assays, X-ray crystallography, and corresponding in vivo phenotypes, we propose here an updated model of the Dbp5 cycle during mRNP export through the NPC. This takes into account all available data and provides a platform for future studies. PMID:22064466

  8. Anisotropic subvoxel-smooth conduction model for bioelectromagnetism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The bioelectric conduction model plays a key role in bioelectromagnetism analysis, such as solving electromagnetic forward and inverse problems. This paper is aimed to develop an anisotropic subvoxel-smooth conduction model (ASCM) to characterize the electrical conductivity tensor jump across the tissue interface, which is derived based on the interfacial continuity condition with asymptotic analysis method. This conduction model is furthermore combined with finite volume method to improve the numerical accuracy for solving electromagnetic forward problem. The performance of ASCM for electrical potential analysis is verified by comparison with analytic solution. The method is also applied to investigate the effect of anisotropic conduction on EEG analysis in a realistic human head model.

  9. Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model for polar ice masses, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Luca; Greve, Ralf; Seddik, Hakime; Faria, Sérgio H.

    2010-03-01

    A complete theoretical presentation of the Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor (CAFFE model) is given. The CAFFE model is an application of the theory of mixtures with continuous diversity for the case of large polar ice masses in which induced anisotropy occurs. The anisotropic response of the polycrystalline ice is described by a generalization of Glen’s flow law, based on a scalar anisotropic enhancement factor. The enhancement factor depends on the orientation mass density, which is closely related to the orientation distribution function and describes the distribution of grain orientations (fabric). Fabric evolution is governed by the orientation mass balance, which depends on four distinct effects, interpreted as local rigid body rotation, grain rotation, rotation recrystallization (polygonization) and grain boundary migration (migration recrystallization), respectively. It is proven that the flow law of the CAFFE model is truly anisotropic despite the collinearity between the stress deviator and stretching tensors.

  10. The anisotropic λ-deformed SU (2) model is integrable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfetsos, Konstantinos; Siampos, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    The all-loop anisotropic Thirring model interpolates between the WZW model and the non-Abelian T-dual of the anisotropic principal chiral model. We focus on the SU (2) case and we prove that it is classically integrable by providing its Lax pair formulation. We derive its underlying symmetry current algebra and use it to show that the Poisson brackets of the spatial part of the Lax pair, assume the Maillet form. In this way we procure the corresponding r and s matrices which provide non-trivial solutions to the modified Yang-Baxter equation.

  11. Hysteresis modeling of anisotropic and isotropic nanocrystalline hard magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, D. R.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2003-05-01

    In the Hauser model, the magnetic state of a system is obtained by minimizing the so-called total energy function for a statistical set of magnetic domains. In this article, this energetic model of ferromagnetic materials is used in order to calculate hysteresis loops of isotropic and anisotropic nanocrystalline SmCo films at room temperature. A qualitative very good agreement between the calculated and experimental curves is obtained, mainly in the anisotropic case. Also, it has been verified that, under suitable approximations, the free parameters of the model can tie with intrinsic characteristics of the reversal magnetization process.

  12. What are the causes for the spread of GLE parameters deduced from NM data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bütikofer, R.; Flückiger, E.

    2015-08-01

    Investigations have shown that the analysis results of ground level enhancements (GLEs) based on neutron monitor (NM) data for a selected event can differ considerably depending the procedure used. This may have significant consequences e.g. for the assessment of radiation doses at flight altitudes. The reasons for the spread of the GLE parameters deduced from NM data can be manifold and are at present unclear. They include differences in specific properties of the various analysis procedures (e.g. NM response functions, different ways in taking into account the dynamics of the Earth's magnetospheric field), different characterisations of the solar particle flux near Earth as well as the specific selection of NM stations used for the analysis. In the present paper we quantitatively investigate this problem for a time interval during the maximum phase of the GLE on 13 December 2006. We present and discuss the changes in the resulting GLE parameters when using different NM response functions, different model representations of the Earth's magnetospheric field as well as different assumptions for the solar particle spectrum and pitch angle distribution near Earth. The results of the study are expected to yield a basis for the reduction in the spread of the GLE parameters deduced from NM data.

  13. Shear-free anisotropic cosmological models in {f (R)} gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, Amare; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-04-01

    We study a class of shear-free, homogeneous but anisotropic cosmological models with imperfect matter sources in the context of f( R) gravity. We show that the anisotropic stresses are related to the electric part of the Weyl tensor in such a way that they balance each other. We also show that within the class of orthogonal f( R) models, small perturbations of shear are damped, and that the electric part of the Weyl tensor and the anisotropic stress tensor decay with the expansion as well as the heat flux of the curvature fluid. Specializing in locally rotationally symmetric spacetimes in orthonormal frames, we examine the late-time behaviour of the de Sitter universe in f( R) gravity. For the Starobinsky model of f( R), we study the evolutionary behavior of the Universe by numerically integrating the Friedmann equation, where the initial conditions for the expansion, acceleration and jerk parameters are taken from observational data.

  14. An anisotropic extension of Bodner's model of viscoplasticity: Model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David N.

    1994-01-01

    An anisotropic viscoplasticity model is developed as an extension of the well known Bodner model. The extension is made by replacing the effective stress of the isotropic Bodner model by one involving invariants for transverse isotropy. The resulting model retains the simplicity of Bodner's in the ease with which the material constants are determined experimentally. It allows a representation of strong initial anisotropy yet is based on the scalar state variable under the assertion that induced anisotropy is negligible relative to the strong initial anisotropy. Temperature dependence is taken as in the original Bodner theory. Account is made of fiber volume fraction through nonlinear rules of mixture applied to the stress history and anisotropy parameters. Focus is on the theoretical development of the model, however, application to a W/Cu composite is in progress and will be reported as a sequel to this report.

  15. Time-independent Anisotropic Plastic Behavior by Mechanical Subelement Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes a procedure for modelling the anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior of metals in plane stress state by the mechanical sub-layer model. In this model the stress-strain curves along the longitudinal and transverse directions are represented by short smooth segments which are considered as piecewise linear for simplicity. The model is incorporated in a finite element analysis program which is based on the assumed stress hybrid element and the iscoplasticity-theory.

  16. Analytical properties of the anisotropic cubic Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Hansel, D.; Maillard, J.M.; Oitmaa, J.; Velgakis, M.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors combine an exact functional relation, the inversion relation, with conventional high-temperature expansions to explore the analytic properties of the anisotropic Ising model on both the square and simple cubic lattice. In particular, they investigate the nature of the singularities that occur in partially resummed expansions of the partition function and of the susceptibility.

  17. Anisotropic bouncing scenario in F(X)-V(φ) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the cosmology of a class of model with noncanonical scalar field and matter in an anisotropic time dependent background. Writing the Einstein Equations in terms of dimensionless dynamical variables appropriately defined for bouncing solutions, we find all the fixed points. While evolving the dynamical variables to their stable fixed points numerically, solutions satisfying non singular bounce are found.

  18. AmeriFlux US-GLE GLEES

    SciTech Connect

    Massman, Bill

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-GLE GLEES. Site Description - The Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site (GLEES) site is located on land owned by the U.S. government and managed by US Forest Service as part of the Medicine Bow National Forest. Many of the trees in the immediate vicinity of the site are older than 400 years, inter-dispersed among trees much younger in age. This widespread age distribution is most likely a derivation of one of two scenarios: 1) A widespread stand replacement about 400 years ago followed by a slow replacement; 2) Intermittent random disturbances over the past 400 years (Bradford et al. 2008). A decade long spruce beetle outbreak that peaked in 2008 resulted in the mortality of 85% of the forested basal area. There are a few private land holdings in the area, with scattered uncorked mining claims. Following the establishment of the National Forest, mining was banned and grazing was closed in the early 1990's in the upper portion of the GLEES site. Recreation in the winter, when snow can remain in patches into the summer months, snow mobiling and cross country skiing are popular. During the limited summer, hiking, camping and fishing are common activities. The site is accessible by vehicle only during the summer on Forest Road FDR 317, and in the winter, the tower is only reachable via snowmobile.

  19. A new model for spherically symmetric anisotropic compact star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Dayanandan, Baiju; Ray, Saibal

    2016-05-01

    In this article we obtain a new anisotropic solution for Einstein's field equations of embedding class one metric. The solution represents realistic objects such as Her X-1 and RXJ 1856-37. We perform a detailed investigation of both objects by solving numerically the Einstein field equations with anisotropic pressure. The physical features of the parameters depend on the anisotropic factor i.e. if the anisotropy is zero everywhere inside the star then the density and pressures will become zero and the metric turns out to be flat. We report our results and compare with the above mentioned two compact objects as regards a number of key aspects: the central density, the surface density onset and the critical scaling behaviour, the effective mass and radius ratio, the anisotropization with isotropic initial conditions, adiabatic index and red shift. Along with this we have also made a comparison between the classical limit and theoretical model treatment of the compact objects. Finally we discuss the implications of our findings for the stability condition in a relativistic compact star.

  20. Anisotropic Turbulence Modeling for Accurate Rod Bundle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baglietto, Emilio

    2006-07-01

    An improved anisotropic eddy viscosity model has been developed for accurate predictions of the thermal hydraulic performances of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies. The proposed model adopts a non-linear formulation of the stress-strain relationship in order to include the reproduction of the anisotropic phenomena, and in combination with an optimized low-Reynolds-number formulation based on Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) to produce correct damping of the turbulent viscosity in the near wall region. This work underlines the importance of accurate anisotropic modeling to faithfully reproduce the scale of the turbulence driven secondary flows inside the bundle subchannels, by comparison with various isothermal and heated experimental cases. The very low scale secondary motion is responsible for the increased turbulence transport which produces a noticeable homogenization of the velocity distribution and consequently of the circumferential cladding temperature distribution, which is of main interest in bundle design. Various fully developed bare bundles test cases are shown for different geometrical and flow conditions, where the proposed model shows clearly improved predictions, in close agreement with experimental findings, for regular as well as distorted geometries. Finally the applicability of the model for practical bundle calculations is evaluated through its application in the high-Reynolds form on coarse grids, with excellent results. (author)

  1. Anisotropic Elastic Resonance Scattering model for the Neutron Transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed Ouisloumen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Shadi Z. Ghrayeb

    2014-11-24

    The resonance scattering transfer cross-section has been reformulated to account for anisotropic scattering in the center-of-mass of the neutron-nucleus system. The main innovation over previous implementations is the relaxation of the ubiquitous assumption of isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass and the actual effective use of scattering angle distributions from evaluated nuclear data files in the computation of the angular moments of the resonant scattering kernels. The formulas for the high order anisotropic moments in the laboratory system are also derived. A multi-group numerical formulation is derived and implemented into a module incorporated within the NJOY nuclear data processing code. An ultra-fine energy mesh cross section library was generated using these new theoretical models and then was used for fuel assembly calculations with the PARAGON lattice physics code. The results obtained indicate a strong effect of this new model on reactivity, multi-group fluxes and isotopic inventory during depletion.

  2. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  3. Anisotropic 2-dimensional Robin Hood model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey; Cwilich, Gabriel; Zypman, Fredy

    2009-03-01

    We have considered the Robin Hood model introduced by Zaitsev[1] to discuss flux creep and depinning of interfaces in a two dimensional system. Although the model has been studied extensively analytically in 1-d [2], its scaling laws have been verified numerically only in that case. Recent work suggest that its properties might be important to understand surface friction[3], where its 2-dimensional properties are important. We show that in the 2-dimensional case scaling laws can be found provided one considers carefully the anisotropy of the model, and different ways of introducing that anisotropy lead to different exponents and scaling laws, in analogy with directed percolation, with which this model is closely related[4]. We show that breaking the rotational symmetry between the x and y axes does not change the scaling properties of the model, but the introduction of a preferential direction of accretion (``robbing'' in the language of the model) leads to new scaling exponents. [1] S.I.Zaitsev, Physica A189, 411 (1992) [2] M. Pacuzki, S. Maslov and P.Bak, Phys Rev. E53, 414 (1996) [3] S. Buldyrev, J. Ferrante and F. Zypman Phys. Rev E64, 066110 (2006) [4] G. Odor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 76, 663 (2004) .

  4. A new model for charged anisotropic compact star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Jasim, M. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Smitha, T. T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have obtained a new singularity free charged anisotropic fluid solution of Einstein's field equations. The physical parameters as radial pressure, tangential pressure, energy density, charge density, electric field intensity, velocity of sound and red-shift are well behaved everywhere inside the star. The obtained compact star models can represent the observational compact objects as PSR 1937{+}21 and PSR J1614-2230.

  5. Modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectral model and its application in moderate-to-strong anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectral model is derived based on the extended Rytov approximation theory for the theoretical investigations of optical plane and spherical waves propagating through moderate-to-strong anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. The anisotropic factor which parameterizes the asymmetry of turbulence cells or eddies in the horizontal and vertical directions is introduced. The general spectral power law in the range of 3-4 is also considered compared with the conventional classic value of 11/3 for Kolmogorov turbulence. Based on the modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectrum, the analytic expressions of the irradiance scintillation index are also derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through moderate-to-strong anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. They are applicable in a wide range of turbulence strengths and can reduce correctly to the previously published results in the special cases of weak anisotropic turbulence and moderate-to-strong isotropic turbulence. Calculations are performed to analyze the derived models. PMID:27140754

  6. Anisotropic Mesoscale Eddy Transport in Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Dennis, J.; Danabasoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    Modern climate models are limited to coarse-resolution representations of large-scale ocean circulation that rely on parameterizations for mesoscale eddies. The effects of eddies are typically introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically in general circulation models. Thus, only a single parameter, namely the eddy diffusivity, is used at each spatial and temporal location to impart the influence of mesoscale eddies on the resolved flow. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion, potential vorticity barriers, oceanic turbulence, and instabilities, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters to three: a major diffusivity, a minor diffusivity, and the principal axis of alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the newly introduced parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces global temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved even further by parameterizing the anisotropic transport mechanisms in the ocean.

  7. Anisotropic models of the upper mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, J.; Anderson, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Long period Rayleigh wave and Love wave dispersion data, particularly for oceanic areas, were not simultaneously satisfied by an isotropic structure. Available phase and group velocity data are inverted by a procedure which includes the effects of transverse anisotropy, an elastic dispersion, sphericity, and gravity. The resulting models, for the average Earth, average ocean and oceanic regions divided according to the age of the ocean floor, are quite different from previous results which ignore the above effects. The models show a low velocity zone with age dependent anisotropy and velocities higher than derived in previous surface wave studies. The correspondence between the anisotropy variation with age and a physical model based on flow aligned olivine is suggested.

  8. Life prediction and constitutive models for anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The intent of this program is to develop a basic understanding of cyclic creep-fatigue deformation mechanisms and damage accumulation, a capability for reliable life prediction, and the ability to model the constitutive behavior of anisotropic single crystal (SC) and directionally solidified or recrystallized (DSR) comprise the program, and the work breakdown for each option reflects a distinct concern for two classes of anisotropic materials, SC and DSR materials, at temperatures encountered in the primary gas path (airfoil temperatures), and at temperatures typical of the blade root attachment and shank area. Work directed toward the higher temperature area of concern in the primary gas path includes effects of coatings on the behavior and properties of the materials of interest. The blade root attachment work areas will address the effects of stress concentrations associated with attachment features.

  9. Anisotropic mesoscale eddy transport in ocean general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; Danabasoglu, Gokhan

    2014-11-01

    In modern climate models, the effects of oceanic mesoscale eddies are introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion and potential vorticity barriers, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters from one to three: major diffusivity, minor diffusivity, and alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved by parameterizing the oceanic anisotropic transport mechanisms.

  10. The anisotropic material constitutive models for the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-yuan; Tighe, Brian

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents an anisotropic analysis model for the human cornea. The model is based on the assumption that the fibrils in the cornea are organised into lamellae, which may have preferential orientation along the superior-inferior and nasal-temporal directions, while the alignment of lamellae with different orientations is assumed to be random. Hence, the cornea can be regarded as a laminated composite shell. The constitutive equation describing the relationships between membrane forces, bending moments, and membrane strains, bending curvatures are derived. The influences of lamella orientations and the random alignment of lamellae on the stiffness coefficients of the constitutive equation are discussed. PMID:16426861

  11. Anisotropic cosmological models in f(G) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farasat Shamir, M.

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this manuscript is to study the anisotropic universe in f(G) Gravity. For this purpose, locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I spacetime is considered. A viable f(G) model is used to explore the exact solutions of modified field equations. In particular, two families involving power law and exponential type solutions have been discussed. Some important cosmological parameters are calculated for the obtained solutions. Moreover, energy density and pressure of the universe is analyzed for the model under consideration.

  12. Hyperelastic anisotropic microplane constitutive model for annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Caner, Ferhun C; Guo, Zaoyang; Moran, Brian; Bazant, Zdenek P; Carol, Ignacio

    2007-10-01

    In a recent paper, Peng et al. (2006, "An Anisotropic Hyperelastic Constitutive Model With Fiber-Matrix Interaction for the Human Annulus Fibrosis," ASME J. Appl. Mech., 73(5), pp. 815-824) developed an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model for the human annulus fibrosus in which fiber-matrix interaction plays a crucial role in simulating experimental observations reported in the literature. Later, Guo et al. (2006, "A Composites-Based Hyperelastic Constitutive Model for Soft Tissue With Application to the Human Fibrosis," J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 54(9), pp. 1952-1971) used fiber reinforced continuum mechanics theory to formulate a model in which the fiber-matrix interaction was simulated using only composite effect. It was shown in these studies that the classical anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive models for soft tissue, which do not account for this shear interaction, cannot accurately simulate the test data on human annulus fibrosus. In this study, we show that the microplane model for soft tissue developed by Caner and Carol (2006, "Microplane Constitutive Model and Computational Framework for Blood Vessel Tissue," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 128(3), pp. 419-427) can be adjusted for human annulus fibrosus and the resulting model can accurately simulate the experimental observations without explicit fiber-matrix interaction because, in microplane model, the shear interaction between the individual fibers distributed in the tissue provides the required additional rigidity to explain these experimental facts. The intensity of the shear interaction between the fibers can be adjusted by adjusting the spread in the distribution while keeping the total amount of the fiber constant. A comparison of results obtained from (i) a fiber-matrix parallel coupling model, which does not account for the fiber-matrix interaction, (ii) the same model but enriched with fiber-matrix interaction, and (iii) microplane model for soft tissue adapted to annulus fibrosus with two

  13. Critical dynamics of anisotropic Bak-Sneppen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirnakli, Ugur; Lyra, Marcelo L.

    2004-10-01

    A new damage spreading algorithm, which was introduced very recently in (Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 14 (2003) 85) has been applied to anisotropic Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution. Since this new algorithm is able to capture both the short-time and long-time dynamics of extended systems which exhibits self-organized criticality, this analysis is expected to shed further light to the recent claim that the dynamics of such systems is similar to the one observed at the usual critical point of continuous phase-transitions and at the chaos threshold of low-dimensional dissipative maps.

  14. Truncated Connectivities in a Highly Supercritical Anisotropic Percolation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Rodrigo G.; de Lima, Bernardo N. B.; Sanchis, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    We consider an anisotropic bond percolation model on , with p=( p h , p v )∈[0,1]2, p v > p h , and declare each horizontal (respectively vertical) edge of to be open with probability p h (respectively p v ), and otherwise closed, independently of all other edges. Let with 0< x 1< x 2, and . It is natural to ask how the two point connectivity function behaves, and whether anisotropy in percolation probabilities implies the strict inequality . In this note we give an affirmative answer in the highly supercritical regime.

  15. A hydrostatic stress-dependent anisotropic model of viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Tao, Q.; Verrilli, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrostatic stress-dependent, anisotropic model of viscoplasticity is formulated as an extension of Bodner's model. This represents a further extension of the isotropic Bodner model over that made to anisotropy by Robinson and MitiKavuma. Account is made of the inelastic deformation that can occur in metallic composites under hydrostatic stress. A procedure for determining the material parameters is identified that is virtually identical to the established characterization procedure for the original Bodner model. Characterization can be achieved using longitudinal/transverse tensile and shear tests and hydrostatic stress tests; alternatively, four off-axis tensile tests can be used. Conditions for a yield stress minimum under off-axis tension are discussed. The model is applied to a W/Cu composite; characterization is made using off-axis tensile data generated at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  16. Inflationary weak anisotropic model with general dissipation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of warm intermediate and logamediate inflationary models during weak dissipative regime with a general form of dissipative coefficient. We analyze these models within the framework of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe. In both cases, we evaluate solution of inflaton, effective scalar potential, dissipative coefficient, slow-roll parameters, scalar and tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index and tensor to scalar ratio under slow-roll approximation. We constrain the model parameters using recent data and conclude that anisotropic inflationary universe model with generalized dissipation coefficient remains compatible with WMAP9, Planck and BICEP2 data. Finally, we have checked the effects of bulk viscous pressure on this considered model and found that it remains compatible with recent data only for intermediate case.

  17. The comparison of isotropic and anisotropic semivariogram for Gauss model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Rr. Kurnia Novita; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-01

    Semivariogram is one of the models used to study the relationship between the sequence of random variables {Z(s),sɛR2} based on the location s. That model is a diagram of variance from the difference between the random variable that distance h, or γ(h) = Var[Z(s)-Z(s+h)]. Experimental variogram can be calculated through observations at several locations. One model that is chosen to be fitted to ̂γ(h) is the Gaussian. In application, ̂γ(h) often considered to depend on the direction (anisotropic semivariogram). This paper develop a nested Gaussian model by considering some angle intervals which is called geometric anisotropy semivariogram. For a case study, the distribution of Bradysia ocellaris insects at a Oyster Mushrooms cultivication is analyzed that the insects fly to follow the direction of light.

  18. Nonlinear inversion for arbitrarily-oriented anisotropic models: Synthetic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present an implementation of new 3-D finite-frequency kernels, based on the Born approximation, for inversion of a synthetic surface wave dataset. The kernels are formulated based on a hexagonal symmetry with an arbitrary orientation. Numerical tests are performed to achieve a robust inversion scheme. Nonlinear inversion schemes are examined for adequate recovery of three input models to include: isotropic, anisotropic, and both anisotropic and isotropic input models. Output models from inversions of calculated synthetic data are compared against these input models to test for accurate reproduction of input model features, and the resolution of those features. The focus of this study is on inverting for structure beneath western North America. The synthetic dataset consists of collected seismic waveforms of 128 earthquake mechanisms, of magnitude 6-7 from Dec 2006 to Feb 2009, from the IRIS database. Events were selected to correlate with USArray deployments, and to have as complete an azimuthal coverage as possible. The events occurred within a circular region of radius 150° centered about 44° lat, -110° lon (an arbitrary location within USArray coverage). The seismograms have been calculated within a simplified version of PREM in which the crust and 220 km discontinuity have been removed, dubbed PREM LIGHT, utilizing a spectral element code (SEM) coupled to a normal mode solution. The mesh consists of a 3-D heterogeneous outer shell, representing the upper mantle above 400 km depth, coupled to a spherically symmetric inner sphere. The SEM solves the weak formulation of the seismic wave equation in the outer shell, and uses normal mode summation methods for the inner sphere. To validate the results of the SEM, seismograms are benchmarked against seismograms calculated with a 1-D normal mode summation. From the synthetic dataset, multi-taper fundamental mode surface wave phase delay measurements are taken. The orthogonal 2.5π spheroidal wave function

  19. Anisotropic rock physics models for interpreting pore structures in carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng-Jie; Shao, Yu; Chen, Xu-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We developed an anisotropic effective theoretical model for modeling the elastic behavior of anisotropic carbonate reservoirs by combining the anisotropic self-consistent approximation and differential effective medium models. By analyzing the measured data from carbonate samples in the TL area, a carbonate pore-structure model for estimating the elastic parameters of carbonate rocks is proposed, which is a prerequisite in the analysis of carbonate reservoirs. A workflow for determining elastic properties of carbonate reservoirs is established in terms of the anisotropic effective theoretical model and the pore-structure model. We performed numerical experiments and compared the theoretical prediction and measured data. The result of the comparison suggests that the proposed anisotropic effective theoretical model can account for the relation between velocity and porosity in carbonate reservoirs. The model forms the basis for developing new tools for predicting and evaluating the properties of carbonate reservoirs.

  20. Reentrance of disorder in the anisotropic shuriken Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Rico; Benton, Owen; Jaubert, L. D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Frustration is often a key ingredient for reentrance mechanisms. Here we study the frustrated anisotropic shuriken Ising model, where it is possible to extend the notion of reentrance between disordered phases, i.e., in absence of phase transitions. By tuning the anisotropy of the lattice, we open a window in the phase diagram where magnetic disorder prevails down to zero temperature, in a classical analogy with a quantum critical point. In this region, the competition between multiple disordered ground states gives rise to a double crossover where both the low- and high-temperature regimes are less correlated than the intervening classical spin liquid. This reentrance of disorder is characterized by an entropy plateau and a multistep Curie law crossover. Our theory is developed based on Monte Carlo simulations, analytical Husimi-tree calculations and an exact decoration-iteration transformation. Its relevance to experiments, in particular, artificial lattices, is discussed.

  1. Anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation modeling using parabolic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, R. I.; Siegmann, W. L.; Jacobson, M. J.; Jacyna, G. M.

    1990-12-01

    A new method for the investigation of anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation in the atmosphere is developed using parabolic approximations. Model equations for the electric field components are formulated which include the effects of both the inhomogeneous atmosphere and the static magnetic field of the earth. Application of parabolic-type approximations produces different systems of coupled parabolic equations. Each is valid for different relative magnitudes of components of the electric field. All admissible cases are then synthesized into one system which can be numerically examined, yielding solutions without a priori knowledge of electric field ratios. A specific example is presented and examined to understand static magnetic field effects on electromagnetic wave propagation. The influences of the earth's magnetic field are discussed and displayed in terms of electric components and the Poynting vector. Results demonstrate that the geomagnetic field can significantly influence HF atmospheric propagation.

  2. Lattice models of directed and semiflexible polymers in anisotropic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydukivska, K.; Blavatska, V.

    2015-10-01

    We study the conformational properties of polymers in presence of extended columnar defects of parallel orientation. Two classes of macromolecules are considered: the so-called partially directed polymers with preferred orientation along direction of the external stretching field and semiflexible polymers. We are working within the frames of lattice models: partially directed self-avoiding walks (PDSAWs) and biased self-avoiding walks (BSAWs). Our numerical analysis of PDSAWs reveals, that competition between the stretching field and anisotropy caused by presence of extended defects leads to existing of three characteristic length scales in the system. At each fixed concentration of disorder we found a transition point, where the influence of extended defects is exactly counterbalanced by the stretching field. Numerical simulations of BSAWs in anisotropic environment reveal an increase of polymer stiffness. In particular, the persistence length of semiflexible polymers increases in presence of disorder.

  3. Anisotropic effects on constitutive model parameters of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter S.; Joshi, Vasant S.

    2012-03-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. Model constants are determined from tension, compression or torsion stress-strain at low and high strain rates at different temperatures. These model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloy. Johnson- Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulation go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results show drastically different behavior it becomes important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests were performed on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal "L", transverse "T", and thickness "TH" directions of 1' thick Al7075 Plate. While flow stress at a strain rate of ~1/s as well as ~1100/s in the thickness and transverse directions are lower than the longitudinal direction. The flow stress in the bar was comparable to flow stress in the longitudinal direction of the plate. Fracture strain data from notched tensile specimens fabricated in the L, T, and Thickness directions of 1' thick plate are used to derive fracture constants.

  4. Anisotropic Effects on Constitutive Model Parameters of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter; Joshi, Vasant

    2011-06-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. The model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloys. Johnson-Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulations go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results are drastically different it is important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy we performed quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal, transverse, and thickness directions of 1' thick Al7075-T651 plate. Flow stresses at a strain rate of ~1100/s in the longitudinal and transverse direction are similar around 670MPa and decreases to 620 MPa in the thickness direction. These data are lower than the flow stress of 760 MPa measured in Al7075-T651 bar stock.

  5. Anisotropic magnetoresistivity in structured elastomer composites: modelling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Mietta, José Luis; Tamborenea, Pablo I; Martin Negri, R

    2016-08-14

    A constitutive model for the anisotropic magnetoresistivity in structured elastomer composites (SECs) is proposed. The SECs considered here are oriented pseudo-chains of conductive-magnetic inorganic materials inside an elastomer organic matrix. The pseudo-chains are formed by fillers which are simultaneously conductive and magnetic dispersed in the polymer before curing or solvent evaporation. The SEC is then prepared in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, referred to as Hcuring. This procedure generates the pseudo-chains, which are preferentially aligned in the direction of Hcuring. Electrical conduction is present in that direction only. The constitutive model for the magnetoresistance considers the magnetic pressure, Pmag, induced on the pseudo-chains by an external magnetic field, H, applied in the direction of the pseudo-chains. The relative changes in conductivity as a function of H are calculated by evaluating the relative increase of the electron tunnelling probability with Pmag, a magneto-elastic coupling which produces an increase of conductivity with magnetization. The model is used to adjust experimental results of magnetoresistance in a specific SEC where the polymer is polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS, and fillers are microparticles of magnetite-silver (referred to as Fe3O4[Ag]). Simulations of the expected response for other materials in both superparamagnetic and blocked magnetic states are presented, showing the influence of the Young's modulus of the matrix and filler's saturation magnetization. PMID:27418417

  6. Anisotropic cosmology and inflation from a tilted Bianchi IX model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundell, P.; Koivisto, T.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of the tilted axisymmetric Bianchi IX cosmological models are explored allowing energy flux in the source fluid. The Einstein equations and the continuity equation are presented treating the equation of state w and the tilt angle of the fluid λ as time-dependent functions, but when analyzing the phase space w and λ are considered free parameters and the shear, the vorticity and the curvature of the spacetime span a three-dimensional phase space that contains seven fixed points. One of them is an attractor that inflates the universe anisotropically, thus providing a counterexample to the cosmic no-hair conjecture. Also, examples of realistic though fine-tuned cosmologies are presented wherein the rotation can become significant towards the present epoch but the shear stays within the observational bounds. The examples suggest that the model used here can explain the parity-violating anomalies of the cosmic microwave background. The result significantly differs from an earlier study, where a nonaxisymmetric Bianchi IX type model with a tilted perfect dust source was found to induce too much shear for observationally significant vorticity.

  7. Chiral Spin Liquid in a Frustrated Anisotropic Kagome Heisenberg Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yin-Chen; Sheng, D. N.; Chen, Yan

    2014-04-01

    Kalmeyer-Laughlin (KL) chiral spin liquid (CSL) is a type of quantum spin liquid without time-reversal symmetry, and it is considered as the parent state of an exotic type of superconductor—anyon superconductor. Such an exotic state has been sought for more than twenty years; however, it remains unclear whether it can exist in a realistic system where time-reversal symmetry is breaking (T breaking) spontaneously. By using the density matrix renormalization group, we show that KL CSL exists in a frustrated anisotropic kagome Heisenberg model, which has spontaneous T breaking. We find that our model has two topological degenerate ground states, which exhibit nonvanishing scalar chirality order and are protected by finite excitation gap. Furthermore, we identify this state as KL CSL by the characteristic edge conformal field theory from the entanglement spectrum and the quasiparticles braiding statistics extracted from the modular matrix. We also study how this CSL phase evolves as the system approaches the nearest-neighbor kagome Heisenberg model.

  8. 1-D DC Resistivity Modeling and Interpretation in Anisotropic Media Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekşen, Ertan; Yas, Türker; Kıyak, Alper

    2014-09-01

    We examine the one-dimensional direct current method in anisotropic earth formation. We derive an analytic expression of a simple, two-layered anisotropic earth model. Further, we also consider a horizontally layered anisotropic earth response with respect to the digital filter method, which yields a quasi-analytic solution over anisotropic media. These analytic and quasi-analytic solutions are useful tests for numerical codes. A two-dimensional finite difference earth model in anisotropic media is presented in order to generate a synthetic data set for a simple one-dimensional earth. Further, we propose a particle swarm optimization method for estimating the model parameters of a layered anisotropic earth model such as horizontal and vertical resistivities, and thickness. The particle swarm optimization is a naturally inspired meta-heuristic algorithm. The proposed method finds model parameters quite successfully based on synthetic and field data. However, adding 5 % Gaussian noise to the synthetic data increases the ambiguity of the value of the model parameters. For this reason, the results should be controlled by a number of statistical tests. In this study, we use probability density function within 95 % confidence interval, parameter variation of each iteration and frequency distribution of the model parameters to reduce the ambiguity. The result is promising and the proposed method can be used for evaluating one-dimensional direct current data in anisotropic media.

  9. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-08-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  10. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  11. Relativistic model of anisotropic charged fluid sphere in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Neeraj; Pradhan, N.; Bansal, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    In this present paper, we present a class of static, spherically symmetric charged anisotropic fluid models of super dense stars in isotropic coordinates by considering a particular type of metric potential, a specific choice of electric field intensity E and pressure anisotropy factor Δ which involve parameters K (charge) and α (anisotropy) respectively. The solutions so obtained are utilized to construct the models for super-dense stars like neutron stars and strange quark stars. Our solutions are well behaved within the following ranges of different constant parameters. In the absence of pressure anisotropy and charge present model reduces to the isotropic model Pant et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 330:353-359, 2010). Our solution is well behaved in all respects for all values of X lying in the range 0< X ≤ 0.18, α lying in the range 0 ≤ α ≤6.6, K lying in the range 0< K ≤ 6.6 and Schwarzschild compactness parameter "u" lying in the range 0< u ≤ 0.38. Since our solution is well behaved for a wide ranges of the parameters, we can model many different types of ultra-cold compact stars like quark stars and neutron stars. We have shown that corresponding to X=0.088, α=0.6 and K=4.3 for which u=0.2054 and by assuming surface density ρb = 4.6888 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius are found to be 1.51 M_{\\varTheta} and 10.90 km respectively. Assuming surface density ρb = 2 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius for a neutron star candidate are found to be 2.313 M_{\\varTheta} and 16.690 km respectively. Hence we obtain masses and radii that fall in the range of what is generally expected for quark stars and neutron stars.

  12. Simulation of angle on geometry anisotropic semivariogram modeling in the case of oil in Jatibarang reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Rr. Kurnia Novita; Neswan, Oki

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropic semivariogram modeling can be aplied in petroleum industry where the angle between a pair of wells has important function in defining the spatial correlation between wells. In geometry anisotropic, function of range is formulated in trigonometric functions of the angle between pairs of wells that have periodicity property. The fluctuations of range will affect on shifting geometry anisotropic models with different properties for each quadrant of angle. In three semivariogram models (exponential, spherical and gaussian), the increasing of angle give difference influence for range function and the shifting of semivariogram value.

  13. An Anisotropic Fluid-Solid Model of the Mouse Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; del Pin, Facundo; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    A critical challenge in biomechanical simulations is the spatial discretization of complex fluid-solid geometries created from imaging. This is especially important when dealing with Lagrangian interfaces, as there must be at a minimum both geometric and topological compatibility between fluid and solid phases, with exact matching of the interfacial nodes being highly desirable. We have developed a solution to this problem and applied the approach to the creation of a 3D fluidsolid mesh of the mouse heart. First, a 50 micron isotropic MRI dataset of a perfusion-fixed mouse heart was segmented into blood, tissue, and background using a customized multimaterial connected fuzzy thresholding algorithm. Then, a multimaterial marching cubes algorithm was applied to produce two compatible isosurfaces, one for the blood-tissue boundary and one for the tissue-background boundary. A multimaterial smoothing algorithm that rigorously conserves volume for each phase simultaneously smoothed the isosurfaces. Next we applied novel automated meshing algorithms to generate anisotropic hybrid meshes with the number of layers and the desired element anisotropy for each material as the only input parameters. As the meshes are scale-invariant within a material and include boundary layer prisms, fluid-structure interaction computations would have a relative error equilibrated over the entire mesh. The resulting model is highly detailed mesh representation of the mouse heart, including features such as chordae and coronary vasculature, that is also maximally efficient to produce the best simulation results for the computational resources available

  14. A robust absorbing layer method for anisotropic seismic wave modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Labbé, S.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-15

    When applied to wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media, Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) exhibit instabilities. Incoming waves are amplified instead of being absorbed. Overcoming this difficulty is crucial as in many seismic imaging applications, accounting accurately for the subsurface anisotropy is mandatory. In this study, we present the SMART layer method as an alternative to PML approach. This method is based on the decomposition of the wavefield into components propagating inward and outward the domain of interest. Only outgoing components are damped. We show that for elastic and acoustic wave propagation in Transverse Isotropic media, the SMART layer is unconditionally dissipative: no amplification of the wavefield is possible. The SMART layers are not perfectly matched, therefore less accurate than conventional PML. However, a reasonable increase of the layer size yields an accuracy similar to PML. Finally, we illustrate that the selective damping strategy on which is based the SMART method can prevent the generation of spurious S-waves by embedding the source in a small zone where only S-waves are damped.

  15. Modeling the anisotropic shock response of single-crystal RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscher, Darby

    Explosives initiate under impacts whose energy, if distributed homogeneously throughout the material, translates to temperature increases that are insufficient to drive the rapid chemistry observed. Heterogeneous thermomechanical interactions at the meso-scale (i.e. between single-crystal and macroscale) leads to the formation of localized hot spots. Direct numerical simulations of mesoscale response can contribute to our understanding of hot spots if they include the relevant deformation mechanisms that are essential to the nonlinear thermomechanical response of explosive molecular crystals. We have developed a single-crystal model for the finite deformation thermomechanical response of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Because of the low symmetry of RDX, a complete description of nonlinear thermoelasticity requires a careful decomposition of free energy into components that represent the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) response and the coupling between isochoric deformation and both deviatoric and hydrostatic stresses. An equation-of-state (EOS) based on Debye theory that defines the PVT response was constructed using experimental data and density functional theory calculations. This EOS replicates the equilibrium states of phase transformation from alpha to gamma polymorphs observed in static high-pressure experiments. Lattice thermoelastic parameters defining the coupled isochoric free energy were obtained from molecular dynamics calculations and previous experimental data. Anisotropic crystal plasticity is modeled using Orowan's expression relating slip rate to dislocation density and velocity. Details of the theory will be presented followed by discussion of simulations of flyer plate impact experiments, including recent experiments diagnosed with in situ X-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. Impact conditions explored within the experimental effort have spanned shock pressures ranging from 1-10 GPa for several crystallographic orientations

  16. 3D time-domain airborne EM modeling for an arbitrarily anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain airborne EM data is currently interpreted based on an isotropic model. Sometimes, it can be problematic when working in the region with distinct dipping stratifications. In this paper, we simulate the 3D time-domain airborne EM responses over an arbitrarily anisotropic earth with topography by edge-based finite-element method. Tetrahedral meshes are used to describe the abnormal bodies with complicated shapes. We further adopt the Backward Euler scheme to discretize the time-domain diffusion equation for electric field, obtaining an unconditionally stable linear equations system. We verify the accuracy of our 3D algorithm by comparing with 1D solutions for an anisotropic half-space. Then, we switch attentions to effects of anisotropic media on the strengths and the diffusion patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses. For numerical experiments, we adopt three typical anisotropic models: 1) an anisotropic anomalous body embedded in an isotropic half-space; 2) an isotropic anomalous body embedded in an anisotropic half-space; 3) an anisotropic half-space with topography. The modeling results show that the electric anisotropy of the subsurface media has big effects on both the strengths and the distribution patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses; this effect needs to be taken into account when interpreting ATEM data in areas with distinct anisotropy.

  17. Modelling the shock response of a damageable anisotropic composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, Alexander A.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is the investigation of the effect of fibre orientation on the shock response of a damageable carbon fibre-epoxy composite (CFEC). A carbon fibre-epoxy composite (CFEC) shock response in the through-thickness orientation and in one of the fibre directions is significantly different. Modelling the effect of fibre orientation on the shock response of a CFEC has been performed using a generalised decomposition of the stress tensor [A.A. Lukyanov, Int. J. Plasticity 24, 140 (2008)] and an accurate extrapolation of high-pressure shock Hugoniot states to other thermodynamics states for shocked CFEC materials. The analysis of the experimental data subject to the linear relation between shock velocities and particle velocities has shown that damage softening process produces discontinuities both in value and slope in the generalized bulk shock velocity and particle velocity relation [A.A. Lukyanov, Eur Phys J B 74, 35 (2010)]. Therefore, in order to remove these discontinuities, the three-wave structure (non-linear anisotropic, fracture and isotropic elastic waves) that accompanies damage softening process is proposed in this work for describing CFEC behavior under shock loading. A numerical calculation shows that Hugoniot Stress Levels (HELs) agree with the experimental data for selected CFEC material in different directions at low and at high intensities. In the through-thickness orientation, the material behaves similar to a simple polymer. In the fibre direction, the proposed model explains a pronounced ramp, before at sufficiently high stresses, and a much faster rising shock above it. The results are presented and discussed, and future studies are outlined.

  18. Notes on shear viscosity bound violation in anisotropic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, XianHui

    2016-03-01

    The shear viscosity bound violation in Einstein gravity for anisotropic black branes is discussed, with the aim of constraining the deviation of the shear viscosity-entropy density ratio from the shear viscosity bound using causality and thermodynamics analysis. The results show that no stringent constraints can be imposed. The diffusion bound in anisotropic phases is also studied. Ultimately, it is concluded that shear viscosity violation always occurs in cases where the equation of motion of the metric fluctuations cannot be written in a form identical to that of the minimally coupled massless scalar fields.

  19. An analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite indium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Song, Xin; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Zhaonian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of anisotropic transport properties and develops an anisotropic low-field electron analytical mobility model for wurtzite indium nitride (InN). For the different effective masses in the Γ-A and Γ-M directions of the lowest valley, both the transient and steady state transport behaviors of wurtzite InN show different transport characteristics in the two directions. From the relationship between velocity and electric field, the difference is more obvious when the electric field is low in the two directions. To make an accurate description of the anisotropic transport properties under low field, for the first time, we present an analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite InN. The effects of different ionized impurity scattering models on the low-field mobility calculated by Monte Carlo method (Conwell-Weisskopf and Brooks-Herring method) are also considered.

  20. Modeling Anisotropic Plasticity: 3D Eulerian Hydrocode Simulations of High Strain Rate Deformation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, Michael W.; Clancy, Sean P.; Maudlin, Paul J.; Holian, Kathleen S.

    2002-07-01

    Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength have been implemented in the three-dimensional Conejo hydrodynamics code. The anisotropic constitutive modeling is posed in an unrotated material frame of reference using the theorem of polar decomposition to obtain rigid body rotation. Continuous quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure were utilized. Simple rectangular shear problems, R-Value problems, and Taylor cylinder impact data were used to verify and validate the implementation of the anisotropic model. A stretching rod problem (involving large strain and high strain-rate deformation) was selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy. Conejo simulations of rod topology were compared for two anisotropic cases.

  1. 3D, 9-C anisotropic seismic modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusmanugroho, Herurisa

    The most complete representation of an elastic medium consists of an elastic tensor with 21 independent moduli. All 21 can be estimated from compressional and shear wave polarization and slowness vectors corresponding to wide apertures of polar and azimuth angles. In isotropic media, when seismic source and receiver components have the same orientation (such as XX and YY), the reflection amplitude contours align approximately perpendicular to the particle motions. The mixed components (such as XY and YX) have amplitude patterns that are in symmetrical pairs of either the same, or of opposite, polarity on either side of the diagonal of the 9-C response matrix. In anisotropic media, amplitude variations with azimuth show the same basic patterns and symmetries as for isotropic, but with a superimposed tendency for alignment parallel to the strike of the vertical cracks. Solutions for elastic tensor elements from synthetic slowness and polarization data calculated directly from the Christoffel equation are more sensitive to the polar angle aperture than to the azimuth aperture. Nine-component synthetic elastic vertical seismic profile data for a model with triclinic symmetry calculated by finite-differencing allows estimation of the elastic 21 tensor elements in the vicinity of a three-component borehole receiver. Wide polar angle and azimuth apertures are needed for accurately estimating the elastic tensor elements. The tensor elements become less independent as the data apertures decrease. Results obtained by extracting slowness and polarization data from the corresponding synthetic seismograms show similar results. The inversion algorithm has produced good results from field vertical seismic profile data set from the Weyburn Field in Southern Saskatchewan in Canada. Synthetic nine-component seismograms calculated from the extracted tensor are able to explain most of the significant features in the field data. The inverted stiffness elastic tensor shows orthorhombic

  2. Asymptotic modelling of a thermopiezoelastic anisotropic smart plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yufei

    Motivated by the requirement of modelling for space flexible reflectors as well as other applications of plate structures in engineering, a general anisotropic laminated thin plate model and a monoclinic Reissner-Mindlin plate model with thermal deformation, two-way coupled piezoelectric effect and pyroelectric effect is constructed using the variational asymptotic method, without any ad hoc assumptions. Total potential energy contains strain energy, electric potential energy and energy caused by temperature change. Three-dimensional strain field is built based on the concept of warping function and decomposition of the rotation tensor. The feature of small thickness and large in-plane dimension of plate structure helped to asymptotically simplify the three-dimensional analysis to a two-dimensional analysis on the reference surface and a one-dimensional analysis through the thickness. For the zeroth-order approximation, the asymptotically correct expression of energy is derived into the form of energetic equation in classical laminated plate theory, which will be enough to predict the behavior of plate structures as thin as a space flexible reflector. A through-the-thickness strain field can be expressed in terms of material constants and two-dimensional membrane and bending strains, while the transverse normal and shear stresses are not predictable yet. In the first-order approximation, the warping functions are further disturbed into a high order and an asymptotically correct energy expression with derivatives of the two-dimensional strains is acquired. For the convenience of practical use, the expression is transformed into a Reissner-Mindlin form with optimization implemented to minimize the error. Transverse stresses and strains are recovered using the in-plane strain variables. Several numerical examples of different laminations and shapes are studied with the help of analytical solutions or shell elements in finite element codes. The constitutive relation is

  3. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:22356987

  4. Modeling anisotropic sensitivity in pentaerythritol tetranitrate using strain rate dependent reactive flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kihong; Fried, Laurence; Yoh, Jack

    2013-06-01

    Initiation of detonation in some high explosives has shown strong anisotropic sensitivity under mechanical impact. Preferred directions of crystal orientation on shock initiation have been experimentally observed in pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), which resulted in dramatic difference in the detonation sensitivity upon shock compression in different directions. The ignition and growth model based on empirical observation on the pressure-dependent initiation of detonation has been widely used to date. Since the model is independent of direction of compression, it is impossible to address sensitivity associated with preferred crystal orientation for establishing the go/no-go criteria. In this paper, we have proposed a new reaction flow model that is consistent with avaialble PETN experiments and atomistic calculations. A general tensor notation is utilized to fully address three-dimensional effect of the strain rate dependence to anisotropic detonation of PETN. K. Kim was supported by post-doctoral research fellowship from the National Research Foundation of Korea.

  5. Extension of the model of the magnetic characteristics of anisotropic metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczyk, Roman

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the Jiles-Atherton model, applied for modelling the magnetic characteristics of anisotropic amorphous material. The presented extension of the model takes into account changes in the parameter k during the magnetization process. Such an extension is physically judged. Moreover, the extended model shows the possibility of a novel achievement of good agreement between experimental data and modelled hysteresis loops. As a result, the extended Jiles-Atherton model may be applied for both technical applications and fundamental research focused on understanding the physical aspects of the magnetization process of anisotropic soft magnetic materials.

  6. Diffusively anisotropic model for the deflagration-to-detonation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Leonid; Sivashinsky, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    To elucidate the key mechanisms responsible for the transition from deflagrative to detonative combustion in smooth-walled channels, a reactive flow with anisotropic thermal and molecular diffusivities is considered. Setting the transverse diffusivities large compared to longitudinal diffusivities, the initially formed deflagration (despite no-slip boundary conditions) appears to be nearly planar and not accelerating. This, however, does not prevent its eventual abrupt transition to Chapman-Jouguet detonation.

  7. Deficiencies in numerical models of anisotropic nonlinearly elastic materials.

    PubMed

    Ní Annaidh, A; Destrade, M; Gilchrist, M D; Murphy, J G

    2013-08-01

    Incompressible nonlinearly hyperelastic materials are rarely simulated in finite element numerical experiments as being perfectly incompressible because of the numerical difficulties associated with globally satisfying this constraint. Most commercial finite element packages therefore assume that the material is slightly compressible. It is then further assumed that the corresponding strain-energy function can be decomposed additively into volumetric and deviatoric parts. We show that this decomposition is not physically realistic, especially for anisotropic materials, which are of particular interest for simulating the mechanical response of biological soft tissue. The most striking illustration of the shortcoming is that with this decomposition, an anisotropic cube under hydrostatic tension deforms into another cube instead of a hexahedron with non-parallel faces. Furthermore, commercial numerical codes require the specification of a 'compressibility parameter' (or 'penalty factor'), which arises naturally from the flawed additive decomposition of the strain-energy function. This parameter is often linked to a 'bulk modulus', although this notion makes no sense for anisotropic solids; we show that it is essentially an arbitrary parameter and that infinitesimal changes to it result in significant changes in the predicted stress response. This is illustrated with numerical simulations for biaxial tension experiments of arteries, where the magnitude of the stress response is found to change by several orders of magnitude when infinitesimal changes in 'Poisson's ratio' close to the perfect incompressibility limit of 1/2 are made. PMID:23011411

  8. Modeling of anisotropic ablation of the concrete during Molten Core Concrete Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyoung Min

    This work proposes a model to explain concrete anisotropic ablation by corium during a Molten Corium Concrete Interaction (MCCI). As a result of recent MCCI prototypic material experiments, CCI and VULCANO tests, one observes that concrete ablation behavior consistently depends on the concrete materials used in the experiments. Specifically, tests with Limestone-Common-Sand (LCS) concrete yielded isotropic concrete ablation; i.e., equal axial and radial concrete erosion. This is in comparison to anisotropic ablation in tests with Siliceous (SIL) concrete, where radial ablation was much larger than axial ablation. This was an unexpected result, because prior results of many MCCI simulant experiments indicated that nearly isotropic ablation was expected in prototypic material experiments regardless of concrete type. A new phenomenological model is proposed in this work based on a hypothesis that unifies the result of both previous simulant and prototypic material experiments; i.e., heat transfer area enhancement and delayed gas release caused by the presence of un-melted solid aggregate material that enters the molten pool. This model offers a logical and phenomenological explanation concerning anisotropic ablation as well as the capability to simulate anisotropic ablation. This model is implemented into the CORQUENCH code as part of this work. Comparisons of simulation results obtained with this new model to the CCI experiments for cases with siliceous concrete and anisotropic ablation show better agreement with the test data than the existing model.

  9. Effects of the January 2005 GLE/SEP events on minor atmospheric components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storini, M.; Damiani, A.

    It is known from long ago that solar energetic charged particles, driven by the geomagnetic field, are able to produce ionization at different altitudes of the terrestrial atmosphere. Moreover, they can initiate catalytic cycles for the ozone depletion, involving NOx (N+NO+NO2) and HOx (H, OH, HO2) components. Nevertheless, only in recent years it was possible to compare chemical models involving atmospheric minor components with satellite data. In this work we looked for effects of the GLE/SEP events occurred during January 2005 on the OH and HNO3 species of the atmosphere. Results show that there is a response on the minor atmospheric components, which is different in the winter and summer terrestrial hemispheres. *: This topic is faced for COST 724 Action and supported by the Italian Antarctic Research Program in the frame of Solar-Terrestrial Relations and partly performed for a PhD thesis under development at Siena University/Dept. of Earth Science.

  10. Implementation of an anisotropic turbulence model in the COMMIX-1C/ATM computer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, M.; Chang, F. C.

    The computer code COMMIX-1C/ATM, which describes single-phase, three-dimensional transient thermofluid dynamic problems, provided the framework for the extension of the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model to a six-equation model with additional transport equations for the turbulence heat fluxes and the variance of temperature fluctuations. The new model which allows simulation of anisotropic turbulence in stratified shear flows is referred to as the Anisotropic Turbulence Model (ATM). The ATM has been verified with numerical computations of stable and unstable stratified shear flow between parallel plates.

  11. Modelling surface waves in anisotropic structures I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C. J.

    1997-02-01

    Surface-wave theory in generally-anisotropic laterally-homogeneous media is partially reformulated in order to obtain intuitively-expected extensions of classic body-wave ideas such as Maslov plane-wave summation, the geometrical-ray/WKBJ limit and source-receiver reciprocity. This is done using the 'reversal' symmetry of Chapman [Chapman, C.H., 1994. Reflection/transmission coefficient reciprocities in anisotropic media. Geophys. J. Int. 116, 498-501] to generalize the point-source treatment of Kennett [Kennett, B.L N., 1983. Seismic Wave Propagation in Stratified Media. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, UK] to a stack of anisotropic layers with complex elastic parameters, lateral slowness and frequency. The 2D-integral representation over horizontal slownesses is reduced by residues to a 1D integral over each mode's slowness or dispersion curve at fixed frequency and this may be considered a 1D Maslov summation over local plane waves tangential to the phase front. The residue calculation involves a modified form of the usual variational principle, in which the Lagrangian now contains reversed modes. The 1D slowness integral may be reduced by stationary-phase arguments to the geometrical-ray or WKBJ limit, provided the dispersion-surface curvature does not vanish. This limit satisfies reciprocity, as the reversal symmetry shows. Dimples on the dispersion surface will correspond to folds on the phase front and multiple arrivals. An appendix contains a discussion of orthogonality of the surface-wave modes in relation to the various wave-equation symmetries.

  12. The ground-level enhancement of 2012 May 17: Derivation of solar proton event properties through the application of the NMBANGLE PPOLA model

    SciTech Connect

    Plainaki, Christina; Laurenza, Monica; Storini, Marisa; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Gerontidou, Maria; Kanellakopoulos, Anastasios

    2014-04-20

    In this work, we apply an updated version of the Neutron Monitor (NM) Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model, in order to derive the characteristics of the ground-level enhancement (GLE) on 2012 May 17 (GLE71), the spectral properties of the related solar energetic particle (SEP) event, the spatial distributions of the high-energy solar cosmic ray fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, and the time evolution of the location of the GLE source. Our modeling, based uniquely on the use of ground-level NM data, leads to the following main results. The SEP spectrum related to GLE71 was rather soft during the whole duration of the event, manifesting some weak acceleration episodes only during the initial phase (at ∼01:55-02:00 UT) and at ∼02:30-02:35 UT and ∼02:55-03:00 UT. The spectral index of the modeled SEP spectrum supports the coronal mass ejection-shock driven particle acceleration scenario, in agreement with past results based on the analysis of satellite measurements. During the initial phase of GLE71, the solar proton source at the top of the atmosphere was located above the northern hemisphere, implying that the asymptotic directions of viewing of the northern hemisphere NMs were more favorably located for registering the event than the southern ones. The spatial distribution of the solar proton fluxes at the top of the atmosphere during the main phase manifested a large variation along longitude and latitude. At the rigidity of 1 GV, the maximum primary solar proton flux resulted on the order of ∼3 × 10{sup 4} part. m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} GV{sup –1}.

  13. The Ground-level Enhancement of 2012 May 17: Derivation of Solar Proton Event Properties through the Application of the NMBANGLE PPOLA Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Laurenza, Monica; Gerontidou, Maria; Kanellakopoulos, Anastasios; Storini, Marisa

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we apply an updated version of the Neutron Monitor (NM) Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model, in order to derive the characteristics of the ground-level enhancement (GLE) on 2012 May 17 (GLE71), the spectral properties of the related solar energetic particle (SEP) event, the spatial distributions of the high-energy solar cosmic ray fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, and the time evolution of the location of the GLE source. Our modeling, based uniquely on the use of ground-level NM data, leads to the following main results. The SEP spectrum related to GLE71 was rather soft during the whole duration of the event, manifesting some weak acceleration episodes only during the initial phase (at ~01:55-02:00 UT) and at ~02:30-02:35 UT and ~02:55-03:00 UT. The spectral index of the modeled SEP spectrum supports the coronal mass ejection-shock driven particle acceleration scenario, in agreement with past results based on the analysis of satellite measurements. During the initial phase of GLE71, the solar proton source at the top of the atmosphere was located above the northern hemisphere, implying that the asymptotic directions of viewing of the northern hemisphere NMs were more favorably located for registering the event than the southern ones. The spatial distribution of the solar proton fluxes at the top of the atmosphere during the main phase manifested a large variation along longitude and latitude. At the rigidity of 1 GV, the maximum primary solar proton flux resulted on the order of ~3 × 104 part. m-2 s-1 sr-1 GV-1.

  14. Magnetically nonlinear and anisotropic iron core model of synchronous reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štumberger, G.; Štumberger, B.; Dolinar, D.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetically nonlinear and anisotropic iron core model of a synchronous reluctance motor (SRM) is presented. The iron core model is given by the current-dependent flux linkages and their partial derivatives. It is included in a dynamic SRM model and confirmed through the comparison of measured and calculated results in the case of current-controlled linear synchronous reluctance servomotor.

  15. Anisotropic models with two fluids in linear and quadratic forms of f( T) gravitational theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashed, Gamal G. L.

    2015-06-01

    Recent astronomical observations show that the universe may be anisotropic on large scales. The Union2 SnIa data hint that the universe has a preferred direction. If such a cosmological privileged axis indeed exists, one has to consider an anisotropic expanding universe, instead of the isotropic cosmological model. In this study, we apply the field equations of quadratic form of the modified teleparallel gravitational theories, f( T)= T+ ɛT 2, to anisotropic model. We assume two fluid components, the matter components have two equation of states (EoS). We study different equation of states for the linear case and show that there is no recombination era between the two fluids. For the quadratic one, we assume two equations of state corresponding to dark matter. In this model we obtain an inflation model and show that the values of the parameter, in the early universe, ɛ are depend on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  16. A 3-D elasticity theory based model for acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2014-05-01

    A theoretical model built upon three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed to investigate the acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates subjected to a harmonic point force excitation. Fourier transform technique and stationary phase method are combined to predict the far-field radiated sound pressure of one-side water immersed plate. Compared to equivalent single-layer plate models, the present model based on elasticity theory can differentiate radiated sound pressure between dry-side and wet-side excited cases, as well as discrepancies induced by different layer sequences for multilayered anisotropic plates. These results highlight the superiority of the present theoretical model especially for handling multilayered anisotropic structures. PMID:24815294

  17. Semi-analytical modeling of acoustic beam divergence in homogeneous anisotropic half-spaces.

    PubMed

    Kono, Naoyuki; Hirose, Sohichi

    2016-02-01

    Beam divergences of acoustical fields in semi-infinite homogeneous anisotropic media are calculated based on a semi-analytical model. The model for a plane source in a semi-infinite homogeneous anisotropic medium is proposed as an extended model for a point source in an infinite medium. Beam divergences propagating along crystallographic axes 〈100〉, 〈110〉, and 〈111〉 in a cubic crystal, a single crystalline Ni-based alloy, are measured and compared to calculation results for verifying the model. The contribution of beam divergence attenuation to the total attenuation for propagating in anisotropic polycrystalline materials is quantitatively evaluated in isolation from scattering attenuation effects. PMID:26508085

  18. Modeling anisotropic flow and heat transport by using mimetic finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele; Willbrand, Karen; Büsing, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Modeling anisotropic flow in porous or fractured rock often assumes that the permeability tensor is diagonal, which means that its principle directions are always aligned with the coordinate axes. However, the permeability of a heterogeneous anisotropic medium usually is a full tensor. For overcoming this shortcoming, we use the mimetic finite difference method (mFD) for discretizing the flow equation in a hydrothermal reservoir simulation code, SHEMAT-Suite, which couples this equation with the heat transport equation. We verify SHEMAT-Suite-mFD against analytical solutions of pumping tests, using both diagonal and full permeability tensors. We compare results from three benchmarks for testing the capability of SHEMAT-Suite-mFD to handle anisotropic flow in porous and fractured media. The benchmarks include coupled flow and heat transport problems, three-dimensional problems and flow through a fractured porous medium with full equivalent permeability tensor. It shows firstly that the mimetic finite difference method can model anisotropic flow both in porous and in fractured media accurately and its results are better than those obtained by the multi-point flux approximation method in highly anisotropic models, secondly that the asymmetric permeability tensor can be included and leads to improved results compared the symmetric permeability tensor in the equivalent fracture models, and thirdly that the method can be easily implemented in existing finite volume or finite difference codes, which has been demonstrated successfully for SHEMAT-Suite.

  19. Damage spreading in 2-dimensional isotropic and anisotropic Bak-Sneppen models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, B.; Tirnakli, U.

    2008-03-01

    We implement the damage spreading technique on 2-dimensional isotropic and anisotropic Bak-Sneppen models. Our extensive numerical simulations show that there exists a power-law sensitivity to the initial conditions at the statistically stationary state (self-organized critical state). Corresponding growth exponent α for the Hamming distance and the dynamical exponent z are calculated. These values allow us to observe a clear data collapse of the finite size scaling for both versions of the Bak-Sneppen model. Moreover, it is shown that the growth exponent of the distance in the isotropic and anisotropic Bak-Sneppen models is strongly affected by the choice of the transient time.

  20. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  1. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a `steering' of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  2. Modeling Cometary Coma with a Three Dimensional, Anisotropic Multiple Scattering Distributed Processing Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchini, Chris B.

    1997-01-01

    Development of camera and instrument simulations for space exploration requires the development of scientifically accurate models of the objects to be studied. Several planned cometary missions have prompted the development of a three dimensional, multi-spectral, anisotropic multiple scattering model of cometary coma.

  3. Model-size reduction for the buckling and vibration analyses of anisotropic panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Whitworth, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for reducing the size of the model used in the buckling and vibration analyses of symmetric anisotropic panels to that of the corresponding orthotropic model. The key elements of the procedure are the application of an operator splitting technique through the decomposition of the material stiffness matrix of the panel into the sum of orthotropic and nonorthotropic (anisotropic) parts and the use of a reduction method through successive application of the finite element method and the classical Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The effectiveness of the procedure is demonstrated by numerical examples.

  4. Thermoelectric conductivities, shear viscosity, and stability in an anisotropic linear axion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Ling, Yi; Niu, Chao; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    We study thermoelectric conductivities and shear viscosities in a holographically anisotropic model, which is dual to a spatially anisotropic N =4 super-Yang-Mills theory at finite chemical potential. Momentum relaxation is realized through perturbing the linear axion field. Ac conductivity exhibits a coherent/incoherent metal transition. Deviations from the Wiedemann-Franz law are also observed in our model. The longitudinal shear viscosity for prolate anisotropy violates the bound conjectured by Kovtun-Son-Starinets. We also find that thermodynamic and dynamical instabilities are not always equivalent by examining the Gubser-Mitra conjecture.

  5. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-01

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  6. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-15

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  7. Modeling anisotropic plasticity: Eulerian hydrocode applications of high strain-rate deformation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, S.P.; Burkett, M.W.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1998-02-01

    Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength are implemented in the two dimensional MESA hydrodynamics code. Quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure are utilized. An associative flow strength formulation incorporating these yield functions is solved using a geometric normal return method. A stretching rod problem is selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy on a tensile plastic instability (necking). The rod necking rate and topology are compared for MESA simulations performed for both isotropic and anisotropic cases utilizing the elastic-perfectly-plastic and the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress models.

  8. Modeling anisotropic plasticity: Eulerian hydrocode applications of high strain-rate deformation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, S.P.; Burkett, M.W.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1997-05-01

    Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength are implemented in the two-dimensional MESA hydrodynamics code. Quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure are utilized. An associative flow strength formulation incorporating these yield functions is solved using a geometric normal return method. A stretching rod problem is selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy on a tensile plastic instability (necking). The rod necking rate and topology are compared for MESA simulations performed for both isotropic and anisotropic cases utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model.

  9. Thick brane isotropization in a generalized 5D anisotropic standing wave braneworld model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Herrera–Aguilar, Alfredo; Malagón–Morejón, Dagoberto; Mora–Luna, Refugio Rigel; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2013-04-01

    We study a smooth cosmological solution within a generalized 5D standing wave braneworld modeled by gravity and a phantom scalar field. In this model the 3-brane is anisotropically warped along its spatial dimensions and contains a novel time-dependent scale factor that multiplies the anisotropic spatial interval of the 5D metric, a fact that allows us to study cosmological effects. By explicitly solving the bulk field equations we found a natural mechanism which isotropizes the braneworld for a wide class of natural initial conditions. We are able to give a physical interpretation of the anisotropic dissipation: as the anisotropic energy of the 3-brane rapidly leaks into the bulk through the nontrivial components of the nonlocal Weyl tensor projected to the brane, the bulk becomes less isotropic. At the same time, under the action of the 4D cosmological constant, the anisotropic braneworld super-exponentially isotropizes by itself, rendering a 3-brane with de Sitter symmetry embedded in a 5D de Sitter space-time, while the phantom scalar field exponentially vanishes.

  10. Analytic models of anisotropic strange stars in f(T) gravity with off-diagonal tetrad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, M.; Abbas, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the analytic models of anisotropic compact stars in f(T) gravity (where T is torsion scalar), with non-diagonal tetrad. By taking the anisotropic source inside the spherically symmetric star, the equations of motions have been derived in the context of f(T) gravity. Krori and Barua metric which satisfies the physical requirement of a realistic star, has been applied to describe the compact objects like strange stars. We use the power law form of f(T) model to determine explicit relations of matter variables. Further, we have found the anisotropic behavior, energy conditions, stability and surface redshift of stars. Using the masses and radii of 4U1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658, we have determined the constants involved in metric components. Finally we discuss the graphical behavior of the analytic description of strange star candidates.

  11. Mott Quantum Criticality in the Anisotropic 2D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Benjamin; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Pruschke, Thomas; Assaad, Fakher F.; Raczkowski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    We present evidence for Mott quantum criticality in an anisotropic two-dimensional system of coupled Hubbard chains at half-filling. In this scenario emerging from variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical mean-field theory, the interchain hopping t⊥ acts as a control parameter driving the second-order critical end point Tc of the metal-insulator transition down to zero at t⊥c/t ≃0.2 . Below t⊥c, the volume of the hole and electron Fermi pockets of a compensated metal vanishes continuously at the Mott transition. Above t⊥c, the volume reduction of the pockets is cut off by a first-order transition. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a putative quantum critical point in layered organic conductors, whose location remains elusive so far.

  12. Mott Quantum Criticality in the Anisotropic 2D Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Benjamin; Manmana, Salvatore R; Pruschke, Thomas; Assaad, Fakher F; Raczkowski, Marcin

    2016-02-26

    We present evidence for Mott quantum criticality in an anisotropic two-dimensional system of coupled Hubbard chains at half-filling. In this scenario emerging from variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical mean-field theory, the interchain hopping t_{⊥} acts as a control parameter driving the second-order critical end point T_{c} of the metal-insulator transition down to zero at t_{⊥}^{c}/t≃0.2. Below t_{⊥}^{c}, the volume of the hole and electron Fermi pockets of a compensated metal vanishes continuously at the Mott transition. Above t_{⊥}^{c}, the volume reduction of the pockets is cut off by a first-order transition. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a putative quantum critical point in layered organic conductors, whose location remains elusive so far. PMID:26967431

  13. Forward modeling of marine DC resistivity method for a layered anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Ping; Cai, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Since the ocean bottom is a sedimentary environment wherein stratification is well developed, the use of an anisotropic model is best for studying its geology. Beginning with Maxwell's equations for an anisotropic model, we introduce scalar potentials based on the divergence-free characteristic of the electric and magnetic (EM) fields. We then continue the EM fields down into the deep earth and upward into the seawater and couple them at the ocean bottom to the transmitting source. By studying both the DC apparent resistivity curves and their polar plots, we can resolve the anisotropy of the ocean bottom. Forward modeling of a high-resistivity thin layer in an anisotropic half-space demonstrates that the marine DC resistivity method in shallow water is very sensitive to the resistive reservoir but is not influenced by airwaves. As such, it is very suitable for oil and gas exploration in shallowwater areas but, to date, most modeling algorithms for studying marine DC resistivity are based on isotropic models. In this paper, we investigate one-dimensional anisotropic forward modeling for marine DC resistivity method, prove the algorithm to have high accuracy, and thus provide a theoretical basis for 2D and 3D forward modeling.

  14. Stress distribution in a premolar 3D model with anisotropic and isotropic enamel.

    PubMed

    Munari, Laís S; Cornacchia, Tulimar P M; Moreira, Allyson N; Gonçalves, Jason B; De Las Casas, Estevam B; Magalhães, Cláudia S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the areas of stress concentration in a three-dimensional (3D) premolar tooth model with anisotropic or isotropic enamel using the finite element method. A computed tomography was imported to an image processing program to create the tooth model which was exported to a 3D modeling program. The mechanical properties and loading conditions were prescribed in Abaqus. In order to evaluate stresses, axial and oblique loads were applied simulating realistic conditions. Compression stress was observed on the side of load application, and tensile stress was observed on the opposite side. Tensile stress was concentrated mainly in the cervical region and in the alveolar insertion bone. Although stress concentration analyses of the isotropic 3D models produced similar stress distribution results when compared to the anisotropic models, tensile stress values shown by anisotropic models were smaller than the isotropic models. Oblique loads resulted in higher values of tensile stresses, which concentrate mainly in the cervical area of the tooth and in the alveolar bone insertion. Anisotropic properties must be utilized in enamel stress evaluation in non-carious cervical lesions. PMID:25850984

  15. Fluid-structure interaction simulations of cerebral arteries modeled by isotropic and anisotropic constitutive laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricerri, Paolo; Dedè, Luca; Deparis, Simone; Quarteroni, Alfio; Robertson, Anne M.; Sequeira, Adélia

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers numerical simulations of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems in hemodynamics for idealized geometries of healthy cerebral arteries modeled by both nonlinear isotropic and anisotropic material constitutive laws. In particular, it focuses on an anisotropic model initially proposed for cerebral arteries to characterize the activation of collagen fibers at finite strains. In the current work, this constitutive model is implemented for the first time in the context of an FSI formulation. In this framework, we investigate the influence of the material model on the numerical results and, in the case of the anisotropic laws, the importance of the collagen fibers on the overall mechanical behavior of the tissue. With this aim, we compare our numerical results by analyzing fluid dynamic indicators, vessel wall displacement, Von Mises stress, and deformations of the collagen fibers. Specifically, for an anisotropic model with collagen fiber recruitment at finite strains, we highlight the progressive activation and deactivation processes of the fibrous component of the tissue throughout the wall thickness during the cardiac cycle. The inclusion of collagen recruitment is found to have a substantial impact on the intramural stress, which will in turn impact the biological response of the intramural cells. Hence, the methodology presented here will be particularly useful for studies of mechanobiological processes in the healthy and diseased vascular wall.

  16. Gle1 functions during mRNA export in an oligomeric complex that is altered in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Folkmann, Andrew W.; Collier, Scott E.; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Aditi; Ohi, Melanie D.; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved multifunctional protein Gle1 regulates gene expression at multiple steps: nuclear messenger (m)RNA export, translation initiation, and translation termination. A GLE1 mutation (FinMajor) is causally linked to human lethal congenital contracture syndrome-1 (LCCS1); however, the resulting perturbations on Gle1 molecular function were unknown. FinMajor results in a Proline-Phenylalanine-Glutamine peptide insertion within the uncharacterized Gle1 coiled-coil domain. Here we find that Gle1 self-associates both in vitro and in living cells via the coiled-coil domain. Electron microscopy reveals high molecular mass Gle1 oligomers form ∼26 nm in diameter disk-shaped particles. With the Gle1-FinMajor protein, these particles are malformed. Moreover, functional assays document a specific requirement for proper Gle1 oligomerization during mRNA export but not for Gle1’s roles in translation. These results identify a novel mechanistic step in Gle1’s mRNA export function at nuclear pore complexes, and directly implicate altered export in LCCS1 disease pathology. PMID:24243016

  17. Modeling Anisotropic Plasticity: 3D Eulerian Hydrocode Simulations of High Strain Rate Deformation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, Michael; Clancy, Sean; Maudlin, Paul; Holian, Kathleen

    2001-06-01

    : Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength has been implemented in the three-dimensional CONEJO hydrodynamics code. CONEJO is an explicit, Eulerian continuum mechanics code that is utilized to predict formation processes associated with material deformation at elevated strain-rates and is a code development project under the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program. Some special features of CONEJO include a high-order advection algorithm, a material interface tracking scheme, and van Leer monotonic advection-limiting. The anisotropic constitutive modeling is posed in an unrotated material frame using the theorem of polar decomposition to describe rigid body rotation. An Euler-Rodrigues description is used to quantify the rigid body rotations. Continuous quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure were utilized. Associative flow formulations incorporating these yield functions were solved using a geometric normal return method. Simple rectangular shear problems, "R-value" problems, and Taylor cylinder impact test data were utilized to verify and validate the implementation of the anisotropic model. A "stretching rod" problem (involving large strain and strain-rate deformation) was selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy for this deformation process. The rod necking rate and topology was compared for CONEJO simulations using several isotropic and anisotropic descriptions that utilized the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model.

  18. Modeling anisotropic plasmon excitations in self-assembled fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey; Gao, Bo; Huang, Danhong

    2014-05-01

    The plasmon excitations in Coulomb-coupled spherical two-dimensional electron gases (S2DEGs) reveal an interesting dependence on the displacement vector between the centers of the spheres with respect to the axis of quantization for the angular momentum quantum number L. Specifically, plasmon modes for a bundle of three S2DEGs have been obtained within the random-phase approximation. The inter-sphere Coulomb interaction matrix elements and their symmetry properties were also investigated in detail. The case of a bundle gives an adequate picture of the way in which the Coulomb interaction depends on the orbital angular momentum quantum number L and its projection M. We concluded that the interaction between the S2DEGs aligned at an angle of 45° with the axis of quantization is negligible compared to the interaction along and perpendicular to the quantization axis, which are themselves unequal to each other. Consequently, the plasmon excitation frequencies reveal an interesting orientational anisotropic coupling to an external electromagnetic field probing the charge density oscillations. Our result on the spatial correlation may be experimentally observable. In this connection, there have already been some experimental reports pointing to a similar effect in nanoparticles.

  19. Mott Quantum Criticality in the Anisotropic 2D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Benjamin; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Pruschke, Thomas; Assaad, Fakher F.; Raczkowski, Marcin

    We present evidence for Mott quantum criticality in an anisotropic two-dimensional system of coupled Hubbard chains at half-filling. In this scenario emerging from variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical mean-field theory, the interchain hopping t⊥ acts as control parameter driving the second-order critical endpoint Tc of the metal-insulator transition down to zero at t⊥c / t ~= 0 . 2 . Below t⊥c the volume of hole and electron Fermi pockets of a compensated metal vanishes continuously at the Mott transition. Above t⊥c the volume reduction of the pockets is cut off by a first-order transition. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a putative quantum critical point in layered organic conductors whose location remains elusive so far. We acknowledge support by DFG research units FOR1807 and FOR1346, ERC Starting Grant No. 306897 and NSF Grant No. PHY11-25915, and computer support by the GWDG and Jülich Supercomputing Centre.

  20. A Model with Ellipsoidal Scatterers for Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Anisotropic Layered Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a model with ellipsoidal scatterers for applications to polarimetric remote sensing of anisotropic layered media at microwave frequencies. The physical configuration includes an isotropic layer covering an anisotropic layer above a homogeneous half space. The isotropic layer consists of randomly oriented spheroids. The anisotropic layer contains ellipsoidal scatterers with a preferential vertical alignment and random azimuthal orientations. Effective permittivities of the scattering media are calculated with the strong fluctuation theory extended to account for the nonspherical shapes and the scatterer orientation distributions. On the basis of the analytic wave theory, dyadic Green's functions for layered media are used to derive polarimetric backscattering coefficients under the distorted Born approximation. The ellipsoidal shape of the scatterers gives rise to nonzero cross-polarized returns from the untilted anisotropic medium in the first-order approximation. Effects of rough interfaces are estimated by an incoherent addition method. Theoretical results and experimental data are matched at 9 GHz for thick first-year sea ice with a bare surface and with a snow cover at Point Barrow, Alaska. The model is then used to study the sensitivity of polarimetric backscattering coefficients with respect to correlation lengths representing the geometry of brine inclusions. Polarimetric signatures of bare and snow-covered sea ice are also simulated based on the model to investigate effects of different scattering mechanisms.

  1. Bianchi type-II models in the presence of perfect fluid and anisotropic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh; Akarsu, Özgür

    2012-06-01

    The spatially homogeneous but totally anisotropic and non-flat Bianchi type-II cosmological model has been studied in general relativity in the presence of two minimally interacting fluids; a perfect fluid as the matter fluid and a hypothetical anisotropic fluid as the dark energy fluid. The Einstein field equations have been solved by applying two kinematical Ansätze: we have assumed the variation law for the mean Hubble parameter that yields a constant value of the deceleration parameter, and one of the components of the shear tensor has been considered proportional to the mean Hubble parameter. We have particularly dwelled on the accelerating models with non-divergent expansion anisotropy as the Universe evolves. Yielding the anisotropic pressure, the fluid we consider in the context of dark energy can produce results that can be produced in the presence of isotropic fluid in accordance with the ΛCDM cosmology. However, the derived model gives additional opportunities by being able to allow kinematics that cannot be produced in the presence of fluids that yield only isotropic pressure. We have obtained well-behaving cases where the anisotropy of the expansion and the anisotropy of the fluid converge to finite values (include zero) in the late Universe. We have also showed that, although the metric we consider is totally anisotropic, the anisotropy of the dark energy is constrained to be axially symmetric, as long as the overall energy momentum tensor possesses zero shear stress.

  2. Calculations of diffuser flows with an anisotropic K-epsilon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T.-H.

    1995-10-01

    A newly developed anisotropic K-epsilon model is applied to calculate three axisymmetric diffuser flows with or without separation. The new model uses a quadratic stress-strain relation and satisfies the realizability conditions, i.e., it ensures both the positivity of the turbulent normal stresses and the Schwarz' inequality between any fluctuating velocities. Calculations are carried out with a finite-element method. A second-order accurate, bounded convection scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure numerical credibility of the solutions. The standard K-epsilon model is also used in order to highlight the performance of the new model. Comparison with the experimental data shows that the anisotropic K-epsilon model performs consistently better than does the standard K-epsilon model in all of the three test cases.

  3. Calculations of Diffuser Flows with an Anisotropic K-Epsilon Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T.-H.

    1995-01-01

    A newly developed anisotropic K-epsilon model is applied to calculate three axisymmetric diffuser flows with or without separation. The new model uses a quadratic stress-strain relation and satisfies the realizability conditions, i.e., it ensures both the positivity of the turbulent normal stresses and the Schwarz' inequality between any fluctuating velocities. Calculations are carried out with a finite-element method. A second-order accurate, bounded convection scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure numerical credibility of the solutions. The standard K-epsilon model is also used in order to highlight the performance of the new model. Comparison with the experimental data shows that the anisotropic K-epsilon model performs consistently better than does the standard K-epsilon model in all of the three test cases.

  4. Recent advances in modeling discontinuities in anisotropic and heterogeneous materials in eddy current NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrin, John C.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.

    2011-06-23

    Recent advances are presented to model discontinuities in random anisotropies that arise in certain materials, such as titanium alloys. A numerical model is developed to provide a full anisotropic representation of each crystalline in a gridded region of the material. Several simulated and experimental demonstrations are presented highlighting the effect of grain noise on eddy current measurements. Agreement between VIC-3D(c) model calculations and experimental data in titanium alloy specimens with known flaws is demonstrated.

  5. Evaluation of Springback for DP980 S Rail Using Anisotropic Hardening Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jisik; Lee, Jinwoo; Bae, Gihyun; Barlat, Frederic; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    The effect of anisotropic hardening models on springback of an S-rail part was investigated. Two advanced constitutive models based on distortional and kinematic hardening, which captured the Bauschinger effect, transient hardening, and permanent softening during strain path change, were implemented in a finite element (FE) code. In-plane compression-tension tests were performed to identify the model parameters. The springback of the S-rail after forming a 980 MPa dual-phase steel sheet sample was measured and analyzed using different hardening models. The comparison between experimental and FE results demonstrated that the advanced anisotropic hardening models, which are particularly suitable for non-proportional loading, significantly improved the springback prediction capability of an advanced high strength steel.

  6. Microscopic model of the Knight shift in anisotropic and correlated metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Bianca E.; Klemm, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a microscopic model of nuclear magnetic resonance in metals. The spin-1/2 local nucleus and its surrounding orbital electrons interact with the arbitrary constant \\boldsymbol{B}{0} and perpendicular time-oscillatory magnetic inductions \\boldsymbol{B}{1}(t) and with each other via an anisotropic hyperfine interaction. An Anderson-like Hamiltonian describes the excitations of the relevant occupied local orbital electrons into the conduction bands, each band described by an anisotropic effective mass with corresponding Landau orbits and an anisotropic spin \\boldsymbol{g} tensor. Local orbital electron correlation effects are included using the mean-field decoupling procedure of Lacroix. The Knight resonance frequency and corresponding linewidth shifts are evaluated to leading orders in the hyperfine and Anderson excitation interactions. While respectively proportional to {{≤ft({{B}1}/{{B}0}\\right)}2} and a constant for weak {{B}0}\\gg {{B}1} , both highly anisotropic shifts depend strongly upon \\boldsymbol{B}{0} when a Landau level is near the Fermi energy. Electron correlations affect the anisotropy of the linewidth shift. The model is easily generalizable to arbitrary nuclear spin I.

  7. Anisotropic Coarse-Grained Model for Proteins Based On Gay–Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gay–Berne anisotropic potential has been widely used to evaluate the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained particles being described as elliptical rigid bodies. In this paper, we are presenting a coarse-grained model for twenty kinds of amino acids and proteins, based on the anisotropic Gay–Berne and point electric multipole (EMP) potentials. We demonstrate that the anisotropic coarse-grained model, namely GBEMP model, is able to reproduce many key features observed from experimental protein structures (Dunbrack Library), as well as from atomistic force field simulations (using AMOEBA, AMBER, and CHARMM force fields), while saving the computational cost by a factor of about 10–200 depending on specific cases and atomistic models. More importantly, unlike other coarse-grained approaches, our framework is based on the fundamental intermolecular forces with explicit treatment of electrostatic and repulsion-dispersion forces. As a result, the coarse-grained protein model presented an accurate description of nonbonded interactions (particularly electrostatic component) between hetero/homodimers (such as peptide–peptide, peptide–water). In addition, the encouraging performance of the model was reflected by the excellent correlation between GBEMP and AMOEBA models in the calculations of the dipole moment of peptides. In brief, the GBEMP model given here is general and transferable, suitable for simulating complex biomolecular systems. PMID:24659927

  8. Estimation of the cosmic ray ionization in the Earth's atmosphere during GLE71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    DYASTIMA is an application, based on Geant4, which simulates the cascades of particles that are generated due to the interactions of cosmic ray particles with the atmospheres of the planets. The first version of DYASTIMA has been successfully applied to the Earth's atmosphere, providing results that are in accordance with the publications of other models. Since then, important improvements and extensions have been made to this application, including a graphical user interface environment that allows the more effective management of the configuration parameters. Also, the actual modeling of the atmosphere has been changed allowing the definition of more complex cases and at the same time providing, in a more efficient way (with respect to the program's previous version) enhanced outputs. In this work, we combine the new version of DYASTIMA with the NMBANGLE PPOLA model, that estimates the spectrum of SEPs during relativistic proton events using ground level neutron monitor data from the worldwide network. Such a joint model has as a primary scope the simulation of a SEP event and of its secondary products at different altitudes in the Earth's atmosphere, providing at the same time an estimation of the respective ionization rates and of their spatial and temporal dependence. We apply this joint model to GLE 71, on 17 May 2012, and we discuss the results.

  9. Optimizing the real-time ground level enhancement alert system based on neutron monitor measurements: Introducing GLE Alert Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvatzoglou, G.; Papaioannou, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Dimitroulakos, J.; Sarlanis, C.

    2014-11-01

    Whenever a significant intensity increase is being recorded by at least three neutron monitor stations in real-time mode, a ground level enhancement (GLE) event is marked and an automated alert is issued. Although, the physical concept of the algorithm is solid and has efficiently worked in a number of cases, the availability of real-time data is still an open issue and makes timely GLE alerts quite challenging. In this work we present the optimization of the GLE alert that has been set into operation since 2006 at the Athens Neutron Monitor Station. This upgrade has led to GLE Alert Plus, which is currently based upon the Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB). We have determined the critical values per station allowing us to issue reliable GLE alerts close to the initiation of the event while at the same time we keep the false alert rate at low levels. Furthermore, we have managed to treat the problem of data availability, introducing the Go-Back-N algorithm. A total of 13 GLE events have been marked from January 2000 to December 2012. GLE Alert Plus issued an alert for 12 events. These alert times are compared to the alert times of GOES Space Weather Prediction Center and Solar Energetic Particle forecaster of the University of Málaga (UMASEP). In all cases GLE Alert Plus precedes the GOES alert by ≈8-52 min. The comparison with UMASEP demonstrated a remarkably good agreement. Real-time GLE alerts by GLE Alert Plus may be retrieved by http://cosray.phys.uoa.gr/gle_alert_plus.html, http://www.nmdb.eu, and http://swe.ssa.esa.int/web/guest/space-radiation. An automated GLE alert email notification system is also available to interested users.

  10. An anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete at transient elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baker, Graham; de Borst, René

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of concrete at elevated temperatures is important for an assessment of integrity (strength and durability) of structures exposed to a high-temperature environment, in applications such as fire exposure, smelting plants and nuclear installations. In modelling terms, a coupled thermomechanical analysis represents a generalization of the computational mechanics of fracture and damage. Here, we develop a fully coupled anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete under high stress and transient temperature, with emphasis on the adherence of the model to the laws of thermodynamics. Specific analytical results are given, deduced from thermodynamics, of a novel interpretation on specific heat, evolution of entropy and the identification of the complete anisotropic, thermomechanical damage surface. The model is also shown to be stable in a computational sense, and to satisfy the laws of thermodynamics. PMID:16243703

  11. Microscopic model of the Knight shift in anisotropic and correlated metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Richard; Hall, Bianca

    We present a microscopic model of nuclear magnetic resonance in metals. The spins of the spin-1/2 local nucleus and its surrounding orbital electrons interact with the arbitrary constant B0 and perpendicular time-oscillatory magnetic inductions B1 (t) and with each other via an anisotropic hyperfine interaction. An Anderson-like Hamiltonian describes the excitations of the relevant occupied local orbital electrons into the conduction bands, each band described by an anisotropic effective mass with corresponding Landau orbits and an anisotropic spin g tensor. Local orbital electron correlation effects are included using the mean-field decoupling procedure of Lacroix. The Knight resonance frequency and corresponding linewidth shifts are evaluated to leading orders in the hyperfine and Anderson excitation interactions. While respectively proportional to (B1 /B0) 2 and a constant for weak B0 > >B1 , both highly anisotropic shifts depend strongly upon B0 when a Landau level is near the Fermi energy. Electron correlations affect the anisotropy of the linewidth shift. The authors acknowledge support from an anonymous donor.

  12. A rock physics model for analysis of anisotropic parameters in a shale reservoir in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Keran; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Shuangquan; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-02-01

    A rock physics model is a very effective tool to describe the anisotropy and mechanical properties of rock from a seismology perspective. Compared to a conventional reservoir, modelling a shale reservoir requires us to face two main challenges in modelling: the existence of organic matter and strong anisotropy. We construct an anisotropic rock physics workflow for a typical shale reservoir in Southwest China, in which the organic matter is treated separately from other minerals by using a combination of anisotropic self-consistent approximation and the differential effective medium method. The standard deviation of the distribution function is used to model the degree of lamination of clay and kerogen. A double scan workflow is introduced to invert the probability of pore aspect ratio and lamination simultaneously, which can give us a better understanding of the shale formation. The anisotropic properties of target formation have been analysed based on the proposed model. Inverted Thomsen parameters, especially the sign of delta, are analysed in terms of the physical properties of rock physics modelling.

  13. Dipole estimation errors due to not incorporating anisotropic conductivities in realistic head models for EEG source analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallez, Hans; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2009-10-01

    EEG source analysis is a valuable tool for brain functionality research and for diagnosing neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. It requires a geometrical representation of the human head or a head model, which is often modeled as an isotropic conductor. However, it is known that some brain tissues, such as the skull or white matter, have an anisotropic conductivity. Many studies reported that the anisotropic conductivities have an influence on the calculated electrode potentials. However, few studies have assessed the influence of anisotropic conductivities on the dipole estimations. In this study, we want to determine the dipole estimation errors due to not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull and/or brain tissues. Therefore, head models are constructed with the same geometry, but with an anisotropically conducting skull and/or brain tissue compartment. These head models are used in simulation studies where the dipole location and orientation error is calculated due to neglecting anisotropic conductivities of the skull and brain tissue. Results show that not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull yields a dipole location error between 2 and 25 mm, with an average of 10 mm. When the anisotropic conductivities of the brain tissues are neglected, the dipole location error ranges between 0 and 5 mm. In this case, the average dipole location error was 2.3 mm. In all simulations, the dipole orientation error was smaller than 10°. We can conclude that the anisotropic conductivities of the skull have to be incorporated to improve the accuracy of EEG source analysis. The results of the simulation, as presented here, also suggest that incorporation of the anisotropic conductivities of brain tissues is not necessary. However, more studies are needed to confirm these suggestions.

  14. Short-time dynamics of isotropic and anisotropic Bak-Sneppen model: extensive simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirnakli, Ugur; Lyra, Marcelo L.

    2004-12-01

    In this work, the short-time dynamics of the isotropic and anisotropic versions of the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model has been investigated using the standard damage spreading technique. Since the system sizes attained in our simulations are larger than the ones employed in previous studies, our results for the dynamic scaling exponents are expected to be more accurate than the results of the existing literature. The obtained scaling exponents of both versions of the BS model are found to be greater than the ones given in previous works. These findings are in agreement with the recent claim of Cafiero et al. (Eur. Phys. J. B7 (1999) 505). Moreover, it is found that the short-time dynamics of the anisotropic model is only slightly affected by finite-size effects and the reported estimate of α≃0.53 can be considered as a good estimate of the true exponent in the thermodynamic limit.

  15. Five-layer realistic head model based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of different tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dandan; Zhang, Jianwei; Wu, Weijuan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiangping

    2009-10-01

    This paper is focused on the sophisticated realistic head modeling based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of the head tissues. The finite element method (FEM) was used to model the five-layer head volume conductor models with hexahedral elements from segmentation and mapping of DT-MRI data. Then the inhomogeneous conductivities of the scalp, CSF and gray matter tissue were distributed according a normal distribution based on the mean value of respective tissues. The electric conductivity of the brain tissues dictates different inhomogeneous and anisotropic at some different microscopic levels. Including the inhomogeneous and anisotropy of the tissue would improve the accuracy of the MREIT, EEG and MEG problems in the simulation research.

  16. Automatic implementation of finite strain anisotropic hyperelastic models using hyper-dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, Ravi; Khandelwal, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to automate the implementation of finite strain anisotropic hyperelastic models into a general finite element framework. The automation presented in this paper enables the end-user to implement a hyperelastic model by programming its Helmholtz free energy function alone. The automation is achieved by employing hyper-dual number system to evaluate analytical quality derivatives. New perturbation techniques are introduced and are employed to extend the hyper-dual numbers system to evaluate tensor derivatives. The capability of the proposed automation scheme is demonstrated by implementing five finite strain anisotropic hyperelastic models. The merits and demerits of the proposed automation scheme are compared to an automation scheme based on the central difference method.

  17. Diffusion-Limited Aggregation with Anisotropic Sticking Probability: A Tentative Model for River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1986-10-01

    Diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model with anisotropic sticking probability Ps is computer-simulated on two dimensional square lattice. The cluster grows from a seed particle at the origin in the positive y area with the absorption-type boundary along x-axis. The cluster is found to grow anisotropically as R//˜Nν// and R\\bot˜Nν\\bot, where R\\bot and R// are the radii of gyration of the cluster along x- and y-axes, respectively, and N is the particle number constituting the cluster. The two exponents are shown to become assymptotically ν//{=}2/3, ν\\bot{=}1/3 whenever the sticking anisotropy exists. It is also found that the present model is fairly consistent with Hack’s law of river networks, suggesting that it is a good candidate of a prototype model for the evolution of the river network.

  18. A heterogeneity model comparison of highly resolved statistically anisotropic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siirila-Woodburn, Erica R.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2015-01-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity is known to affect solute characteristics such as spatial spreading, mixing, and residence time, and is often modeled geostatistically to address aquifer uncertainties. While parameter uncertainty is often considered, the model uncertainty of the heterogeneity structure is frequently ignored. In this high-resolution heterogeneity model comparison, we perform a stochastic analysis utilizing spatial moment and breakthrough curve (BTC) metrics on Gaussian (G), truncated Gaussian (TG), and non-Gaussian, or "facies" (F) heterogeneous domains. Three-dimensional plume behavior is rigorously assessed with meter (horizontal) and cm (vertical) scale discretization over a ten-kilometer aquifer. Model differences are quantified as a function of statistical anisotropy, ε, by varying the x-direction integral scale of hydraulic conductivity, K, from 15 to 960 (m). We demonstrate that the model is important only for certain metrics within a range of ε. For example, spreading is insensitive to the model selection at low ε, but not at high ε. In contrast, center of mass is sensitive to the model selection at low ε, and not at high ε. A conceptual model to explain these trends is proposed and validated with BTC metrics. Simulations show that G model effective K, and 1st and 2nd spatial moments are much greater than that of TG and F models. A comparison of G and TG models (which only differ in K-distribution tails) reveal drastically different behavior, exemplifying how accurate characterization of the K-distribution may be important in modeling efforts, especially in aquifers where extreme K values are often not measured, or inadvertently overlooked.

  19. Magnetization process modeling of anisotropic magnetoresistive permalloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, H.; Fulmek, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    The results of model calculations by the Jiles-Atherton approach and the energetic model (EM) of ferromagnetic hysteresis are discussed. In contrast to other phenomenological models, the EM parameters are calculated directly from the angle of the magnetization with respect to the easy axis. The transversal Kerr-effect is used to determine the magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic permalloy films with uniaxial anisotropy.

  20. Modeling anisotropic MHD turbulence in simulations of liquid metal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlund, O.

    2001-06-01

    The dynamical properties of the MHD turbulence model proposed by Widlund etal. are examined for the case of homogeneous decaying turbulence. The model is a Reynolds stress closure, extended with a transport equation for a dimensional anisotropy variable, α, which carries information about length scale anisotropy. The analysis suggests that the model term originally proposed for the nonlinear energy transfer in the α equation should be modified. A unique set of model coefficients could be determined, which makes the model consistent with theory and experiments for interaction parameters N ranging from zero to infinity. The model coincides with the standard K-eps model when there is no magnetic field. In the linear regime of large N, it produces the K˜ t^{-1/2} energy decay predicted by linear theory. When nonlinear effects are important, the model predicts K˜ t^{-1.7} and L_∥ ˜ t^{0.65}, in agreement with the classical experiments by Alemany etal. Figs 5, Refs 11.

  1. Implementation of an anisotropic mechanical model for shale in Geodyn

    SciTech Connect

    Attaia, A.; Vorobiev, O.; Walsh, S.

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to present the implementation of a shale model in the Geodyn code, based on published rock material models and properties that can help a petroleum engineer in his design of various strategies for oil/gas recovery from shale rock formation.

  2. Evolution of initially contracting Bianchi class A models in the presence of an ultra-stiff anisotropic pressure fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Ganguly, Chandrima

    2016-06-01

    We study the behaviour of Bianchi class A universes containing an ultra-stiff isotropic ghost field and a fluid with anisotropic pressures which is also ultra-stiff on the average. This allows us to investigate whether cyclic universe scenarios, like the ekpyrotic model, do indeed lead to isotropization on approach to a singularity (or bounce) in the presence of dominant ultra-stiff pressure anisotropies. We specialize to consider the closed Bianchi type IX universe, and show that when the anisotropic pressures are stiffer on average than any isotropic ultra-stiff fluid then, if they dominate on approach to the singularity, it will be anisotropic. We include an isotropic ultra-stiff ghost fluid with negative energy density in order to create a cosmological bounce at finite volume in the absence of the anisotropic fluid. When the dominant anisotropic fluid is present it leads to an anisotropic cosmological singularity rather than an isotropic bounce. The inclusion of anisotropic stresses generated by collisionless particles in an anisotropically expanding universe is therefore essential for a full analysis of the consequences of a cosmological bounce or singularity in cyclic universes.

  3. Evaluation of three-dimensional anisotropic head model for mapping realistic electromagnetic fields of brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Wi, Hun; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields provide fundamental data for the imaging of electrical tissue properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, in recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based tissue property mapping. The induced voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density caused by externally injected current are critical factors for determining the image quality of electrical tissue conductivity. As a useful tool to identify bio-electromagnetic phenomena, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subject to an injected currents. In this study, we provide the numerical simulation results of electromagnetic field mapping of brain tissues using a MR-based conductivity imaging method. First, we implemented a realistic three-dimensional human anisotropic head model using high-resolution anatomical and diffusion tensor MR images. The voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density of brain tissues were imaged by injecting 1 mA of current through pairs of electrodes on the surface of our head model. The current density map of anisotropic brain tissues was calculated from the measured magnetic flux density based on the linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. Comparing the current density to the previous isotropic model, the anisotropic model clearly showed the differences between the brain tissues. This originates from the enhanced signals by the inherent conductivity contrast as well as the actual tissue condition resulting from the injected currents.

  4. An analysis of 3D anisotropic-viscoelastic forward modeling and dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunying; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Yun

    2015-12-01

    The anisotropic-viscoelastic wave equation is a generalized expression of a transversely isotropic-viscoelastic medium. The viscoelastic horizontal-tranverse isotropic (HTI) medium is a special case. Considering the horizontal symmetry axis of viscoelastic HTI media, we develop elasticities and wave equations for preserving its transverse isotropy. To model anisotropic-viscoelastic wave propagation, we apply the fourth-order Runge-Kutta and Fourier pseudospectral method to discretize the wave equation. The convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbed boundary condition is applied to the 3D modeling algorithm and the result shows that it absorbs reflected energy efficiently. We present three models to investigate anisotropic-viscoelastic waves. Two half-space models demonstrate the azimuthal attenuation, which appears both on the PP and PSv wave. The quality factor is greater along the fracture direction for both the PP and PSv waves. Analysis shows that frequency-dependent amplitude attenuation behaves differently along the fracture azimuth. This demonstates that we can use this property for reservoir detection.

  5. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasmas using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2014-12-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic tokamak plasmas is theoretically analyzed by using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation. The bi-Maxwellian distribution function for guiding-center ions is assumed to obtain a self-consistent form, yielding pressures satisfying the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) anisotropic equilibrium condition. The double adiabatic model gives the dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which agrees well with the one derived from gyro-kinetic equation. The GAM frequency increases with the ratio of pressures, p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, and the Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}. MHD result shows a low-frequency zonal flow existing for all p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, while according to the kinetic dispersion relation, no low-frequency branch exists for p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}≳ 2.

  6. Analysis of a theoretical model for anisotropic enzyme membranes application to enzyme electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, H; Chotani, G K

    1981-12-01

    A theoretical model of diffusion and reaction in an anisotropic enzyme membrane is presented with particular emphasis on the application of such membranes in enzyme electrodes. The dynamic response of systems in which the kinetics are linear, which comprises the practical operating regime for enzyme electrodes in analysis, is investigated via an analytic solution of the governing differential equations. The response is presented as a function of a single dimensionless group, Μ, that is the membrane modulus. PMID:24233978

  7. Large scale behavior of a two-dimensional model of anisotropic branched polymers.

    PubMed

    Knežević, Milan; Knežević, Dragica

    2013-10-28

    We study critical properties of anisotropic branched polymers modeled by semi-directed lattice animals on a triangular lattice. Using the exact transfer-matrix approach on strips of quite large widths and phenomenological renormalization group analysis, we obtained pretty good estimates of various critical exponents in the whole high-temperature region, including the point of collapse transition. Our numerical results suggest that this collapse transition belongs to the universality class of directed percolation. PMID:24182076

  8. Large scale behavior of a two-dimensional model of anisotropic branched polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Milan; Knežević, Dragica

    2013-10-01

    We study critical properties of anisotropic branched polymers modeled by semi-directed lattice animals on a triangular lattice. Using the exact transfer-matrix approach on strips of quite large widths and phenomenological renormalization group analysis, we obtained pretty good estimates of various critical exponents in the whole high-temperature region, including the point of collapse transition. Our numerical results suggest that this collapse transition belongs to the universality class of directed percolation.

  9. Effect of anisotropic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions on phase diagrams of the Ashkin-Teller model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dani, I.; Tahiri, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study, using mean field theory (MFT), the effect of the anisotropic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction on the phase diagrams of the spin-half Ashkin-Teller model on hypercubic lattice. Different new phase diagrams are found by varying the anisotropy of DM interaction. The multicritical behavior is studied as a function of four-spin interaction coefficient J4 /J1 and for two fixed values of spin interaction coefficient J2 /J1.

  10. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    PubMed

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles θ∈[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. PMID:23290584

  11. Constitutive Modeling of Anisotropic Finite-Deformation Hyperelastic Behaviors of Soft Materials Reinforced by Tortuous Fibers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Philip H; Lammers, Steven R; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R; Shandas, Robin; Qi, H Jerry

    2010-04-01

    Many biological materials are composites composed of a soft matrix reinforced with stiffer fibers. These stiffer fibers may have a tortuous shape and wind through the soft matrix. At small material deformation, these fibers deform in a bending mode and contribute little to the material stiffness; at large material deformation, these fibers deform in a stretching mode and induce a stiffening effect in the material behavior. The transition from bending mode deformation to stretching mode deformation yields a characteristic J-shape stress-strain curve. In addition, the spatial distribution of these fibers may render the composite an anisotropic behavior. In this paper, we present an anisotropic finite-deformation hyperelastic constitutive model for such materials. Here, the matrix is modeled as an isotropic neo-Hookean material. "The behaviors of single tortuous fiber are represented by a crimped fiber model". The anisotropic behavior is introduced by a structure tensor representing the effective orientation distribution of crimped fibers. Parametric studies show the effect of fiber tortuosity and fiber orientation distribution on the overall stress-strain behaviors of the materials. PMID:21822502

  12. Modeling of Anisotropic Rock Joints Under Cyclic Loading (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    This work describes a constitutive framework for modeling the behavior of rough joints under cyclic loading. Particular attention is paid to the intrinsic links between dilatancy, surface degradation, and mobilized shear strength. The framework also accounts for the important effect of shear-induced anisotropy. Both the governing formulation and an algorithm for implicit numerical integration are presented. While the proposed methods are general, we also postulate a specific model that is compared with experimental data. It employs relatively few free parameters, but shows good agreement with laboratory tests.

  13. Intersecting S-branes and an anisotropic models of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Dmitry G.

    2008-10-10

    We consider an anisotropic S-brane (space-like hyperbrane) solutions in application to cosmological model. The gravity-dilaton-antisymmetric form field initial model is compactified of extra space and we get four dimensional space (space of three dimensional S-brane plus time coordinate). Dynamic of obtained model depends from the dynamic of compactified space. In all cases of extra space in such cosmological models the primordial inflationary phase was obtained. Focus attention to the question of an anisotropy of space and an improving a number of e-folding.

  14. Anisotropic, nonsingular early universe model leading to a realistic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Lasenby, Anthony N.; Hobson, Michael P.

    2009-02-15

    We present a novel cosmological model in which scalar field matter in a biaxial Bianchi IX geometry leads to a nonsingular 'pancaking' solution: the hypersurface volume goes to zero instantaneously at the 'big bang', but all physical quantities, such as curvature invariants and the matter energy density remain finite, and continue smoothly through the big bang. We demonstrate that there exist geodesics extending through the big bang, but that there are also incomplete geodesics that spiral infinitely around a topologically closed spatial dimension at the big bang, rendering it, at worst, a quasiregular singularity. The model is thus reminiscent of the Taub-NUT vacuum solution in that it has biaxial Bianchi IX geometry and its evolution exhibits a dimensionality reduction at a quasiregular singularity; the two models are, however, rather different, as we will show in a future work. Here we concentrate on the cosmological implications of our model and show how the scalar field drives both isotropization and inflation, thus raising the question of whether structure on the largest scales was laid down at a time when the universe was still oblate (as also suggested by [T. S. Pereira, C. Pitrou, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 9 (2007) 6.][C. Pitrou, T. S. Pereira, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 4 (2008) 4.][A. Guemruekcueoglu, C. Contaldi, and M. Peloso, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 11 (2007) 005.]). We also discuss the stability of our model to small perturbations around biaxiality and draw an analogy with cosmological perturbations. We conclude by presenting a separate, bouncing solution, which generalizes the known bouncing solution in closed FRW universes.

  15. Anisotropic, nonsingular early universe model leading to a realistic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Lasenby, Anthony N.; Hobson, Michael P.

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel cosmological model in which scalar field matter in a biaxial Bianchi IX geometry leads to a nonsingular “pancaking” solution: the hypersurface volume goes to zero instantaneously at the “big bang”, but all physical quantities, such as curvature invariants and the matter energy density remain finite, and continue smoothly through the big bang. We demonstrate that there exist geodesics extending through the big bang, but that there are also incomplete geodesics that spiral infinitely around a topologically closed spatial dimension at the big bang, rendering it, at worst, a quasiregular singularity. The model is thus reminiscent of the Taub-NUT vacuum solution in that it has biaxial Bianchi IX geometry and its evolution exhibits a dimensionality reduction at a quasiregular singularity; the two models are, however, rather different, as we will show in a future work. Here we concentrate on the cosmological implications of our model and show how the scalar field drives both isotropization and inflation, thus raising the question of whether structure on the largest scales was laid down at a time when the universe was still oblate (as also suggested by [T. S. Pereira, C. Pitrou, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys.1475-7516 9 (2007) 6.10.1088/1475-7516/2007/09/006][C. Pitrou, T. S. Pereira, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys.1475-7516 4 (2008) 4.10.1088/1475-7516/2008/04/004][A. Gümrükçüoǧlu, C. Contaldi, and M. Peloso, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys.1475-7516 11 (2007) 005.10.1088/1475-7516/2007/11/005]). We also discuss the stability of our model to small perturbations around biaxiality and draw an analogy with cosmological perturbations. We conclude by presenting a separate, bouncing solution, which generalizes the known bouncing solution in closed FRW universes.

  16. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic cosmological model with quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaubey, R.; Raushan, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The present work is a phase-plane analysis of LRS Bianchi type I cosmological model with a scalar field and exponential potential. The evolution equations are reduced to an autonomous system of ordinary equations by suitable transformation of variables. We also analyse the evolution of the effective equation of state parameter for different values of curvature. The nature of critical points is analysed and stable attractors are examined from the point of view of cosmology.

  17. From isotropic to anisotropic side chain representations: comparison of three models for residue contact estimation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weitao; He, Jing

    2011-01-01

    The criterion to determine residue contact is a fundamental problem in deriving knowledge-based mean-force potential energy calculations for protein structures. A frequently used criterion is to require the side chain center-to-center distance or the -to- atom distance to be within a pre-determined cutoff distance. However, the spatially anisotropic nature of the side chain determines that it is challenging to identify the contact pairs. This study compares three side chain contact models: the Atom Distance criteria (ADC) model, the Isotropic Sphere Side chain (ISS) model and the Anisotropic Ellipsoid Side chain (AES) model using 424 high resolution protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. The results indicate that the ADC model is the most accurate and ISS is the worst. The AES model eliminates about 95% of the incorrectly counted contact-pairs in the ISS model. Algorithm analysis shows that AES model is the most computational intensive while ADC model has moderate computational cost. We derived a dataset of the mis-estimated contact pairs by AES model. The most misjudged pairs are Arg-Glu, Arg-Asp and Arg-Tyr. Such a dataset can be useful for developing the improved AES model by incorporating the pair-specific information for the cutoff distance. PMID:21552527

  18. Anisotropic generalization of Matese & Whitman solution for compact star models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanandan, Baiju; Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Smitha, T. T.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the stability of anisotropic compact star models by introducing Matese and Whitman (Phys. Rev. D 11:1270, 1980) solution in general relativity. We have particularly looked into the detailed investigation of the measurements of basic physical parameters such as radial pressure, tangential pressure, energy density, red shift, sound velocity, masses and radii are affected by unknown effects such as loss, accretion and diffusion of mass. Those give insight into the characteristics of the compact astrophysical object with anisotropic matter distribution as well as the physical reality. The results obtained for the physical feature of compact stars such as, Her. X-1, RXJ 1856-37, SAX J1808.4-3658(SS2) and SAX J1808.4-3658(SS1) are compared to the recently observed massive compact object.

  19. Spreading and wandering of Gaussian–Schell model laser beams in an anisotropic turbulent ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-09-01

    The effect of anisotropic turbulence on the spreading and wandering of Gaussian–Schell model (GSM) laser beams propagating in an ocean is studied. The long-term spreading of a GSM beam propagating through the paraxial channel of a turbulent ocean is also developed. Expressions of random wander for such laser beams are derived in an anisotropic turbulent ocean based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle. We investigate the influence of parameters in a turbulent ocean on the beam wander and spreading. Our results indicate that beam spreading and random beam wandering are smaller without considering the anisotropy of turbulence in the oceanic channel. Salinity fluctuation has a greater contribution to both the beam spreading and beam wander than that of temperature fluctuations in a turbulent ocean. Our results could be helpful for designing a free-space optical wireless communication system in an oceanic environment.

  20. Model-size reduction technique for the analysis of symmetric anisotropic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Peters, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A two-step computational procedure is presented for reducing the size of the analysis model for an anisotropic symmetric structure to that of the corresponding orthotropic structure. The key elements of the procedure are: (1) decomposition of the stiffness matrix into the sum of an orthotropic and nonorthotropic (anisotropic) parts; and (2) successive application of the finite element method and the classical Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The finite element method is first used to generate few global approximation vectors (or modes). Then the amplitudes of these modes are computed by using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The global approximation vectors are selected to be the solution corresponding to zero nonorthotropic matrix and its various-order derivatives with respect to an anisotropic tracing parameter (identifying the nonorthotropic material coefficients). The size of the analysis model used in generating the global approximation vectors is identical to that of the corresponding orthotropic structure. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is demonstrated by means of numerical examples and its potential for solving other quasi-symmetric problems is discussed.

  1. Formation of Bragg band gaps in anisotropic phononic crystals analyzed with the empty lattice model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yan -Feng; Maznev, Alexei; Laude, Vincent

    2016-05-11

    Bragg band gaps of phononic crystals generally, but not always, open at Brillouin zone boundaries. The commonly accepted explanation stems from the empty lattice model: assuming a small material contrast between the constituents of the unit cell, avoided crossings in the phononic band structure appear at frequencies and wavenumbers corresponding to band intersections; for scalar waves the lowest intersections coincide with boundaries of the first Brillouin zone. However, if a phononic crystal contains elastically anisotropic materials, its overall symmetry is not dictated solely by the lattice symmetry. We construct an empty lattice model for phononic crystals made of isotropic andmore » anisotropic materials, based on their slowness curves. We find that, in the anisotropic case, avoided crossings generally do not appear at the boundaries of traditionally defined Brillouin zones. Furthermore, the Bragg "planes" which give rise to phononic band gaps, are generally not flat planes but curved surfaces. Lastly, the same is found to be the case for avoided crossings between shear (transverse) and longitudinal bands in the isotropic case.« less

  2. GLE Observations in 23rd Solar Cycle at the Baksan Air Shower Arrays Andyrchy and Carpet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S. N.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Djappuev, D. D.; Karpova, Z. M.; Khaerdinov, N. S.; Petkov, V. B.; Radchenkov, A. V.; Zaichenko, A. N.

    2003-07-01

    Total counting rates of two Baksan extensive air shower arrays Andyrchy and Carp et were examined during 10 Ground Level Enhancements (GLE) of Solar Cosmic Rays (SCR) observed in current 23rd cycle of solar activity. In this case the threshold primary energy is equal to geomagnetic cut-off, Emin = 5.8 GeV. Significant increases (>3 st.dev.) above the galactic cosmic ray background were found during 6 GLE events from 10. The amplitudes of all increases make the tenth shares of percent. Therefore, they can not be registered by neutron monitors with a close geomagnetic cut-off.

  3. Towards an Anisotropic Whole Mantle 3D Elastic Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, M. P.; Romanowicz, B.; Gung, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Many studies have documented the existence of anisotropy in the earth's upper mantle, concentrated in the top 200 km. This evidence comes from the study of surface waves as well as shear wave splitting. There is also evidence for shear wave splitting in D", at least in well sampled regions. There are some hints of anisotropy at the base of the transition zone. Tomographic models of the upper mantle have been developed with simplifying assumptions about the nature of the anisotropy, in order to minimize the number of free parameters in the inversions. Some assume transverse isotropy (e.g Ekström and Dziewonski, 1997), others include additional degrees of freedom with some realistic constraints on mineralogy (e.g. Montagner and Tanimoto, 1991). Our goal is to investigate anisotropy in the whole mantle, using the framework of waveform inversion, and the nonlinear asymptotic mode coupling theory (NACT), previously developed and applied to the construction of whole-mantle SH velocity models (Li and Romanowicz, 1996; Mégnin and Romanowicz, 2000). For this we require a 3 component dataset, and we have extended our automatic transverse (T) component wavepicking procedures to the vertical (Z) and longitudinal (L) component - a non-trivial task given the large number of phases present in the coupled P-SV system. A useful initial assumption, for which the theory has been readily adapted, is that of transverse isotropy. As a first step towards this, we have been investigating inversions using T component and Z,L component data separately. In particular, this allows us to explore the sampling that can be achieved with Z,L component data alone in the deepest part of the mantle. Indeed, D" is in general much better sampled in SH than in SV, owing to the availability of SHdiff at large distances, while SVdiff decays more rapidly due to mantle-core coupling. We present the results of our resolution experiments and discuss the differences between the 3D SV model obtained in well

  4. Stripe orientation in an anisotropic t-J model

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, Arno P.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; White, Steven R.

    2001-08-01

    The tilt pattern of the CuO{sub 6} octahedra in the low-temperature tetragonal (LTT) phase of the cuprate superconductors leads to planar anisotropies for the exchange coupling and hopping integrals. Here, we show that these anisotropies provide a possible structural mechanism for the orientation of stripes. A t{sub x}-t{sub y}-J{sub x}-J{sub y} model thus serves as an effective Hamiltonian to describe stripe formation and orientation in LTT-phase cuprates.

  5. 78 FR 29808 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2012 Lita GLE-6 Low-Speed Vehicles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ..., 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). How to Read Comments submitted to the Docket: You may read the comments received... Nonconforming 2012 Lita GLE-6 Low-Speed Vehicles Are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... 2012 Lita GLE-6 low-speed vehicles (LSV) that were not originally manufactured to comply with...

  6. Modeling anisotropic properties of media with oriented fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chergoleishvili, T. T.; Balabuyev, A. A.; Mandzhgaladze, P. F.

    1984-05-01

    Fracture formation at the focus of an impending earthquake occurs along a definite orientation governed by tectonic shears. The effectiveness of the many methods used in the theoretical computation of the elastic properties of such media was assessed in laboratory experiments using models with controllable parameters. The propagation velocity of longitudinal and transverse waves were investigated. Experimental results are compared with computations made by different methods. The curves corresponding to different theories quantitatively differ greatly from one another but there is a satisfactory correspondence of the shape of both the theoretical and experimental curves, revealing a uniformity of the dependence of wave propagation velocity on angle of approach to the oriented system of fractures. An attempt is made to resolve various discrepancies.

  7. Inter-comparison of isotropic and anisotropic sea ice rheology in a fully coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Cassano, J. J.; Maslowski, W.; Osinski, R.; Seefeldt, M. W.; Hughes, M.; Duvivier, A.; Nijssen, B.; Hamman, J.; Hutchings, J. K.; Hunke, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    We present the sea ice climate of the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), using a suite of new physics available in the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE5). RASM is a high-resolution fully coupled pan-Arctic model that also includes the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. The model domain extends from ~45˚N to the North Pole and is configured to run at ~9km resolution for the ice and ocean components, coupled to 50km resolution atmosphere and land models. The baseline sea ice model configuration includes mushy-layer sea ice thermodynamics and level-ice melt ponds. Using this configuration, we compare the use of isotropic and anisotropic sea ice mechanics, and evaluate model performance using these two variants against observations including Arctic buoy drift and deformation, satellite-derived drift and deformation, and sea ice volume estimates from ICESat. We find that the isotropic rheology better approximates spatial patterns of thickness observed across the Arctic, but that both rheologies closely approximate scaling laws observed in the pack using buoys and RGPS data. A fundamental component of both ice mechanics variants, the so called Elastic-Viscous-Plastic (EVP) and Anisotropic-Elastic-Plastic (EAP), is that they are highly sensitive to the timestep used for elastic sub-cycling in an inertial-resolving coupled framework, and this has a significant affect on surface fluxes in the fully coupled framework.

  8. Synthetic Seismograms for Realistic 3D Earth Model with Anisotropic Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, S.; Tono, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We have demonstrated that we can calculate global theoretical seismograms for realistic 3D Earth models based upon the combination of a precise numerical technique (the spectral-element method) and a sufficiently fast supercomputer (the Earth Simulator) [Tsuboi et al, 2003]. Here we have calculated synthetic seismograms by using model S20RTS of the mantle (Ritsema et al., 1999), model CRUST2.0 of the crust (Basin et al., 2000), topography and bathymetry model ETOPO5, and anisotropic inner core model (Ishii 2002). The calculations are performed on 4056 processors, which require 507 out of 640 nodes of the Earth Simulator. These synthetics are computed by using SPECFEM3D(Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002) and are accurate up to 3.5 seconds. We have calculated these synthetics with aisotropic inner core model for several earthquakes and compared with the synthetics which are calculated for isotropic inner core model. Preliminary comparison shows that the travel time differences between anisotropic inner core model and isotropic core model for PKPab phases are at most a few seconds. There seems to be no significant differences in waveforms of PKP phases. These differences in travel times may help us to improve inner core fine structure by comparing these synthetics with observation.

  9. EEG source analysis of epileptiform activity using a 1mm anisotropic hexahedra finite element head model

    PubMed Central

    Rullmann, M.; Anwander, A.; Dannhauer, M.; Warfield, S.K.; Duffy, F.H.; Wolters, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The major goal of the evaluation in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis for medically intractable patients is the precise reconstruction of the epileptogenic foci, preferably with non-invasive methods. This paper evaluates whether surface electroencephalography (EEG) source analysis based on a 1mm anisotropic finite element (FE) head model can provide additional guidance for presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and whether it is practically feasible in daily routine. A 1mm hexahedra FE volume conductor model of the patient’s head with special focus on accurately modeling the compartments skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the anisotropic conducting brain tissues was constructed using non-linearly co-registered T1-, T2- and diffusion-tensor- magnetic resonance imaging data. The electrodes of intra-cranial EEG (iEEG) measurements were extracted from a co-registered computed tomography image. Goal function scan (GFS), minimum norm least squares (MNLS), standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) and spatio-temporal current dipole modeling inverse methods were then applied to the peak of the averaged ictal discharges EEG data. MNLS and sLORETA pointed to a single center of activity. Moving and rotating single dipole fits resulted in an explained variance of more than 97%. The non-invasive EEG source analysis methods localized at the border of the lesion and at the border of the iEEG electrodes which mainly received ictal discharges. Source orientation was towards the epileptogenic tissue. For the reconstructed superficial source, brain conductivity anisotropy and the lesion conductivity had only a minor influence, whereas a correct modeling of the highly conducting CSF compartment and the anisotropic skull was found to be important. The proposed FE forward modeling approach strongly simplifies meshing and reduces run-time (37 Milliseconds for one forward computation in the model with 3.1 Million unknowns), corroborating the practical feasibility of the

  10. Self-Similar Cosmologies in 5D: Spatially Flat Anisotropic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    In the context of theories of the Kaluza-Klein type, with a large extra dimension, we study self-similar cosmological models in 5D that are homogeneous, anisotropic and spatially flat. The "ladder" to go between the physics in 5D and in 4D is provided by Campbell-Maagard's embedding theorems. We show that the 5D field equations RAB = 0 determine the form of the similarity variable. There are three different possibilities: homothetic, conformal and "wavelike" solutions in 5D. We derive the most general homothetic and conformal solutions to the 5D field equations. They require the extra dimension to be spacelike, and are given in terms of one arbitrary function of the similarity variable and three parameters. The Riemann tensor in 5D is not zero, except in the isotropic limit, which corresponds to the case where the parameters are equal to each other. The solutions can be used as 5D embeddings for a great variety of 4D homogeneous cosmological models, with and without matter, including the Kasner universe. Since the extra dimension is spacelike, the 5D solutions are invariant under the exchange of spatial coordinates. Therefore they also embed a family of spatially inhomogeneous models in 4D. We show that these models can be interpreted as vacuum solutions in braneworld theory. Our work (I) generalizes the 5D embeddings used for FLRW models; (II) shows that anisotropic cosmologies are, in general, curved in 5D, in contrast with FLRW models, which can always be embedded in a 5D Riemann-flat (Minkowski) manifold; and (III) reveals that anisotropic cosmologies can be curved and devoid of matter, both in 5D and in 4D, even when the metric in 5D explicitly depends on the extra coordinate, which is quite different from the isotropic case.

  11. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Linjiang; Yang, Changfu

    2016-06-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In this study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modelling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  12. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linjiang, QIN; Changfu, YANG

    2016-03-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In the present study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modeling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  13. Adaptive Phase-Field Modeling of Anisotropic Wetting with Line Tension at the Triple Junction.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S Y; Lan, C W

    2015-09-01

    Line tension could affect the contact angle at triple junction, especially in micro- to nanoscale wetting. We have developed an adaptive phase-field model to consider the line tension quantitatively. This model is coupled to the smoothed boundary method for treating the contact line with the solid phase, while the volume constraint is imposed. Our calculated contact angles are in good agreement with the modified Young's equation. Further examples are illustrated for the anisotropic wetting on hydrophilic/hydrophobic stripes and rectangular grooves. PMID:26274914

  14. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose is to develop life prediction models for coated anisotropic materials used in gas temperature airfoils. Two single crystal alloys and two coatings are now being tested. These include PWA 1480; Alloy 185; overlay coating, PWA 286; and aluminide coating, PWA 273. Constitutive models are also being developed for these materials to predict the plastic and creep strain histories of the materials in the lab tests and for actual design conditions. This nonlinear material behavior is particularily important for high temperature gas turbine applications and is basic to any life prediction system.

  15. Global structure of black hole and brane solutions in a multidimensional model with anisotropic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolokhov, S. V.; Ivashchuk, V. D.

    We analyse the global causal structure of a family of multidimensional spherically-symmetric solutions with a horizon which appear in the model with 1-component anisotropic fluid. This family can be considered as a generalized analogs of the well-known black hole solutions (including the Reissner--Nordström one) and some black brane solutions. The structure of regular horizons and singular boundaries is studied, and the corresponding Carter--Penrose diagrams are constructed for various values of the parameters of the model.

  16. Dynamic analysis of rotor flex-structure based on nonlinear anisotropic shell models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauchau, Olivier A.; Chiang, Wuying

    1991-05-01

    In this paper an anisotropic shallow shell model is developed that accommodates transverse shearing deformations and arbitrarily large displacements and rotations, but strains are assumed to remain small. Two kinematic models are developed, the first using two DOF to locate the direction of the normal to the shell's midplane, the second using three. The latter model allows for an automatic compatibility of the shell model with beam models. The shell model is validated by comparing its predictions with several benchmark problems. In actual helicopter rotor blade problems, the shell model of the flex structure is shown to give very different results shown compared to beam models. The lead-lag and torsion modes in particular are strongly affected, whereas flapping modes seem to be less affected.

  17. A 3D porous media liver lobule model: the importance of vascular septa and anisotropic permeability for homogeneous perfusion.

    PubMed

    Debbaut, Charlotte; Vierendeels, Jan; Siggers, Jennifer H; Repetto, Rodolfo; Monbaliu, Diethard; Segers, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic blood circulation is complex, particularly at the microcirculatory level. Previously, 2D liver lobule models using porous media and a 3D model using real sinusoidal geometries have been developed. We extended these models to investigate the role of vascular septa (VS) and anisotropic permeability. The lobule was modelled as a hexagonal prism (with or without VS) and the tissue was treated as a porous medium (isotropic or anisotropic permeability). Models were solved using computational fluid dynamics. VS inclusion resulted in more spatially homogeneous perfusion. Anisotropic permeability resulted in a larger axial velocity component than isotropic permeability. A parameter study revealed that results are most sensitive to the lobule size and radial pressure drop. Our model provides insight into hepatic microhaemodynamics, and suggests that inclusion of VS in the model leads to perfusion patterns that are likely to reflect physiological reality. The model has potential for applications to unphysiological and pathological conditions. PMID:23237543

  18. Nonlinear inversion for arbitrarily-oriented anisotropic models II: Inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present output models from inversion of a synthetic surface wave dataset. We implement new 3-D finite-frequency kernels, based on the Born approximation, to invert for upper mantle structure beneath western North America. The kernels are formulated based on a hexagonal symmetry with an arbitrary orientation. Numerical tests were performed to achieve a robust inversion scheme. Four synthetic input models were created, to include: isotropic, constant strength anisotropic, variable strength anisotropic, and both anisotropic and isotropic together. The reference model was a simplified version of PREM (dubbed PREM LIGHT) in which the crust and 220 km discontinuity have been removed. Output models from inversions of calculated synthetic data are compared against these input models to test for accurate reproduction of input model features, and the resolution of those features. The object of this phase of the study was to determine appropriate nonlinear inversion schemes that adequately recover the input models. The synthetic dataset consists of collected seismic waveforms of 126 earthquake mechanisms, of magnitude 6-7 from Dec 2006 to Feb 2009, from the IRIS database. Events were selected to correlate with USArray deployments, and to have as complete an azimuthal coverage as possible. The events occurred within a circular region of radius 150o centered about 44o lat, -110o lon (an arbitrary location within USArray coverage). Synthetic data were calculated utilizing a spectral element code (SEM) coupled to a normal mode solution. The mesh consists of a 3-D heterogeneous outer shell, representing the upper mantle above 450 km depth, coupled to a spherically symmetric inner sphere. From the synthetic dataset, multi-taper fundamental mode surface wave phase delay measurements are taken. The orthogonal 2.5π -prolate spheroidal wave function eigentapers (Slepian tapers) reduce noise biasing, and can provide error estimates in phase delay measurements. This study is a

  19. Identification and analysis of LNO1-Like and AtGLE1-Like Nucleoporins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Braud, Christopher; Zheng, Wenguang; Xiao, Wenyan

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoporins (Nups) are building blocks of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) that mediate cargo trafficking between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Although the physical structure of the NPC is well studied in yeast and vertebrates, little is known about the structure of NPCs or the function of most Nups in plants. Recently we demonstrated two Nups in Arabidopsis: LONO1 (LNO1), homolog of human NUP214 and yeast Nup159, and AtGLE1, homolog of yeast Gle1, are required for early embryogenesis and seed development. To identify LNO1 and AtGLE1 homologs in other plant species, we searched the protein databases and identified 30 LNO1-like and 35 AtGLE1-like proteins from lower plant species to higher plants. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the evolutionary trees of these proteins follow expected plant phylogenies. High sequence homology and conserved domain structure of these nucleoporins suggest important functions of these proteins in nucleocytoplasmic transport, growth and development in plants. PMID:24384931

  20. A new anisotropic compact star model having Matese & Whitman mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali; Ratanpal, B. S.

    2016-07-01

    Present paper proposed a new singularity free model of anisotropic compact star. The Einstein field equations are solved in closed form by utilizing Matese & Whitman mass function. The model parameters ρ, pr and pt all are well behaved inside the stellar interior and our model satisfies all the required conditions to be physically acceptable. The model given in the present work is compatible with observational data of compact objects like SAX J 1808.4-3658 (SS1), SAX J 1808.4-3658 (SS2) and 4U 1820-30. A particular model of 4U 1820-30 is studied in detail and found that it satisfies all the condition needed for physically acceptable model. The present work is the generalization of Sharma and Ratanpal (Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 22:1350074, 2013) model for compact stars admitting quadratic equation of state.

  1. A quantum fidelity study of the anisotropic next-nearest-neighbour triangular lattice Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thesberg, Mischa; Sørensen, Erik S.

    2014-10-01

    Ground- and excited-state quantum fidelities in combination with generalized quantum fidelity susceptibilites, obtained from exact diagonalizations, are used to explore the phase diagram of the anisotropic next-nearest-neighbour triangular Heisenberg model. Specifically, the J‧ - J2 plane of this model, which connects the J1 - J2 chain and the anisotropic triangular lattice Heisenberg model, is explored using these quantities. Through the use of a quantum fidelity associated with the first excited-state, in addition to the conventional ground-state fidelity, the BKT-type transition and Majumdar-Ghosh point of the J1 - J2 chain (J‧ = 0) are found to extend into the J‧ - J2 plane and connect with points on the J2 = 0 axis thereby forming bounded regions in the phase diagram. These bounded regions are then explored through the generalized quantum fidelity susceptibilities χρ, χ120\\circ , χD and χCAF which are associated with the spin stiffness, 120° spiral order parameter, dimer order parameter and collinear antiferromagnetic order parameter respectively. These quantities are believed to be extremely sensitive to the underlying phase and are thus well suited for finite-size studies. Analysis of the fidelity susceptibilities suggests that the J‧, J2 ≪ J phase of the anisotropic triangular model is either a collinear antiferromagnet or possibly a gapless disordered phase that is directly connected to the Luttinger phase of the J1 - J2 chain. Furthermore, the outer region is dominated by incommensurate spiral physics as well as dimer order.

  2. Application of a continuum-mechanical model for the flow of anisotropic polar ice to the EDML core, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddik, Hakime; Greve, Ralf; Placidi, Luca; Hamann, Ilka; Gagliardini, Olivier

    We present an application of the newly developed CAFFE model (Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor) to the EPICA ice core at Kohnen Station, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica (referred to as the EDML core). A one-dimensional flow model for the site is devised, which includes the anisotropic flow law and the fabric evolution equation of the CAFFE model. Three different solution methods are employed: (1) computing the ice flow based on the flow law of the CAFFE model and the measured fabrics; (2) solving the CAFFE fabric evolution equation under the simplifying assumption of transverse isotropy; and (3) solving the unrestricted CAFFE fabric evolution equation. Method (1) demonstrates clearly the importance of the anisotropic fabric in the ice column for the flow velocity. The anisotropic enhancement factor produced with method (2) agrees reasonably well with that of method (1), even though the measured fabric shows a girdle structure (which breaks the transverse isotropy) in large parts of the ice core. For method (3), we find that the measured fabric is reproduced well by the model down to ˜2100m depth. Systematic deviations at greater depths are attributed to the disregard of migration recrystallization in the model.

  3. Multiscale Gaussian network model (mGNM) and multiscale anisotropic network model (mANM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Gaussian network model (GNM) and anisotropic network model (ANM) are some of the most popular methods for the study of protein flexibility and related functions. In this work, we propose generalized GNM (gGNM) and ANM methods and show that the GNM Kirchhoff matrix can be built from the ideal low-pass filter, which is a special case of a wide class of correlation functions underpinning the linear scaling flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) method. Based on the mathematical structure of correlation functions, we propose a unified framework to construct generalized Kirchhoff matrices whose matrix inverse leads to gGNMs, whereas, the direct inverse of its diagonal elements gives rise to FRI method. With this connection, we further introduce two multiscale elastic network models, namely, multiscale GNM (mGNM) and multiscale ANM (mANM), which are able to incorporate different scales into the generalized Kirchhoff matrices or generalized Hessian matrices. We validate our new multiscale methods with extensive numerical experiments. We illustrate that gGNMs outperform the original GNM method in the B-factor prediction of a set of 364 proteins. We demonstrate that for a given correlation function, FRI and gGNM methods provide essentially identical B-factor predictions when the scale value in the correlation function is sufficiently large. More importantly, we reveal intrinsic multiscale behavior in protein structures. The proposed mGNM and mANM are able to capture this multiscale behavior and thus give rise to a significant improvement of more than 11% in B-factor predictions over the original GNM and ANM methods. We further demonstrate the benefits of our mGNM through the B-factor predictions of many proteins that fail the original GNM method. We show that the proposed mGNM can also be used to analyze protein domain separations. Finally, we showcase the ability of our mANM for the analysis of protein collective motions.

  4. Multiscale Gaussian network model (mGNM) and multiscale anisotropic network model (mANM).

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-28

    Gaussian network model (GNM) and anisotropic network model (ANM) are some of the most popular methods for the study of protein flexibility and related functions. In this work, we propose generalized GNM (gGNM) and ANM methods and show that the GNM Kirchhoff matrix can be built from the ideal low-pass filter, which is a special case of a wide class of correlation functions underpinning the linear scaling flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) method. Based on the mathematical structure of correlation functions, we propose a unified framework to construct generalized Kirchhoff matrices whose matrix inverse leads to gGNMs, whereas, the direct inverse of its diagonal elements gives rise to FRI method. With this connection, we further introduce two multiscale elastic network models, namely, multiscale GNM (mGNM) and multiscale ANM (mANM), which are able to incorporate different scales into the generalized Kirchhoff matrices or generalized Hessian matrices. We validate our new multiscale methods with extensive numerical experiments. We illustrate that gGNMs outperform the original GNM method in the B-factor prediction of a set of 364 proteins. We demonstrate that for a given correlation function, FRI and gGNM methods provide essentially identical B-factor predictions when the scale value in the correlation function is sufficiently large. More importantly, we reveal intrinsic multiscale behavior in protein structures. The proposed mGNM and mANM are able to capture this multiscale behavior and thus give rise to a significant improvement of more than 11% in B-factor predictions over the original GNM and ANM methods. We further demonstrate the benefits of our mGNM through the B-factor predictions of many proteins that fail the original GNM method. We show that the proposed mGNM can also be used to analyze protein domain separations. Finally, we showcase the ability of our mANM for the analysis of protein collective motions. PMID:26627949

  5. An anisotropic numerical model for thermal hydraulic analyses: application to liquid metal flow in fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitillo, F.; Vitale Di Maio, D.; Galati, C.; Caruso, G.

    2015-11-01

    A CFD analysis has been carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of liquid metal coolant in a fuel assembly of triangular lattice. In order to obtain fast and accurate results, the isotropic two-equation RANS approach is often used in nuclear engineering applications. A different approach is provided by Non-Linear Eddy Viscosity Models (NLEVM), which try to take into account anisotropic effects by a nonlinear formulation of the Reynolds stress tensor. This approach is very promising, as it results in a very good numerical behavior and in a potentially better fluid flow description than classical isotropic models. An Anisotropic Shear Stress Transport (ASST) model, implemented into a commercial software, has been applied in previous studies, showing very trustful results for a large variety of flows and applications. In the paper, the ASST model has been used to perform an analysis of the fluid flow inside the fuel assembly of the ALFRED lead cooled fast reactor. Then, a comparison between the results of wall-resolved conjugated heat transfer computations and the results of a decoupled analysis using a suitable thermal wall-function previously implemented into the solver has been performed and presented.

  6. Anisotropic reversible piezoresistivity in magnetic-metallic/polymer structured elastomeric composites: modelling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Mietta, José Luis; Tamborenea, Pablo I; Martin Negri, R

    2016-01-14

    Structured elastomeric composites (SECs) with electrically conductive fillers display anisotropic piezoresistivity. The fillers do not form string-of-particle structures but pseudo-chains formed by grouping micro-sized clusters containing nanomagnetic particles surrounded by noble metals (e.g. silver, Ag). The pseudo-chains are formed when curing or preparing the composite in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, thus pseudo-chains are aligned in the direction of the field. The electrical conduction through pseudo-chains is analyzed and a constitutive model for the anisotropic reversible piezoresistivity in SECs is proposed. Several effects and characteristics, such as electron tunnelling, conduction inside the pseudo-chains, and chain-contact resistivity, are included in the model. Experimental results of electrical resistance, R, as a function of the normal stress applied in the direction of the pseudo-chains, P, are very well fitted by the model in the case of Fe3O4[Ag] microparticles magnetically aligned while curing in polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS. The cross sensitivity of different parameters (like the potential barrier and the effective distance for electron tunnelling) is evaluated. The model predicts the presence of several gaps for electron tunnelling inside the pseudo-chains. Estimates of those parameters for the mentioned experimental system under strains up to 20% are presented. Simulations of the expected response for other systems are performed showing the influence of Young's modulus and other parameters on the predicted piezoresistivity. PMID:26477664

  7. Modelling the deformation and force balance of anisotropic Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heorton, Harry; Feltham, Daniel; Tsamados, Michel; Schroeder, David

    2016-04-01

    The movement and spatial distribution of Arctic sea ice is due to its response to external forces. The deformation of Arctic sea ice is observed to have structural alignment on all length scales. By considering the alignment of diamond-shaped sea ice floes an anisotropic rheology has been developed for use in a climate sea ice model. Here we present investigations into the role of anisotropy in calculating the internal stress gradient of Arctic sea ice over climate length and time scales in a state-of-the-art climate sea ice model, the Los Alamos Sea Ice model. Our investigations are focused on the link between the external dynamical forcing and the emergent properties of sea ice such as its drift speed and thickness distribution. We analyse the model's response to external forcing over short time scales showing the characteristics of deformation events for different sea ice states and anisotropic alignment. We show how these events add up to produce the full seasonal stress balance and sea ice state over the Arctic ocean.

  8. Anisotropic induced Compton scattering - Constraints on models of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppi, P.; Blandford, R. D.; Rees, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    A model for nonlinear radiative transfer on a lattice is used to explore observational signatures of anisotropic induced Compton scattering. Ways in which an intense beam of radiation may be altered in passing through a slab of plasma that is optically thin to spontaneous Thomson scattering are explained. A numerical approach to induced Compton scattering which involves solving the equations of nonlinear transfer on a lattice is described. Results of calculations for some simple geometrical configurations (spheres, disks, cylindrical 'jets', etc.) are presented. Some possible applications of these results to the interpretation of actual data on compact radio sources are outlined, and the FIR spectra of AGN are considered.

  9. Dynamics of Anisotropic Bianchi Type-III Bulk Viscous String Model with Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. K.; Ram, Shri

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the dynamics of spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III string cosmological model in presence of bulk viscous fluid and electromagnetic field. Exact solutions of Einstein's field equations are obtained by assuming (i) a special form of the deceleration parameter and (ii) the component of the shear scalar tensor is proportional to mean Hubble parameter. The source of magnetic field is due to an electric current produced along z-axis. The role of bulk viscosity and magnetic field in establishing string phase of universe is presented. The physical and kinematical features of solutions are also discussed in detail.

  10. Anisotropic modified holographic Ricci dark energy cosmological model with hybrid expansion law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kanika; Sultana, Tazmin

    2015-11-01

    Here in this paper we present a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type-II metric filled with dark matter and anisotropic modified holographic Ricci dark energy. To solve the Einstein's field equations we have taken the hybrid expansion law (HEL) which exhibits a cosmic transition of the universe from decelerating to accelerating phase. We have investigated the physical and geometrical properties of the model. It is observed that the anisotropy of the universe and that of the modified holographic Ricci dark energy tends to zero at later times and the universe becomes homogeneous, isotropic and flat. We have also studied the cosmic jerk parameter.

  11. Modeling the viscosity and aggregation of suspensions of highly anisotropic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Puisto, A; Illa, X; Mohtaschemi, M; Alava, M J

    2012-01-01

    The rheology of nanofiber suspensions is studied solving numerically the Population Balance Equations (PBE). To account for the anisotropic nature of nanofibers, a relation is proposed for their hydrodynamic volume. The suspension viscosity is calculated using the computed aggregate size distributions together with the Krieger-Dougherty constitutive equation. The model is fitted to experimental flow curves for Carbon NanoFibers (CNF) and for NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC), giving a first estimation of the microscopic anisotropy parameter, and yielding information on the structural properties and rheology of each system. PMID:22282294

  12. Modelling And Analysis Of Permeability Of Anisotropic Compressed Non-Woven Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur du Plessis, J.; Woudberg, Sonia; Le Coq, Laurence

    2010-05-01

    An existing geometrical pore-scale model for flow through isotropic spongelike media is adapted to predict flow through anisotropic non-woven glass fibre filters. Model predictions are compared to experimental results for the permeability obtained for a filter under different stages of compression to demonstrate the capability of the model to adjust to changes in porosity. The experimental data used are for a glass fibre paper with a uniform fibre diameter. The input parameters of the pore-scale model are the porosity, fibre diameter and some measure of the anisotropy between the in-plane and normal directions to the paper. Correlation between the predictions and the experimental results is satisfactory and provides confidence in the modelling procedure. It is shown that the permeability is very sensitive to changes in the level of anisotropy, i.e. the level of compression of the nonwoven material.

  13. Evolution of stress-induced borehole breakout in inherently anisotropic rock: Insights from discrete element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, K.; Kwok, C. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms controlling the initiation, propagation, and ultimate pattern of borehole breakouts in shale formation when drilled parallel with and perpendicular to beddings. A two-dimensional discrete element model is constructed to explicitly represent the microstructure of inherently anisotropic rocks by inserting a series of individual smooth joints into an assembly of bonded rigid discs. Both isotropic and anisotropic hollow square-shaped samples are generated to represent the wellbores drilled perpendicular to and parallel with beddings at reduced scale. The isotropic model is validated by comparing the stress distribution around borehole wall and along X axis direction with analytical solutions. Effects of different factors including the particle size distribution, borehole diameter, far-field stress anisotropy, and rock anisotropy are systematically evaluated on the stress distribution and borehole breakout propagation. Simulation results reveal that wider particle size distribution results in the local stress perturbations which cause localization of cracks. Reduction of borehole diameter significantly alters the crack failure from tensile to shear and raises the critical pressure. Rock anisotropy plays an important role on the stress state around wellbore which lead to the formation of preferred cracks under hydrostatic stress. Far-field stress anisotropy plays a dominant role in the shape of borehole breakout when drilled perpendicular to beddings while a secondary role when drilled parallel with beddings. Results from this study can provide fundamental insights on the underlying particle-scale mechanisms for previous findings in laboratory and field on borehole stability in anisotropic rock.

  14. Effect on GLE Occurrence Distribution: Possible Action on Active Region by Earth and Jupiter Magnetospheres through Cosmic Ray Deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pozo Garcia, Eduardo

    Eduardo del Pozo Garcia Geophysics and Astronomy Institute Havana, Cuba pozo@iga.cu Following Perez- Peraza and collaborators works on GLE prediction on basis to Cosmic Ray periodicities and cycles, in particular with 1,2 year cycle, effect prognosis of GLE occurrence was determine, I present here a possible interpretation of their results. Here I present the time distribution of the observed GLE in respect to each GLE nearly Sun-Earth-Jupiter alignment time. At the histogram the X axis cero is the alignment time. These alignments take place cyclically every 1,1 year. The histogram shows a modulation-like GLE distribution. The occurrence increments are near the alignment time and, about 125 days before and after the alignment time. Besides, a work hypothesis is proposed: “The Jupiter and Earth magnetospheres must deflect cosmic rays and, at some Jupiter and Earth positions according the current interplanetary magnetic field, may be favorable to increase the energetic particle flux over current Sun active regions, giving place to a modulation-like GLE distribution. Also, by the cosmic rays action some particle flux increase over active regions may come from radiation belts” This effect means that, during solar activity this is a factor that contributes to: - An accumulative activity increase of sunspot groups and their magnetic configuration complexity - Eventually, over complex active region some increase of high energy particle flux help to trigger GLE, or intensify solar proton events in progress, and become a GLE. This effect is taken into account for GLE prediction.

  15. Three-dimensional DC anisotropic resistivity modelling using finite elements on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Xiaoping; Spitzer, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    We present a newly developed finite element program for direct current resistivity modelling, which can handle arbitrary 3-D electric anisotropy. For this purpose, it is of particular importance to construct appropriate grids because artificial anisotropy can be introduced through preferential directions associated with regular grid structures. Therefore, results from different kinds of grids (structured hexahedral, structured tetrahedral and unstructured tetrahedral) are checked for symmetry. After a series of comparisons, we conclude that unstructured tetrahedral grids generally perform best. In addition, this grid type allows for local refinement, which greatly reduces the number of nodes and, consequently, lowers the computational costs significantly. A singularity removal technique is applied, which improves the accuracy considerably. The resulting system of linear equations is solved by a conjugate gradient method with a symmetric successive overrelaxation pre-conditioner. Comparisons with analytical solutions prove the code to be highly accurate for both isotropic and anisotropic models. More complex models are investigated to analyse the response of anisotropic structures, for example, in form of the P2 tensor invariant. Finally, we apply the code to a hot dry rock scenario and show that anisotropy reveals significant information on the hydraulically induced fracture system.

  16. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  17. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in a quintessence cosmological model: Including anisotropic stress of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. T.; Xu, L. X.; Gui, Y. X.

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the quintessence cold dark matter model with constant equation of state and constant speed of sound in dark energy rest frame, including dark energy perturbation and its anisotropic stress. Comparing with the {Lambda}CDM model, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW)-power spectrums are affected by different background evolutions and dark energy perturbation. As we change the speed of sound from 1 to 0 in the quintessence cold dark matter model with given state parameters, it is found that the inclusion of dark energy anisotropic stress makes the variation of magnitude of the ISW source uncertain due to the anticorrelation between the speed of sound and the ratio of dark energy density perturbation contrast to dark matter density perturbation contrast in the ISW-source term. Thus, the magnitude of the ISW-source term is governed by the competition between the alterant multiple of (1+3/2xc-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}) and that of {delta}{sub de}/{delta}{sub m} with the variation of c-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}.

  18. Anisotropic Bianchi-III cosmological model in f (R, T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, P. K.; Sahu, S. K.; Nath, A.

    2016-01-01

    An anisotropic Bianchi type-III universe is investigated in the presence of a perfect fluid within the framework of f(R,T) gravity, where R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the source of matter. Here we have considered the first two cases of the f(R,T) model, i.e. f(R,T)=R+2f(T) and f(R,T)=f1(R)+f2(T). We have shown that the field equations of f(R,T) gravity are solvable for any arbitrary function of a scale factor. To get a physically realistic model of the universe, we have assumed a simple power-law form of a scale factor. The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained, which represent an expanding model of the universe which starts expanding with a big bang at t = 0 . The physical behaviours of the model are discussed.

  19. Model of the anisotropic behavior of doubly oriented and non-oriented materials using coenergy: Application to a large generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, M.; Pera, T.; Marechal, Y.

    1995-05-01

    The anisotropic and nonlinear behavior of doubly oriented and non-oriented sheets are modeled using the coenergy density. These models have been implemented in a finite element computation. A large generator has been modeled and the advantages of doubly oriented sheets compared to the conventional non-oriented ones are shown.

  20. Micromechanics model for predicting anisotropic electrical conductivity of carbon fiber composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Mohammad Faisal; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Yasmeen, Farzana

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous materials, such as composites consist of clearly distinguishable constituents (or phases) that show different electrical properties. Multifunctional composites have anisotropic electrical properties that can be tailored for a particular application. The effective anisotropic electrical conductivity of composites is strongly affected by many parameters including volume fractions, distributions, and orientations of constituents. Given the electrical properties of the constituents, one important goal of micromechanics of materials consists of predicting electrical response of the heterogeneous material on the basis of the geometries and properties of the individual phases, a task known as homogenization. The benefit of homogenization is that the behavior of a heterogeneous material can be determined without resorting or testing it. Furthermore, continuum micromechanics can predict the full multi-axial properties and responses of inhomogeneous materials, which are anisotropic in nature. Effective electrical conductivity estimation is performed by using classical micromechanics techniques (composite cylinder assemblage method) that investigates the effect of the fiber/matrix electrical properties and their volume fractions on the micro scale composite response. The composite cylinder assemblage method (CCM) is an analytical theory that is based on the assumption that composites are in a state of periodic structure. The CCM was developed to extend capabilities variable fiber shape/array availability with same volume fraction, interphase analysis, etc. The CCM is a continuum-based micromechanics model that provides closed form expressions for upper level length scales such as macro-scale composite responses in terms of the properties, shapes, orientations and constituent distributions at lower length levels such as the micro-scale.

  1. Modelling of the frictional behaviour of the snake skin covered by anisotropic surface nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-03-01

    Previous experimental data clearly revealed anisotropic friction on the ventral scale surface of snakes. However, it is known that frictional properties of the ventral surface of the snake skin range in a very broad range and the degree of anisotropy ranges as well to a quite strong extent. This might be due to the variety of species studied, diversity of approaches used for the friction characterization, and/or due to the variety of substrates used as a counterpart in the experiments. In order to understand the interactions between the nanostructure arrays of the ventral surface of the snake skin, this study was undertaken, which is aimed at numerical modeling of frictional properties of the structurally anisotropic surfaces in contact with various size of asperities. The model shows that frictional anisotropy appears on the snake skin only on the substrates with a characteristic range of roughness, which is less or comparable with dimensions of the skin microstructure. In other words, scale of the skin relief should reflect an adaptation to the particular range of surfaces asperities of the substrate.

  2. Modelling of the frictional behaviour of the snake skin covered by anisotropic surface nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous experimental data clearly revealed anisotropic friction on the ventral scale surface of snakes. However, it is known that frictional properties of the ventral surface of the snake skin range in a very broad range and the degree of anisotropy ranges as well to a quite strong extent. This might be due to the variety of species studied, diversity of approaches used for the friction characterization, and/or due to the variety of substrates used as a counterpart in the experiments. In order to understand the interactions between the nanostructure arrays of the ventral surface of the snake skin, this study was undertaken, which is aimed at numerical modeling of frictional properties of the structurally anisotropic surfaces in contact with various size of asperities. The model shows that frictional anisotropy appears on the snake skin only on the substrates with a characteristic range of roughness, which is less or comparable with dimensions of the skin microstructure. In other words, scale of the skin relief should reflect an adaptation to the particular range of surfaces asperities of the substrate. PMID:27005001

  3. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel. PMID:27294283

  4. Anisotropic spin model of strong spin-orbit-coupled triangular antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yao-Dong; Wang, Xiaoqun; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental progress on the strong spin-orbit-coupled rare-earth triangular antiferromagnet, we analyze the highly anisotropic spin model that describes the interaction between the spin-orbit-entangled Kramers' doublet local moments on the triangular lattice. We apply the Luttinger-Tisza method, the classical Monte Carlo simulation, and the self-consistent spin wave theory to analyze the anisotropic spin Hamiltonian. The classical phase diagram includes the 120∘ state and two distinct stripe-ordered phases. The frustration is very strong and significantly suppresses the ordering temperature in the regimes close to the phase boundary between two ordered phases. Going beyond the semiclassical analysis, we include the quantum fluctuations of the spin moments within a self-consistent Dyson-Maleev spin-wave treatment. We find that the strong quantum fluctuations melt the magnetic order in the frustrated regions. We explore the magnetic excitations in the three different ordered phases as well as in strong magnetic fields. Our results provide a guidance for the future theoretical study of the generic model and are broadly relevant for strong spin-orbit-coupled triangular antiferromagnets such as YbMgGaO4, RCd3P3 , RZn3P3 , RCd3As3 , RZn3As3 , and R2O2CO3 .

  5. Modeling of DNA-Mediated Self-Assembly from Anisotropic Nanoparticles: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, Jaime; Girard, Martin; Brodin, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Matt; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    The programmable selectivity of DNA recognition constitutes an elegant scheme to self-assemble a rich variety of superlattices from versatile nanoscale building blocks, where the natural interactions between building blocks are traded by complementary DNA hybridization interactions. Recently, we introduced and validated a scale-accurate coarse-grained model for a molecular dynamics approach that captures the dynamic nature of DNA hybridization events and reproduces the experimentally-observed crystallization behavior of various mixtures of spherical DNA-modified nanoparticles. Here, we have extended this model to robustly reproduce the assembly of nanoparticles with the anisotropic shapes observed experimentally. In particular, we are interested in two different particle types: (i) regular shapes, namely the cubic and octahedral polyhedra shapes commonly observed in gold nanoparticles, and (ii) irregular shapes akin to those exhibited by enzymes. Anisotropy in shape can provide an analog to the atomic orbitals exhibited by conventional atomic crystals. We present results for the assembly of enzymes or anisotropic nanoparticles and the co-assembly of enzymes and nanoparticles.

  6. Analytical modeling of pressure transient behavior for coalbed methane transport in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-06-01

    Resulting from the nature of anisotropy of coal media, it is a meaningful work to evaluate pressure transient behavior and flow characteristics within coals. In this article, a complete analytical model called the elliptical flow model is established by combining the theory of elliptical flow in anisotropic media and Fick's laws about the diffusion of coalbed methane. To investigate pressure transient behavior, analytical solutions were first obtained through introducing a series of special functions (Mathieu functions), which are extremely complex and are hard to calculate. Thus, a computer program was developed to establish type curves, on which the effects of the parameters, including anisotropy coefficient, storage coefficient, transfer coefficient and rate constant, were analyzed in detail. Calculative results show that the existence of anisotropy would cause great pressure depletion. To validate new analytical solutions, previous results were used to compare with the new results. It is found that a better agreement between the solutions obtained in this work and the literature was achieved. Finally, a case study is used to explain the effects of the parameters, including rock total compressibility coefficient, coal medium porosity and anisotropic permeability, sorption time constant, Langmuir volume and fluid viscosity, on bottom-hole pressure behavior. It is necessary to coordinate these parameters so as to reduce the pressure depletion.

  7. The phase transition in the anisotropic Heisenberg model with long range dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mól, L. A. S.; Costa, B. V.

    2014-03-01

    In this work we have used extensive Monte Carlo calculations to study the planar to paramagnetic phase transition in the two-dimensional anisotropic Heisenberg model with dipolar interactions (AHd) considering the true long-range character of the dipolar interactions by means of the Ewald summation. Our results are consistent with an order-disorder phase transition with unusual critical exponents in agreement with our previous results for the Planar Rotator model with dipolar interactions. Nevertheless, our results disagree with the Renormalization Group results of Maier and Schwabl [Phys. Rev. B, 70, 134430 (2004)] [13] and the results of Rapini et al. [Phys. Rev. B, 75, 014425 (2007)] [12], where the AHd was studied using a cut-off in the evaluation of the dipolar interactions. We argue that besides the long-range character of dipolar interactions their anisotropic character may have a deeper effect in the system than previously believed. Besides, our results show that the use of a cut-off radius in the evaluation of dipolar interactions must be avoided when analyzing the critical behavior of magnetic systems, since it may lead to erroneous results.

  8. An Anisotropic Model for Magnetostriction and Magnetization Computing for Noise Generation in Electric Devices.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Serigne Saliou; Buiron, Nicolas; Lanfranchi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process and use of ferromagnetic sheets, operations such as rolling, cutting, and tightening induce anisotropy that changes the material's behavior. Consequently for more accuracy in magnetization and magnetostriction calculations in electric devices such as transformers, anisotropic effects should be considered. In the following sections, we give an overview of a macroscopic model which takes into account the magnetic and magnetoelastic anisotropy of the material for both magnetization and magnetostriction computing. Firstly, a comparison between the model results and measurements from a Single Sheet Tester (SST) and values will be shown. Secondly, the model is integrated in a finite elements code to predict magnetostrictive deformation of an in-house test bench which is a stack of 40 sheets glued together by the Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation (VPI) method. Measurements on the test bench and Finite Elements results are presented. PMID:27092513

  9. Faceting transitions in crystal growth and heteroepitaxial growth in the anisotropic phase-field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Du, Xiu-Juan

    2012-11-01

    We modify the anisotropic phase-field crystal model (APFC), and present a semi-implicit spectral method to numerically solve the dynamic equation of the APFC model. The process results in the acceleration of computations by orders of magnitude relative to the conventional explicit finite-difference scheme, thereby, allowing us to work on a large system and for a long time. The faceting transitions introduced by the increasing anisotropy in crystal growth are then discussed. In particular, we investigate the morphological evolution in heteroepitaxial growth of our model. A new formation mechanism of misfit dislocations caused by vacancy trapping is found. The regular array of misfit dislocations produces a small-angle grain boundary under the right conditions, and it could significantly change the growth orientation of epitaxial layers.

  10. An Anisotropic Model for Magnetostriction and Magnetization Computing for Noise Generation in Electric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Mbengue, Serigne Saliou; Buiron, Nicolas; Lanfranchi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process and use of ferromagnetic sheets, operations such as rolling, cutting, and tightening induce anisotropy that changes the material’s behavior. Consequently for more accuracy in magnetization and magnetostriction calculations in electric devices such as transformers, anisotropic effects should be considered. In the following sections, we give an overview of a macroscopic model which takes into account the magnetic and magnetoelastic anisotropy of the material for both magnetization and magnetostriction computing. Firstly, a comparison between the model results and measurements from a Single Sheet Tester (SST) and values will be shown. Secondly, the model is integrated in a finite elements code to predict magnetostrictive deformation of an in-house test bench which is a stack of 40 sheets glued together by the Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation (VPI) method. Measurements on the test bench and Finite Elements results are presented. PMID:27092513

  11. Composite model for the anisotropic elastic moduli of lean oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.B.; Schuler, K.W.

    1981-02-01

    A model to predict the anisotropic elastic moduli of lean oil shale is formulated. Deformation of a homogeneous ellipsoidal inclusion in a host matrix is used as the basis for computing the deformation of the composite. Both inclusions and the host rock are presumed to be separately isotropic. Anisotropy of the composite arises from the nonspherical shape of the kerogen inclusions. Six parameters are needed to quantify the model fully: 2 elastic moduli for the host rock, 2 for the inclusions, the kerogen content, and the inclusion aspect ratio. The model is compared to a set of statically measured elastic moduli. Good agreement with lean oil shale data was found. However, some systematic differences appear in comparison with moduli measured ultrasonically. 20 references.

  12. Analytical modeling of equilibrium of strongly anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2013-08-15

    Theoretical analysis of equilibrium of anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators is presented. The anisotropy is assumed strong, which includes the cases with essentially nonuniform distributions of plasma pressure on magnetic surfaces. Such distributions can arise at neutral beam injection or at ion cyclotron resonance heating. Then the known generalizations of the standard theory of plasma equilibrium that treat p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} (parallel and perpendicular plasma pressures) as almost constant on magnetic surfaces are not applicable anymore. Explicit analytical prescriptions of the profiles of p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} are proposed that allow modeling of the anisotropic plasma equilibrium even with large ratios of p{sub ‖}/p{sub ⊥} or p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ‖}. A method for deriving the equation for the Shafranov shift is proposed that does not require introduction of the flux coordinates and calculation of the metric tensor. It is shown that for p{sub ⊥} with nonuniformity described by a single poloidal harmonic, the equation for the Shafranov shift coincides with a known one derived earlier for almost constant p{sub ⊥} on a magnetic surface. This does not happen in the other more complex case.

  13. Modeling the anisotropic electro-optic interaction in hybrid silicon-ferroelectric optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuan; Cueff, Sébastien; Romeo, Pedro Rojo; Orobtchouk, Régis

    2015-01-26

    We present a numerical method to accurately model the electro-optic interaction in anisotropic materials. Specifically, we combine a full-vectorial finite-difference optical mode solver with a radio-frequency solver to analyze the overlap between optical modes and applied electric field. This technique enables a comprehensive understanding on how electro-optic effects modify individual elements in the permittivity tensor of a material. We demonstrate the interest of this approach by designing a modulator that leverages the Pockels effect in a hybrid silicon-BaTiO3 slot waveguide. Optimized optical confinement in the active BaTiO3 layer as well as design of travelling-wave index-matched electrodes is presented. Most importantly, we show that the overall electro-optic modulation is largely governed by off-diagonal elements in the permittivity tensor. As most of active electro-optic materials are anisotropic, this method paves the way to better understand the physics of electro-optic effects and to improve optical modulators. PMID:25835926

  14. The numerical simulation for a 3D two-phase anisotropic medium based on BISQ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhejiang; He, Qiaodeng; Wang, Deli

    2008-03-01

    Biot-flow and squirt-flow are the two most important fluid flow mechanisms in porous media containing fluids. Based on the BISQ (Biot-Squirt) model where the two mechanisms are treated simultaneously, the elastic wave-field simulation in the porous medium is limited to two-dimensions and two-components (2D2C) or two-dimensions and three-components (2D3C). There is no previous report on wave simulation in three-dimensions and three-components. Only through three dimensional numerical simulations can we have an overall understanding of wave field coupling relations and the spatial distribution characteristics between the solid and fluid phases in the dual-phase anisotropic medium. In this paper, based on the BISQ equation, we present elastic wave propagation in a three dimensional dual-phase anisotropic medium simulated by the staggered-grid high-order finite-difference method. We analyze the resulting wave fields and show that the results are an improvement.

  15. Anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure of the Earth's mantle: A global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustowski, B.; EkströM, G.; DziewońSki, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    We combine a new, large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body wave travel times to construct a three-dimensional model of the anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modeling approach is improved and more comprehensive compared to our earlier studies and involves the development and implementation of a new spherically symmetric reference model, simultaneous inversion for velocity and anisotropy, as well as discontinuity topographies, and implementation of nonlinear crustal corrections for waveforms. A comparison of our new three-dimensional model, S362ANI, with two other models derived from comparable data sets but using different techniques reveals persistent features: (1) strong, ˜200-km-thick, high-velocity anomalies beneath cratons, likely representing the continental lithosphere, underlain by weaker, fast anomalies extending below 250 km, which may represent continental roots, (2) weak velocity heterogeneity between 250 and 400 km depths, (3) fast anomalies extending horizontally up to 2000-3000 km in the mantle transition zone beneath subduction zones, (4) lack of strong long-wavelength heterogeneity below 650 km suggesting inhibiting character of the upper mantle-lower mantle boundary, and (5) slow-velocity superplumes beneath the Pacific and Africa. The shear wave radial anisotropy is strongest at 120 km depth, in particular beneath the central Pacific. Lateral anisotropic variations appreciably improve the fit to data that are predominantly sensitive to the uppermost and lowermost mantle but not to the waveforms that control the transition zone and midmantle depths. Tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy are negligible in the uppermost mantle but noticeable at the bottom of the mantle.

  16. A Whole-Mantle Three Dimensional Radially Anisotropic S Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, M. P.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    We present a 3D radially anisotropic model of the whole mantle obtained using a large three component surface and body waveform dataset and an iterative inversion for structure and source parameters based on Nonlinear Asymptotic Coupling Theory (NACT) (Li and Romanowicz, 1995). The model is parameterized by isotropic VS up to spherical harmonic degree 24 and ξ (ξ = VSH2 / VSV2), a measurement of radial anisotropy in shear velocity, up to degree 16. While the isotropic portion of the model is consistent with previous shear velocity tomographic models, the anisotropic portion suggests relationships between flow and anisotropy in a vairety of depth ranges. In the uppermost mantle, we confirm observations of regions with VSH}>V{SV starting at ˜80 km under oceanic regions and ˜250 km under old continental lithosphere, suggesting horizontal flow beneath the lithosphere (Gung et al., 2003). We also observe a VSV}>V{SH signature at ˜200-300 km depth beneath major ridge systems with amplitude significantly correlated with spreading rate for fast-spreading segments. In the transition zone (400-700 km depth), regions of subducted slab material are associated with VSV}>V{SH. We also confirm the observation of strong radially symmetric VSH}>V{SV in the lowermost 300 km (Panning and Romanowicz, 2004). The 3D deviations from this degree 0 signature are associated with the transition to the large-scale low-velocity superplumes under the central Pacific and Africa, suggesting that VSH}>V{SV is generated in the predominant horizontal flow of a mechanical boundary layer, with a change in signature related to transition to upwelling at the superplumes. We also solve for source perturbations in an interative procedure. Source perturbations are generally small compared to published Harvard CMT solutions, but significantly improve the fit to the data. The sources in the circum-Pacific subduction zones show small but clearly systematic shifts in location due to an improved structural

  17. Warm Forming of Aluminum Alloys using a Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Anisotropic Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abedrabbo, Nader; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Carsley, John E.

    2005-08-05

    Temperature-dependant anisotropic material models for two types of automotive aluminum alloys (5754-O and 5182-O) were developed and implemented in LS-Dyna as a user material subroutine (UMAT) for coupled thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) of warm forming of aluminum alloys. The anisotropy coefficients of the Barlat YLD2000 plane stress yield function for both materials were calculated for the range of temperatures 25 deg. C-260 deg. C. Curve fitting was used to calculate the anisotropy coefficients of YLD2000 and the flow stress as a function of temperature. This temperature-dependent material model was successfully applied to the coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of stretching of aluminum sheets and results were compared with experiments.

  18. Warm Forming of Aluminum Alloys using a Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Anisotropic Material Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedrabbo, Nader; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Carsley, John E.

    2005-08-01

    Temperature-dependant anisotropic material models for two types of automotive aluminum alloys (5754-O and 5182-O) were developed and implemented in LS-Dyna as a user material subroutine (UMAT) for coupled thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) of warm forming of aluminum alloys. The anisotropy coefficients of the Barlat YLD2000 plane stress yield function for both materials were calculated for the range of temperatures 25°C-260°C. Curve fitting was used to calculate the anisotropy coefficients of YLD2000 and the flow stress as a function of temperature. This temperature-dependent material model was successfully applied to the coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of stretching of aluminum sheets and results were compared with experiments.

  19. Investigation of the Anisotropic Mechanical Behaviors of Copper Single Crystals Through Nanoindentation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao; Tieu, Kiet Anh; Zhou, Kun; Peng, Ching-Tun

    2016-03-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element method constitutive model was developed to investigate the anisotropic mechanical behaviors of (001), (011), and (111) initially orientated copper (Cu) single crystals during nanoindentation deformation. The numerical load-indentation depth curve and hardness-indentation depth curve were compared with experimental observations to validate the established three-dimensional (3D) CPFEM model. The difference of indentation loads between (111) crystal and (001) crystal is ~10.68 pct, and the difference of indentation modulus between (111) surface and (001) surface is ~10.80 pct. The numerical results show the noticeable indentation size effect for three crystals, and slightly different hardness values on different crystallographic planes. The equivalent plastic strain and lattice rotation angles were also analyzed on three through-thickness cross sections to study the plastic deformation-induced texture anisotropy.

  20. Perona Malik anisotropic diffusion model using Peaceman Rachford scheme on digital radiographic image

    SciTech Connect

    Halim, Suhaila Abd; Razak, Rohayu Abd; Ibrahim, Arsmah; Manurung, Yupiter HP

    2014-06-19

    In image processing, it is important to remove noise without affecting the image structure as well as preserving all the edges. Perona Malik Anisotropic Diffusion (PMAD) is a PDE-based model which is suitable for image denoising and edge detection problems. In this paper, the Peaceman Rachford scheme is applied on PMAD to remove unwanted noise as the scheme is efficient and unconditionally stable. The capability of the scheme to remove noise is evaluated on several digital radiography weld defect images computed using MATLAB R2009a. Experimental results obtained show that the Peaceman Rachford scheme improves the image quality substantially well based on the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). The Peaceman Rachford scheme used in solving the PMAD model successfully removes unwanted noise in digital radiographic image.

  1. Investigation of the Anisotropic Mechanical Behaviors of Copper Single Crystals Through Nanoindentation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao; Tieu, Kiet Anh; Zhou, Kun; Peng, Ching-Tun

    2016-06-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element method constitutive model was developed to investigate the anisotropic mechanical behaviors of (001), (011), and (111) initially orientated copper (Cu) single crystals during nanoindentation deformation. The numerical load-indentation depth curve and hardness-indentation depth curve were compared with experimental observations to validate the established three-dimensional (3D) CPFEM model. The difference of indentation loads between (111) crystal and (001) crystal is ~10.68 pct, and the difference of indentation modulus between (111) surface and (001) surface is ~10.80 pct. The numerical results show the noticeable indentation size effect for three crystals, and slightly different hardness values on different crystallographic planes. The equivalent plastic strain and lattice rotation angles were also analyzed on three through-thickness cross sections to study the plastic deformation-induced texture anisotropy.

  2. Spin conductivity of the two-dimensional anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model in the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    We use the SU(3) Schwinger's boson theory to study the spin transport properties of the two-dimensional anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model in a honeycomb lattice at T=0. We have investigated the behavior of the spin conductivity for this model which presents a single-ion anisotropy and J1 and J2 exchange interactions. We study the spin transport in the Bose-Einstein condensation regime where we have that the tz bosons are condensed and the following condition is valid: = < tz† > = t. Our results show a metallic spin transport for ω > 0 and a superconductor spin transport in the limit of DC conductivity, ω → 0, where σ(ω) tends to infinity in this limit of ω.

  3. Exact work statistics of quantum quenches in the anisotropic XY model.

    PubMed

    Bayocboc, Francis A; Paraan, Francis N C

    2015-09-01

    We derive exact analytic expressions for the average work done and work fluctuations in instantaneous quenches of the ground and thermal states of a one-dimensional anisotropic XY model. The average work and a quantum fluctuation relation is used to determine the amount of irreversible entropy produced during the quench, eventually revealing how the closing of the excitation gap leads to increased dissipated work. The work fluctuation is calculated and shown to exhibit nonanalytic behavior as the prequench anisotropy parameter and transverse field are tuned across quantum critical points. Exact compact formulas for the average work and work fluctuation in ground state quenches of the transverse field Ising model allow us to calculate the first singular field derivative at the critical field values. PMID:26465461

  4. Spin superfluidity in the anisotropic XY model in the triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    We use the SU(3) Schwinger's boson theory to study the spin transport properties in the two-dimensional anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model in the triangular lattice at T=0. We have investigated the behavior of the spin conductivity for this model which presents an single-ion anisotropy. We study the spin transport in the Bose-Einstein condensation regime where we have that the tz bosons are condensed and the following condition is valid: = < tz† > = t . Our results show a metallic spin transport for ω > 0 and a superfluid spin transport in the limit of DC conductivity, ω → 0 , where σ(ω) tends to infinity in this limit of ω.

  5. Monogamy of quantum correlations in the one-dimensional anisotropic XY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuai; Song, Xue-Ke; Ye, Liu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the monogamy properties of some quantum correlations, including the geometric quantum discord, concurrence, entanglement of formation and entropy quantum discord, in the anisotropic spin-1/2 XY model with staggered Dzyaloshinskii—Moriya (DM) interaction have been investigated using the quantum renormalization group (QRG) method. We summarize the monogamy relation for different quantum correlation measures and make an explicit comparison. Through mathematical calculations and analysis, we obtain that no matter whether the QRG steps are carried out, the monogamy of the given states are always unaltered. Moreover, we conclude that the geometric quantum discord and concurrence obey the monogamy property while other quantum correlation measures, such as entanglement of formation and quantum discord, violate it for this given model.

  6. 43 CFR Appendix III to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/GLE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/GLE III Appendix III to Part 11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Pt. 11, App. III Appendix III to Part 11—Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/GLE...

  7. Paramagnetic Meissner effect of high-temperature granular superconductors: Interpretation by anisotropic and isotropic models

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.H. |; Horng, W.C.; Hsu, H.T.; Tseng, T.Y.

    1995-02-01

    The field-cooled magnetization of high-{Tc} superconducting ceramics measured in low magnetic field exhibits the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), i.e., the diamagnetic signal initially increases with decrease in temperature but reaches a maximum at temperature T{sub d} and later decreases with decrease in temperature. Even in some samples the signal is ultimately able to transform inversely into a paramagnetic regime once the sample is cooled below a temperature T{sub p} as long as the applied field is sufficiently small. This PME has been observed in various high-{Tc} cuprates and is explained by disparate aspects. An anisotropic model, in which the granular superconductors are assumed to be ideally anisotropic, was first alternatively proposed in the present work so as to theoretically account for this effect. On the other hand, an isotropic model, suitable for granular superconductors with randomly oriented grains, was proposed to deal with the samples prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The anomalous magnetization behavior in the present model was demonstrated to be the superposition of the diamagnetic signal, which occurs as a result of the intragranular shielding currents, over the paramagnetic one due to the induction of the intergranular component induced by these currents where the intergranular one behaved as the effective pinning centers. The PME was demonstrated by this model to exist parasitically in granular superconductors. This intergranular effect is therefore worthy of remark when evaluating the volume fraction of superconductivity for the samples from the Meissner signal, in particular, at a low magnetic field.

  8. A Numerical Model of Anisotropic Mass Transport Through Grain Boundary Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yibo

    Tin (Sn) thin films are commonly used in electronic circuit applications as coatings on contacts and solders for joining components. It is widely observed, for some such system, that whiskers---long, thin crystalline structures---emerge and grow from the film. The Sn whisker phenomenon has become a highly active research area since Sn whiskers have caused a large amount of damage and loss in manufacturing, military, medical and power industries. Though lead (Pb) addition to Sn has been used to solve this problem for over five decades, the adverse environmental and health effects of Pb have motivated legislation to severely constrain Pb use in society. People are researching and seeking the reasons which cause whiskers and corresponding methods to solve the problem. The contributing factors to cause a Sn whisker are potentially many and much still remains unknown. Better understanding of fundamental driving forces should point toward strategies to improve (a) the accuracy with which we can predict whisker formation, and (b) our ability to mitigate the phenomenon. This thesis summarizes recent important research achievements in understanding Sn whisker formation and growth, both experimentally and theoretically. Focus is then placed on examining the role that anisotropy in grain boundary diffusivity plays in determining whisker characteristics (specifically, whether they form and, if so, where on a surface). To study this aspect of the problem and to enable future studies on stress driven grain boundary diffusion, this thesis presents a numerical anisotropic mass transport model. In addition to presenting details of the model and implementation, model predictions for a set of increasingly complex grain boundary networks are discussed. Preliminary results from the model provide evidence that anisotropic grain boundary diffusion may be a primary driving mechanism in whisker formation.

  9. The effect of cosmic rays on biological systems - an investigation during GLE events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belisheva, N. K.; Lammer, H.; Biernat, H. K.; Vashenuyk, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, first direct and circumstantial evidences of the effects of cosmic rays (CR) on biological systems are presented. A direct evidence of biological effects of CR is demonstrated in experiments with three cellular lines growing in culture during three events of Ground Level Enhancement (GLEs) in the neutron count rate detected by ground-based neutron monitor in October 1989. Various phenomena associated with DNA lesion on the cellular level demonstrate coherent dynamics of radiation effects in all cellular lines coincident with the time of arrival of high-energy solar particles to the near-Earth space and with the main peak in GLE. These results were obtained in the course of six separate experiments, with partial overlapping of the time of previous and subsequent experiments, which started and finished in the quiet period of solar activity (SA). A significant difference between the values of multinuclear cells in all cellular lines in the quiet period and during GLE events indicates that the cause of radiation effects in the cell cultures is an exposure of cells to the secondary solar CR near the Earth's surface. The circumstantial evidence was obtained by statistical analysis of cases of congenital malformations (CM) at two sites in the Murmansk region. The number of cases of all classes of CM reveals a significant correlation with the number of GLE events. The number of cases of CM with pronounced chromosomal abnormalities clearly correlates with the GLE events that occurred a year before the birth of a child. We have found a significant correlation between modulations of the water properties and daily background variations of CR intensity. We believe that the effects of CR on biological systems can be also mediated by fluctuations in water properties, considered as one of possible mechanisms controlling the effects of CRs on biological systems.

  10. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Nucleic Acids Using Anisotropic Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohui; Shen, Hujun; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Yan; Wang, Honglei

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we attempt to apply a coarse-grained (CG) model, which is based on anisotropic Gay-Berne and electric multipole (EMP) potentials, to the modeling of nucleic acids. First, a comparison has been made between the CG and atomistic models (AMBER point-charge model) in the modeling of DNA and RNA hairpin structures. The CG results have demonstrated a good quality in maintaining the nucleic acid hairpin structures, in reproducing the dynamics of backbone atoms of nucleic acids, and in describing the hydrogen-bonding interactions between nucleic acid base pairs. Second, the CG and atomistic AMBER models yield comparable results in modeling double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules. It is encouraging that our CG model is capable of reproducing many elastic features of nucleic acid base pairs in terms of the distributions of the interbase pair step parameters (such as shift, slide, tilt, and twist) and the intrabase pair parameters (such as buckle, propeller, shear, and stretch). Finally, The GBEMP model has shown a promising ability to predict the melting temperatures of DNA duplexes with different lengths. PMID:26717419

  11. Second-order statistics of a radially polarized cosine-Gaussian correlated Schell-model beam in anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Shijun; Wang, Haiyan; Cai, Yangjian; Li, Zhenhua

    2016-05-30

    Recently, we introduced a new class of radially polarized cosine-Gaussian correlated Schell-model (CGCSM) beams of rectangular symmetry based on the partially coherent electromagnetic theory [Opt. Express23, 33099 (2015)]. In this paper, we extend the work to study the second-order statistics such as the average intensity, the spectral degree of coherence, the spectral degree of polarization and the state of polarization in anisotropic turbulence based on an extended von Karman power spectrum with a non-Kolmogorov power law α and an effective anisotropic parameter. Analytical formulas for the cross-spectral density matrix elements of a radially polarized CGCSM beam in anisotropic turbulence are derived. It is found that the second-order statistics are greatly affected by the source correlation function, and the change in the turbulent statistics induces relatively small effect. The significant effect of anisotropic turbulence on the beam parameters mainly appears nearα=3.1, and decreases with the increase of the anisotropic parameter. Furthermore, the polarization state exhibits self-splitting property and each beamlet evolves into a radially polarized structure in the far field. Our work enriches the classical coherence theory and may be important for free-space optical communications. PMID:27410089

  12. Anisotropic viscoelastic-viscoplastic continuum model for high-density cellulose-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahjanto, D. D.; Girlanda, O.; Östlund, S.

    2015-11-01

    A continuum material model is developed for simulating the mechanical response of high-density cellulose-based materials subjected to stationary and transient loading. The model is formulated in an infinitesimal strain framework, where the total strain is decomposed into elastic and plastic parts. The model adopts a standard linear viscoelastic solid model expressed in terms of Boltzmann hereditary integral form, which is coupled to a rate-dependent viscoplastic formulation to describe the irreversible plastic part of the overall strain. An anisotropic hardening law with a kinematic effect is particularly adopted in order to capture the complex stress-strain hysteresis typically observed in polymeric materials. In addition, the present model accounts for the effects of material densification associated with through-thickness compression, which are captured using an exponential law typically applied in the continuum description of elasticity in porous media. Material parameters used in the present model are calibrated to the experimental data for high-density (press)boards. The experimental characterization procedures as well as the calibration of the parameters are highlighted. The results of the model simulations are systematically analyzed and validated against the corresponding experimental data. The comparisons show that the predictions of the present model are in very good agreement with the experimental observations for both stationary and transient load cases.

  13. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.; Linask, I.; Nissley, D. M.; Norris, P. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Walker, K. P.

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a program designed to develop life prediction and constitutive models for two coated single crystal alloys used in gas turbine airfoils. The two alloys are PWA 1480 and Alloy 185. The two oxidation resistant coatings are PWA 273, an aluminide coating, and PWA 286, an overlay NiCoCrAlY coating. To obtain constitutive and fatigue data, tests were conducted on uncoated and coated specimens loaded in the CH76 100 CH110 , CH76 110 CH110 , CH76 111 CH110 and CH76 123 CH110 crystallographic directions. Two constitutive models are being developed and evaluated for the single crystal materials: a micromechanic model based on crystallographic slip systems, and a macroscopic model which employs anisotropic tensors to model inelastic deformation anisotropy. Based on tests conducted on the overlay coating material, constitutive models for coatings also appear feasible and two initial models were selected. A life prediction approach was proposed for coated single crystal materials, including crack initiation either in the coating or in the substrate. The coating initiated failures dominated in the tests at load levels typical of gas turbine operation. Coating life was related to coating stress/strain history which was determined from specimen data using the constitutive models.

  14. Instability of Interacting Ghost Dark Energy Model in an Anisotropic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, N.; Barati, F.

    2016-02-01

    A new dark energy model called "ghost dark energy" was recently suggested to explain the observed accelerating expansion of the universe. This model originates from the Veneziano ghost of QCD. The dark energy density is proportional to Hubble parameter, ρ Λ = α H, where α is a constant of order {Λ }3_{QCD} and Λ Q C D ˜ 100M e V is QCD mass scale. In this paper, we investigate about the stability of generalized QCD ghost dark energy model against perturbations in the anisotropic background. At first, the ghost dark energy model of the universe with spatial BI model with/without the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is discussed. In particular, the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of this dark energy model are obtained. Then, we use the squared sound speed {vs2} the sign of which determines the stability of the model. We explore the stability of this model in the presence/absence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter in both flat and non-isotropic geometry. In conclusion, we find evidence that the ghost dark energy might can not lead to a stable universe favored by observations at the present time in BI universe.

  15. Instability of Interacting Ghost Dark Energy Model in an Anisotropic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, N.; Barati, F.

    2016-07-01

    A new dark energy model called "ghost dark energy" was recently suggested to explain the observed accelerating expansion of the universe. This model originates from the Veneziano ghost of QCD. The dark energy density is proportional to Hubble parameter, ρ Λ = α H, where α is a constant of order {Λ }3_{QCD} and Λ Q C D ˜ 100 M e V is QCD mass scale. In this paper, we investigate about the stability of generalized QCD ghost dark energy model against perturbations in the anisotropic background. At first, the ghost dark energy model of the universe with spatial BI model with/without the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is discussed. In particular, the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of this dark energy model are obtained. Then, we use the squared sound speed {vs2} the sign of which determines the stability of the model. We explore the stability of this model in the presence/absence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter in both flat and non-isotropic geometry. In conclusion, we find evidence that the ghost dark energy might can not lead to a stable universe favored by observations at the present time in BI universe.

  16. Convergence dynamics of 2-dimensional isotropic and anisotropic Bak Sneppen models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Burhan; Tirnakli, Ugur

    2008-09-01

    The conventional Hamming distance measurement captures only short-time dynamics of the displacement between uncorrelated random configurations. The minimum difference technique introduced by Tirnakli and Lyra [U. Tirnakli, M.L. Lyra. Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 14 (2003) 805] is used to study short-time and long-time dynamics of the two distinct random configurations of isotropic and anisotropic Bak-Sneppen models on a square lattice. Similar to a 1-dimensional case, the time evolution of the displacement is intermittent. The scaling behavior of the jump activity rate and waiting time distribution reveal the absence of typical spatial-temporal scales in the mechanism of displacement jumps used to quantify convergence dynamics.

  17. Polarization in Cary model 14 spectrophotometers and its effect on transmittance measurements of anisotropic materials.

    PubMed

    Hills, M E; Olsen, A L; Nichols, L W

    1968-08-01

    Cary model 14 spectrophotometers like other prism and grating instruments have polarization characteristics that affect the transmittance values of anisotropic or dichroic materials. In the uv, the degree of polarization is fairly constant from 3000 A to 4000 A, whereas in the visible, it shows some variation with wavelength. In the near ir, the variation of the degree of polarization with wavelength is large, showing sharply defined maxima at approximately 0.77 micro, 0.97 micro, and 1.27 micro. The spectral transmittance of optical quality sapphire, a uniaxial crystal, cut at 45 degrees , 60 degrees , and 90 degrees to the c axis, showed undulations for certain orientations of the privileged directions. PMID:20068821

  18. Anisotropic string cosmological models in Heckmann-Schucking space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, G. K.; Dewangan, R. N.; Yadav, A. K.; Pradhan, A.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work we have searched the existence of the late time acceleration of the universe with string fluid as source of matter in anisotropic Heckmann-Schucking space-time by using 287 high red shift (0.3 ≤ z≤1.4) SN Ia data of observed absolute magnitude along with their possible error from Union 2.1 compilation. It is found that the best fit values for (\\varOmegam)0, (\\varOmega_{\\varLambda})0, (\\varOmega_{σ })0 and (q)0 are 0.2820, 0.7177, 0.0002 & -0.5793 respectively. Several physical aspects and geometrical properties of the model are discussed in detail.

  19. Macroscopic modeling of anisotropic magnetostriction and magnetization in soft ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbengue, Serigne Saliou; Buiron, Nicolas; Lanfranchi, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic and magnetoelastic properties of soft ferromagnetic materials, used as laminated sheets, are sensitive to manufacturing processes such as rolling, cutting and coating. One of the effects of these processes is to induce an anisotropic behavior of materials. Therefore, an anhysteretic magnetostriction and magnetization calculation taking into account the anisotropy effect at macroscopic scale is presented. This model is based on the expression and then the minimization of the total energy in order to determine magnetization and magnetostriction at equilibrium. The total energy to minimize depends on energy terms identified from measurements of the magnetization and magnetostriction at a scale large enough to neglect the heterogeneity due to grains. Therefore, this approach attempts to reproduce ferromagnetic polycrystal behavior at macroscopic without knowing texture (Orientation Density Function) nor grain properties.

  20. Density fluctuations in the interstellar medium: Evidence for anisotropic magnetogasdynamic turbulence. I - Model and astrophysical sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, J. C.

    1984-10-01

    A model of anisotropic magnetogasdynamic turbulence is developed in order to investigate quantitatively a turbulent fluid origin for the small spatial scale density fluctuations observed in 1981 by Armstrong, Cordes, and Rickett in the interstellar medium. The anisotropy at these small spatial scales results from the presence of a large-scale approximately uniform magnetic field that is a sum of the steady-state galactic magnetic field and the large-scale turbulent magnetic field fluctuations. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted to be two-dimensional isobaric entropy variations with oppositely directed gradients in temperature and density projected transverse to the local approximately uniform magnetic field. Three possible sites - cloud shell H II regions, diffuse H II regions produced by O stars, and the tenuous intercloud medium - are investigated as possible locations for turbulent flows.

  1. Robust Heterogeneous Anisotropic Elastic Network Model Precisely Reproduces the Experimental B-factors of Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Tong, Dudu; Lu, Lanyuan

    2013-08-13

    A computational method called the progressive fluctuation matching (PFM) is developed for constructing robust heterogeneous anisotropic network models (HANMs) for biomolecular systems. An HANM derived through the PFM approach consists of harmonic springs with realistic positive force constants, and yields the calculated B-factors that are basically identical to the experimental ones. For the four tested protein systems including crambin, trypsin inhibitor, HIV-1 protease, and lysozyme, the root-mean-square deviations between the experimental and the computed B-factors are only 0.060, 0.095, 0.247, and 0.049 Å(2), respectively, and the correlation coefficients are 0.99 for all. By comparing the HANM/ANM normal modes to their counterparts derived from both an atomistic force field and an NMR structure ensemble, it is found that HANM may provide more accurate results on protein dynamics. PMID:26584122

  2. The luminosity law of ellipticals; a test of a family of anisotropic models on eight galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, G.; Saglia, R. P.; Stiavelli, M.

    An important clue to the structure and dynamics of elliptical galaxies is provided by the empirical r1/4 luminosity law proposed by de Vaucouleurs (1948). The existence of such a law is indicative of a common underlying mass distribution in these galaxies. The fact that this law is universal suggests that essentially a single physical mechanism characterizes the formation of ellipticals. The authors report on a recent study where they have analyzed published photometric and kinematical data for a set of bright elliptical galaxies (NGC 3379, NGC 4374, NGC 4472, NGC 4486, NGC 4636, NGC 7562, NGC 7619, and NGC 7626) in terms of self-consistent anisotropic models under the assumption of constant mass-to-light ratio.

  3. Sudden death of distillability in a two-qutrit anisotropic Heisenberg spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, You-neng; Fang, Mao-fa; Zou, Hong-mei; Zhang, Shi-yang; Liu, Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Sudden death of distillability for a two-qutrit anisotropic Heisenberg XX chain with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied in detail. By using the negativity and realignment criterion, we show that certain initial prepared free entangled states may become bound entangled or separable states in a finite time. Moreover, the influences of the isotropic bilinear interaction parameter, the external magnetic field strength, the DM interaction parameter, as well as the intrinsic decoherence parameter on the possibility of distillability sudden death (DSD) have been studied. The results show, controlling the isotropic bilinear interaction parameter, the external magnetic field strength, the DM interaction parameter, as well as the intrinsic decoherence parameter, can accelerate the possibility of DSD in the present model.

  4. The monogamy relation and quantum phase transition in one-dimensional anisotropic XXZ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xue-ke; Wu, Tao; Ye, Liu

    2013-10-01

    In the paper, we have researched the monogamy relation and the quantum phase transition (QPT) in the anisotropic spin XXZ model by exploiting the quantum renormalization group method. The results show that there exits QPT after several iterations of renormalization in the present system. And we can find out that the monogamy inequality of entanglement of formation (EOF) and entropy quantum discord develop two saturated values which associate with spin-liquid and Néel phases after several iterations of the renormalization. Furthermore, we can also find out that the renormalization of EOF and entropy quantum discord violate the monogamy property while the renormalized geometric quantum discord obeys it no matter whether the QPT iterations are carried out. As a byproduct, the nonanalytic phenomenon and scaling behavior of the spin system are analyzed in detail.

  5. Comparison of structural anisotropic soft tissue models for simulating Achilles tendon tensile behaviour.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Longo, Giacomo; Gustafsson, Anna; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of tendon injury (tendinopathy) has increased over the past decades due to greater participation in sports and recreational activities. But little is known about the aetiology of tendon injuries because of our limited knowledge in the complex structure-function relationship in tendons. Computer models can capture the biomechanical behaviour of tendons and its structural components, which is essential for understanding the underlying mechanisms of tendon injuries. This study compares three structural constitutive material models for the Achilles tendon and discusses their application on different biomechanical simulations. The models have been previously used to describe cardiovascular tissue and articular cartilage, and one model is novel to this study. All three constitutive models captured the tensile behaviour of rat Achilles tendon (root mean square errors between models and experimental data are 0.50-0.64). They further showed that collagen fibres are the main load-bearing component and that the non-collagenous matrix plays a minor role in tension. By introducing anisotropic behaviour also in the non-fibrillar matrix, the new biphasic structural model was also able to capture fluid exudation during tension and high values of Poisson׳s ratio that is reported in tendon experiments. PMID:27108350

  6. Anisotropic Multishell Analytical Modeling of an Intervertebral Disk Subjected to Axial Compression.

    PubMed

    Demers, Sébastien; Nadeau, Sylvie; Bouzid, Abdel-Hakim

    2016-04-01

    Studies on intervertebral disk (IVD) response to various loads and postures are essential to understand disk's mechanical functions and to suggest preventive and corrective actions in the workplace. The experimental and finite-element (FE) approaches are well-suited for these studies, but validating their findings is difficult, partly due to the lack of alternative methods. Analytical modeling could allow methodological triangulation and help validation of FE models. This paper presents an analytical method based on thin-shell, beam-on-elastic-foundation and composite materials theories to evaluate the stresses in the anulus fibrosus (AF) of an axisymmetric disk composed of multiple thin lamellae. Large deformations of the soft tissues are accounted for using an iterative method and the anisotropic material properties are derived from a published biaxial experiment. The results are compared to those obtained by FE modeling. The results demonstrate the capability of the analytical model to evaluate the stresses at any location of the simplified AF. It also demonstrates that anisotropy reduces stresses in the lamellae. This novel model is a preliminary step in developing valuable analytical models of IVDs, and represents a distinctive groundwork that is able to sustain future refinements. This paper suggests important features that may be included to improve model realism. PMID:26833355

  7. Relevance of near-Earth magnetic field modeling in deriving SEP properties using ground-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellakopoulos, Anastasios; Plainaki, Christina; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Laurenza, Monica; Gerontidou, Maria; Storini, Marisa; Andriopoulou, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) are short-term increases observed in cosmic ray intensity records of ground-based particle detectors such as neutron monitors (NMs) or muon detectors; they are related to the arrival of solar relativistic particles in the terrestrial environment. Hence, GLE events are related to the most energetic class of solar energetic particle (SEP) events. In this work we investigate how the use of different magnetospheric field models can influence the derivation of the relativistic SEP properties when modeling GLE events. As a case study, we examine the event of 2012 May 17 (also known as GLE71), registered by ground-based NMs. We apply the Tsyganenko 89 and the Tsyganenko 96 models in order to calculate the trajectories of the arriving SEPs in the near-Earth environment. We show that the intersection of the SEP trajectories with the atmospheric layer at ~20 km from the Earth's surface (i.e., where the flux of the generated secondary particles is maximum), forms for each ground-based neutron monitor a specified viewing region that is dependent on the magnetospheric field configuration. Then, we apply the Neutron Monitor Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model (Plainaki et al. 2010, Solar Phys, 264, 239), in order to derive the spectral properties of the related SEP event and the spatial distributions of the SEP fluxes impacting the Earth's atmosphere. We examine the dependence of the results on the used magnetic field models and evaluate their range of validity. Finally we discuss information derived by modeling the SEP spectrum in the frame of particle acceleration scenarios.

  8. Modeling and characterizing anisotropic inclusion orientation in heterogeneous material via directional cluster functions and stochastic microstructure reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yang Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-03-07

    We present a framework to model and characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous materials with anisotropic inclusions of secondary phases based on the directional correlation functions of the inclusions. Specifically, we have devised an efficient method to incorporate both directional two-point correlation functions S{sub 2} and directional two-point cluster functions C{sub 2} that contain non-trivial topological connectedness information into the simulated annealing microstructure reconstruction procedure. Our framework is applied to model an anisotropic aluminum alloy and the accuracy of the reconstructed structural models is assessed by quantitative comparison with the actual microstructure obtained via x-ray tomography. We show that incorporation of directional clustering information via C{sub 2} significantly improves the accuracy of the reconstruction. In addition, a set of analytical “basis” correlation functions are introduced to approximate the actual S{sub 2} and C{sub 2} of the material. With the proper choice of basis functions, the anisotropic microstructure can be represented by a handful of parameters including the effective linear sizes of the iron-rich and silicon-rich inclusions along three orthogonal directions. This provides a general and efficient means for heterogeneous material modeling that enables one to significantly reduce the data set required to characterize the anisotropic microstructure.

  9. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  10. Anomaly in the phase diagram of the spin quantum 1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnet model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction: A low temperature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parente, Walter E. F.; Pacobahyba, J. T. M.; Araújo, Ijanílio G.; Neto, Minos A.; Ricardo de Sousa, J.

    2015-11-01

    We will study phase diagram the quantum spin-1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnet model in the presence of a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (D) and a uniform longitudinal (H) magnetic field, where we have observed an anomaly at low temperatures. Using the effective-field theory with a finite cluster N=2 spin (EFT-2) we calculate the phase diagram in the H - D plane on a simple cubic lattice (z=6). We analyzed the cases: anisotropic Heisenberg - case I: (Δ = 1), anisotropic Heisenberg - case II: (Δ = 0.5) and anisotropic Heisenberg - case III: (Δ = 0), where only second order phase transitions are observed.

  11. Urban flood modeling with porous shallow-water equations: A case study of model errors in the presence of anisotropic porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byunghyun; Sanders, Brett F.; Famiglietti, James S.; Guinot, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Porous shallow-water models (porosity models) simulate urban flood flows orders of magnitude faster than classical shallow-water models due to a relatively coarse grid and large time step, enabling flood hazard mapping over far greater spatial extents than is possible with classical shallow-water models. Here the errors of both isotropic and anisotropic porosity models are examined in the presence of anisotropic porosity, i.e., unevenly spaced obstacles in the cross-flow and along-flow directions, which is common in practical applications. We show that porosity models are affected by three types of errors: (a) structural model error associated with limitations of the shallow-water equations, (b) scale errors associated with use of a relatively coarse grid, and (c) porosity model errors associated with the formulation of the porosity equations to account for sub-grid scale obstructions. Results from a unique laboratory test case with strong anisotropy indicate that porosity model errors are smaller than structural model errors, and that porosity model errors in both depth and velocity are substantially smaller for anisotropic versus isotropic porosity models. Test case results also show that the anisotropic porosity model is equally accurate as classical shallow-water models when compared directly to gage measurements, while the isotropic model is less accurate. Further, results show the anisotropic porosity model resolves flow variability at smaller spatial scales than the isotropic model because the latter is restricted by the assumption of a Representative Elemental Volume (REV) which is considerably larger than the size of obstructions. These results point to anisotropic porosity models as being well-suited to whole-city urban flood prediction, but also reveal that point-scale flow attributes relevant to flood risk such as localized wakes and wave reflections from flow obstructions may not be resolved.

  12. Modeling Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Isotropic Objects: from Hairy Nanoparticles to Methylcellulose Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Valeriy

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking and formation of anisotropic structures from apparently isotropic building blocks is an exciting and not fully understood topic. I will discuss two examples of such self-assembly. The first example is related to the assembly of ``hairy'' nanoparticles in homopolymer matrices. The particles can assemble into long strings (they can also form other morphologies, as well) even though the shape of each particle and the distribution of ligands on the particle surface is spherically symmetric. Using the approach developed by Thompson, Ginzburg, Matsen, and Balazs, we show that presence of other particles can re-distribute the ligands and effectively ``polarize'' the particle-particle interaction, giving rise to the formation of 1d particle strings. In the second example, we consider aqueous solutions of methylcellulose (MC) polymers. It has been shown recently that at high temperature, the polymers form high-aspect ratio ``fibrils'' with diameter ~15 nm and length in the hundreds on nanometers. Using coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (CG-MD), we propose that the ``fibrils'' are result of one-dimensional self-assembly of single molecule ``rings''. Each MC polymer chain is forced into a ring because of the balance between internal chain rigidity (favoring more expanded configuration) and unfavorable polymer-water interactions (favoring more collapsed conformation). We also develop a theory predicting rheology and phase behavior of aqueous MC, and validate it against experimental data. Both examples show that anisotropic self-assembly can show up in unexpected places, and various theoretical tools are needed to successfully model it. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company through Grant 223278AF. Collaborators: R. L. Sammler (Dow), W. Huang and R. Larson (U. of Michigan).

  13. Explaining anisotropic macroseismic fields in terms of fault zone attenuation-A simple model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovic, Ivica; Sariri, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a simple model of anisotropic macroseismic field based on the assumption that local and regional geological structures change the shape of the isotropic macroseismic field (as expected in 1D media). Local geological structures, like water saturated stratified media, may increase intensity level by multiple reflections, constructive interference and resonant effects, but inelastic attenuation, significantly stronger in water-saturated soils, as well as destructive interference, may decrease intensities. On the other hand, large geological structures like seismotectonically active fault zones decrease intensities due to energy redistribution and inelastic attenuation. This model has been developed for the Karst region of the Outer Dinarides where site effects may be neglected because of specific building construction. Neglecting of site effects simplifies the model, so we just need a map of seismically active faults acting as modulator of macroseismic field. In order to demonstrate how the model works, we have calculated the standard error for 10 earthquakes and the macroseismic fields for three of them with epicenters in the Outer Dinarides and compared the model to empiric isoseismals.

  14. Vertex-element models for anisotropic growth of elongated plant organs

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, John A.; Lucas, Mikaël; King, John R.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2013-01-01

    New tools are required to address the challenge of relating plant hormone levels, hormone responses, wall biochemistry and wall mechanical properties to organ-scale growth. Current vertex-based models (applied in other contexts) can be unsuitable for simulating the growth of elongated organs such as roots because of the large aspect ratio of the cells, and these models fail to capture the mechanical properties of cell walls in sufficient detail. We describe a vertex-element model which resolves individual cells and includes anisotropic non-linear viscoelastic mechanical properties of cell walls and cell division whilst still being computationally efficient. We show that detailed consideration of the cell walls in the plane of a 2D simulation is necessary when cells have large aspect ratio, such as those in the root elongation zone of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to avoid anomalous transverse swelling. We explore how differences in the mechanical properties of cells across an organ can result in bending and how cellulose microfibril orientation affects macroscale growth. We also demonstrate that the model can be used to simulate growth on realistic geometries, for example that of the primary root apex, using moderate computational resources. The model shows how macroscopic root shape can be sensitive to fine-scale cellular geometries. PMID:23847638

  15. Elliptic-blending second-moment turbulence closure using an algebraic anisotropic dissipation rate tensor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jong-Keun; Seo, Jeong-Sik; Choi, Young-Don

    2009-06-01

    This study describes the amendment of an algebraic anisotropic dissipation rate model (ADRM) and its application to various turbulent flows to test the model's performance. Modeling anisotropies for the turbulence dissipation rate is considered by an analysis of the exact transport equation for the dissipation rate tensor. The second-moment closure, which is based on the explicit amended ADRM, is proposed and it is closely linked to the elliptic-blending model that is used for the prediction of Reynolds stresses. To develop and calibrate the present elliptic-blending second-moment closure that uses the amended ADRM, firstly, the distributions of both the mean velocity and Reynolds stress are solved for flows in a fully developed non-rotating channel and a straight square duct. And then, the fully developed turbulent flows in a rotating channel and a rotating straight square duct are predicted to test the ability of the explicit amended ADRM that is combined with the rotation effect. The prediction results are directly compared with the DNS and the large-eddy simulation (LES) to assess the performance of the new model predictions and to show their reasonable agreement with the DNS and LES data for all the flow fields that are analyzed for the present study. This paper is a modified version of the original article from the Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena held in Munich, Germany on 27-29 August 2007.

  16. A class of spherical, truncated, anisotropic models for application to globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vita, Ruggero; Bertin, Giuseppe; Zocchi, Alice

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a class of non-truncated, radially anisotropic models (the so-called f(ν)-models), originally constructed in the context of violent relaxation and modelling of elliptical galaxies, has been found to possess interesting qualities in relation to observed and simulated globular clusters. In view of new applications to globular clusters, we improve this class of models along two directions. To make them more suitable for the description of small stellar systems hosted by galaxies, we introduce a "tidal" truncation by means of a procedure that guarantees full continuity of the distribution function. The new fT(ν)-models are shown to provide a better fit to the observed photometric and spectroscopic profiles for a sample of 13 globular clusters studied earlier by means of non-truncated models; interestingly, the best-fit models also perform better with respect to the radial-orbit instability. Then, we design a flexible but simple two-component family of truncated models to study the separate issues of mass segregation and multiple populations. We do not aim at a fully realistic description of globular clusters to compete with the description currently obtained by means of dedicated simulations. The goal here is to try to identify the simplest models, that is, those with the smallest number of free parameters, but still have the capacity to provide a reasonable description for clusters that are evidently beyond the reach of one-component models. With this tool, we aim at identifying the key factors that characterize mass segregation or the presence of multiple populations. To reduce the relevant parameter space, we formulate a few physical arguments based on recent observations and simulations. A first application to two well-studied globular clusters is briefly described and discussed.

  17. A class of spherical, truncated, anisotropic models for application to globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vita, Ruggero; Bertin, Giuseppe; Zocchi, Alice

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a class of non-truncated, radially anisotropic models (the so-called f(ν)-models), originally constructed in the context of violent relaxation and modelling of elliptical galaxies, has been found to possess interesting qualities in relation to observed and simulated globular clusters. In view of new applications to globular clusters, we improve this class of models along two directions. To make them more suitable for the description of small stellar systems hosted by galaxies, we introduce a "tidal" truncation by means of a procedure that guarantees full continuity of the distribution function. The new fT(ν)-models are shown to provide a better fit to the observed photometric and spectroscopic profiles for a sample of 13 globular clusters studied earlier by means of non-truncated models; interestingly, the best-fit models also perform better with respect to the radial-orbit instability. Then, we design a flexible but simple two-component family of truncated models to study the separate issues of mass segregation and multiple populations. We do not aim at a fully realistic description of globular clusters to compete with the description currently obtained by means of dedicated simulations. The goal here is to try to identify the simplest models, that is, those with the smallest number of free parameters, but still have the capacity to provide a reasonable description for clusters that are evidently beyond the reach of one-component models. With this tool, we aim at identifying the key factors that characterize mass segregation or the presence of multiple populations. To reduce the relevant parameter space, we formulate a few physical arguments based on recent observations and simulations. A first application to two well-studied globular clusters is briefly described and discussed.

  18. Analytical Solution for the Anisotropic Rabi Model: Effects of Counter-Rotating Terms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhu, Hanjie

    2015-01-01

    The anisotropic Rabi model, which was proposed recently, differs from the original Rabi model: the rotating and counter-rotating terms are governed by two different coupling constants. This feature allows us to vary the counter-rotating interaction independently and explore the effects of it on some quantum properties. In this paper, we eliminate the counter-rotating terms approximately and obtain the analytical energy spectrums and wavefunctions. These analytical results agree well with the numerical calculations in a wide range of the parameters including the ultrastrong coupling regime. In the weak counter-rotating coupling limit we find out that the counter-rotating terms can be considered as the shifts to the parameters of the Jaynes-Cummings model. This modification shows the validness of the rotating-wave approximation on the assumption of near-resonance and relatively weak coupling. Moreover, the analytical expressions of several physics quantities are also derived, and the results show the break-down of the U(1)-symmetry and the deviation from the Jaynes-Cummings model. PMID:25736827

  19. Specimen-specific multi-scale model for the anisotropic elastic constants of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Deuerling, Justin M.; Yue, Weimin; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2009-01-01

    The anisotropic elastic constants of human cortical bone were predicted using a specimen-specific micromechanical model that accounted for structural parameters across multiple length scales. At the nano-scale, the elastic constants of the mineralized collagen fibril were estimated from measured volume fractions of the constituent phases, namely apatite crystals and Type I collagen. The elastic constants of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were predicted using the measured orientation distribution function (ODF) for the apatite crystals to average the contribution of misoriented mineralized collagen fibrils. Finally, the elastic constants of cortical bone tissue were determined by accounting for the measured volume fraction of Haversian porosity within the ECM. Model predictions using the measured apatite crystal ODF were not statistically different from experimental measurements for both the magnitude and anisotropy of elastic constants. In contrast, model predictions using common idealized assumptions of perfectly aligned or randomly oriented apatite crystals were significantly different from the experimental measurements. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the apatite crystal volume fraction and ODF were the most influential structural parameters affecting model predictions of the magnitude and anisotropy, respectively, of elastic constants. PMID:19664772

  20. On modelling of anisotropic viscoelasticity for soft tissue simulation: numerical solution and GPU execution.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Z A; Comas, O; Cheng, M; Passenger, J; Hawkes, D J; Atkinson, D; Ourselin, S

    2009-04-01

    Efficient and accurate techniques for simulation of soft tissue deformation are an increasingly valuable tool in many areas of medical image computing, such as biomechanically-driven image registration and interactive surgical simulation. For reasons of efficiency most analyses are based on simplified linear formulations, and previously almost all have ignored well established features of tissue mechanical response such as anisotropy and time-dependence. We address these latter issues by firstly presenting a generalised anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive framework for soft tissues, particular cases of which have previously been used to model a wide range of tissues. We then develop an efficient solution procedure for the accompanying viscoelastic hereditary integrals which allows use of such models in explicit dynamic finite element algorithms. We show that the procedure allows incorporation of both anisotropy and viscoelasticity for as little as 5.1% additional cost compared with the usual isotropic elastic models. Finally we describe the implementation of a new GPU-based finite element scheme for soft tissue simulation using the CUDA API. Even with the inclusion of more elaborate constitutive models as described the new implementation affords speed improvements compared with our recent graphics API-based implementation, and compared with CPU execution a speed up of 56.3 x is achieved. The validity of the viscoelastic solution procedure and performance of the GPU implementation are demonstrated with a series of numerical examples. PMID:19019721

  1. A Generalized Anisotropic Hardening Rule Based on the Mroz Multi-Yield-Surface Model for Pressure Insensitive and Sensitive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Pan, Jwo

    2009-07-27

    In this paper, a generalized anisotropic hardening rule based on the Mroz multi-yield-surface model is derived. The evolution equation for the active yield surface is obtained by considering the continuous expansion of the active yield surface during the unloading/reloading process. The incremental constitutive relation based on the associated flow rule is then derived for a general yield function. As a special case, detailed incremental constitutive relations are derived for the Mises yield function. The closed-form solutions for one-dimensional stress-plastic strain curves are also derived and plotted for the Mises materials under cyclic loading conditions. The stress-plastic strain curves show closed hysteresis loops under uniaxial cyclic loading conditions and the Masing hypothesis is applicable. A user material subroutine based on the Mises yield function, the anisotropic hardening rule and the constitutive relations was then written and implemented into ABAQUS. Computations were conducted for a simple plane strain finite element model under uniaxial monotonic and cyclic loading conditions based on the anisotropic hardening rule and the isotropic and nonlinear kinematic hardening rules of ABAQUS. The results indicate that the plastic response of the material follows the intended input stress-strain data for the anisotropic hardening rule whereas the plastic response depends upon the input strain ranges of the stress-strain data for the nonlinear kinematic hardening rule.

  2. Spatial turning bands simulation of anisotropic non-linear models of coregionalization with symmetric cross-covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, D.

    2016-04-01

    The turning bands method (TBM) is a commonly used method of simulation for large Gaussian fields, its O(N) complexity being unsurpassed (N denotes the number of points to simulate). TBM can be implemented either in the spatial or the spectral domains. In the multivariate anisotropic case, spatial versions of TBM are currently available only for the linear model of coregionalization (LMC). For anisotropic non-LMC with symmetrical covariances only the spectral version is currently available. The spectral domain approach can be slow in the case of non-differentiable covariances due to the numerous frequencies to sample. Here a derivation of the equations is provided for simulating the anisotropic non-LMC directly in the spatial domain and the method is illustrated with two synthetic examples. The approach allows the specification of many different direct and cross-covariance components, each with possibly different geometric anisotropies and different model types. The complexity of the new multivariate approach remains O(N). Hence, a case of two variables defining an anisotropic non-LMC is simulated over one billion points in less than one hour on a desktop computer. These results help enlarge the scope of application of the TBM. The method can be easily implemented in any existing TBM program.

  3. Isotropic and anisotropic shear velocity model of the NA upper mantle using EarthScope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, J.; Clouzet, P.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope TA deployment has provided dense array coverage across the continental US and with it, the opportunity for high resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere in the continent. Building upon our previous work, we present a new 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear wave model of the North American (NA) lithospheric mantle, using full waveform tomography and shorter-period (40 s) waveform data. Our isotropic velocity model exhibits pronounced spatial correlation between major tectonic localities of the eastern NA continent, as evidenced in the geology, and seismic anomalies, suggesting recurring episodes of tectonic events not only are well exposed at the surface, but also leave persistent scars in the continental lithosphere mantle, marked by isotropic and radially anisotropic velocity anomalies that reach as deep as 100-150 km. In eastern North America, our Vs images distinguish the fast velocity cratonic NA from the deep rooted large volume high velocity blocks which are east of the continent rift margin and extend 200-300 km offshore into Atlantic. In between is a prominent narrow band of low velocities that roughly follows the south and eastern Laurentia rift margin and extends into New England. The lithosphere associated with this low velocity band is thinned likely due to combined effects of repeated rifting processes along the rift margin and northward extension of the Bermuda low-velocity channel across the New England region. Deep rooted high velocity blocks east of the Laurentia margin are proposed to represent the Proterozoic Gondwanian terranes of pan-African affinity, which were captured during the Rodinia formation but left behind during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The anisotropy model takes advantage of the up-to-date SKS compilation in the continent and new splitting results from Greenland. The new joint waveform and SKS splitting data inversion is carried out with a 2

  4. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    The nuclear moderator for high temperature nuclear reactors are fabricated from graphite. During reactor operations graphite components are subjected to complex stress states arising from structural loads, thermal gradients, neutron irradiation damage, and seismic events. Graphite is a quasi-brittle material. Two aspects of nuclear grade graphite, i.e., material anisotropy and different behavior in tension and compression, are explicitly accounted for in this effort. Fracture mechanic methods are useful for metal alloys, but they are problematic for anisotropic materials with a microstructure that makes it difficult to identify a "critical" flaw. In fact cracking in a graphite core component does not necessarily result in the loss of integrity of a nuclear graphite core assembly. A phenomenological failure criterion that does not rely on flaw detection has been derived that accounts for the material behaviors mentioned. The probability of failure of components fabricated from graphite is governed by the scatter in strength. The design protocols being proposed by international code agencies recognize that design and analysis of reactor core components must be based upon probabilistic principles. The reliability models proposed herein for isotropic graphite and graphite that can be characterized as being transversely isotropic are another set of design tools for the next generation very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as well as molten salt reactors. The work begins with a review of phenomenologically based deterministic failure criteria. A number of this genre of failure models are compared with recent multiaxial nuclear grade failure data. Aspects in each are shown to be lacking. The basic behavior of different failure strengths in tension and compression is exhibited by failure models derived for concrete, but attempts to extend these concrete models to anisotropy were unsuccessful. The phenomenological models are directly dependent on stress invariants. A set of

  5. An Anisotropic Coarse-Grained Model for Proteins Based On Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hujun; Li, Yan; Ren, Pengyu; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Guohui

    2014-02-10

    Gay-Berne anisotropic potential has been widely used to evaluate the non-bonded interactions between coarse-grained particles being described as elliptical rigid bodies. In this paper, we are presenting a coarse-grained model for twenty kinds of amino acids and proteins, based on the anisotropic Gay-Berne and point electric multipole (EMP) potentials. We demonstrate that the anisotropic coarse-grained model, namely GBEMP model, is able to reproduce many key features observed from experimental protein structures (Dunbrack Library) as well as from atomistic force field simulations (using AMOEBA, AMBER and CHARMM force fields) while saving the computational cost by a factor of about 10~200 depending on specific cases and atomistic models. More importantly, unlike other coarse-grained approaches, our framework is based on the fundamental intermolecular forces with explicit treatment of electrostatic and repulsion-dispersion forces. As a result, the coarse-grained protein model presented an accurate description of non-bonded interactions (particularly electrostatic component) between hetero-/homo-dimers (such as peptide-peptide, peptide-water). In addition, the encouraging performance of the model was reflected by the excellent correlation between GBEMP and AMOEBA models in the calculations of the dipole moment of peptides. In brief, the GBEMP model given here is general and transferable, suitable for simulating complex biomolecular systems. PMID:24659927

  6. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    The nuclear moderator for high temperature nuclear reactors are fabricated from graphite. During reactor operations graphite components are subjected to complex stress states arising from structural loads, thermal gradients, neutron irradiation damage, and seismic events. Graphite is a quasi-brittle material. Two aspects of nuclear grade graphite, i.e., material anisotropy and different behavior in tension and compression, are explicitly accounted for in this effort. Fracture mechanic methods are useful for metal alloys, but they are problematic for anisotropic materials with a microstructure that makes it difficult to identify a "critical" flaw. In fact cracking in a graphite core component does not necessarily result in the loss of integrity of a nuclear graphite core assembly. A phenomenological failure criterion that does not rely on flaw detection has been derived that accounts for the material behaviors mentioned. The probability of failure of components fabricated from graphite is governed by the scatter in strength. The design protocols being proposed by international code agencies recognize that design and analysis of reactor core components must be based upon probabilistic principles. The reliability models proposed herein for isotropic graphite and graphite that can be characterized as being transversely isotropic are another set of design tools for the next generation very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as well as molten salt reactors. The work begins with a review of phenomenologically based deterministic failure criteria. A number of this genre of failure models are compared with recent multiaxial nuclear grade failure data. Aspects in each are shown to be lacking. The basic behavior of different failure strengths in tension and compression is exhibited by failure models derived for concrete, but attempts to extend these concrete models to anisotropy were unsuccessful. The phenomenological models are directly dependent on stress invariants. A set of

  7. Radially Anisotropic Viscous Root beneath Ontong - Java Plateau: Evidence from SS Waveform Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharimena, Saikiran; Rychert, Catherine; Harmon, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    We present evidence for a deep viscous mantle root beneath the Ontong-Java Plateau (OJP) which is a massive, stable, buoyant mass of anomalous oceanic lithosphere in the southwest Pacific Ocean. OJP is the largest of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). Bulk of OJP was emplaced due to a catastrophic volcanic event c. 120 Ma years ago and a minor event at c. 90 Ma years ago in a submarine environment. OJP is hypothesised to represent a modern day analogue for continental craton formation due to its anomalously thick crust, stability and buoyancy, which is also suggestive of processes well beyond the ones that explain the evolution of oceanic plates. Though several models have been proposed for the formation of continents and also OJP, their origin remains an enigma since no single model fits all observations constraints. Understanding the lithospheric and mantle structure of the OJP will plausibly provide an insight into the processes that created the cratons towards the end of the Archean. We image seismic discontinuity structure beneath OJP by modelling SS precursor waveforms. We present results beneath the northern OJP where bouncepoint coverage is high, > 500 bounces. We observe a thick (28 ± 4 km) crust, in agreement with previous active source refraction results. A Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuity (MLD) was detected at a depth of 80 ± 5 km with a velocity decrease of 6 ± 4 %. We also detect a velocity decrease of 5 ± 4 % at a depth of 282 ± 7 km, base of the mantle root of OJP. This deeper discontinuity (DD") could possibly represent a change in anisotropic structure. MLD is reminiscent of structure that has been recently imaged beneath continental interiors. However, the DD" discontinuity beneath OJP is not imaged beneath continental interiors, suggesting that if OJP is a proto-craton this boundary, plausibly a dehydration boundary formed by the large melting event that created OJP, may be destroyed over billions of years. SS precursor stacks from the Nauru

  8. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  9. AN INTERPRETATION OF GLE71 CONCURRENT CME-DRIVEN SHOCK WAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Firoz, Kazi A.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.; Zhang, Q. M.; Gan, W. Q.; Li, Y. P.; Moon, Y.-J.; Kudela, K.; Park, Y.-D.; Dorman, Lev I. E-mail: firoz.kazi@uah.es

    2014-08-01

    Particle accelerations in solar flares and CME-driven shocks can sometimes result in very high-energy particle events (≥1 GeV) that are known as ground level enhancements (GLEs). Recent studies on the first GLE event (GLE71 2012 May 17 01:50 UT) of solar cycle 24 suggested that CME-driven shock played a leading role in causing the event. To verify this claim, we have made an effort to interpret the GLE71 concurrent shock wave. For this, we have deduced the possible speed and height of the shock wave in terms of the frequency (MHz) of the solar radio type II burst and its drift rate (MHz min{sup –1}), and studied the temporal evolution of the particle intensity profiles at different heights of the solar corona. For a better perception of the particle acceleration in the shock, we have studied the solar radio type II burst with concurrent solar radio and electron fluxes. When the particle intensity profiles are necessarily shifted in time at ∼1 AU, it is found that the growth phases of the electron and cosmic ray intensity fluxes are strongly correlated (>0.91; ≥0.87) with the frequency drift rate of the type II burst, which is also consistent with the intensive particle accelerations at upper coronal heights (∼≥0.80 R {sub S} < 1.10 R {sub S}). Thus, we conclude that the CME-driven shock was possibly capable of producing the high-energy particle event. However, since the peaks of some flare components are found to be strongly associated with the fundamental phase of the type II burst, the preceding flare is supposed to contribute to the shock acceleration process.

  10. Anisotropic cosmologies with ghost dark energy models in f (R, T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayaz, V.; Hossienkhani, H.; Zarei, Z.; Azimi, N.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the generalized Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) ghost model of dark energy in the framework of Einstein gravity is investigated. For this purpose, we use the squared sound speed vs2 whose sign determines the stability of the model. At first, the non-interacting ghost dark energy in a Bianchi type-I (BI) background is discussed. Then the equation-of-state parameter, ω_D=pD/ρD, the deceleration parameter, and the evolution equation of the generalized ghost dark energy are obtained. It is shown that the equation-of-state parameter of the ghost dark energy can cross the phantom line ( ω=-1 in some range of the parameter spaces. Then, this investigation was extended to the general scheme for modified f(R,T) gravity reconstruction from a realistic case in an anisotropic Bianchi type-I cosmology, using the dark matter and ghost dark energy. Special attention is taken into account for the case in which the function f is given by f(R,T)=f1(R) +f2(T). We consider a specific model which permits the standard continuity equation in this modified theory. Besides Ω_{Λ} and Ω in standard Einstein cosmology, another density parameter, Ω_{σ}, is expected by the anisotropy. This theory implies that if Ω_{σ} is zero then it yields the FRW universe model. Interestingly enough, we find that the corresponding f ( R, T) gravity of the ghost DE model can behave like phantom or quintessence of the selected models which describe the accelerated expansion of the universe.

  11. A robust macroscopic model for normal–shear coupling, asymmetric and anisotropic behaviors of polycrystalline SMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghi, M.; Damanpack, A. R.; Liao, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this article is to develop a robust macroscopic bi-axial model to capture self-accommodation, martensitic transformation/orientation/reorientation, normal–shear deformation coupling and asymmetric/anisotropic strain generation in polycrystalline shape memory alloys. By considering the volume fraction of martensite and its preferred direction as scalar and directional internal variables, constitutive relations are derived to describe basic mechanisms of accommodation, transformation and orientation/reorientation of martensite variants. A new definition is introduced for maximum recoverable strain, which allows the model to capture the effects of tension–compression asymmetry and transformation anisotropy. Furthermore, the coupling effects between normal and shear deformation modes are considered by merging inelastic strain components together. By introducing a calibration approach, material and kinetic parameters of the model are recast in terms of common quantities that characterize a uniaxial phase kinetic diagram. The solution algorithm of the model is presented based on an elastic-predictor inelastic-corrector return mapping process. In order to explore and demonstrate capabilities of the proposed model, theoretical predictions are first compared with existing experimental results on uniaxial tension, compression, torsion and combined tension–torsion tests. Afterwards, experimental results of uniaxial tension, compression, pure bending and buckling tests on {{NiTi}} rods and tubes are replicated by implementing a finite element method along with the Newton–Raphson and Riks techniques to trace non-linear equilibrium path. A good qualitative and quantitative correlation is observed between numerical and experimental results, which verifies the accuracy of the model and the solution procedure.

  12. Forward modelling of multi-component induction logging tools in layered anisotropic dipping formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Xu, Chenhao; Xiao, Jiaqi

    2013-10-01

    Multi-component induction logging provides great assistance in the exploration of thinly laminated reservoirs. The 1D parametric inversion following an adaptive borehole correction is the key step in the data processing of multi-component induction logging responses. To make the inversion process reasonably fast, an efficient forward modelling method is necessary. In this paper, a modelling method has been developed to simulate the multi-component induction tools in deviated wells drilled in layered anisotropic formations. With the introduction of generalized reflection coefficients, the analytic expressions of magnetic field in the form of a Sommerfeld integral were derived. The fast numerical computation of the integral has been completed by using the fast Fourier-Hankel transform and fast Hankel transform methods. The latter is so time efficient that it is competent enough for real-time multi-parameter inversion. In this paper, some simulated results have been presented and they are in excellent agreement with the finite difference method code's solution.

  13. Noncollinear and noncoplanar magnetic order in the extended Hubbard model on anisotropic triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasrija, Kanika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the importance of noncollinear and noncoplanar magnetic phases in determining various electrical properties in magnets, we investigate the magnetic phase diagram of the extended Hubbard model on an anisotropic triangular lattice. We map out the ground-state phase diagram within a mean-field scheme that treats collinear, noncollinear, and noncoplanar phases on equal footing. In addition to the standard ferromagnet and 120∘ antiferromagnet states, we find the four-sublattice flux, the 3Q noncoplanar, and the noncollinear charge-ordered states to be stable at specific values of filling fraction n . Inclusion of a nearest-neighbor Coulomb repulsion leads to intriguing spin-charge-ordered phases. The most notable of these are the collinear and noncollinear magnetic states at n =2 /3 , which occur together with a pinball-liquid-like charge order. Our results demonstrate that the elementary single-orbital extended Hubbard model on a triangular lattice hosts unconventional spin-charge ordered phases, which are similar to those reported in more complex and material-specific electronic Hamiltonians.

  14. Global motions exhibited by proteins in micro- to milliseconds simulations concur with anisotropic network model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gur, M.; Zomot, E.; Bahar, I.

    2013-09-01

    The Anton supercomputing technology recently developed for efficient molecular dynamics simulations permits us to examine micro- to milli-second events at full atomic resolution for proteins in explicit water and lipid bilayer. It also permits us to investigate to what extent the collective motions predicted by network models (that have found broad use in molecular biophysics) agree with those exhibited by full-atomic long simulations. The present study focuses on Anton trajectories generated for two systems: the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, and an archaeal aspartate transporter, GltPh. The former, a thoroughly studied system, helps benchmark the method of comparative analysis, and the latter provides new insights into the mechanism of function of glutamate transporters. The principal modes of motion derived from both simulations closely overlap with those predicted for each system by the anisotropic network model (ANM). Notably, the ANM modes define the collective mechanisms, or the pathways on conformational energy landscape, that underlie the passage between the crystal structure and substates visited in simulations. In particular, the lowest frequency ANM modes facilitate the conversion between the most probable substates, lending support to the view that easy access to functional substates is a robust determinant of evolutionarily selected native contact topology.

  15. Nonlinear force propagation, anisotropic stiffening and non-affine relaxation in a model cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Daisuke; Head, David; Ikebe, Emi; Nakamasu, Akiko; Kinoshita, Suguru; Peijuan, Zhang; Ando, Shoji

    2013-03-01

    Forces are generated heterogeneously in living cells and transmitted through cytoskeletal networks that respond highly non-linearly. Here, we carry out high-bandwidth passive microrheology on vimentin networks reconstituted in vitro, and observe the nonlinear mechanical response due to forces propagating from a local source applied by an optical tweezer. Since the applied force is constant, the gel becomes equilibrated and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be employed to deduce the viscoelasticity of the local environment from the thermal fluctuations of colloidal probes. Our experiments unequivocally demonstrate the anisotropic stiffening of the cytoskeletal network behind the applied force, with greater stiffening in the parallel direction. Quantitative agreement with an affine continuum model is obtained, but only for the response at certain frequency ~ 10-1000 Hz which separates the high-frequency power law and low-frequency elastic behavior of the network. We argue that the failure of the model at lower frequencies is due to the presence of non-affinity, and observe that zero-frequency changes in particle separation can be fitted when an independently-measured, empirical nonaffinity factor is applied.

  16. Unveiling -tangle and quantum phase transition in the one-dimensional anisotropic XY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Xu, Shuai; He, Juan; Ye, Liu

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the relationship between -tangle and quantum phase transition (QPT) is investigated by employing the quantum renormalization-group method in the one-dimensional anisotropic XY model. The results show that all the 1-tangles increase firstly and then decrease with the anisotropy parameter increasing, and the Coffman-Kundu-Wootters monogamy inequality is always tenable for this system. The entanglement's status of subsystems depends on its site position, and this proposition can be generalized to a multipartite system. Meanwhile, with the increasing of the size of the system, the -tangle decreases slowly and tends to a fixed value finally. Additionally, it exhibits a QPT and a maximum value for the next-nearest-neighbor entanglement at the critical point in our model, which is different from the case of two-body system. After several iterations of the renormalization, the quantum entanglement measure can develop two saturated values, which are associated with two different phases: spin-fluid phase and the Néel phase. To gain further insight, the nonanalytic and scaling behaviors of -tangle have also been analyzed in detail.

  17. The Anisotropic Aphid: Three-Dimensional Induction Modeling of Electrical Texture with Mixed Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    At the macroscopic scale, where the e-folding distance of low-frequency electromagnetic fields in conductive geomaterials is much larger than the size of organized heterogeneities such as fracture sets or laminations that constitute the geologic texture therein, electrical properties can be conveniently approximated by a generalized 3x3 tensor σ. Less convenient, however, are the algorithmic consequences of this approximation in electromagnetic modeling of 3D induction methods for geophysical exploration. Previous efforts at modelling generalized anisotropy with finite differences on a staggered Cartesian grid (e.g. Weiss and Newman, 2002; Wang and Fang, 2001) are posed in terms of the electric field with its governing "curl-curl" equation and well-documented null-space issues at low induction numbers. In contrast, Weiss (2013) proposed an alternate full-physics formulation in terms of Lorenz-gauged magentic vector A and electric scalar Φ potentials (Project APhiD) that eliminates the troublesome curl-curl operator, with ultrabroadband examples drawn from geologies with scalar, isotropic conductivity over the frequency range 10-2-1010 Hz. Here, the anisotropic theory presented in Weiss (2013) is implemented with finite differences on a Cartesian grid. Briefly stated, in this theoretical approach the conductivity tensor σ is split in terms of a rotationally-invariant isotropic conductivity σ* = ⅓ Tr(σ) and the residual σ - σ*I. This splitting decomposes the resulting finite difference coefficient matrix K into the sum Kiso + Kaniso, where the Kiso term is the coefficient matrix for the isotropic medium σ*, thus enabling reuse of the various routines previously developed for computing matrix coefficients in the isotropic case. Treatment of anisotropy is algorithmically therefore restricted to computing the coefficients in the sparse matrix Kaniso consisting of simple inner products of (σ - σ*I) · (A-∇Φ) and their divergence. In keeping with the

  18. Peripapillary and Posterior Scleral Mechanics, Part I – Development of an Anisotropic Hyperelastic Constitutive Model

    PubMed Central

    Downs, J. Crawford; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Suh, J-K. Francis

    2009-01-01

    Background The sclera is the white outer shell and principal load-bearing tissue of the eye as it sustains the intraocular pressure. We have hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the posterior sclera play a significant role in, and are altered by the development of glaucoma – an ocular disease manifested by structural damage to the optic nerve head. Method of Approach An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of the posterior sclera under acute elevations of intraocular pressure. The constitutive model is derived from fiber-reinforced composite theory, and incorporates stretch-induced stiffening of the reinforcing collagen fibers. Collagen fiber alignment was assumed to be multi-directional at local material points, confined within the plane tangent to the scleral surface, and described by the semi-circular von-Mises distribution. The introduction of a model parameter, namely the fiber concentration factor, was used to control collagen fiber alignment along a preferred fiber orientation. To investigate the effects of scleral collagen fiber alignment on the overall behaviors of the posterior sclera and optic nerve head, finite element simulations of an idealized eye were performed. The four output quantities analyzed were the scleral canal expansion, the scleral canal twist, the posterior scleral canal deformation and the posterior laminar deformation. Results A circumferential fiber organization in the sclera restrained scleral canal expansion but created posterior laminar deformation, whereas the opposite was observed with a meridional fiber organization. Additionally, the fiber concentration factor acted as an amplifying parameter on the considered outputs. Conclusions The present model simulation suggests that the posterior sclera has a large impact on the overall behavior of the optic nerve head. It is therefore primordial to provide accurate mechanical properties for this tissue. In a companion

  19. Mixed models and reduction method for dynamic analysis of anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Peters, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A time-domain computational procedure is presented for predicting the dynamic response of laminated anisotropic shells. The two key elements of the procedure are: (1) use of mixed finite element models having independent interpolation (shape) functions for stress resultants and generalized displacements for the spatial discretization of the shell, with the stress resultants allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries; and (2) use of a dynamic reduction method, with the global approximation vectors consisting of the static solution and an orthogonal set of Lanczos vectors. The dynamic reduction is accomplished by means of successive application of the finite element method and the classical Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The finite element method is first used to generate the global approximation vectors. Then the Rayleigh-Ritz technique is used to generate a reduced system of ordinary differential equations in the amplitudes of these modes. The temporal integration of the reduced differential equations is performed by using an explicit half-station central difference scheme (Leap-frog method). The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is demonstrated by means of a numerical example and its advantages over reduction methods used with the displacement formulation are discussed.

  20. Asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian approach for modeling anisotropic transport in magnetized plasmas for arbitrary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory

    2012-10-01

    Modeling electron transport in magnetized plasmas is extremely challenging due to the extreme anisotropy between parallel (to the magnetic field) and perpendicular directions (χ/χ˜10^10 in fusion plasmas). Recently, a Lagrangian Green's function approach, developed for the purely parallel transport case,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011)^,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, 19, 056112 (2012) has been extended to the anisotropic transport case in the tokamak-ordering limit with constant density.footnotetextL. Chac'on, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, C. Hauck, JCP, submitted (2012) An operator-split algorithm is proposed that allows one to treat Eulerian and Lagrangian components separately. The approach is shown to feature bounded numerical errors for arbitrary χ/χ ratios, which renders it asymptotic-preserving. In this poster, we will present the generalization of the Lagrangian approach to arbitrary magnetic fields. We will demonstrate the potential of the approach with various challenging configurations, including the case of transport across a magnetic island in cylindrical geometry.

  1. Numerical Modelling of the Anisotropic Mechanical Behaviour of Opalinus Clay at the Laboratory-Scale Using FEM/DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisjak, Andrea; Tatone, Bryan S. A.; Grasselli, Giovanni; Vietor, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The Opalinus Clay (OPA) is an argillaceous rock formation selected to host a deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in Switzerland. It has been shown that the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in this formation is heavily affected by the anisotropic mechanical response of the material related to the presence of bedding planes. In this context, the purpose of this study is twofold: (i) to illustrate the new developments that have been introduced into the combined finite-discrete element method (FEM/DEM) to model layered materials and (ii) to demonstrate the effectiveness of this new modelling approach in simulating the short-term mechanical response of OPA at the laboratory-scale. A transversely isotropic elastic constitutive law is implemented to account for the anisotropic elastic modulus, while a procedure to incorporate a distribution of preferentially oriented defects is devised to capture the anisotropic strength. Laboratory results of indirect tensile tests and uniaxial compression tests are used to calibrate the numerical model. Emergent strength and deformation properties, together with the simulated damage mechanisms, are shown to be in strong agreement with experimental observations. Subsequently, the calibrated model is validated by investigating the effect of confinement and the influence of the loading angle with respect to the specimen anisotropy. Simulated fracture patterns are discussed in the context of the theory of brittle rock failure and analyzed with reference to the EDZ formation mechanisms observed at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory.

  2. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model of brain white matter in biaxial tension and structural-mechanical relationships.

    PubMed

    Labus, Kevin M; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2016-09-01

    Computational models of the brain require accurate and robust constitutive models to characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The anisotropy of white matter has been previously demonstrated; however, there is a lack of data describing the effects of multi-axial loading, even though brain tissue experiences multi-axial stress states. Therefore, a biaxial tensile experiment was designed to more fully characterize the anisotropic behavior of white matter in a quasi-static loading state, and the mechanical data were modeled with an anisotropic hyperelastic continuum model. A probabilistic analysis was used to quantify the uncertainty in model predictions because the mechanical data of brain tissue can show a high degree of variability, and computational studies can benefit from reporting the probability distribution of model responses. The axonal structure in white matter can be heterogeneous and regionally dependent, which can affect computational model predictions. Therefore, corona radiata and corpus callosum regions were tested, and histology and transmission electron microscopy were performed on tested specimens to relate the distribution of axon orientations and the axon volume fraction to the mechanical behavior. These measured properties were implemented into a structural constitutive model. Results demonstrated a significant, but relatively low anisotropic behavior, yet there were no conclusive mechanical differences between the two regions tested. The inclusion of both biaxial and uniaxial tests in model fits improved the accuracy of model predictions. The mechanical anisotropy of individual specimens positively correlated with the measured axon volume fraction, and, accordingly, the structural model exhibited slightly decreased uncertainty in model predictions compared to the model without structural properties. PMID:27214689

  3. A three-dimensional radially anisotropic model of shear velocity in the whole mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Mark; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    We present a 3-D radially anisotropic S velocity model of the whole mantle (SAW642AN), obtained using a large three component surface and body waveform data set and an iterative inversion for structure and source parameters based on Non-linear Asymptotic Coupling Theory (NACT). The model is parametrized in level 4 spherical splines, which have a spacing of ~ 8°. The model shows a link between mantle flow and anisotropy in a variety of depth ranges. In the uppermost mantle, we confirm observations of regions with VSH > VSV starting at ~80 km under oceanic regions and ~200 km under stable continental lithosphere, suggesting horizontal flow beneath the lithosphere. We also observe a VSV > VSH signature at ~150-300 km depth beneath major ridge systems with amplitude correlated with spreading rate for fast-spreading segments. In the transition zone (400-700 km depth), regions of subducted slab material are associated with VSV > VSH, while the ridge signal decreases. While the mid-mantle has lower amplitude anisotropy (<1 per cent), we also confirm the observation of radially symmetric VSH > VSV in the lowermost 300 km, which appears to be a robust conclusion, despite an error in our previous paper which has been corrected here. The 3-D deviations from this signature are associated with the large-scale low-velocity superplumes under the central Pacific and Africa, suggesting that VSH > VSV is generated in the predominant horizontal flow of a mechanical boundary layer, with a change in signature related to transition to upwelling at the superplumes.

  4. COMPOUND TWIN CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2012 MAY 17 GLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, C.; Wang, Yuming; Li, G.; Kong, X.; Hu, J.; Sun, X. D.; Ding, L.; Chen, Y.; Xia, L.

    2013-02-15

    We report a multiple spacecraft observation of the 2012 May 17 GLE event. Using the coronagraph observations by SOHO/LASCO, STEREO-A/COR1, and STEREO-B/COR1, we identify two eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred in the same active region and close in time ({approx}2 minutes) in the 2012 May 17 GLE event. Both CMEs were fast. Complicated radio emissions, with multiple type II episodes, were observed from ground-based stations: Learmonth and BIRS, as well as the WAVES instrument on board the Wind spacecraft. High time-resolution SDO/AIA imaging data and SDO/HMI vector magnetic field data were also examined. A complicated pre-eruption magnetic field configuration, consisting of twisted flux-tube structure, is reconstructed. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) up to several hundred MeV nucleon{sup -1} were detected in this event. Although the eruption source region was near the west limb, the event led to ground-level enhancement. The existence of two fast CMEs and the observation of high-energy particles with ground-level enhancement agrees well with a recently proposed 'twin CME' scenario.

  5. GLE2, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe export factor RAE1, is required for nuclear pore complex structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, R; Watkins, J L; Wente, S R

    1996-01-01

    To identify and characterize novel factors required for nuclear transport, a genetic screen was conducted in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations that were lethal in combination with a null allele of the gene encoding the nucleoporin Nup100p were isolated using a colony-sectoring assay. Three complementation groups of gle (for GLFG lethal) mutants were identified. In this report, the characterization of GLE2 is detailed. GLE2 encodes a 40.5-kDa polypeptide with striking similarity to that of Schizosaccharomyces pombe RAE1. In indirect immunofluorescence and nuclear pore complex fractionation experiments, Gle2p was associated with nuclear pore complexes. Mutated alleles of GLE2 displayed blockage of polyadenylated RNA export; however, nuclear protein import was not apparently diminished. Immunofluorescence and thin-section electron microscopic analysis revealed that the nuclear pore complex and nuclear envelope structure was grossly perturbed in gle2 mutants. Because the clusters of herniated pore complexes appeared subsequent to the export block, the structural perturbations were likely indirect consequences of the export phenotype. Interestingly, a two-hybrid interaction was detected between Gle2p and Srp1p, the nuclear localization signal receptor, as well as Rip1p, a nuclear export signal-interacting protein. We propose that Gle2p has a novel role in mediating nuclear transport. Images PMID:8970155

  6. Local conditions separating expansion from collapse in spherically symmetric models with anisotropic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoso, José P.; Le Delliou, Morgan; Mena, Filipe C.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate spherically symmetric spacetimes with an anisotropic fluid and discuss the existence and stability of a separating shell dividing expanding and collapsing regions. We resort to a 3+1 splitting and obtain gauge invariant conditions relating intrinsic spacetime quantities to properties of the matter source. We find that the separating shell is defined by a generalization of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equilibrium condition. The latter establishes a balance between the pressure gradients, both isotropic and anisotropic, and the strength of the fields induced by the Misner-Sharp mass inside the separating shell and by the pressure fluxes. This defines a local equilibrium condition, but conveys also a nonlocal character given the definition of the Misner-Sharp mass. By the same token, it is also a generalized thermodynamical equation of state as usually interpreted for the perfect fluid case, which now has the novel feature of involving both the isotropic and the anisotropic stresses. We have cast the governing equations in terms of local, gauge invariant quantities that are revealing of the role played by the anisotropic pressures and inhomogeneous electric part of the Weyl tensor. We analyze a particular solution with dust and radiation that provides an illustration of our conditions. In addition, our gauge invariant formalism not only encompasses the cracking process from Herrera and co-workers but also reveals transparently the interplay and importance of the shear and of the anisotropic stresses.

  7. Using COMSOL Multiphysics Software to Model Anisotropic Dielectric and Metamaterial Effects in Folded-Waveguide Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starinshak, David P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic effects of conventional dielectrics, anisotropic dielectrics, and metamaterials were modeled in a terahertz-frequency folded-waveguide slow-wave circuit. Results of attempts to utilize these materials to increase efficiency are presented.

  8. Finite-size effects for anisotropic 2D Ising model with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the exact partition function of the anisotropic Ising model on finite M × N rectangular lattices under four different boundary conditions (periodic-periodic (pp), periodic-antiperiodic (pa), antiperiodic-periodic (ap) and antiperiodic-antiperiodic (aa)) obtained by Kaufman (1949 Phys. Rev. 76 1232), Wu and Hu (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5189) and Kastening (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 057103)). We express the partition functions in terms of the partition functions Zα, β(J, k) with (α, β) = (0, 0), (1/2, 0), (0, 1/2) and (1/2, 1/2), J is an interaction coupling and k is an anisotropy parameter. Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich et al (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5543) to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. Our result is f = fbulk + ∑∞p = 0fp(ρ, k)S-p - 1, where f is the free energy of the system, fbulk is the free energy of the bulk, S = MN is the area of the lattice and ρ = M/N is the aspect ratio. All coefficients in this expansion are expressed through analytical functions. We have introduced the effective aspect ratio ρeff = ρ/sinh 2Jc and show that for pp and aa boundary conditions all finite size correction terms are invariant under the transformation ρeff → 1/ρeff. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  9. Anisotropic matter in cosmology: locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi I and VII o models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, David

    2016-05-01

    We examine the behaviour of homogeneous, anisotropic space-times, specifically the locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi types I and VII o in the presence of anisotropic matter. By finding an appropriate constant of the motion, and transforming the equations of motion we are able to provide exact solutions in the presence of perfect fluids with anisotropic pressures. The solution space covers matter consisting of a single perfect fluid which satisfies the weak energy condition and is rich enough to contain solutions which exhibit behaviour which is qualitatively distinct from the isotropic sector. Thus we find that there is more ‘matter that matters’ close to a homogeneous singularity than the usual stiff fluid. Example metrics are given for cosmologies whose matter sources are magnetic fields, relativistic particles, cosmic strings and domain walls.

  10. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic injuries and gradual wear-and-tear of articular cartilage (AC) that can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) have been hypothesized to result from tissue damage to AC. In this study, a previous equilibrium constitutive model of AC was extended to a constitutive damage articular cartilage (CDAC) model. In particular, anisotropic collagen (COL) fibril damage and isotropic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) damage were considered in a 3D formulation. In the CDAC model, time-dependent effects, such as viscoelasticity and poroelasticity, were neglected, and thus all results represent the equilibrium response after all time-dependent effects have dissipated. The resulting CDAC model was implemented in two different finite-element models. The first simulated uniaxial tensile loading to failure, while the second simulated spherical indentation with a rigid indenter displaced into a bilayer AC sample. Uniaxial tension to failure simulations were performed for three COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain (i.e., the maximum elastic COL fibril strain) values of 15%, 30%, and 45%, while spherical indentation simulations were performed with a COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain of 15%. GAG damage parameters were held constant for all simulations. Our results indicated that the equilibrium postyield tensile response of AC and the macroscopic tissue failure strain are highly dependent on COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain. The uniaxial tensile response consisted of an initial nonlinear ramp region due to the recruitment of intact fibrils followed by a rapid decrease in tissue stress at initial COL fibril failure, as a result of COL fibril damage which continued until ultimate tissue failure. In the spherical indentation simulation, damage to both the COL fibril and GAG constituents was located only in the superficial zone (SZ) and near the articular surface with tissue thickening following unloading. Spherical indentation simulation results are in agreement with published experimental

  11. An Anisotropic Ocean Surface Emissivity Model Based on WindSat Polarimetric Brightness Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. F.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sandeep, S.; Weber, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this research has been to develop a standardized fast full-Stokes ocean surface emissivity model with Jacobian for a wind-driven ocean surface applicable at arbitrary microwave frequencies, polarizations, and incidence angles. The model is based on the Ohio State University (OSU) two-scale code for surface emission developed by Johnson (2006, IEEE TGRS, 44, 560) but modified as follows: (1) the Meissner-Wentz dielectric permittivity (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) replaces the original permittivity, (2) the Elfouhaily sea surface spectrum (1997, JGR, 102, C7,15781) replaces the Durden-Vesecky spectrum (1985, IEEE TGRS, OE-10, 445), but the Durden-Vesecky angular spreading function is retained, (3) the high-frequency portion of the Elfouhaily spectrum is multiplied by the Pierson-Moskowitz shape spectrum to correct an error in the original paper, (4) the generalized Phillips-Kitaigorodskii equilibrium range parameter for short waves is modeled as a continuous function of the friction velocity at the water surface to eliminate a discontinuous jump in the original paper. A total of five physical tuning parameters were identified, including the spectral strength and the hydrodynamic modulation factor. The short wave part of the spectrum is also allowed to have an arbitrary ratio relative to the long wave part. The foam fraction is multiplied by a variable correction factor, and also modulated to allow an anisotropic foam fraction with more foam on the leeward side of a wave. The model is being tuned against multi-year sequences of WindSat and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) data as analyzed by Meissner and Wentz (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) for up to four Stokes brightnesses and in all angular harmonics up to two in twenty five wind bins from 0.5-25.5 m/s and of 1 m/s width. As a result there are 40 brightnesses per wind bin, for a total of 1000 brightnesses used to constrain the modified model. A chi-squared tuning criterion based on error standard

  12. Unit-Sphere Anisotropic Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Probability Density Distribution for the Orientation of Critical Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of monolithic glass and ceramic components under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" failure models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This report develops a formulation to describe the probability density distribution of the orientation of critical strength-controlling flaws that results from an applied load. This distribution is a function of the multiaxial stress state, the shear sensitivity of the flaws, the Weibull modulus, and the strength anisotropy. Examples are provided showing the predicted response on the unit sphere for various stress states for isotropic and transversely isotropic (anisotropic) materials--including the most probable orientation of critical flaws for offset uniaxial loads with strength anisotropy. The author anticipates that this information could be used to determine anisotropic stiffness degradation or anisotropic damage evolution for individual brittle (or quasi-brittle) composite material constituents within finite element or micromechanics-based software

  13. Peripapillary and posterior scleral mechanics--part I: development of an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model.

    PubMed

    Girard, Michaël J A; Downs, J Crawford; Burgoyne, Claude F; Suh, J-K Francis

    2009-05-01

    The sclera is the white outer shell and principal load-bearing tissue of the eye as it sustains the intraocular pressure. We have hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the posterior sclera play a significant role in and are altered by the development of glaucoma-an ocular disease manifested by structural damage to the optic nerve head. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of the posterior sclera under acute elevations of intraocular pressure. The constitutive model is derived from fiber-reinforced composite theory, and incorporates stretch-induced stiffening of the reinforcing collagen fibers. Collagen fiber alignment was assumed to be multidirectional at local material points, confined within the plane tangent to the scleral surface, and described by the semicircular von Mises distribution. The introduction of a model parameter, namely, the fiber concentration factor, was used to control collagen fiber alignment along a preferred fiber orientation. To investigate the effects of scleral collagen fiber alignment on the overall behaviors of the posterior sclera and optic nerve head, finite element simulations of an idealized eye were performed. The four output quantities analyzed were the scleral canal expansion, the scleral canal twist, the posterior scleral canal deformation, and the posterior laminar deformation. A circumferential fiber organization in the sclera restrained scleral canal expansion but created posterior laminar deformation, whereas the opposite was observed with a meridional fiber organization. Additionally, the fiber concentration factor acted as an amplifying parameter on the considered outputs. The present model simulation suggests that the posterior sclera has a large impact on the overall behavior of the optic nerve head. It is therefore primordial to provide accurate mechanical properties for this tissue. In a companion paper (Girard, Downs, Bottlang, Burgoyne, and Suh, 2009

  14. Deficiency in the mRNA export mediator Gle1 impairs Schwann cell development in the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Seytanoglu, A; Alsomali, N I; Valori, C F; McGown, A; Kim, H R; Ning, K; Ramesh, T; Sharrack, B; Wood, J D; Azzouz, M

    2016-05-13

    GLE1 mutations cause lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 (LCCS1), a severe autosomal recessive fetal motor neuron disease, and more recently have been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The gene encodes a highly conserved protein with an essential role in mRNA export. The mechanism linking Gle1 function to motor neuron degeneration in humans has not been elucidated, but increasing evidence implicates abnormal RNA processing as a key event in the pathogenesis of several motor neuron diseases. Homozygous gle1(-/-) mutant zebrafish display various aspects of LCCS, showing severe developmental abnormalities including motor neuron arborization defects and embryonic lethality. A previous gene expression study on spinal cord from LCCS fetuses indicated that oligodendrocyte dysfunction may be an important factor in LCCS. We therefore set out to investigate the development of myelinating glia in gle1(-/-) mutant zebrafish embryos. While expression of myelin basic protein (mbp) in hindbrain oligodendrocytes appeared relatively normal, our studies revealed a prominent defect in Schwann cell precursor proliferation and differentiation in the posterior lateral line nerve. Other genes mutated in LCCS have important roles in Schwann cell development, thereby suggesting that Schwann cell deficits may be a common factor in LCCS pathogenesis. These findings illustrate the potential importance of glial cells such as myelinating Schwann cells in motor neuron diseases linked to RNA processing defects. PMID:26921650

  15. Anisotropic ray trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  16. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental United-State (US) has reached its eastern part, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave (Vs) model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. We here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of Vs for NA based entirely on SEM-based numerical waveforms from an augmented dataset of 155 regional events and 70 teleseismic events. The forward wavefield computations are performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic Vs model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). To model teleseismic wavefields within our regional computational domain, we developed a new modeling technique which allows us to replace a distant source by virtual sources at the boundary of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). Computing virtual sources requires one global simulation per teleseismic events.We then compare two models obtained: one using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and another using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels

  17. Surface tensions of linear and branched alkanes from Monte Carlo simulations using the anisotropic united atom model.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Goujon, F; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic united atoms (AUA4) model has been used for linear and branched alkanes to predict the surface tension as a function of temperature by Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations are carried out for n-alkanes ( n-C5, n-C6, n-C7, and n-C10) and for two branched C7 isomers (2,3-dimethylpentane and 2,4-dimethylpentane). Different operational expressions of the surface tension using both the thermodynamic and the mechanical definitions have been applied. The simulated surface tensions with the AUA4 model are found to be consistent within both definitions and in good agreement with experiments. PMID:18847235

  18. Application of the anisotropic bond model to second-harmonic generation from amorphous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adles, E. J.; Aspnes, D. E.

    2008-04-01

    As a step toward analyzing second-harmonic generation (SHG) from crystalline Si nanospheres in glass, we develop an anisotropic bond model (ABM) that expresses SHG in terms of physically meaningful parameters and provide a detailed understanding of the basic physics of SHG on the atomic scale. Nonlinear-optical (NLO) responses are calculated classically via the four fundamental steps of optics: evaluate the local field at a given bond site, solve the force equation for the acceleration of the charge, calculate the resulting radiation, then superpose the radiation from all charges. Because the emerging NLO signals are orders of magnitude weaker and occur at wavelengths different from that of the pump beam, these steps are independent. Paradoxically, the treatment of NLO is therefore simpler than that of linear optics (LO), where these calculations must be done self-consistently. The ABM goes beyond previous bond models by including the complete set of underlying contributions: retardation (RD), spatial-dispersion (SD), and magnetic (MG) effects, in addition to the anharmonic restoring force acting on the bond charge. Transverse as well as longitudinal motion is also considered. We apply the ABM to obtain analytic expressions for SHG from amorphous materials under Gaussian-beam excitation. These materials represent an interesting test case not only because they are ubiquitous but also because the anharmonic-force contribution that dominates the SHG response of crystalline materials and ordered interfaces vanishes by symmetry. The remaining contributions, and hence the SHG signals, are entirely functions of the LO response and beam geometry, so the only new information available is the anisotropy of the LO response at the bond level. The RD, SD, and MG contributions are all of the same order of magnitude, so none can be ignored. Diffraction is important in determining not only the pattern of the emerging beam but also the phases and amplitudes of the different terms

  19. Solid-State Constitutive Modelling of Glassy Polymers: Coupling the Rolie-Poly Equations for Melts with Anisotropic Viscoplastic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    De Focatiis, Davide S. A.; Buckley, C. Paul; Embery, John

    2008-07-07

    This paper investigates the behaviour of a well-characterised monodisperse grade of entangled atactic polystyrene across a very wide temperature and strain rate range through linear and non-linear melt rheology and solid-state deformation. In an effort to construct a constitutive model for large deformations able to describe rheological response right across this wide timescale, two well-established rheological models are combined: the well known RoliePoly (RP) conformational melt model and the Oxford glass-rubber constitutive model for glassy polymers. Comparisons between experimental data and simulations from a numerical implementation of the model illustrate that the model can cope well with the range of deformations in which orientation is limited to length-scales longer than an entanglement length. One approach in which the model can be expanded to incorporate the effects of orientation on shorter length scales using anisotropic viscoplastic flow is briefly discussed.

  20. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.; Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental US now has reached the eastern part of the United States, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. Building upon our previous work, we here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of shear velocity for North America based entirely on regional waveforms from an augmented dataset of ~150 events contained and observed inside the study region, with forward wavefield computations performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic shear velocity model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). Several iterations of inversion are performed using a Gauss-Newton scheme. We present and compare two models obtained, on the one hand, using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and on the other, using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels while preserving the fast convergence properties of the Gauss-Newton inversion scheme. We also present an update to our azimuthally anisotropic shear

  1. Anisotropic resistivity tomography: A model study for characterization of fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka

    1994-12-31

    Since fractured rocks often exhibit anisotropy with respect to hydraulic conductivity, it is expected that anisotropy may play an important factor in describing their electrical properties. Based upon this observation, numerical experiments have been carried out to determine whether anisotropic resistivity tomography can be used for characterization of fractured rocks. In fractured rock masses, the conventional 2-D inversion in which anisotropy is ignored produces peculiar distortions of the resistivity distribution. In contrast, the inversion accounting for anisotropy reconstructs anisotropic background media, as well as conductive anomalies associated with the zones of concentrated fracturing. It is also found that the fracture planes inclined with respect to the strike direction may have no significant effects on 2-D inversion if the angle is within about 20{degree}.

  2. Simple types of anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Hervik, Sigbjoern

    2010-01-15

    We display some simple cosmological solutions of gravity theories with quadratic Ricci curvature terms added to the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian which exhibit anisotropic inflation. The Hubble expansion rates are constant and unequal in three orthogonal directions. We describe the evolution of the simplest of these homogeneous and anisotropic cosmological models from its natural initial state and evaluate the deviations they will create from statistical isotropy in the fluctuations produced during a period of anisotropic inflation. The anisotropic inflation is not a late-time attractor in these models but the rate of approach to a final isotropic de Sitter state is slow and is conducive to the creation of observable anisotropic statistical effects in the microwave background. The statistical anisotropy would not be scale invariant and the level of statistical anisotropy will grow with scale.

  3. Anisotropic hardening model based on non-associated flow rule and combined nonlinear kinematic hardening for sheet materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherizadeh, Aboozar; Green, Daniel E.; Yoon, Jeong W.

    2013-12-01

    A material model for more effective analysis of plastic deformation of sheet materials is presented in this paper. The model is capable of considering the following aspects of plastic deformation behavior of sheet materials: the anisotropy in yielding stresses in different directions by using a quadratic yield function (based on Hill's 1948 model and stress ratios), the anisotropy in work hardening by introducing non-constant flow stress hardening in different directions, the anisotropy in plastic strains in different directions by using a quadratic plastic potential function and non-associated flow rule (based on Hill's 1948 model and plastic strain ratios, r-values), and finally some of the cyclic hardening phenomena such as Bauschinger's effect and transient behavior for reverse loading by using a coupled nonlinear kinematic hardening (so-called Armstrong-Frederick-Chaboche model). Basic fundamentals of the plasticity of the model are presented in a general framework. Then, the model adjustment procedure is derived for the plasticity formulations. Also, a generic numerical stress integration procedure is developed based on backward-Euler method (so-called multi-stage return mapping algorithm). Different aspects of the model are verified for DP600 steel sheet. Results show that the new model is able to predict the sheet material behavior in both anisotropic hardening and cyclic hardening regimes more accurately. By featuring the above-mentioned facts in the presented constitutive model, it is expected that more accurate results can be obtained by implementing this model in computational simulations of sheet material forming processes. For instance, more precise results of springback prediction of the parts formed from highly anisotropic hardened materials or that of determining the forming limit diagrams is highly expected by using the developed material model.

  4. Enhancing 3-D cell structures in confocal and STED microscopy: a joint model for interpolation, deblurring and anisotropic smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persch, Nico; Elhayek, Ahmed; Welk, Martin; Bruhn, Andrés; Grewenig, Sven; Böse, Katharina; Kraegeloh, Annette; Weickert, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an advanced image enhancement method that is specifically tailored towards 3-D confocal and STED microscopy imagery. Our approach unifies image denoising, deblurring and interpolation in one joint method to handle the typical weaknesses of these advanced microscopy techniques: out-of-focus blur, Poisson noise and low axial resolution. In detail, we propose the combination of (i) Richardson-Lucy deconvolution, (ii) image restoration and (iii) anisotropic inpainting in one single scheme. To this end, we develop a novel PDE-based model that realizes these three ideas. First we consider a basic variational image restoration functional that is turned into a joint interpolation scheme by extending the regularization domain. Next, we integrate the variational representation of Richardson-Lucy deconvolution into our model, and illustrate its relation to Poisson distributed noise. In the following step, we supplement the components of our model with sub-quadratic penalization strategies that increase the robustness of the overall method. Finally, we consider the associated minimality conditions, where we exchange the occurring scalar-valued diffusivity function by a so-called diffusion tensor. This leads to an anisotropic regularization that is aligned with structures in the evolving image. As a further contribution of this paper, we propose a more efficient and faster semi-implicit iteration scheme that also increases the stability. Our experiments on real data sets demonstrate that this joint model achieves a superior reconstruction quality of the recorded cell.

  5. The Spaghetti Model of the Turbulent Solar Wind: Implications for the Scaling of Anisotropic Magnetic Fluctuations and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Smith, C.; Vasquez, B.

    2010-11-01

    There has been a steady accumulation of observational evidence that the solar wind may be thought of as spaghetti: a network of individual magnetic flux tubes each with its own magnetic and plasma characteristics. As early as 1963, Parker referred to these tubes as magnetic and plasma ``filaments,'' and the picture has undergone several refinements since then [Bartley et al. 1966, Marliani et al. 1973, Tu and Marsch 1990, Bruno et al. 2001], culminating in the recent work of Borovsky [2008] who has suggested that these are fossil structures that originate at the solar surface. We use the weakly compressible MHD turbulence model [Bhattacharjee et al., 1998], which incorporates the effect of background spatial inhomogeneities, to describe such structures. We revisit the model equations, showing their relation to recent work by Hunana and Zank [2010]. For a model of interchange-instability driven turbulence, we then use the 1998 model equations to make predictions for the beta scaling of the anisotropic magnetic fluctuation spectra (the so-called variance anisotropy) observed by ACE, and show that the predictions bracket the observations well. We also predict the scaling of the anisotropic transport coefficients for particles and thermal energy.

  6. Anisotropic inflation with the nonvacuum initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Zarei, Moslem

    2014-07-01

    In this work we study models of anisotropic inflation with the generalized nonvacuum initial states for the inflaton field and the gauge field. The effects of the non-Bunch-Davies initial condition on the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum are calculated. We show that the non-Bunch-Davies initial state can help to reduce the fine-tuning on the anisotropic power spectrum while reducing the level of anisotropic bispectrum.

  7. A multilayer anisotropic plate model with warping functions for the study of vibrations reformulated from Woodcock's work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, A.; Castel, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a suitable model for static and dynamic analysis of inhomogeneous anisotropic multilayered plates is described. This model takes into account the variations of the transverse shear strains through the thickness of the plate by means of warping functions. Warping functions are determined by enforcing kinematic and static assumptions at the interfaces. This model leads to: a 10×10 stiffness matrix coupling to each other the membrane strains, the bending and torsion curvatures, and the x and y-derivatives of the transverse shear strains; and a classical 2×2 transverse shear stiffness matrix. This model has been proven to be very efficient, especially when high ratios between the stiffnesses of layers - up to 106 - are present. This work is related to Woodcock's model, so it can be seen as a reformulation of his work. However, it brings several enhancements: the displacement field is made explicit; it is reformulated with commonly used plate notations; laminate equations of motion are fully detailed; the place of this model among other plate models is now easy to see and is discussed; the link between this formulation and the original one is completely written with all necessary proofs; misses and errors have been found in the energy coefficients of the original work and have been corrected; it is now easy to improve or to adapt the model for specific applications with the choice of refined or specific warping functions. Static deflection and natural frequencies for isotropic and anisotropic sandwich plates are given and compared to other models: they show that the present model is very accurate for the simulation of such structures.

  8. Modelling ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane wave responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeida, Yousif; Pinfield, Valerie J.; Challis, Richard E.

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays have seen increasing use for the characterisation of composite materials. In this paper, ultrasonic wave propagation in multilayer anisotropic materials has been modelled using plane wave and angular spectrum decomposition techniques. Different matrix techniques, such as the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method, are used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients of ultrasonic plane waves in the considered media. Then, an angular decomposition technique is used to derive the bounded beams from finite-width ultrasonic array elements from the plane wave responses calculated earlier. This model is considered to be an analytical exact solution for the problem; hence the diffraction of waves in such composite materials can be calculated for different incident angles for a very wide range of frequencies. This model is validated against experimental measurements using the Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) of array data in both a homogeneous isotropic material, i.e. aluminium, and an inhomogeneous multilayer anisotropic material, i.e. a carbon fibre reinforced composite.

  9. Anisotropic elasticity of silicon and its application to the modelling of X-ray optics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Barrett, Raymond; Cloetens, Peter; Detlefs, Carsten; Sanchez del Rio, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The crystal lattice of single-crystal silicon gives rise to anisotropic elasticity. The stiffness and compliance coefficient matrix depend on crystal orientation and, consequently, Young’s modulus, the shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio as well. Computer codes (in Matlab and Python) have been developed to calculate these anisotropic elasticity parameters for a silicon crystal in any orientation. These codes facilitate the evaluation of these anisotropy effects in silicon for applications such as microelectronics, microelectromechanical systems and X-ray optics. For mechanically bent X-ray optics, it is shown that the silicon crystal orientation is an important factor which may significantly influence the optics design and manufacturing phase. Choosing the appropriate crystal orientation can both lead to improved performance whilst lowering mechanical bending stresses. The thermal deformation of the crystal depends on Poisson’s ratio. For an isotropic constant Poisson’s ratio, ν, the thermal deformation (RMS slope) is proportional to (1 + ν). For a cubic anisotropic material, the thermal deformation of the X-ray optics can be approximately simulated by using the average of ν12 and ν13 as an effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio, where the direction 1 is normal to the optic surface, and the directions 2 and 3 are two normal orthogonal directions parallel to the optical surface. This average is independent of the direction in the optical surface (the crystal plane) for Si(100), Si(110) and Si(111). Using the effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio for these orientations leads to an error in thermal deformation smaller than 5.5%. PMID:24763640

  10. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of directionally solidified and single crystal alloys is perhaps the most important recent advancement in hot section materials technology. The objective is to develop knowledge that enables the designer to improve anisotropic gas turbine parts to their full potential. Two single crystal alloys selected were PWA 1480 and Alloy 185. The coatings selected were an overlay coating, PWA 286, and an aluminide diffusion coating, PWA 273. The constitutive specimens were solid and cylindrical; the fatigue specimens were hollow and cylindrical. Two thicknesses of substrate are utilized. Specimens of both thickness (0.4 and 1.5 mm) will be coated and then tested for tensile, creep, and fatigue properties.

  11. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  12. Generalization of the CCLADS method for modeling anisotropic diffusion tensors on three-dimensional finite-volume grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, A.; Langevin, C.

    2012-12-01

    A number of numerical methods exist for incorporating anisotropic diffusion tensors, such as hydraulic or thermal conductivity, into two- and three-dimensional numerical models. The methods vary in mathematical approach, complexity, performance, and applicability to different types of model grids. The CCLADS variant of the CCLAD (Cell-Centered LAgrangian Diffusion) method of Maire & Breil (2011) is applicable to two-dimensional, unstructured, cell-centered finite-volume grids. It has a local stencil and exhibits nearly second-order accuracy on smooth distorted grids. As originally derived, CCLADS is not directly generalizable to three dimensions, and the derivation breaks down when adjacent cell edges meet at 180 degrees. Here, we rederive CCLADS to overcome these limitations and investigate the performance of the generalized method in a suite of three-dimensional test problems on structured, rectangular grids. As in two dimensions, the generalized method should be applicable to unstructured grids. Maire, P.-H., and Breil J., 2012, A nominally second-order accurate finite volume cell-centered scheme for anisotropic diffusion on two-dimensional unstructured grids, J. Comput. Phys., 231 (5), 2259-2299.

  13. Anisotropic inflation with general potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, JiaMing; Huang, XiaoTian; Qiu, TaoTao

    2016-04-01

    Anomalies in recent observational data indicate that there might be some "anisotropic hair" generated in an inflation period. To obtain general information about the effects of this anisotropic hair to inflation models, we studied anisotropic inflation models that involve one vector and one scalar using several types of potentials. We determined the general relationship between the degree of anisotropy and the fraction of the vector and scalar fields, and concluded that the anisotropies behave independently of the potentials. We also generalized our study to the case of multi-directional anisotropies.

  14. Exact results for model wave functions of anisotropic composite fermions in the fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Jain, J. K.

    2016-02-01

    The microscopic wave functions of the composite fermion theory can incorporate electron mass anisotropy by a trivial rescaling of the coordinates. These wave functions are very likely adiabatically connected to the actual wave functions of the anisotropic fractional quantum Hall states. We show in this paper that they possess the nice property that their energies can be analytically related to the previously calculated energies for the isotropic states through a universal scale factor, thus allowing an estimation of several observables in the thermodynamic limit for all fractional quantum Hall states as well as the composite fermion Fermi sea. The rather weak dependence of the scale factor on the anisotropy provides insight into why fractional quantum Hall effect and composite fermions are quite robust to electron mass anisotropy. We discuss how better, though still approximate, wave functions can be obtained by introducing a variational parameter, following Haldane [F. D. M. Haldane, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 116801 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.116801], but the resulting wave functions are not readily amenable to calculations. Our considerations are also applicable, with minimal modification, to the case where the dielectric function of the background material is anisotropic.

  15. Phase transition in ultrathin magnetic films with long-range interactions: Monte Carlo simulation of the anisotropic Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapini, M.; Dias, R. A.; Costa, B. V.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrathin magnetic films can be modeled as an anisotropic Heisenberg model with long-range dipolar interactions. It is believed that the phase diagram presents three phases: An ordered ferromagnetic phase (I), a phase characterized by a change from out-of-plane to in-plane in the magnetization (II), and a high-temperature paramagnetic phase (III). It is claimed that the border lines from phase I to III and II to III are of second order and from I to II is first order. In the present work we have performed a very careful Monte Carlo simulation of the model. Our results strongly support that the line separating phases II and III is of the BKT type.

  16. Resolution of anisotropic and shielded highly conductive layers using 2-D electromagnetic modelling in the Rhine Graben and Black Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezkan, Bülent; Červ, Václav; Pek, Josef

    1992-12-01

    Anisotropy in magnetotelluric (MT) data has been found very often and has been explained as the result of local structures of different conductivities. In this paper, an observed anisotropy in MT data is not interpreted qualitatively in terms of local structures but is modelled quantitatively by a quasi-anisotropic layer. Besides the MT transfer functions, measurements of the vertical magnetic component are required. The second goal of this paper is to describe a method which permits the resolution of mid-crustal conductive layers in the presence of an additional high-conductivity layer at the surface. This method is possible in a two-dimensional (2-D) situation that limits the spatial extension of the surface structure. Again, vertical magnetic field recordings are necessary, but the phase of the E-polarization with respect to the 2-D structure is the most sensitive parameter. Using two field sites in Southern Germany, it has been possible to give a quantitative explanation of anisotropy and an improved depth resolution, and to derive an integrated conductivity of the highly conductive mid-crustal layers using MT and geomagnetic depth sounding data. The anisotropic highly conductive layer is located 12 km beneath the poorly conductive Black Forest crystalline rocks, whereas it is at a depth of 6 km beneath the highly conductive Rhine Graben sediments.

  17. Effects of anisotropic turbulence on average polarizability of Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams through ocean link.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Minyu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the spatial power spectrum of the refractive index of anisotropic turbulence, the average polarizability of the Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams and lateral coherence length of the spherical wave propagating through the ocean water channel are derived. Numerical results show that, in strong temperature fluctuation, the depolarization effects of anisotropic turbulence are inferior to isotropic turbulence, as the other parameters of two links are the same. The depolarization effects of salinity fluctuation are less than the effects of the temperature fluctuation; the average polarizability of beams increases when increasing the inner scale of turbulence and the source's transverse size; and the larger rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid enhances the average polarizability of beams. The region of the receiving radius is smaller than the characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is smaller than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. However, the receiving radius region is larger than a characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is larger than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. PMID:27409215

  18. Anisotropic Ambient Volume Shading.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Dachsbacher, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method to compute anisotropic shading for direct volume rendering to improve the perception of the orientation and shape of surface-like structures. We determine the scale-aware anisotropy of a shading point by analyzing its ambient region. We sample adjacent points with similar scalar values to perform a principal component analysis by computing the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance matrix. In particular, we estimate the tangent directions, which serve as the tangent frame for anisotropic bidirectional reflectance distribution functions. Moreover, we exploit the ratio of the eigenvalues to measure the magnitude of the anisotropy at each shading point. Altogether, this allows us to model a data-driven, smooth transition from isotropic to strongly anisotropic volume shading. In this way, the shape of volumetric features can be enhanced significantly by aligning specular highlights along the principal direction of anisotropy. Our algorithm is independent of the transfer function, which allows us to compute all shading parameters once and store them with the data set. We integrated our method in a GPU-based volume renderer, which offers interactive control of the transfer function, light source positions, and viewpoint. Our results demonstrate the benefit of anisotropic shading for visualization to achieve data-driven local illumination for improved perception compared to isotropic shading. PMID:26529745

  19. A consistent formulation of the anisotropic stress tensor for use in models of the large-scale ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wajsowicz, R.C. )

    1993-04-01

    Subgrid-scale dissipation of momentum in numerical models of the large-scale ocean circulation is commonly parameterized as a viscous diffusion resulting from the divergence of a stress tensor of the form [omega] = Au. The form of the fourth-order coefficient tensor A is derived for anisotropic dissipation with an axis of rotational symmetry. Sufficient conditions for A to be positive definite for incompressible flows, so guaranteeing a net positive dissipation of kinetic energy, are found. The divergence of the stress tensor, in Cartesian and spherical polar coordinates, is given for A with constant and spatially varying elements. A consistent form of A and [omega] for use in models based on the Arakawa B- and C-grids is also derived. 16 refs.

  20. EM modelling of arbitrary shaped anisotropic dielectric objects using an efficient 3D leapfrog scheme on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, A.; Hachemi, M. El; Belouettar, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.

    2016-09-01

    The standard Yee algorithm is widely used in computational electromagnetics because of its simplicity and divergence free nature. A generalization of the classical Yee scheme to 3D unstructured meshes is adopted, based on the use of a Delaunay primal mesh and its high quality Voronoi dual. This allows the problem of accuracy losses, which are normally associated with the use of the standard Yee scheme and a staircased representation of curved material interfaces, to be circumvented. The 3D dual mesh leapfrog-scheme which is presented has the ability to model both electric and magnetic anisotropic lossy materials. This approach enables the modelling of problems, of current practical interest, involving structured composites and metamaterials.

  1. Hard Spherocylinders of Two Different Lengths as a Model System of a Nematic Liquid Crystal on an Anisotropic Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Tomonori; Hyodo, Yosuke; Momoi, Yuichi; Kwak, Musun; Kang, Dongwoo; Choi, Youngseok; Nishioka, Akihiro; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we describe the effects of an anisotropic substrate on the alignment of a nematic liquid crystal. We examine how the substrate affects the alignment of a nematic liquid crystal by Monte Carlo simulation. The liquid crystal on a substrate was described by the phase separation of liquid crystal molecules and substrate molecules, both of which were modeled by hard particles. We used hard rods to represent both the liquid crystal and the substrate. The length of the hard rods representing the substrate was adjusted to represent the degree of substrate anisotropy. The results show that the nematic alignment could either be reinforced or weakened, depending on the length of the substrate rods. Mean field theory is used to analyze the simulation results. We confirmed that the distance over which the substrate affects the bulk liquid crystal is about 3 nm for the present hard-rod-based model.

  2. Study of optical clearing in polarization measurements by Monte Carlo simulations with anisotropic tissue-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zeng, Nan; Wang, Yunfei; He, Honghui; Tuchin, Valery V; Ma, Hui

    2016-08-01

    We conducted Monte Carlo simulations based on anisotropic sclera-mimicking models to examine the polarization features in Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) parameters during the refractive index matching process, which is one of the major mechanisms of optical clearing. In a preliminary attempt, by changing the parameters of the models, wavelengths, and detection geometries, we demonstrate how the depolarization coefficient and retardance vary during the refractive index matching process and explain the polarization features using the average value and standard deviation of scattering numbers of the detected photons. We also study the depth-resolved polarization features during the gradual progression of the refractive index matching process. The results above indicate that the refractive index matching process increases the depth of polarization measurements and may lead to higher contrast between tissues of different anisotropies in deeper layers. MMPD-derived polarization parameters can characterize the refractive index matching process qualitatively. PMID:27240298

  3. Anisotropic viscoelastic shell modeling technique of copper patterns/photoimageable solder resist composite for warpage simulation of multi-layer printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Joo, Sung-Jun; Kwak, Dong-Ok; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the warpage simulation of a multi-layer printed circuit board (PCB) was performed as a function of various copper (Cu) patterns/photoimageable solder resist (PSR) composite patterns and their anisotropic viscoelastic properties. The thermo-mechanical properties of Cu/PSR patterns were obtained from finite element analysis (virtual test) and homogenized with anisotropic composite shell models that considered the viscoelastic properties. The multi-layer PCB model was simplified based on the unit Cu/PSR patterns and the warpage simulation during the reflow process was performed by using ABAQUS combined with a user-defined subroutine. From these results, it was demonstrated that the proposed anisotropic viscoelastic composite shell simulation technique can be successfully used to predict warpage of multi-layer PCBs during the reflow process.

  4. Anisotropic path modeling to assess pedestrian-evacuation potential from Cascadia-related tsunamis in the US Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent disasters highlight the threat that tsunamis pose to coastal communities. When developing tsunami-education efforts and vertical-evacuation strategies, emergency managers need to understand how much time it could take for a coastal population to reach higher ground before tsunami waves arrive. To improve efforts to model pedestrian evacuations from tsunamis, we examine the sensitivity of least-cost-distance models to variations in modeling approaches, data resolutions, and travel-rate assumptions. We base our observations on the assumption that an anisotropic approach that uses path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in slope is the most realistic of an actual evacuation landscape. We focus our efforts on the Long Beach Peninsula in Washington (USA), where a substantial residential and tourist population is threatened by near-field tsunamis related to a potential Cascadia subduction zone earthquake. Results indicate thousands of people are located in areas where evacuations to higher ground will be difficult before arrival of the first tsunami wave. Deviations from anisotropic modeling assumptions substantially influence the amount of time likely needed to reach higher ground. Across the entire study, changes in resolution of elevation data has a greater impact on calculated travel times than changes in land-cover resolution. In particular areas, land-cover resolution had a substantial impact when travel-inhibiting waterways were not reflected in small-scale data. Changes in travel-speed parameters had a substantial impact also, suggesting the importance of public-health campaigns as a tsunami risk-reduction strategy.

  5. Towards a new multiscale air quality transport model using the fully unstructured anisotropic adaptive mesh technology of Fluidity (version 4.1.9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhu, J.; Wang, Z.; Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Xiang, J.

    2015-10-01

    An integrated method of advanced anisotropic hr-adaptive mesh and discretization numerical techniques has been, for first time, applied to modelling of multiscale advection-diffusion problems, which is based on a discontinuous Galerkin/control volume discretization on unstructured meshes. Over existing air quality models typically based on static-structured grids using a locally nesting technique, the advantage of the anisotropic hr-adaptive model has the ability to adapt the mesh according to the evolving pollutant distribution and flow features. That is, the mesh resolution can be adjusted dynamically to simulate the pollutant transport process accurately and effectively. To illustrate the capability of the anisotropic adaptive unstructured mesh model, three benchmark numerical experiments have been set up for two-dimensional (2-D) advection phenomena. Comparisons have been made between the results obtained using uniform resolution meshes and anisotropic adaptive resolution meshes. Performance achieved in 3-D simulation of power plant plumes indicates that this new adaptive multiscale model has the potential to provide accurate air quality modelling solutions effectively.

  6. Evaluation of Bianchi type VI0 magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter in bimetric theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, M. S.; Ameen, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Bianchi type VI0 magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter have been studied by solving the Rosen's field equations in Bimetric theory of gravitation. The models corresponding to power law expansion and exponential law expansion have been evaluated and studied their nature geometrically and physically. It is seen that there is real visible matter (baryonic matter) suddenly appeared only for small interval of time 0.7 ≤ t < 0.7598 and for the remaining whole range of time t, there is dark energy matter in the universe. Our investigations are supported to the observational fact that the usual matter described by known particle theory is about 4% and the dark energy cause the accelerating expansion of the universe and several high precision observational experiments, especially the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropic Probe (WMAP) satellite experiment (see [C. L. Bennett et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 148 (2003) 1; WMAP Collab. (D. N. Spergel et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 148 (2003) 175; D. N. Spergel et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. 170 (2007) 377; WMAP Collab. (E. Komastu et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180 (2009) 330; WMAP Collab. (G. Hinshaw et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. 208 (2013) 19; Plank Collab. (P. A. R. Ade), arXiv:1303.5076; arXiv:1303.5082]) conclude that the dark energy occupies near about 73% of the energy of the universe and dark matter is about 23%. In exponential law of expansion, our model is fully occupied by real visible matter and there is no chance of dark energy and dark matter.

  7. Influence of anisotropic conductivity in the skull and white matter on transcranial direct current stimulation via an anatomically realistic finite element head model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyun Sang; Lee, Won Hee; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2012-11-01

    To establish safe and efficient transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), it is of particular importance to understand the electrical effects of tDCS in the brain. Since the current density (CD) and electric field (EF) in the brain generated by tDCS depend on various factors including complex head geometries and electrical tissue properties, in this work, we investigated the influence of anisotropic conductivity in the skull and white matter (WM) on tDCS via a 3D anatomically realistic finite element head model. We systematically incorporated various anisotropic conductivity ratios into the skull and WM. The effects of anisotropic tissue conductivity on the CD and EF were subsequently assessed through comparisons to the conventional isotropic solutions. Our results show that the anisotropic skull conductivity significantly affects the CD and EF distribution: there is a significant reduction in the ratio of the target versus non-target total CD and EF on the order of 12-14%. In contrast, the WM anisotropy does not significantly influence the CD and EF on the targeted cortical surface, only on the order of 1-3%. However, the WM anisotropy highly alters the spatial distribution of both the CD and EF inside the brain. This study shows that it is critical to incorporate anisotropic conductivities in planning of tDCS for improved efficacy and safety.

  8. An anisotropic coarse-grained model based on Gay-Berne and electric multipole potentials and its application to simulate a DMPC bilayer in an implicit solvent model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hujun; Li, Yan; Xu, Peijun; Li, Xiaofang; Chu, Huiying; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Guohui

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we aim at optimizing the performance of the anisotropic GBEMP model, which adopts a framework by combining a Gay-Berne (GB) anisotropic potential with an electric multipole (EMP) potential, in simulating a DMPC lipid bilayer in an implicit solvent model. First, the Gay-Berne parameters were initially obtained by fitting to atomistic profiles of van der Waals interactions between homodimers of molecular fragments while EMP parameters was directly derived from the expansion of point multipoles at predefined EMP sites. Second, the GB and EMP parameters for DMPC molecule were carefully optimized to be comparable to AMBER atomistic model in the calculations of the dipole moments of DMPC monomers adopting different conformations as well as the nonbonded interactions between two DMPC molecules adopting different conformations and separated at various distances. Finally, the GB parameters for DMPC were slightly adjusted in simulating a 72 DMPC bilayer system so that our GBEMP model would be able to reproduce a few important structural properties, namely, thickness (DHH), area per lipid ( AL) and volume per lipid ( VL). Meanwhile, the atomistic and experimental results for electron density profiles and order parameters were reproduced reasonably well by the GBEMP model, demonstrating the promising feature of GBEMP model in modeling lipid systems. Finally, we have shown that current GBEMP model is more efficient by a factor of about 25 than AMBER atomistic point charge model. PMID:25788250

  9. Anisotropic diffusion in a two-dimensional model with obstruction and a comparison of mean first passage time calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, K. K.

    2014-05-01

    The disagreement between two different studies of the diffusion equation for two hard disks to diffuse past each other in a narrow channel remains unresolved. Two different values for the divergence exponent of the mean first passage time (MFPT) were obtained. This has motivated the proposal that the difference arises from the use of different and nonequivalent definitions for the MFPT. Doubt was raised regarding the validity of the numerical solution of the diffusion equation as an explanation for the disagreement with the dimensional reduction method. In this paper, a one disk model which partially mimics the two disks problem is studied in the infinitely anisotropic diffusion limits. Although analytical arguments predict the exact exponent to be 1/2, it has not been probed in numerical studies. Using the two algorithms, we obtain exponents from numerical solutions which are consistent with each other and the proposed exact value.

  10. Application of continuum percolation theory for modeling single- and two-phase characteristics of anisotropic carbon paper gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Cheng, Ping

    2016-03-01

    Percolation theory is used to model intrinsic and relative permeabilities as well as tortuosity in anisotropic carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDL) and compared with existing results from lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations and experimental measurements. Although single- and two-phase characteristics of the carbon paper GDL are mainly affected by medium geometrical and topological properties, e.g., pore-size distribution, connectivity, and pore geometry, analyzing capillary pressure curves implies that the pore-size distribution of the carbon paper GDL is very narrow. This suggests that its effect on tortuosity and wetting- and nonwetting-phase relative permeabilities is trivial. However, integrated effects of pore geometry, surface area, connectivity, and tortuosity on intrinsic permeability might be substantial. Universal power laws from percolation theory predict the tortuosity-porosity and relative permeability-saturation curves accurately, indicating both characteristics not affected by the pore-size distribution. The permeability-porosity relationship, however, conforms to nonuniversality.

  11. Dynamics of non-planar vortices in the classical 2D anisotropic heisenberg model at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamppeter, T.; Mertens, F. G.; Sánchez, Angel; Gronbech-Jensen, N.; Bishop, A. R.; Dominguez-Adame, F.

    The 2-dimensional anisotropic Heisenberg model with XY- or easy-plane symmetry bears non-planar vortices which exhibit a localized structure of the z-components of the spins around the vortex center. In order to study the dynamics of these vortices under thermal fluctuations we use the Landau-Lifshitz equation and add white noise and Gilbert damping. Using a collective variable theory we derive an equation of motion with stochastic forces which are shown to represent white noise with an effective diffusion constant. We compare the results with Langevin dynamics simulations for the Landau-Lifshitz equation and find three temperature regimes: For low temperatures the dynamics is described by a 3rd-order equation of motion, for intermediate temperatures by a 1st-order equation. For higher temperatures, but still below the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature, the spontaneous appearance of vortex-antivortex pairs does not allow a single-particle description.

  12. Phase transitions of the anisotropic Ashkin-Teller model on a family of diamond-type hierarchical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Jian-Xin; Yang, Z. R.

    2003-12-01

    The phase transitions of the anisotropic Ashkin-Teller model on a family of diamond-type hierarchical lattices is studied by means of the transfer-matrix method and the real-space renormalization-group transformation. We find that the phase diagram, for the ferromagnetic case, consists of five phases, i.e., the fully disordered paramagnetic phase P, the fully ordered ferromagnetic phase F, and three partially ordered ferromagnetic phases Fs, Fσ, and Fsσ, as well as ten nontrivial fixed points. The correlation length critical exponents and the crossover exponents are also calculated. In addition, we also investigate the variations of the critical exponents with the fractal dimension df, the number of branches m, and the number of bonds per branch b of the generator of the family of diamond-type hierarchical lattices. Finally we give a brief discussion about universality.

  13. Anisotropic diffusion in a two-dimensional model with obstruction and a comparison of mean first passage time calculations.

    PubMed

    Mon, K K

    2014-05-14

    The disagreement between two different studies of the diffusion equation for two hard disks to diffuse past each other in a narrow channel remains unresolved. Two different values for the divergence exponent of the mean first passage time (MFPT) were obtained. This has motivated the proposal that the difference arises from the use of different and nonequivalent definitions for the MFPT. Doubt was raised regarding the validity of the numerical solution of the diffusion equation as an explanation for the disagreement with the dimensional reduction method. In this paper, a one disk model which partially mimics the two disks problem is studied in the infinitely anisotropic diffusion limits. Although analytical arguments predict the exact exponent to be 1/2, it has not been probed in numerical studies. Using the two algorithms, we obtain exponents from numerical solutions which are consistent with each other and the proposed exact value. PMID:24832282

  14. Relating tripartite quantum discord with multisite entanglement and their performance in the one-dimensional anisotropic XXZ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liang; Tang, Gang; Yang, Xian-qing; Wang, An-min

    2014-02-01

    In order to define quantum correlations, there are two important paradigms in quantum information theory, viz. the information-theoretic and the entanglement-separability ones. In this paper, we give an analytical relation between two measures of quantum correlations. One of them is related to the monogamy of squared bipartite quantum discord, which is a information-theoretic multipartite quantum correlation measure, while the other is the generalized geometric measure which lies in the entanglement-separability paradigm. We find a certain cone-like region on the two-dimensional spaces spanned by the two measures. Moreover, we have investigated the quantum phase transition with the two measures in the anisotropic spin XXZ model by exploiting the quantum renormalization group method.

  15. 3-D frequency-domain seismic wave modelling in heterogeneous, anisotropic media using a Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a modified version of the spectral element method (SEM), called the Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach, for frequency domain 3D seismic modelling in arbitrary heterogeneous, anisotropic media. The model may incorporate an arbitrary free-surface topography and irregular subsurface interfaces. Unlike the SEM ,it does not require a powerful mesh generator such as the Delauney Triangular or TetGen. Rather, the GQG approach replaces the element mesh with Gaussian quadrature abscissae to directly sample the physical properties of the model parameters and compute the weighted residual or variational integral. This renders the model discretisation simple and easily matched to the model topography, as well as direct control of the model paramterisation for subsequent inversion. In addition, it offers high accuracy in numerical modelling provided that an appropriate density of the Gaussian quadrature abscissae is employed. The second innovation of the GQG is the incorporation of a new implementation of perfectly matched layers to suppress artificial reflections from the domain margins. We employ PML model parameters (specified complex valued density and elastic moduli) rather than explicitly solving the governing wave equation with a complex co-ordinate system as in conventional approaches. Such an implementation is simple, general, effective and easily extendable to any class of anisotropy and other numerical modelling methods. The accuracy of the GQG approach is controlled by the number of Gaussian quadrature points per minimum wavelength, the so-called sampling density. The optimal sampling density should be the one which enables high definition of geological characteristics and high precision of the variational integral evaluation and spatial differentiation. Our experiments show that satisfactory results can be obtained using sampling densities of 5 points per minimum wavelength. Efficiency of the GQG approach mainly depends on the linear

  16. The value and cost of complexity in predictive modelling: role of tissue anisotropic conductivity and fibre tracts in neuromodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Shahid, Syed; Bikson, Marom; Salman, Humaira; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2014-06-01

    Objectives. Computational methods are increasingly used to optimize transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) dose strategies and yet complexities of existing approaches limit their clinical access. Since predictive modelling indicates the relevance of subject/pathology based data and hence the need for subject specific modelling, the incremental clinical value of increasingly complex modelling methods must be balanced against the computational and clinical time and costs. For example, the incorporation of multiple tissue layers and measured diffusion tensor (DTI) based conductivity estimates increase model precision but at the cost of clinical and computational resources. Costs related to such complexities aggregate when considering individual optimization and the myriad of potential montages. Here, rather than considering if additional details change current-flow prediction, we consider when added complexities influence clinical decisions. Approach. Towards developing quantitative and qualitative metrics of value/cost associated with computational model complexity, we considered field distributions generated by two 4 × 1 high-definition montages (m1 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C3 and m2 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C1) and a single conventional (m3 = C3-Fp2) tDCS electrode montage. We evaluated statistical methods, including residual error (RE) and relative difference measure (RDM), to consider the clinical impact and utility of increased complexities, namely the influence of skull, muscle and brain anisotropic conductivities in a volume conductor model. Main results. Anisotropy modulated current-flow in a montage and region dependent manner. However, significant statistical changes, produced within montage by anisotropy, did not change qualitative peak and topographic comparisons across montages. Thus for the examples analysed, clinical decision on which dose to select would not be altered by the omission of anisotropic brain conductivity

  17. Model atmospheres and radiation of magnetic neutron stars: Anisotropic thermal emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Ventura, J.; Zavlin, V. E.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropy of the thermal radiation emitted by a surface element of a neutron star atmosphere (e.g., by a polar cap of a radio pulsar). Angular dependences of the partial fluxes at various photon energies, and spectra at various angles are obtained for different values of the effective temperature T(sub eff) and magnetic field strength B, and for different directions of the magnetic field. It is shown that the local radiation of the magnetized neutron star atmospheres is highly anisotropic, with the maximum flux emitted in the magnetic field direction. At high B the angular dependences in the soft X-ray range have two maxima, a high narrow peak along B and a lower and broader maximum at intermediate angles. The radiation is strongly polarized, the modulation of the degree of polarization due to the rotation of the neurtron star may be much higher than that for the radiative flux. The results obtained are compared with recent ROSAT observations of the thermal-like radiation from the radio pulsars PSR 1929+10 and PSR J0437-4715.

  18. An Anisotropic-Alfvénic-turbulence-based Solar Wind Model with Proton Temperature Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Habbal, S. R.

    2013-04-01

    How the solar wind is accelerated to its supersonic speed is intimately related to how it is heated. Mechanisms based on ion-cyclotron resonance have been successful in explaining a large number of observations, those concerning the significant ion temperature anisotropy above coronal holes in particular. However, they suffer from the inconsistency with turbulence theory which says that the turbulent cascade in a low-beta medium like the solar corona should proceed in the perpendicular rather than the parallel direction, meaning that there is little energy in the ion gyro-frequency range for ions to absorb via ion-cyclotron resonance. Recently a mechanism based on the interaction between the solar wind particles and the anisotropic turbulence has been proposed, where the perpendicular proton energy addition is via the stochastic heating (Chandran et al. 2011). We extend this promising mechanism by properly accounting for the effect of proton temperature anisotropy on the propagation of Alfvén waves, for the radiative losses of electron energy, and for the field line curvature that naturally accompanies solar winds in the corona. While this mechanism was shown in previous studies to apply to the polar fast solar wind, we demonstrate here for the first time that it applies also to the slow wind flowing along field lines bordering streamer helmets.

  19. Anisotropic spectral-spatial total variation model for multispectral remote sensing image destriping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Yan, Luxin; Fang, Houzhang; Luo, Chunan

    2015-06-01

    Multispectral remote sensing images often suffer from the common problem of stripe noise, which greatly degrades the imaging quality and limits the precision of the subsequent processing. The conventional destriping approaches usually remove stripe noise band by band, and show their limitations on different types of stripe noise. In this paper, we tentatively categorize the stripes in remote sensing images in a more comprehensive manner. We propose to treat the multispectral images as a spectral-spatial volume and pose an anisotropic spectral-spatial total variation regularization to enhance the smoothness of solution along both the spectral and spatial dimension. As a result, a more comprehensive stripes and random noise are perfectly removed, while the edges and detail information are well preserved. In addition, the split Bregman iteration method is employed to solve the resulting minimization problem, which highly reduces the computational load. We extensively validate our method under various stripe categories and show comparison with other approaches with respect to result quality, running time, and quantitative assessments. PMID:25706634

  20. Characterizing fiber formation in meat analogs using an anisotropic photon migration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghesagara, J.; Hsieh, F.; Yao, G.

    2006-10-01

    Animal meat products may not be the best choice for many people in the world due to various reasons such as cost, health problems, or religious restrictions. High moisture (40-80%) extrusion technology shows a great promise for texturizing vegetable proteins into fibrous meat alternatives. Soy protein which is healthy, highly nutritious, low in both fat and carbohydrate has been used in high moisture extrusion process to produce meat analogs with well formed fiber that resemble chicken or turkey breast meat. Assessing fiber formation in extruded products is important for controlling extrusion quality in manufacturing process. Although several methods have been studied for quantifying fiber formation in extrudates, their applications for real time quality control in manufacturing process have been challenging. We explored the possibility of applying a nondestructive method based on backscattered reflectance to measure the fiber formation of extruded soy proteins. An image processing method was developed to extract the light reflectance profile at the extrudates' surface. We applied the anisotropic continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory to quantitatively describe the fiber formation in extrudates based on extracted surface reflectance profiles. This method has a potential to be used as a non-destructive, fast, real time quality control tool for products with fibrous structures.

  1. A two-dimensional hybrid method for modeling seismic waves propagation in laterally-varying anisotropic media and its application to central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wen, L.

    2009-12-01

    The shear wave splitting measurements provide important information on mantle flow, deformation and mineralogy. They are now routinely made using the method developed by Silver and Chan (1994). More and more dense regional observations also begin to reveal sharp spatial variations of seismic anisotropy which could not be explained by simplified horizontal homogeneous anisotropic structures. To better constrain the mantle anisotropy beneath those regions, we developed a two-dimensional hybrid method for simulating seismic wave propagation in laterally-varying anisotropic media [Zhao et al., 2008]. In this presentation, we apply the method to study anisotropic structures beneath central Tibet by waveform modeling the teleseismic SKS phases recorded in the International Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas project (INDEPTH) III. Using data from two events that were selected such that the stations and sources can be approximated as a two-dimensional profile, we derived an optimal model for the anisotropic structures of the upper mantle beneath the study region: a 50-70 km thick anisotropic layer with a fast direction trending N95°E beneath the Qiangtang block, a 150 km thick and 60 km wide anisotropic segment with an axis trending N95°E beneath the northernmost Lhasa block, and a ~30 km wide transition zone in between within which the fast direction trends N45°E and the depth extent of anisotropy decreases northward sharply. Synthetic waveform modeling further suggests that an anisotropic model with a horizontal symmetry axis can explain the observations better than that with a dipping symmetry, and a low velocity zone possibly underlies or mixes with the anisotropic structures in the northern portion of the region. The optimal model yields synthetic seismograms that are in good agreement with the observations in both amplitudes and relative arrival times of SKS phases. Synthetic tests also indicate that different elastic constants, source parameters and depth

  2. Insights into mRNA export-linked molecular mechanisms of human disease through a Gle1 structure-function analysis

    PubMed Central

    Folkmann, Andrew W.; Dawson, T. Renee; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step during gene expression is the directional export of nuclear messenger (m)RNA through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) to the cytoplasm. During export, Gle1 in conjunction with inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) spatially regulates the activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5 at the NPC cytoplasmic face. GLE1 mutations are causally linked to the human diseases lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 (LCCS1) and lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (LAAHD). Here, structure prediction and functional analysis provide strong evidence to suggest that the LCCS1 and LAAHD disease mutations disrupt the function of Gle1 in mRNA export. Strikingly, direct fluorescence microscopy in living cells reveals a dramatic loss of steady-state NPC localization for GFP-gle1 proteins expressed from human gle1 genes harboring LAAHD and LCCS1 mutations. The potential significance of these residues is further clarified by analyses of sequence and predicted structural conservation. This work offers insights into the perturbed mechanisms underlying human LCCS-1 and LAAHD disease states and emphasizes the potential impact of altered mRNA transport and gene expression in human disease. PMID:24275432

  3. On the modelling of complex kinematic hardening and nonquadratic anisotropic yield criteria at finite strains: application to sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilo, Tiago J.; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Valente, Robertt A. F.; Reese, Stefanie

    2016-02-01

    In the present paper, a finite strain model for complex combined isotropic-kinematic hardening is presented. It accounts for finite elastic and finite plastic strains and is suitable for any anisotropic yield criterion. In order to model complex cyclic hardening phenomena, the kinematic hardening is described by several back stress components. To that end, a new procedure is proposed in which several multiplicative decompositions of the plastic part of the deformation gradient are considered. The formulation incorporates a completely general format of the yield function, which means that any yield function can by employed by following a procedure that ensures the principle of material frame indifference. The constitutive equations are derived in a thermodynamically consistent way and numerically integrated by means of a backward-Euler algorithm based on the exponential map. The performance of the constitutive model is assessed via numerical simulations of industry-relevant sheet metal forming processes (U-channel forming and draw/re-draw of a panel benchmarks), the results of which are compared to experimental data. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the use of multiple back stress components is very advantageous in the description of springback. This holds in particular if one carries out a comparison with the results of using only one component. Moreover, the numerically obtained results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  4. On the modelling of complex kinematic hardening and nonquadratic anisotropic yield criteria at finite strains: application to sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilo, Tiago J.; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Valente, Robertt A. F.; Reese, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a finite strain model for complex combined isotropic-kinematic hardening is presented. It accounts for finite elastic and finite plastic strains and is suitable for any anisotropic yield criterion. In order to model complex cyclic hardening phenomena, the kinematic hardening is described by several back stress components. To that end, a new procedure is proposed in which several multiplicative decompositions of the plastic part of the deformation gradient are considered. The formulation incorporates a completely general format of the yield function, which means that any yield function can by employed by following a procedure that ensures the principle of material frame indifference. The constitutive equations are derived in a thermodynamically consistent way and numerically integrated by means of a backward-Euler algorithm based on the exponential map. The performance of the constitutive model is assessed via numerical simulations of industry-relevant sheet metal forming processes (U-channel forming and draw/re-draw of a panel benchmarks), the results of which are compared to experimental data. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the use of multiple back stress components is very advantageous in the description of springback. This holds in particular if one carries out a comparison with the results of using only one component. Moreover, the numerically obtained results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  5. An anisotropic shear velocity model of the Earth's mantle using normal modes, body waves, surface waves and long-period waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We use normal-mode splitting functions in addition to surface wave phase anomalies, body wave traveltimes and long-period waveforms to construct a 3-D model of anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modelling approach inverts for mantle velocity and anisotropy as well as transition-zone discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the non-linear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+M, is an update to the earlier model S362ANI, which did not include normal-mode splitting functions in its derivation. The new model has stronger isotropic velocity anomalies in the transition zone and slightly smaller anomalies in the lowermost mantle, as compared with S362ANI. The differences in the mid- to lowermost mantle are primarily restricted to features in the Southern Hemisphere. We compare the isotropic part of S362ANI+M with other recent global tomographic models and show that the level of agreement is higher now than in the earlier generation of models, especially in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+M is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle and is similar to S362ANI. When radial anisotropy is allowed throughout the mantle, large-scale anisotropic patterns are observed in the lowermost mantle with vSV > vSH beneath Africa and South Pacific and vSH > vSV beneath several circum-Pacific regions. The transition zone exhibits localized anisotropic anomalies of ˜3 per cent vSH > vSV beneath North America and the Northwest Pacific and ˜2 per cent vSV > vSH beneath South America. However, small improvements in fits to the data on adding anisotropy at depth leave the question open on whether large-scale radial anisotropy is required in the transition zone and in the lower mantle. We demonstrate the potential of mode-splitting data in reducing the trade-offs between isotropic velocity and

  6. Phase structure of the anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a layered triangular lattice: Spiral state and deconfined spin liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nakane, Kazuya; Kamijo, Takeshi; Ichinose, Ikuo

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, we study a spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic (AF) Heisenberg model on layered anisotropic triangular lattice and obtain its phase structure. We use the Schwinger bosons for representing spin operators and also a coherent-state path integral for calculating physical quantities. Finite-temperature properties of the system are investigated by means of the numerical Monte-Carlo simulations. A detailed phase diagram of the system is obtained by calculating internal energy, specific heat, spin correlation functions, etc. There are AF Neel, paramagnetic, and spiral states. Turning on the plaquette term (i.e., the Maxwell term on a lattice) of an emergent U(1) gauge field that flips a pair of parallel spin-singlet bonds, we found that there appears a phase that is regarded as a deconfined spin-liquid state, though 'transition' to this phase from the paramagnetic phase is not of second order but a crossover. In that phase, the emergent gauge boson is a physical gapless excitation coupled with spinons. These results support our previous study on an AF Heisenberg model on a triangular lattice at vanishing temperature.

  7. A two-dimensional analytical model describing groundwater level fluctuations in an anisotropic and bending leaky aquifer system near estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hund-Der; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung

    2014-05-01

    Tide-induced head fluctuation in a two-dimensional estuarine aquifer system is complicated and rather important in dealing with many groundwater management or remediation problems. The conceptual model of the aquifer system we considered is anisotropic, multi-layered with a bending estuarine bank, and subject to the tidal fluctuation effects from both the sea shore and estuarine river. The solution of the model describing the groundwater head distribution in such a coastal aquifer system is developed based on the method of separation of variables and a coordinate transformation applied to the river boundary at the bend with an angle of arbitrary degree to the line perpendicular to the sea shore. The solutions by Sun (Sun H. A two-dimensional analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary, Water Resour. Res. 1997; 33:1429-35) as well as Tang and Jiao (Tang Z. and J. J. Jiao, A two-dimensional analytical solution for groundwater flow in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water, Hydrological Processes, 2001; 15: 573-585) can be shown to be special cases of the present solution if the degree of the bending angle is zero. On the basis of the analytical solution, the groundwater head distribution in response to estuarine boundary is examined and the influences of anisotropy, leakage, hydraulic parameters, and bending angle on the groundwater head fluctuation are investigated and discussed.

  8. Dynamics of ordering in highly degenerate models with anisotropic grain-boundary potential: Effects of temperature and vortex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1989-11-01

    Monte Carlo computer-simulation techniques are used to elucidate the equilibrium phase behavior as well as the late-stage ordering dynamics of some two-dimensional models with ground-state ordering of a high degeneracy Q. The models are Q-state Potts models with anisotropic grain-boundary potential on triangular lattices-essentially clock models, except that the potential is not a cosine, but a sine function of the angle between neighboring grain orientations. For not too small Q, these models display two thermally driven phase transitions, one which takes the system from a low-temperature Potts-ordered phase to an intermediate phase which lacks conventional long-range order, and another transition which takes the system to the high-temperature disordered phase. The linear nature of the sine potential used makes it a marginal case in the sense that it favors neither hard domain boundaries, like the standard Potts models do, nor a wetting of the boundaries, as the standard clock models do. Thermal fluctuations nevertheless cause wetting to occur for not too small temperatures. Specifically, we have studied models with Q=12 and 48. The models are quenched from infinity to zero as well as finite temperatures within the two low-temperature phases. The order parameter is a nonconserved quantity during these quenches. The nonequilibrium ordering process subsequent to the quench is studied as a function of time by calculating the interfacial energy, ΔE, associated with the entire grain-boundary network. The time evolution of this quantity is shown to obey the growth law, ΔE(t)~t-n, over an extended time range at late times. It is found that the zero-temperature dynamics is characterized by a special exponent value which for the Q=48 model is n~=0.25 in accordance with earlier work. However, for quenches to finite temperatures in the Potts-ordered phase there is a distinct crossover to the classical Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn exponent value, n=(1/2, for both values of Q. This

  9. Dark Energy Models and Cosmic Acceleration with Anisotropic Universe in f(T) Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sehrish, Azeem

    2014-04-01

    This paper is devoted to studing the accelerated expansion of the universe in context of f(T) theory of gravity. For this purpose, we construct different f(T) models and investigate their cosmological behavior through equation of state parameter by using holographic, new agegraphic and their power-law entropy corrected dark energy models. We discuss the graphical behavior of this parameter versus redshift for particular values of constant parameters in Bianchi type I universe model. It is shown that the universe lies in different forms of dark energy, namely quintessence, phantom, and quintom corresponding to the chosen scale factors, which depend upon the constant parameters of the models.

  10. A compressive failure model for anisotropic plates with a cutout under compressive and shear loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper introduces a failure model for laminated composite plates with a cutout under combined compressive and shear loads. The model is based on kinking failure of the load-carrying fibers around a cutout, and includes the effect of local shearing and compressive stresses. Comparison of predictions of the model with available experimental results for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic plates with a circular hole indicated a good agreement. Predictions for orthotropic plates under combined loading are compared with the predictions of a point-stress model. The present model indicates significant reductions in axial load-carrying capacity due to shearing loads for plates with principal axis of orthotropy oriented along the axial load direction. A gain in strength is achieved by rotating the axis of orthotropy to counteract the shearing stress, or by eliminating the compressive-shear deformation coupling.

  11. A Dynamic/Anisotropic Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Ionizing Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; West, Katie J.; Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.; Abrahms, Briana L.; Luetke, Nathan J.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides the proving ground for future long duration human activities in space. Ionizing radiation measurements in ISS form the ideal tool for the experimental validation of ionizing radiation environmental models, nuclear transport code algorithms, and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the Space Transportation System (STS; Shuttle) have provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code development by requiring dynamic models of the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. Previous studies using Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of the evolving ISS configurations with Thermo Luminescent Detector (TLD) area monitors, demonstrated that computational dosimetry requires environmental models with accurate non-isotropic as well as dynamic behavior, detailed information on rack loading, and an accurate 6 degree of freedom (DOF) description of ISS trajectory and orientation.

  12. Global Upper Mantle Radially Anisotropic Model Developed Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B.

    2008-12-01

    Improving the resolution of global upper mantle tomographic models of shear wavespeed and anisotropy is crucial for understanding the nature and morphology of upper mantle heterogeneities. Traditional methods of global tomography that rely on infinite-frequency and first-order perturbation theory become increasingly inadequate as shorter-wavelength heterogeneities are investigated. The spectral element method, on the other hand, permits accurate calculation of wave propagation through highly heterogeneous structures, and is computationally economical when coupled with a normal mode solution and applied to a restricted region of the earth such as the upper mantle (cSEM: Capdeville et al., 2003). Importantly, cSEM allows a dramatic improvement in accounting for the effects of crustal structure. We have implemented a new method for global tomography, which uses cSEM for forward modeling in conjunction with approximate 2D finite frequency kernels for the inversion step, calculated using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). In order to avoid biasing our results toward existing 3D upper mantle models, we start our iterative inversion procedure with a 1D model. We verify that the use of approximate kernels does not prevent our iterative procedure from converging. With each iteration, we include additional waveforms that would be rejected based on a comparison with the 1D starting model. We obtain the first global model of upper mantle velocity and radial anisotropy developed by applying the SEM to modeling 3-component long- period (corner frequency : 80s) fundamental- and higher-mode waveforms. Our model confirms the large- scale features observed by previous researchers. In particular, we retrieve the relatively shallow, seismically slow velocities beneath volcanic arcs and mid-ocean ridges, the deeper fast roots underlying cratons, slow velocities in the central Pacific below 250km depth, and enhanced fast velocities anomalies

  13. (An)Isotropic models in scalar and scalar-tensor cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinchón, José Antonio

    2012-04-01

    We study how the constants G and Λ may vary in different theoretical models (general relativity with a perfect fluid, scalar cosmological models ("quintessence") with and without interacting scalar and matter fields and a scalar-tensor model with a dynamical Λ) in order to explain some observational results. We apply the program outlined in section II to study three different geometries which generalize the FRW ones, which are Bianchi V, VII0 and IX, under the self-similarity hypothesis. We put special emphasis on calculating exact power-law solutions which allow us to compare the different models. In all the studied cases we arrive at the conclusion that the solutions are isotropic and noninflationary while the cosmological constant behaves as a positive decreasing time function (in agreement with the current observations) and the gravitational constant behaves as a growing time function.

  14. A coarse-grained α-carbon protein model with anisotropic hydrogen-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Eng-Hui; Fawzi, Nicolas Lux; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We develop a sequence based α-carbon model to incorporate a mean field estimate of the orientation dependence of the polypeptide chain that gives rise to specific hydrogen bond pairing to stabilize α-helices and β-sheets. We illustrate the success of the new protein model in capturing thermodynamic measures and folding mechanism of proteins L and G. Compared to our previous coarse-grained model, the new model shows greater folding cooperativity and improvements in designability of protein sequences, as well as predicting correct trends for kinetic rates and mechanism for proteins L and G. We believe the model is broadly applicable to other protein folding and protein–protein co-assembly processes, and does not require experimental input beyond the topology description of the native state. Even without tertiary topology information, it can also serve as a mid-resolution protein model for more exhaustive conformational search strategies that can bridge back down to atomic descriptions of the polypeptide chain. PMID:17879350

  15. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.; Meyer, T. G.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from a 7 year program designed to develop generic constitutive and life prediction approaches and models for nickel-based single crystal gas turbine airfoils. The program was composed of a base program and an optional program. The base program addressed the high temperature coated single crystal regime above the airfoil root platform. The optional program investigated the low temperature uncoated single crystal regime below the airfoil root platform including the notched conditions of the airfoil attachment. Both base and option programs involved experimental and analytical efforts. Results from uniaxial constitutive and fatigue life experiments of coated and uncoated PWA 1480 single crystal material formed the basis for the analytical modeling effort. Four single crystal primary orientations were used in the experiments: group of zone axes (001), group of zone axes (011), group of zone axes (111), and group of zone axes (213). Specific secondary orientations were also selected for the notched experiments in the optional program. Constitutive models for an overlay coating and PWA 1480 single crystal materials were developed based on isothermal hysteresis loop data and verified using thermomechanical (TMF) hysteresis loop data. A fatigue life approach and life models were developed for TMF crack initiation of coated PWA 1480. A life model was developed for smooth and notched fatigue in the option program. Finally, computer software incorporating the overlay coating and PWA 1480 constitutive and life models was developed.

  16. A mesostructurally-based anisotropic continuum model for biological soft tissues--decoupled invariant formulation.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Georges

    2011-11-01

    Characterising and modelling the mechanical behaviour of biological soft tissues is an essential step in the development of predictive computational models to assist research for a wide range of applications in medicine, biology, tissue engineering, pharmaceutics, consumer goods, cosmetics, transport or military. It is therefore critical to develop constitutive models that can capture particular rheological mechanisms operating at specific length scales so that these models are adapted for their intended applications. Here, a novel mesoscopically-based decoupled invariant-based continuum constitutive framework for transversely isotropic and orthotropic biological soft tissues is developed. A notable feature of the formulation is the full decoupling of shear interactions. The constitutive model is based on a combination of the framework proposed by Lu and Zhang [Lu, J., Zhang, L., 2005. Physically motivated invariant formulation for transversely isotropic hyperelasticity. International Journal of Solids and Structures 42, 6015-6031] and the entropic mechanics of tropocollagen molecules and collagen assemblies. One of the key aspects of the formulation is to use physically-based nanoscopic quantities that could be extracted from experiments and/or atomistic/molecular dynamics simulations to inform the macroscopic constitutive behaviour. This effectively couples the material properties at different levels of the multi-scale hierarchical structure of collagenous tissues. The orthotropic hyperelastic model was shown to reproduce very well the experimental multi-axial properties of rabbit skin. A new insight into the shear response of a skin sample subjected to a simulated indentation test was obtained using numerical direct sensitivity analyses. PMID:22098866

  17. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.; Meyer, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results from a 35 month period of a program designed to develop generic constitutive and life prediction approaches and models for nickel-based single crystal gas turbine airfoils. The program is composed of a base program and an optional program. The base program addresses the high temperature coated single crystal regime above the airfoil root platform. The optional program investigates the low temperature uncoated single crystal regime below the airfoil root platform including the notched conditions of the airfoil attachment. Both base and option programs involve experimental and analytical efforts. Results from uniaxial constitutive and fatigue life experiments of coated and uncoated PWA 1480 single crystal material form the basis for the analytical modeling effort. Four single crystal primary orientations were used in the experiments: (001), (011), (111), and (213). Specific secondary orientations were also selected for the notched experiments in the optional program. Constitutive models for an overlay coating and PWA 1480 single crystal material were developed based on isothermal hysteresis loop data and verified using thermomechanical (TMF) hysteresis loop data. A fatigue life approach and life models were selected for TMF crack initiation of coated PWA 1480. An initial life model used to correlate smooth and notched fatigue data obtained in the option program shows promise. Computer software incorporating the overlay coating and PWA 1480 constitutive models was developed.

  18. AniTomo - New Anisotropic Teleseismic Body-Wave Tomography Code to Unravel Structure of the Upper Mantle: Impact of Inversion Settings on Inferences of the Output Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzarova, H.; Plomerova, J.; Kissling, E. H.

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of only isotropic wave propagation and neglecting anisotropy in tomography studies is a simplification obviously incongruous with current understanding of mantle-lithosphere plate dynamics. Both fossil anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere and anisotropy due to the present-day flow in the asthenosphere may significantly influence propagation of seismic waves. We present a novel code for anisotropic teleseismic tomography (AniTomo) that allows to invert relative P-wave travel time residuals simultaneously for coupled isotropic-anisotropic P-wave velocity models of the upper mantle. We have modified frequently-used isotropic teleseismic tomography code Telinv by assuming weak hexagonal anisotropy with symmetry axis oriented generally in 3D to be, together with heterogeneities, a source of the observed P-wave travel-time residuals. Careful testing of the new code with synthetics, concentrating on strengths and limitations of the inversion method, is a necessary step before AniTomo is applied to real datasets. We examine various aspects of anisotropic tomography and particularly influence of ray coverage on resolvability of individual model parameters and of initial models on the result. Synthetic models are designed to schematically represent heterogeneous and anisotropic structures in the upper mantle. Several synthetic tests mimicking a real tectonic setting, e.g. the lithosphere subduction in the Northern Apennines in Italy (Munzarova et al., G-Cubed, 2013), allow us to make quantitative assessments of the well-known trade-off between effects of seismic anisotropy and heterogeneities. Our results clearly document that significant distortions of imaged velocity heterogeneities may result from neglecting anisotropy.

  19. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Petrovich, Cristobal; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (`rotochemical heating'). This effect has previously been studied by Fernández & Reisenegger for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our predictions with the surface temperature of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and upper limits for 21 classical pulsars, we find the millisecond pulsar can be only explained by the models with the effectively largest energy gaps (type B models), the classical pulsars require with the gap models that vanish for some angle (type C) and two different envelope compositions. Thus, no single model for neutron superfluidity can simultaneously account for the thermal emission of all available observations of non-accreting neutron stars, possibly due to our neglect of proton superconductivity.

  20. Microstrain in nanostructured nickel oxide studied using isotropic and anisotropic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, G.; Bose, Vipin C.; Maniammal, K.; Aiswarya Raj, A. S.; Biju, V.

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured nickel oxide, NiO is synthesized through a novel chemical route using nickel chloride and ethanol amine as starting materials. The prepared samples are annealed at higher temperatures, viz. 350 °C, 400 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C. The samples are characterized using XRD, TEM, antioxidant activity and DC conductivity measurements. The crystallite size and microstrain in the samples are studied using Williamson-Hall (W-H) analysis assuming uniform deformation model, uniform deformation stress model and uniform deformation energy density model. The results obtained using three models yield microstrain values which decreases with increase of crystallite size. The average crystallite size and the microstrain of the samples measured from modified W-H plot using uniform energy density model are found to be most suitable. The study shows that the microstrain in nanostructured NiO originates due to the presence of Ni2+ and O2- vacancies and it is confirmed by the measurement of antioxidant activity and dc conductivity of the samples in vacuum and air ambience.

  1. Integral formulation of shallow-water equations with anisotropic porosity for urban flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Brett F.; Schubert, Jochen E.; Gallegos, Humberto A.

    2008-11-01

    SummaryAn integral form of the shallow-water equations suitable for urban flood modeling is derived by applying Reynolds transport theorem to a finite control volume encompassing buildings on a flood plain. The effect of buildings on storage and conveyance is modeled with a binary density function i(x,y) that equals unity when (x,y) corresponds to a void, and nil otherwise, and can be measured using remote sensing data such as classified aerial imagery; the effect of buildings on flow resistance is modeled with a drag formulation. Discrete equations are obtained by applying the integral equations to a computational cell and adopting a Godunov-type, piecewise linear distribution of flow variables. The discrete equations include a volumetric porosity ϕ that represents the integral of i over the cell, normalized by the cell area, and an areal porosity ψ that represents the integral of i over an edge of the mesh, normalized by the edge length. The latter is directionally dependent which introduces anisotropy to the shallow-water equations and captures sub-grid preferential flow directions which occur in urban settings due to asymmetric building shapes and spacings and the alignment of buildings along streets. A important implication is that model predictions are necessarily grid dependent; therefore, a mesh design strategy is proposed. First- and second-order accurate numerical methods are presented to solve the discrete equations, and applications are shown for verification and validation purposes including the ability of the model to resolve preferential flow directions.

  2. Life prediction and constitutive models for engine hot section anisotropic materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. A.; Linask, I.; Nissley, D. M.; Norris, P. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Walker, K. P.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first year of a program designed to develop life prediction and constitutive models for two coated single crystal alloys used in gas turbine airfoils. The two alloys are PWA 1480 and Alloy 185. The two oxidation resistant coatings are PWA 273, an aluminide coating, and PWA 286, an overlay NiCoCrAlY coating. To obtain constitutive and/or fatigue data, tests were conducted on coated and uncoated PWA 1480 specimens tensilely loaded in the 100 , 110 , 111 , and 123 directions. A literature survey of constitutive models was completed for both single crystal alloys and metallic coating materials; candidate models were selected. One constitutive model under consideration for single crystal alloys applies Walker's micromechanical viscoplastic formulation to all slip systems participating in the single crystal deformation. The constitutive models for the overlay coating correlate the viscoplastic data well. For the aluminide coating, a unique test method is under development. LCF and TMF tests are underway. The two coatings caused a significant drop in fatigue life, and each produced a much different failure mechanism.

  3. Block entropy and quantum phase transition in the anisotropic Kondo necklace model

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2010-06-15

    We study the von Neumann block entropy in the Kondo necklace model for different anisotropies {eta} in the XY interaction between conduction spins using the density matrix renormalization group method. It was found that the block entropy presents a maximum for each {eta} considered, and, comparing it with the results of the quantum criticality of the model based on the behavior of the energy gap, we observe that the maximum block entropy occurs at the quantum critical point between an antiferromagnetic and a Kondo singlet state, so this measure of entanglement is useful for giving information about where a quantum phase transition occurs in this model. We observe that the block entropy also presents a maximum at the quantum critical points that are obtained when an anisotropy {Delta} is included in the Kondo exchange between localized and conduction spins; when {Delta} diminishes for a fixed value of {eta}, the critical point increases, favoring the antiferromagnetic phase.

  4. The Low Earth Orbit validation of a dynamic and anisotropic trapped radiation model through ISS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.

    2011-10-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides the proving ground for future long duration human activities in space. Ionizing radiation measurements in ISS form the ideal tool for the experimental validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear transport code algorithms and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the Space Transportation System (STS; Shuttle) have provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code development by requiring dynamic models of the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. Previous studies using Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of the evolving ISS configurations with Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) area monitors, demonstrated that computational dosimetry requires environmental models with accurate non-isotropic as well as dynamic behavior, detailed information on rack loading, and an accurate six degree of freedom (DOF) description of ISS trajectory and orientation. It is imperative that we understand ISS exposures dynamically for crew career planning, and insure that the regulatory requirements of keeping exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) are adequately implemented. This is especially true as ISS nears some form of completion with increasing complexity, resulting in a larger drag coefficient, and requiring operation at higher altitudes with increased exposure rates. In this paper ISS environmental model is configured for 11A (circa mid 2005), and uses non-isotropic and dynamic geomagnetic transmission and trapped proton models. ISS 11A and LEO model validations are important steps in preparation for the design and validation for the next generation manned vehicles. While the described cutoff rigidity, trapped proton and electron formalisms as coded in a package named GEORAD (GEOmagnetic RADiation) and a web interface named OLTARIS (On-line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space) are applicable to the LEO, Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) and

  5. Structure of intermediate shocks in collisionless anisotropic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics plasma models

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.

    2013-10-15

    The existence of discontinuities within the double-adiabatic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model is discussed. These solutions are transitional layers where some of the plasma properties change from one equilibrium state to another. Under the assumption of traveling wave solutions with velocity C and propagation angle θ with respect to the ambient magnetic field, the Hall-MHD model reduces to a dynamical system and the waves are heteroclinic orbits joining two different fixed points. The analysis of the fixed points rules out the existence of rotational discontinuities. Simple considerations about the Hamiltonian nature of the system show that, unlike dissipative models, the intermediate shock waves are organized in branches in parameter space, i.e., they occur if a given relationship between θ and C is satisfied. Electron-polarized (ion-polarized) shock waves exhibit, in addition to a reversal of the magnetic field component tangential to the shock front, a maximum (minimum) of the magnetic field amplitude. The jumps of the magnetic field and the relative specific volume between the downstream and the upstream states as a function of the plasma properties are presented. The organization in parameter space of localized structures including in the model the influence of finite Larmor radius is discussed.

  6. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  7. ISS Observations of the Trapped Proton Anisotropic Effect: A Comparison with Model Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachev, T.; Atwell, W.; Semones, E.; Tomov, B.; Reddell, B.

    Space radiation measurements were made on the International Space Station (ISS) with the Bulgarian Liulin-E094 instrument, which contains 4 Mobile Dosimetry Unit (MDU), and the NASA Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) during 2001. Four MDUs were placed at fixed locations: one unit (MDU #1) in the ISS "Unity" Node-1 and three (MDU #2-#4) units were located in the US Laboratory module. The MDU #2 and the TEPC were located in the US Laboratory module Human Research Facility (rack #1, port side). Space radiation flight measurements were obtained during the time period May 11 - July 26, 2001. In this paper we discuss the flight observed asymmetries in different detectors on the ascending and descending parts of the ISS orbits. The differences are described by the development of a shielding model using combinatorial geometry and 3-D visualization and the orientation and placement of the five detectors at the locations within the ISS. Shielding distributions were generated for the combined ISS and detector shielding models. The AP8MAX and AE8MAX trapped radiation models were used to compute the daily absorbed dose for the five detectors and are compared with the flight measurements. In addition, the trapped proton anisotropy (East-West effect) was computed for the individual passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly based on the Badhwar-Konradi anisotropy model.

  8. Exact solution of an anisotropic 2D random walk model with strong memory correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressoni, J. C.; Viswanathan, G. M.; da Silva, M. A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, there has been progress in understanding one-dimensional non-Markovian processes via analytic, sometimes exact, solutions. The extension of these ideas and methods to two and higher dimensions is challenging. We report the first exactly solvable two-dimensional (2D) non-Markovian random walk model belonging to the family of the elephant random walk model. In contrast to Lévy walks or fractional Brownian motion, such models incorporate memory effects by keeping an explicit history of the random walk trajectory. We study a memory driven 2D random walk with correlated memory and stops, i.e. pauses in motion. The model has an inherent anisotropy with consequences for its diffusive properties, thereby mixing the dominant regime along one dimension with a subdiffusive walk along a perpendicular dimension. The anomalous diffusion regimes are fully characterized by an exact determination of the Hurst exponent. We discuss the remarkably rich phase diagram, as well as several possible combinations of the independent walks in both directions. The relationship between the exponents of the first and second moments is also unveiled.

  9. Improved understanding of the dynamic response in anisotropic directional composite materials through the combination of experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Key, C. T.; Schumacher, S. C.

    2014-05-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the dynamic response of composite materials; specifically low density epoxy matrix binders strengthened with continuous reinforcing fibers. This is in part due to the widespread use of carbon fiber composites in military, commercial, industrial, and aerospace applications. The design community requires better understanding of these materials in order to make full use of their unique properties. Planar impact testing was performed resulting in pressures up to 15 GPa on a unidirectional carbon fiber - epoxy composite, engineered to have high uniformity and low porosity. Results illustrate the anisotropic nature of the response under shock loading. Along the fiber direction, a two-wave structure similar to typical elastic-plastic response is observed, however, when shocked transverse to the fibers, only a single bulk shock wave is detected. At higher pressures, the epoxy matrix dissociates resulting in a loss of anisotropy. Greater understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the observed response has been achieved through numerical modeling of the system at the micromechanical level using the CTH hydrocode. From the simulation results it is evident that the observed two-wave structure in the longitudinal fiber direction is the result of a fast moving elastic precursor wave traveling in the carbon fibers ahead of the bulk response in the epoxy resin. Similarly, in the transverse direction, results show a collapse of the resin component consistent with the experimental observation of a single shock wave traveling at speeds associated with bulk carbon. Experimental and simulation results will be discussed and used to show where additional mechanisms, not fully described by the currently used models, are present.

  10. Anisotropic four-state clock model in the presence of random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Octavio D. Rodriguez; Nobre, Fernando D.

    2016-02-01

    A four-state clock ferromagnetic model is studied in the presence of different configurations of anisotropies and random fields. The model is considered in the limit of infinite-range interactions, for which the mean-field approach becomes exact. Both representations of Cartesian spin components and two Ising variables are used, in terms of which the physical properties and phase diagrams are discussed. The random fields follow bimodal probability distributions and the richest criticality is found when the fields, applied in the two Ising systems, are not correlated. The phase diagrams present new interesting topologies, with a wide variety of critical points, which are expected to be useful in describing different complex phenomena.

  11. Renormalization of the global quantum correlation and monogamy relation in the anisotropic Heisenberg XXZ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Meng; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the global quantum correlation, monogamy relation and quantum phase transition of the Heisenberg XXZ model are investigated by the method of quantum renormalization group. We obtain, analytically, the expressions of the global negativity, the global measurement-induced disturbance and the monogamy relation for the system. The result shows that for a three-site block state, the partial transpose of an asymmetric block can get stronger entanglement than that of the symmetric one. The residual entanglement and the difference of the monogamy relation of measurement-induced disturbance show a scaling behavior with the size of the system becoming large. Moreover, the monogamy nature of entanglement measured by negativity exists in the model, while the nonclassical correlation quantified by measurement-induced disturbance violates the monogamy relation and demonstrates polygamy.

  12. Heterogeneous and anisotropic integrative model of pulmonary veins: computational study of arrhythmogenic substrate for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidi, Oleg V.; Colman, Michael A.; Varela, Marta; Zhao, Jichao; Smaill, Bruce H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Boyett, Mark R.; Zhang, Henggui

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the genesis of re-entrant substrate for the most common cardiac arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF), are not well understood. In this study, we develop a multi-scale three-dimensional computational model that integrates cellular electrophysiology of the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) with the respective tissue geometry and fibre orientation. The latter is reconstructed in unique detail from high-resolution (approx. 70 μm) contrast micro-computed tomography data. The model is used to explore the mechanisms of re-entry initiation and sustenance in the PV region, regarded as the primary source of high-frequency electrical activity in AF. Simulations of the three-dimensional model demonstrate that an initial break-down of normal electrical excitation wave-fronts can be caused by the electrical heterogeneity between the PVs and LA. High tissue anisotropy is then responsible for the slow conduction and generation of a re-entrant circuit near the PVs. Evidence of such circuits has been seen clinically in AF patients. Our computational study suggests that primarily the combination of electrical heterogeneity and conduction anisotropy between the PVs and LA tissues leads to the generation of a high-frequency (approx. 10 Hz) re-entrant source near the PV sleeves, thus providing new insights into the arrhythmogenic mechanisms of excitation waves underlying AF. PMID:24427522

  13. Three-dimensional pseudospectral modelling of cardiac propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Ng, K T; Yan, R

    2003-11-01

    Various investigators have used the monodomain model to study cardiac propagation behaviour. In many cases, the governing non-linear parabolic equation is solved using the finite-difference method. An adequate discretisation of cardiac tissue with realistic dimensions, however, often leads to a large model size that is computationally demanding. Recently, it has been demonstrated, for a two-dimensional homogeneous monodomain, that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method can offer higher computational efficiency than the finite-difference technique. Here, an extension of the pseudospectral approach to a three-dimensional inhomogeneous case with fibre rotation is presented. The unknown transmembrane potential is expanded in terms of Chebyshev polynomial trial functions, and the monodomain equation is enforced at the Gauss-Lobatto node points. The forward Euler technique is used to advance the solution in time. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method offered an even larger improvement in computational performance over the finite-difference method in the three-dimensional case. Specifically, the pseudospectral method allowed the number of nodes to be reduced by approximately 85 times, while the same solution accuracy was maintained. Depending on the model size, simulations were performed with approximately 18-41 times less memory and approximately 99-169 times less CPU time. PMID:14686586

  14. Anisotropic tight-binding model applied to zigzag ultra-small nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. N.; Macedo, C. A.

    2010-04-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can be visualized as a graphene rolled into a cylinder. Tight-binding band structure calculations, with hopping between nearest-neighbor π orbitals only (NNTB), established rules by which both the mode in which the graphene is rolled up and the diameter determine whether the SWCNT is a metal or a semiconductor. However, when the diameter of the SWCNT is ultra-small its large curvature results in the breakage of these rules. In this work, we studied zigzag (n, 0) SWCNTs with diameters smaller than 0.7 nm using a π orbital-only tight-binding model including anisotropy in the hopping between next-nearest-neighbor sites (ANNNTB). Band overlaps were found in the electronic band structures of the zigzag SWCNTs for n=3, 4, 5, and 6, indicating that they are metals. The reason why the band structures of armchair and chiral SWCNTs are less affected by curvature effects becomes clear with the ANNNTB model, as does the reason why non-degenerate states cause band overlaps of the zigzag SWCNTs for n=3, 4, 5, and 6. Our results show that a π orbital-only tight-binding model is able to describe both the band overlaps and gaps obtained by ab initio calculations for zigzag SWCNTs.

  15. Unit-Sphere Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Applied to Anisotropic and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel, N.

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of brittle materials under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This methodology has been extended to predict the multiaxial strength response of transversely isotropic brittle materials, including polymer matrix composites (PMCs), by considering (1) flaw-orientation anisotropy, whereby a preexisting microcrack has a higher likelihood of being oriented in one direction over another direction, and (2) critical strength, or K (sub Ic) orientation anisotropy, whereby the level of critical strength or fracture toughness for mode I crack propagation, K (sub Ic), changes with regard to the orientation of the microstructure. In this report, results from finite element analysis of a fiber-reinforced-matrix unit cell were used with the unit-sphere model to predict the biaxial strength response of a unidirectional PMC previously reported from the World-Wide Failure Exercise. Results for nuclear-grade graphite materials under biaxial loading are also shown for comparison. This effort was successful in predicting the multiaxial strength response for the chosen problems. Findings regarding stress-state interactions and failure modes also are provided.

  16. Optics of anisotropic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokushima, Katsu; Antoš, Roman; Mistrík, Jan; Višňovský, Štefan; Yamaguchi, Tomuo

    2006-07-01

    The analytical formalism of Rokushima and Yamakita [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 73, 901-908 (1983)] treating the Fraunhofer diffraction in planar multilayered anisotropic gratings proved to be a useful introduction to new fundamental and practical situations encountered in laterally structured periodic (both isotropic and anisotropic) multilayer media. These are employed in the spectroscopic ellipsometry for modeling surface roughness and in-depth profiles, as well as in the design of various frequency-selective elements including photonic crystals. The subject forms the basis for the solution of inverse problems in scatterometry of periodic nanostructures including magnetic and magneto-optic recording media. It has no principal limitations as for the frequencies and period to radiation wavelength ratios and may include matter wave diffraction. The aim of the paper is to make this formalism easily accessible to a broader community of students and non-specialists. Many aspects of traditional electromagnetic optics are covered as special cases from a modern and more general point of view, e.g., plane wave propagation in isotropic media, reflection and refraction at interfaces, Fabry-Perot resonator, optics of thin films and multilayers, slab dielectric waveguides, crystal optics, acousto-, electro-, and magneto-optics, diffraction gratings, etc. The formalism is illustrated on a model simulating the diffraction on a ferromagnetic wire grating.

  17. PP/PS anisotropic stereotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Steinar; Alerini, Mathias; Ursin, Bjørn

    2010-04-01

    Stereotomography is a slope tomographic method which gives good results for background velocity model estimation in 2-D isotropic media. We develop here the extension of the method to 3-D general anisotropic media for PP and PS events. We do not take into account the issue of shear wave degeneracy. As in isotropic media, the sensitivity matrix of the inversion can be computed by paraxial ray tracing. We introduce a `constant Z stereotomography' approach, which can reduce the size of the sensitivity matrix. Based on ray perturbation theory, we give all the derivatives of stereotomography data parameters with respect to model parameters in a 3-D general anisotropic medium. These general formulas for the derivatives can also be used in other applications that rely on anisotropic ray perturbation theory. In particular, we obtain derivatives of the phase velocity with respect to position, phase angle and elastic medium parameters, all for general anisotropic media. The derivatives are expressed using the Voigt notation for the elastic medium parameters. We include a Jacobian that allows to change the model parametrization from Voigt to Thomsen parameters. Explicit expressions for the derivatives of the data are given for the case of 2-D tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. We validate the method by single-parameter estimation of each Thomsen parameter field of a 2-D TTI synthetic model, where data are modelled by ray tracing. For each Thomsen parameter, the estimated velocity field fits well with the true velocity field.

  18. A scale-bridging modeling approach for anisotropic organic molecules at patterned semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleppmann, Nicola; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2015-02-01

    Hybrid systems consisting of organic molecules at inorganic semiconductor surfaces are gaining increasing importance as thin film devices for optoelectronics. The efficiency of such devices strongly depends on the collective behavior of the adsorbed molecules. In the present paper, we propose a novel, coarse-grained model addressing the condensed phases of a representative hybrid system, that is, para-sexiphenyl (6P) at zinc-oxide (ZnO). Within our model, intermolecular interactions are represented via a Gay-Berne potential (describing steric and van-der-Waals interactions) combined with the electrostatic potential between two linear quadrupoles. Similarly, the molecule-substrate interactions include a coupling between a linear molecular quadrupole to the electric field generated by the line charges characterizing ZnO(10-10). To validate our approach, we perform equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations, where the lateral positions are fixed to a 2D lattice, while the rotational degrees of freedom are continuous. We use these simulations to investigate orientational ordering in the condensed state. We reproduce various experimentally observed features such as the alignment of individual molecules with the line charges on the surface, the formation of a standing uniaxial phase with a herringbone structure, as well as the formation of a lying nematic phase.

  19. A scale-bridging modeling approach for anisotropic organic molecules at patterned semiconductor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleppmann, Nicola; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-02-14

    Hybrid systems consisting of organic molecules at inorganic semiconductor surfaces are gaining increasing importance as thin film devices for optoelectronics. The efficiency of such devices strongly depends on the collective behavior of the adsorbed molecules. In the present paper, we propose a novel, coarse-grained model addressing the condensed phases of a representative hybrid system, that is, para-sexiphenyl (6P) at zinc-oxide (ZnO). Within our model, intermolecular interactions are represented via a Gay-Berne potential (describing steric and van-der-Waals interactions) combined with the electrostatic potential between two linear quadrupoles. Similarly, the molecule-substrate interactions include a coupling between a linear molecular quadrupole to the electric field generated by the line charges characterizing ZnO(10-10). To validate our approach, we perform equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations, where the lateral positions are fixed to a 2D lattice, while the rotational degrees of freedom are continuous. We use these simulations to investigate orientational ordering in the condensed state. We reproduce various experimentally observed features such as the alignment of individual molecules with the line charges on the surface, the formation of a standing uniaxial phase with a herringbone structure, as well as the formation of a lying nematic phase. PMID:25681929

  20. Modeling cell elongation during germ band retraction: cell autonomy versus applied anisotropic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Holley E.; Veldhuis, Jim; Brodland, G. Wayne; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-05-01

    The morphogenetic process of germ band retraction in Drosophila embryos involves coordinated movements of two epithelial tissues—germ band and amnioserosa. The germ band shortens along its rostral-caudal or head-to-tail axis, widens along its perpendicular dorsal-ventral axis, and uncurls from an initial ‘U’ shape. The amnioserosa mechanically assists this process by pulling on the crook of the U-shaped germ band. The amnioserosa may also provide biochemical signals that drive germ band cells to change shape in a mechanically autonomous fashion. Here, we use a finite-element model to investigate how these two contributions reshape the germ band. We do so by modeling the response to laser-induced wounds in each of the germ band’s spatially distinct segments (T1-T3, A1-A9) during the middle of retraction when segments T1-A3 form the ventral arm of the ‘U’, A4-A7 form its crook, and A8-A9 complete the dorsal arm. We explore these responses under a range of externally applied stresses and internal anisotropy of cell edge tensions—akin to a planar cell polarity that can drive elongation of cells in a direction parallel to the minimum edge tension—and identify regions of parameter space (edge-tension anisotropy versus stress anisotropy) that best match previous experiments for each germ band segment. All but three germ band segments are best fit when the applied stress anisotropy and the edge-tension anisotropy work against one another—i.e., when the isolated effects would elongate cells in perpendicular directions. Segments in the crook of the germ band (A4-A7) have cells that elongate in the direction of maximum external stress, i.e., external stress anisotropy is dominant. In most other segments, the dominant factor is internal edge-tension anisotropy. These results are consistent with models in which the amnioserosa pulls on the crook of the germ band to mechanically assist retraction. In addition, they suggest a mechanical cue for edge

  1. Phase transition of anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model on the square lattice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ai-Yuan; Wang, Huai-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the J_{1}-J_{2} Heisenberg model with exchange anisotropy on a square lattice and focused on possible AF1-AF2 phase transition below the Néel point and its dependence on the exchange anisotropy, where AF1 and AF2 represent Néel state and collinear state, respectively. We use the double-time Green's-function method and adopt the random-phase approximation. The less the exchange anisotropy, the stronger the quantum fluctuation of the system will be. Both the Néel state and collinear state can exist and have the same Néel temperature for arbitrary anisotropy and spin quantum number S when J_{2}/J_{1}=0.5. Under such parameters, the calculated free energies show that there may occur a first-order phase transition between the Néel state and collinear state for an arbitrary S when anisotropy is not strong. PMID:26871025

  2. Asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian approach for modeling anisotropic transport in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2012-03-01

    Modeling electron transport in magnetized plasmas is extremely challenging due to the extreme anisotropy between parallel (to the magnetic field) and perpendicular directions (the transport-coefficient ratio χ/χ˜10^10 in fusion plasmas). Recently, a novel Lagrangian Green's function method has been proposedfootnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011); D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, submitted (2011) to solve the local and non-local purely parallel transport equation in general 3D magnetic fields. The approach avoids numerical pollution, is inherently positivity-preserving, and is scalable algorithmically (i.e., work per degree-of-freedom is grid-independent). In this poster, we discuss the extension of the Lagrangian Green's function approach to include perpendicular transport terms and sources. We present an asymptotic-preserving numerical formulation, which ensures a consistent numerical discretization temporally and spatially for arbitrary χ/χ ratios. We will demonstrate the potential of the approach with various challenging configurations, including the case of transport across a magnetic island in cylindrical geometry.

  3. Exploring the Conformational Transitions of Biomolecular Systems Using a Simple Two-State Anisotropic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunhwan; Bahar, Ivet; Roux, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecular conformational transitions are essential to biological functions. Most experimental methods report on the long-lived functional states of biomolecules, but information about the transition pathways between these stable states is generally scarce. Such transitions involve short-lived conformational states that are difficult to detect experimentally. For this reason, computational methods are needed to produce plausible hypothetical transition pathways that can then be probed experimentally. Here we propose a simple and computationally efficient method, called ANMPathway, for constructing a physically reasonable pathway between two endpoints of a conformational transition. We adopt a coarse-grained representation of the protein and construct a two-state potential by combining two elastic network models (ENMs) representative of the experimental structures resolved for the endpoints. The two-state potential has a cusp hypersurface in the configuration space where the energies from both the ENMs are equal. We first search for the minimum energy structure on the cusp hypersurface and then treat it as the transition state. The continuous pathway is subsequently constructed by following the steepest descent energy minimization trajectories starting from the transition state on each side of the cusp hypersurface. Application to several systems of broad biological interest such as adenylate kinase, ATP-driven calcium pump SERCA, leucine transporter and glutamate transporter shows that ANMPathway yields results in good agreement with those from other similar methods and with data obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, in support of the utility of this simple and efficient approach. Notably the method provides experimentally testable predictions, including the formation of non-native contacts during the transition which we were able to detect in two of the systems we studied. An open-access web server has been created to deliver ANMPathway results

  4. Regional electric field induced by electroconvulsive therapy in a realistic finite element head model: influence of white matter anisotropic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Deng, Zhi-De; Kim, Tae-Seong; Laine, Andrew F; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2012-02-01

    We present the first computational study investigating the electric field (E-field) strength generated by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) electrode configurations in specific brain regions of interest (ROIs) that have putative roles in the therapeutic action and/or adverse side effects of ECT. This study also characterizes the impact of the white matter (WM) conductivity anisotropy on the E-field distribution. A finite element head model incorporating tissue heterogeneity and WM anisotropic conductivity was constructed based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI data. We computed the spatial E-field distributions generated by three standard ECT electrode placements including bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), and right unilateral (RUL) and an investigational electrode configuration for focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST). The key results are that (1) the median E-field strength over the whole brain is 3.9, 1.5, 2.3, and 2.6 V/cm for the BL, BF, RUL, and FEAST electrode configurations, respectively, which coupled with the broad spread of the BL E-field suggests a biophysical basis for observations of superior efficacy of BL ECT compared to BF and RUL ECT; (2) in the hippocampi, BL ECT produces a median E-field of 4.8 V/cm that is 1.5-2.8 times stronger than that for the other electrode configurations, consistent with the more pronounced amnestic effects of BL ECT; and (3) neglecting the WM conductivity anisotropy results in E-field strength error up to 18% overall and up to 39% in specific ROIs, motivating the inclusion of the WM conductivity anisotropy in accurate head models. This computational study demonstrates how the realistic finite element head model incorporating tissue conductivity anisotropy provides quantitative insight into the biophysics of ECT, which may shed light on the differential clinical outcomes seen with various forms of ECT, and may guide the development of novel stimulation paradigms

  5. Phonon heat conduction in layered anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnich, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal properties of anisotropic crystals are of both fundamental and practical interest, but transport phenomena in anisotropic materials such as graphite remain poorly understood because solutions of the Boltzmann equation often assume isotropy. Here, we extend an analytic solution of the transient, frequency-dependent Boltzmann equation to highly anisotropic solids and examine its predictions for graphite. We show that this simple model predicts key results, such as long c -axis phonon mean free paths and a negative correlation of cross-plane thermal conductivity with in-plane group velocity, that were previously observed with computationally expensive molecular-dynamics simulations. Further, using our analytic solution, we demonstrate a method to reconstruct the anisotropic mean free path spectrum of crystals with arbitrary dispersion relations without any prior knowledge of their harmonic or anharmonic properties using observations of quasiballistic heat conduction. These results provide a useful analytic framework to understand thermal transport in anisotropic crystals.

  6. Designing anisotropic inflation with form fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2015-12-01

    We study inflation with anisotropic hair induced by form fields. In four dimensions, the relevant form fields are gauge (one-form) fields and two-form fields. Assuming the exponential form of potential and gauge kinetic functions, we find new exact power-law solutions endowed with anisotropic hair. We also explore the phase space of anisotropic inflation and find fixed points corresponding to the exact power-law solutions. Moreover, we perform the stability analysis around the fixed points to reveal the structure of the phase space. It turns out that one of the fixed points becomes an attractor and others (if any) are saddle points. In particular, the one corresponding to anisotropic inflation becomes an attractor when it exists. We also argue that various anisotropic inflation models can be designed by choosing coupling constants.

  7. Improved understanding of the dynamic response in anisotropic directional composite materials through the combination of experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C.

    2013-06-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the dynamic response of composite materials; specifically low density epoxy resin binders strengthened with continuous reinforcing fibers. This is in part due to the widespread use of carbon fiber composites in military, commercial, industrial, and aerospace applications. The design community requires better understanding of these materials in order to make full use of their unique properties. Experimental testing has been performed on a unidirectional carbon fiber - epoxy composite, engineered to have high uniformity and low porosity. Planar impact testing was performed at the Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) facility at Sandia National Labs resulting in pressures up to 15 GPa in the composite material. Results illustrate the anisotropic nature of the response under shock loading. Along the fiber direction, a two-wave structure similar to typical elastic-plastic response is observed, however, when shocked transverse to the fibers, only a single bulk shock wave is detected. The two-wave structure persists when impact occurs at angles up to 45 degrees off the fiber direction. At higher pressures, the epoxy matrix dissociates resulting in a loss of anisotropy. Details of the experimental configurations and results will be presented and discussed. Greater understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the observed response has been achieved through the use of numerical modeling of the system at the micromechanical level using the CTH hydrocode. From the simulation results it is evident that the observed two-wave structure in the longitudinal fiber direction is the result of a fast moving elastic precursor wave traveling in the carbon fibers ahead of the bulk response in the epoxy resin. Similarly, in the transverse direction, results show a collapse of the resin component consistent with the experimental observation of a single shock wave traveling at speeds associated with bulk carbon. These results will be

  8. Can cosmic parallax distinguish between anisotropic cosmologies?

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanini, Michele; West, Eric J.; Trodden, Mark

    2009-12-15

    In an anisotropic universe, observers not positioned at a point of special symmetry should observe cosmic parallax--the relative angular motion of test galaxies over cosmic time. It was recently argued that the nonobservance of this effect in upcoming precision astrometry missions such as GAIA may be used to place strong bounds on the position of off-center observers in a void-model universe described by the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. We consider the analogous effect in anisotropic cosmological models described by an axisymmetric homogeneous Bianchi type I metric and discuss whether any observation of cosmic parallax would distinguish between different anisotropic evolutions.

  9. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  10. An anisotropic character of nonlinear fluxes not involved in the plasma energy transport in the Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byunghoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae; Lee, Gun Bok

    2015-04-01

    Fluxes of both the vorticity and the plasma density due to the nonlinear E × B convective derivatives are divided into two parts. One part, which is almost isotropic, is well known to engage in the transfer of energies from the energy-producing scale where the phase mismatch between the density and the electric potential is large. The other part, in the Fourier space , is found to be highly anisotropic. If it is summed over k y , the result is nearly random around zero in k x while the sum over k x is approximately proportional to k y . In Fourier space, such anisotropic fluxes are found to be closely related to the gradients of the squares of the vorticity and the electric potential, respectively. We argue that the advecting velocities in Fourier space may be predicted on dimensional grounds.

  11. Mapping fractures using 1D anisotropic modelling of magnetotelluric data: a case study from the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, A.; Heinson, G.; Holford, S.; Thiel, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 1D anisotropic inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data as a potential tool for mapping structural permeability in sedimentary basins. Using 1D inversions of a 171 site, broadband MT data set from the Koroit region of the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia, we have delineated an electrically anisotropic layer at approximately 2.5 to 3.5 km depth. The anisotropy strike is consistent between stations at approximately 160° east of north. The depth of anisotropy corresponds to the top depth of the Lower Cretaceous Crayfish Group, and the anisotropy factor increases from west to east. We interpret the anisotropy as resulting from north-northwest oriented, fluid-filled fractures resulting in enhanced electrical and hydraulic conductivity. This interpretation is consistent with permeability data from well formation tests. It is also consistent with the orientation of mapped faults in the area, which are optimally oriented for reactivation in the current stress field.

  12. A solely radiance-based spectral anisotropic distribution model and its application in deriving clear-sky spectral fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Huang, X.

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropic distribution model (ADM) plays a uniquely central role in converting broadband radiance measurement to broadband flux. Scene type classifications are usually needed for such ADM and such classifications are usually done with auxiliary measurements and information since broadband radiance does not contain detailed information about temperature, humidity, and clouds. Recently Huang et al. (2008 and 2010) has developed spectral ADM based on such scene type classifications and successfully derived spectral flux from spectral radiance measurement. Unlike broadband radiances, the spectrally resolved radiances indeed contain rich information about temperature, humidity, and clouds. Therefore, it is meaningful to explore whether it is possible to develop scene-type classification solely based on spectral radiance and consequently to construct spectral ADM solely base on radiances measurement. Using AIRS spectrum as an example, here we develop a clear-sky scene classification algorithm solely based on AIRS radiances. The definitions of scene types are similar to those of clear-sky scene types used in CERES SSF algorithm, which are discrete intervals based on surface skin temperature, lapse rate (temperature change of the first 300 mb above the surface), and the total precipitable water (TPW). Brightness temperature of AIRS channel at 963.8 cm-1 are used for determine corresponding discrete intervals of surface skin temperature. This channel is also used in conjunction with a channel at 748.6 cm-1 for categorizing the lapse rate. Given the slow varying of water vapor continuum in the window region and the dominant weight of lower tropospheric humidity in TPW, a double-differential technique is used to categorize the TPW. By choosing two pairs of AIRS channels with similar frequency intervals, the technique can classify the TPW without any a priori information about continuum absorption since double differencing largely remove the slow-varying continuum

  13. Sound field distribution influenced by anisotropic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Erhard, A.; Boehm, R.; Wuestenberg, H.

    1993-12-31

    Sound wave distributions in isotropic materials are often described using analytical or numerical solutions of the wave equation. In opposition to this, it is more difficult to find a solution for anisotropic mediums. One possible method is the elastic finite integration technique (EFIT). With this method, scalar and vectorial calculations of the sound distribution from a line source in anisotropic materials were carried out. This method needs a powerful computer in order to keep the computation time short. In the present paper another theoretical model was used -- the pulse integration model -- with which sound field distributions for scalar waves were calculated in the sound field distribution of longitudinal waves in anisotropic materials. The principle of the model is described briefly. Different sound field pattern generated with a phased array longitudinal wave probe were calculated during the propagation in a homogeneous isotropic material and in a homogeneous anisotropic material (single crystal).

  14. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Bram; Koren, Barry; de Blank, Hugo J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  15. Anisotropic fractional diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Magin, Richard L; Ye, Allen Q

    2015-01-01

    Traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps brain structure by fitting a diffusion model to the magnitude of the electrical signal acquired in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fractional DTI employs anomalous diffusion models to obtain a better fit to real MRI data, which can exhibit anomalous diffusion in both time and space. In this paper, we describe the challenge of developing and employing anisotropic fractional diffusion models for DTI. Since anisotropy is clearly present in the three-dimensional MRI signal response, such models hold great promise for improving brain imaging. We then propose some candidate models, based on stochastic theory.

  16. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics with nonlinear Moving-Least-Squares WENO reconstruction to model anisotropic dispersion in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avesani, Diego; Herrera, Paulo; Chiogna, Gabriele; Bellin, Alberto; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Most numerical schemes applied to solve the advection-diffusion equation are affected by numerical diffusion. Moreover, unphysical results, such as oscillations and negative concentrations, may emerge when an anisotropic dispersion tensor is used, which induces even more severe errors in the solution of multispecies reactive transport. To cope with this long standing problem we propose a modified version of the standard Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method based on a Moving-Least-Squares-Weighted-Essentially-Non-Oscillatory (MLS-WENO) reconstruction of concentrations. This scheme formulation (called MWSPH) approximates the diffusive fluxes with a Rusanov-type Riemann solver based on high order WENO scheme. We compare the standard SPH with the MWSPH for different a few test cases, considering both homogeneous and heterogeneous flow fields and different anisotropic ratios of the dispersion tensor. We show that, MWSPH is stable and accurate and that it reduces the occurrence of negative concentrations compared to standard SPH. When negative concentrations are observed, their absolute values are several orders of magnitude smaller compared to standard SPH. In addition, MWSPH limits spurious oscillations in the numerical solution more effectively than classical SPH. Convergence analysis shows that MWSPH is computationally more demanding than SPH, but with the payoff a more accurate solution, which in addition is less sensitive to particles position. The latter property simplifies the time consuming and often user dependent procedure to define the initial dislocation of the particles.

  17. Spectral Analyses and Radiation Exposures from Several Ground-Level Enhancement (GLE) Solar Proton Events: A Comparison of Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan; Dietrich, William; Badavi, Francis; Rojdev, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Several methods for analyzing the particle spectra from extremely large solar proton events, called Ground-Level Enhancements (GLEs), have been developed and utilized by the scientific community to describe the solar proton energy spectra and have been further applied to ascertain the radiation exposures to humans and radio-sensitive systems, namely electronics. In this paper 12 GLEs dating back to 1956 are discussed, and the three methods for describing the solar proton energy spectra are reviewed. The three spectral fitting methodologies are EXP [an exponential in proton rigidity (R)], WEIB [Weibull fit: an exponential in proton energy], and the Band function (BAND) [a double power law in proton rigidity]. The EXP and WEIB methods use low energy (MeV) GLE solar proton data and make extrapolations out to approx.1 GeV. On the other hand, the BAND method utilizes low- and medium-energy satellite solar proton data combined with high-energy solar proton data deduced from high-latitude neutron monitoring stations. Thus, the BAND method completely describes the entire proton energy spectrum based on actual solar proton observations out to 10 GeV. Using the differential spectra produced from each of the 12 selected GLEs for each of the three methods, radiation exposures are presented and discussed in detail. These radiation exposures are then compared with the current 30-day and annual crew exposure limits and the radiation effects to electronics.

  18. Calculation of the surface tension of cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons from Monte Carlo simulations using an anisotropic united atom model (AUA).

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-01

    We report the calculation of the surface tension of cycloalkanes and aromatics by direct two-phase MC simulations using an anisotropic united atom model (AUA). In the case of aromatics, the polar version of the AUA-4 (AUA 9-sites) model is used. A comparison with the nonpolar models is carried out on the surface tension of benzene. The surface tension is calculated from different routes: the mechanical route using the Irving and Kirkwood (IK) and Kirkwood-Buff (KB) expressions; the thermodynamic route by using the test-area (TA) method. The different operational expressions of these definitions are presented with those of their long range corrections. The AUA potential allows to reproduce very well the dependence of the surface tension with respect to the temperature for cyclopentane, cyclohexane, benzene and toluene. PMID:19606323

  19. InsP6-Sensitive Variants of the Gle1 mRNA Export Factor Rescue Growth and Fertility Defects of the ipk1 Low-Phytic-Acid Mutation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seok; Lee, Du-Hwa; Cho, Hui Kyung; Kim, Song Hee; Auh, Joong Hyuck; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate (InsP6), also known as phytic acid, accumulates in large quantities in plant seeds, serving as a phosphorus reservoir, but is an animal antinutrient and an important source of water pollution. Here, we report that Gle1 (GLFG lethal 1) in conjunction with InsP6 functions as an activator of the ATPase/RNA helicase LOS4 (low expression of osmotically responsive genes 4), which is involved in mRNA export in plants, supporting the Gle1-InsP6-Dbp5 (LOS4 homolog) paradigm proposed in yeast. Interestingly, plant Gle1 proteins have modifications in several key residues of the InsP6 binding pocket, which reduce the basicity of the surface charge. Arabidopsis thaliana Gle1 variants containing mutations that increase the basic charge of the InsP6 binding surface show increased sensitivity to InsP6 concentrations for the stimulation of LOS4 ATPase activity in vitro. Expression of the Gle1 variants with enhanced InsP6 sensitivity rescues the mRNA export defect of the ipk1 (inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase) InsP6-deficient mutant and, furthermore, significantly improves vegetative growth, seed yield, and seed performance of the mutant. These results suggest that Gle1 is an important factor responsible for mediating InsP6 functions in plant growth and reproduction and that Gle1 variants with increased InsP6 sensitivity may be useful for engineering high-yielding low-phytate crops. PMID:25670768

  20. Anisotropic elastic scattering of stripe/line-shaped scatters to two-dimensional electron gas: Model and illustrations in a nonpolar AlGaN/GaN hetero-junction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinfeng Li, Yao; Yan, Ran; Nie, Yuhu; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue; Liu, Guipeng

    2014-09-07

    In a semiconductor hetero-junction, the stripe/line-shaped scatters located at the hetero-interface lead to the anisotropic transport of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The elastic scattering of infinitely long and uniform stripe/line-shaped scatters to 2DEG is theoretically investigated based on a general theory of anisotropic 2DEG transport [J. Schliemann and D. Loss, Phys. Rev. B 68(16), 165311 (2003)], and the resulting 2DEG mobility along the applied electrical field is modeled to be a function of the angle between the field and the scatters. The anisotropy of the scattering and the mobility originate in essence from that the stripe/line-shaped scatters act upon the injecting two-dimensional wave vector by changing only its component perpendicular to the scatters. Three related scattering mechanisms in a nonpolar AlGaN/GaN hetero-junction are discussed as illustrations, including the striated morphology caused interface roughness scattering, and the polarization induced line charge dipole scattering and the misfit dislocation scattering at the AlGaN/GaN interface. Different anisotropic behaviors of the mobility limited by these scattering mechanisms are demonstrated, but analysis shows that all of them are determined by the combined effects of the anisotropic bare scattering potential and the anisotropic dielectric response of the 2DEG.

  1. δN formalism in anisotropic inflation and large anisotropic bispectrum and trispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Firouzjahi, Hassan E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir

    2013-08-01

    We present the consistent δN formalism for curvature perturbations in anisotropic cosmological backgrounds. We employ our δN formalism to calculate the power spectrum, the bispectrum and the trispectrum in models of anisotropic inflation with the background gauge fields in Bianchi I universe. Our results coincide exactly with the recent results obtained from in-in formalism. To satisfy the observational constraints the anisotropies generated on power spectrum are kept small but large orientation-dependent non-Gaussianities can be generated. We study the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality for the amplitudes of the bispectrum and the trispectrum in the presence of anisotropic shapes.

  2. Internal noise-driven generalized Langevin equation from a nonlocal continuum model.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saikat; Chowdhury, Shubhankar Roy; Roy, Debasish; Vasu, Ram Mohan

    2015-08-01

    Starting with a micropolar formulation, known to account for nonlocal microstructural effects at the continuum level, a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for a particle, describing the predominant motion of a localized region through a single displacement degree of freedom, is derived. The GLE features a memory-dependent multiplicative or internal noise, which appears upon recognizing that the microrotation variables possess randomness owing to an uncertainty principle. Unlike its classical version, the present GLE qualitatively reproduces the experimentally measured fluctuations in the steady-state mean square displacement of scattering centers in a polyvinyl alcohol slab. The origin of the fluctuations is traced to nonlocal spatial interactions within the continuum, a phenomenon that is ubiquitous across a broad class of response regimes in solids and fluids. This renders the proposed GLE a potentially useful model in such cases. PMID:26382386

  3. Internal noise-driven generalized Langevin equation from a nonlocal continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saikat; Chowdhury, Shubhankar Roy; Roy, Debasish; Vasu, Ram Mohan

    2015-08-01

    Starting with a micropolar formulation, known to account for nonlocal microstructural effects at the continuum level, a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for a particle, describing the predominant motion of a localized region through a single displacement degree of freedom, is derived. The GLE features a memory-dependent multiplicative or internal noise, which appears upon recognizing that the microrotation variables possess randomness owing to an uncertainty principle. Unlike its classical version, the present GLE qualitatively reproduces the experimentally measured fluctuations in the steady-state mean square displacement of scattering centers in a polyvinyl alcohol slab. The origin of the fluctuations is traced to nonlocal spatial interactions within the continuum, a phenomenon that is ubiquitous across a broad class of response regimes in solids and fluids. This renders the proposed GLE a potentially useful model in such cases.

  4. Aligning Experimental and Theoretical Anisotropic B-Factors: Water Models, Normal-Mode Analysis Methods, and Metrics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The strength of X-ray crystallography in providing the information for protein dynamics has been under appreciated. The anisotropic B-factors (ADPs) from high-resolution structures are invaluable in studying the relationship among structure, dynamics, and function. Here, starting from an in-depth evaluation of the metrics used for comparing the overlap between two ellipsoids, we applied normal-mode analysis (NMA) to predict the theoretical ADPs and then align them with experimental results. Adding an extra layer of explicitly treated water on protein surface significantly improved the energy minimization results and better reproduced the anisotropy of experimental ADPs. In comparing experimental and theoretical ADPs, we focused on the overlap in shape, the alignment of dominant directions, and the similarity in magnitude. The choices of water molecules, NMA methods, and the metrics for evaluating the overlap of ADPs determined final results. This study provides useful information for exploring the physical basis and the application potential of experimental ADPs. PMID:24673391

  5. Anisotropic metamaterial optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Dheeraj; Anantha Ramakrishna, S; Pollock, Justin G; Iyer, Ashwin K

    2015-04-01

    Internal physical structure can drastically modify the properties of waveguides: photonic crystal fibers are able to confine light inside a hollow air core by Bragg scattering from a periodic array of holes, while metamaterial loaded waveguides for microwaves can support propagation at frequencies well below cutoff. Anisotropic metamaterials assembled into cylindrically symmetric geometries constitute light-guiding structures that support new kinds of exotic modes. A microtube of anodized nanoporous alumina, with nanopores radially emanating from the inner wall to the outer surface, is a manifestation of such an anisotropic metamaterial optical fiber. The nanopores, when filled with a plasmonic metal such as silver or gold, greatly increase the electromagnetic anisotropy. The modal solutions in such anisotropic circular waveguides can be uncommon Bessel functions with imaginary orders. PMID:25968741

  6. Application of an anisotropic bone-remodelling model based on a damage-repair theory to the analysis of the proximal femur before and after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Doblaré, M; García, J M

    2001-09-01

    In this work, a new model for internal anisotropic bone remodelling is applied to the study of the remodelling behaviour of the proximal femur before and after total hip replacement (THR). This model considers bone remodelling under the scope of a general damage-repair theory following the principles of continuum damage mechanics. A "damage-repair" tensor is defined in terms of the apparent density and Cowin's "fabric tensor", respectively, associated with porosity and directionality of the trabeculae. The different elements of a thermodynamically consistent damage theory are established, including resorption and apposition criteria, evolution law and rate of remodelling. All of these elements were introduced and discussed in detail in a previous paper (García, J. M., Martinez, M. A., Doblaré, M., 2001. An anisotrophic internal-external bone adaptation model based on a combination of CAO and continuum damage mechanics technologies. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering 4(4), 355-378.), including the definition of the proposed mechanical stimulus and the qualitative properties of the model. In this paper, the fundamentals of the proposed model are briefly reviewed and the computational aspects of its implementation are discussed. This model is then applied to the analysis of the remodelling behaviour of the intact femur obtaining densities and mass principal values and directions very close to the experimental data. The second application involved the proximal femoral extremity after THR and the inclusion of an Exeter prosthesis. As a result of the simulation process, some well-known features previously detected in medical clinics were recovered, such as the stress yielding effect in the proximal part of the implant or the enlargement of the cortical layer at the distal part of the implant. With respect to the anisotropic properties, bone microstructure and local stiffness are known to tend to align with the stress principal directions. This

  7. Inhomogeneous and anisotropic Universe and apparent acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanizza, G.; Tedesco, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) Bianchi type I (plane symmetric) model of the Universe. We study and solve Einstein field equations. We investigate the effects of such a model of the Universe; in particular, these results are important in understanding the effect of the combined presence of an inhomogeneous and anisotropic universe. The observational magnitude-redshift data deviated from the UNION 2 catalog have been analyzed in the framework of this LTB anisotropic universe, and the fit has been achieved without the inclusion of any dark energy.

  8. Probing π-tangle and quantum phase transition in the one-dimensional anisotropic XY model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-cheng; Xu, Shuai; He, Juan; Ye, Liu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and anisotropy on the π-tangle and quantum phase transition (QPT) by employing the QRG method in the one-dimensional anisotropic XY model is investigated. In our model the anisotropy and DM interaction parameters can influence the phase diagrams. While the anisotropy suppresses the entanglement due to favoring of the alignment of spins, the DM interaction restores the spoiled entanglement via creation of the quantum fluctuations. When the value of DM interaction is certain, the π-tangle develops into two different values which separate the system into two phases i.e. the spin-fluid phase and the Néel phase with the number of QRG iterations increased. Meanwhile, the π-tangle decreases slowly as the sites of the chain became larger, but the π-tangle tends to be a fixed value finally. Additionally, it exhibits a maximum for the next-nearest-neighbor entanglement at the critical point in our model which is different from the situation of the two-body system. To gain further insight, the nonanalytic and scaling behaviors of π-tangle have also been analyzed in detail and this phenomenon indicates that the behavior of the entanglement can perfectly help one to observe the quantum critical properties of the model.

  9. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  10. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jérôme

    2006-11-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  11. Hybrid Anisotropic Micromesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutzov, S.; Danchova, N.; Tsekov, R.; Barreno, I.; Ruiz del Portal, X.; Ulbikas, J.

    2015-10-01

    A new hybrid woven micromesh containing metal and polyester wires with a 2D porosity of about 30% has been created. The anisotropic microcomposite is developed as a new material with wide applications in thermal and electrical engineering. The mesh material is carefully characterized using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, chemical analysis, thermal conductivity measurements and differential scanning calorimetry.

  12. Long-Range Surface Plasmons on Highly Anisotropic Dielectric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumen, L.; Nagaraj; Neogi, A.; Krokhin, A.

    We calculate the propagation length of surface plasmons in metal-dielectric structures with anisotropic substrates. We show that the Joule losses can be minimized by appropriate orientation of the optical axis of a birefringent substrate and that the favorable orientation of the axis depends on ω. A simple Kronig-Penney model for anisotropic plasmonic crystal is also proposed.

  13. Matter sourced anisotropic stress for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Baorong; Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin

    2014-11-01

    Usually a dark energy as a perfect fluid is characterized by the ratio of pressure to energy density (w =p /ρ ) and the ratio of their perturbations in its rest frame (cs2=δ p /δ ρ ). However, a dark energy would have other characteristics beyond its equation of state and the effective speed of sound. Here the extra property is the anisotropic stress sourced by matter as a simple extension to the perfect fluid model. At the background level, this anisotropic stress is zero with respect to the cosmological principle, but not at the first-order perturbation. We tested the viability of the existence of this kind of anisotropic stress by using the currently available cosmic observations through the geometrical and dynamical measurements. Using the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method, we found that the upper bounds on the anisotropic stress which enters into the summation of the Newtonian potentials should be of the order O (1 0-3)Δm . We did not find any strong evidence for the existence of this matter-sourced anisotropic stress, even in the 1 σ region.

  14. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does. PMID:27090239

  15. Variational wave functions for the S =1/2 Heisenberg model on the anisotropic triangular lattice: Spin liquids and spiral orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Elaheh; Tocchio, Luca F.; Becca, Federico

    2016-02-01

    By using variational wave functions and quantum Monte Carlo techniques, we investigate the complete phase diagram of the Heisenberg model on the anisotropic triangular lattice, where two out of three bonds have superexchange couplings J and the third one has instead J'. This model interpolates between the square lattice and the isotropic triangular one, for J'/J ≤1 , and between the isotropic triangular lattice and a set of decoupled chains, for J /J'≤1 . We consider all the fully symmetric spin liquids that can be constructed with the fermionic projective-symmetry group classification (Zhou and Wen, arXiv:cond-mat/0210662) and we compare them with the spiral magnetic orders that can be accommodated on finite clusters. Our results show that, for J'/J ≤1 , the phase diagram is dominated by magnetic orderings, even though a spin-liquid state may be possible in a small parameter window, i.e., 0.7 ≲J'/J ≲0.8 . In contrast, for J /J'≤1 , a large spin-liquid region appears close to the limit of decoupled chains, i.e., for J /J'≲0.6 , while magnetically ordered phases with spiral order are stabilized close to the isotropic point.

  16. An efficient model to predict guided wave radiation by finite-sized sources in multilayered anisotropic plates with account of caustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stévenin, M.; Lhémery, A.; Grondel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Elastic guided waves (GW) are used in various non-destructive testing (NDT) methods to inspect plate-like structures, generated by finite-sized transducers. Thanks to GW long range propagation, using a few transducers at permanent positions can provide a full coverage of the plate. Transducer diffraction effects take place, leading to complex radiated fields. Optimizing transducers positioning makes it necessary to accurately predict the GW field radiated by a transducer. Fraunhofer-like approximations applied to GW in isotropic homogeneous plates lead to fast and accurate field computation but can fail when applied to multi-layered anisotropic composite plates, as shown by some examples given. Here, a model is proposed for composite plates, based on the computation of the approximate Green's tensor describing modal propagation from a source point, with account of caustics typically seen when strong anisotropy is concerned. Modal solutions are otherwise obtained by the Semi-Analytic Finite Element method. Transducer diffraction effects are accounted for by means of an angular integration over the transducer surface as seen from the calculation point, that is, over energy paths involved, which are mode-dependent. The model is validated by comparing its predictions with those computed by means of a full convolution integration of the Green's tensor with the source over transducer surface. Examples given concern disk and rectangular shaped transducers commonly used in NDT.

  17. Gravitational stresses in anisotropic rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.; Swolfs, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained and are modelled as a homogeneous, orthotropic or transversely isotropic, linearly elastic material. The analysis, constrained by the thermodynamic requirement that strain energy be positive definite, gives the following important result: inclusion of anisotropy broadens the range of permissible values of gravity-induced horizontal stresses. In fact, for some ranges of anisotropic rock properties, it is thermodynamically admissible for gravity-induced horizontal stresses to exceed the vertical stress component; this is not possible for the classical isotropic solution. Specific examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity-induced stress field in anisotropic rocks and its dependence on the type, degree and orientation of anisotropy with respect to the horizontal ground surface. ?? 1987.

  18. Development of an Anisotropic Geological-Based Land Use Regression and Bayesian Maximum Entropy Model for Estimating Groundwater Radon across Northing Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messier, K. P.; Serre, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radon (222Rn) is a naturally occurring chemically inert, colorless, and odorless radioactive gas produced from the decay of uranium (238U), which is ubiquitous in rocks and soils worldwide. Exposure to 222Rn is likely the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking via inhalation; however, exposure through untreated groundwater is also a contributing factor to both inhalation and ingestion routes. A land use regression (LUR) model for groundwater 222Rn with anisotropic geological and 238U based explanatory variables is developed, which helps elucidate the factors contributing to elevated 222Rn across North Carolina. Geological and uranium based variables are constructed in elliptical buffers surrounding each observation such that they capture the lateral geometric anisotropy present in groundwater 222Rn. Moreover, geological features are defined at three different geological spatial scales to allow the model to distinguish between large area and small area effects of geology on groundwater 222Rn. The LUR is also integrated into the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) geostatistical framework to increase accuracy and produce a point-level LUR-BME model of groundwater 222Rn across North Carolina including prediction uncertainty. The LUR-BME model of groundwater 222Rn results in a leave-one out cross-validation of 0.46 (Pearson correlation coefficient= 0.68), effectively predicting within the spatial covariance range. Modeled results of 222Rn concentrations show variability among Intrusive Felsic geological formations likely due to average bedrock 238U defined on the basis of overlying stream-sediment 238U concentrations that is a widely distributed consistently analyzed point-source data.

  19. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  20. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  1. Features of the electric-field distribution in anisotropic semiconductor wafers in a transverse magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, V. V.; Bormontov, E. N.

    2013-07-15

    A macroscopic model of the Hall effects and magnetoresistance in anisotropic semiconductor wafers is developed. The results obtained by solving the electrodynamic boundary problem allow the potential and eddy currents in anisotropic semiconductors to be calculated at different current-contact locations, depending on the parameters of the sample material's anisotropy. The results of this study are of great practical importance for investigating the physical properties of anisotropic semiconductors and simulating the electron-transport phenomena in devices based on anisotropic semiconductors.

  2. Anisotropic Total Variation Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grasmair, Markus; Lenzen, Frank

    2010-12-15

    Total variation regularization and anisotropic filtering have been established as standard methods for image denoising because of their ability to detect and keep prominent edges in the data. Both methods, however, introduce artifacts: In the case of anisotropic filtering, the preservation of edges comes at the cost of the creation of additional structures out of noise; total variation regularization, on the other hand, suffers from the stair-casing effect, which leads to gradual contrast changes in homogeneous objects, especially near curved edges and corners. In order to circumvent these drawbacks, we propose to combine the two regularization techniques. To that end we replace the isotropic TV semi-norm by an anisotropic term that mirrors the directional structure of either the noisy original data or the smoothed image. We provide a detailed existence theory for our regularization method by using the concept of relaxation. The numerical examples concluding the paper show that the proposed introduction of an anisotropy to TV regularization indeed leads to improved denoising: the stair-casing effect is reduced while at the same time the creation of artifacts is suppressed.

  3. MODELING THE MULTIWAVELENGTH LIGHT CURVES OF PSR B1259-63/LS 2883. II. THE EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC PULSAR WIND AND DOPPLER BOOSTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, S. W.; Huang, Y. F.; Cheng, K. S.

    2012-07-10

    PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 is a binary system in which a 48 ms pulsar orbits around a Be star in a high eccentric orbit with a long orbital period of about 3.4 yr. It is special for having asymmetric two-peak profiles in both the X-ray and TeV light curves. Recently, an unexpected GeV flare has been detected by the Fermi gamma-ray observatory several weeks after the last periastron passage. In this paper, we show that this observed GeV flare could be produced by the Doppler-boosted synchrotron emission in the bow-shock tail. An anisotropic pulsar wind model, which mainly affects the energy flux injection into the termination shock in a different orbital phase, is also used in this paper, and we find that the anisotropy in the pulsar wind can play a significant role in producing the asymmetric two-peak profiles in both X-ray and TeV light curves. The X-ray and TeV photons before periastron are mainly produced by the shocked electrons around the shock apex, and the light curves after periastron are contributed by the emission from the shock apex and the shock tail together, which result in asymmetric two-peak light curves.

  4. Study of one-dimensional spectral dynamic equations of the Reynolds stresses in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence: Application to split-spectrum modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiestel, R.

    1987-01-01

    The CTR numerical data base generated by direct simulation of homogeneous anisotropic turbulence was used to calculate all of the terms in the spectral balance equations for the turbulent Reynolds stresses. The aim in not only to test the main closure assumptions used in the split-spectrum models, but also to try to devise improved hypotheses deduced from the statistical information. Numerical simulations of turbulent flows provide a large amount of data, a thought provoking wealth of information. The main advantage of this type of comparison is that a great variety of flows can be considered, and this is necessary to test closure hypotheses. Moreover various initial conditions can be introduced in the calculation, even if they are not experimentally feasible. All the terms in the spectral equations can be calculated. The limited Reynolds numbers of the simulations and the statistical noise caused by a small sample, particularly at the large scales, causes some difficulty in the interpretation of the results, but the method of approach proved to be a powerful tool for testing and improving spectral closures.

  5. Spatially anisotropic Heisenberg kagome antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W.; Yavors'kii, T.; Everts, H.-U.

    2007-04-01

    In the search for spin-1/2 kagome antiferromagnets, the mineral volborthite has recently been the subject of experimental studies (Hiroi et al 2001 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 70 3377; Fukaya et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 207603; Bert et al 2004 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16 S829; Bert et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 087203). It has been suggested that the magnetic properties of this material are described by a spin-1/2 Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice with spatially anisotropic exchange couplings. We report on investigations of the {\\mathrm {Sp}}(\\mathcal {N}) symmetric generalization of this model in the large \\mathcal {N} limit. We obtain a detailed description of the dependence of possible ground states on the anisotropy and on the spin length S. A fairly rich phase diagram with a ferrimagnetic phase, incommensurate phases with and without long-range order and a decoupled chain phase emerges.

  6. A 1.5-D anisotropic sigma-coordinate thermal stress model of landlocked sea ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Y.; Tremblay, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a 1.5-D thermal stress model that takes into account the effect of land confinement, which causes anisotropy in thermal stresses. To this end, we fix the total strain in the direction perpendicular to the coastline to its value at landlocked ice onset. This prevents thermal expansion in the direction perpendicular to the coastline and therefore induces larger thermal stresses in this direction. The simulated stresses best match the observations, when a Young's Modulus of 0.5 GPa and a relaxation time constant of 8 days are used. This simulation gives root-mean-square errors of 13.0 and 13.1 kPa (˜15%) in the major and minor principal stresses, respectively. The simulated anisotropic component of thermal stress also generally agrees with observations. The optimal Young's Modulus is in the low range of reported values in the literature, and the optimal relaxation time constant (8 days) is larger than the largest relaxation time constant reported in the literature (5 days). A series of experiments are done to examine the model sensitivity to vertical resolution, snow cover, and the parameterizations of Young's Modulus and viscous creep. Results show that a minimum of one and three layers in the snow and ice, respectively, is required to simulate the thermal stresses within 15% error of the value assessed with the higher-resolution control simulation. This highlights the importance of resolving the internal snow and ice vertical temperature profile in order to properly model the thermal stresses of sea ice.

  7. Self-consistent treatment of the sheath boundary conditions by introducing anisotropic ion temperatures and virtual divertor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, Satoshi; Takizuka, Tomonori; Nakamura, Makoto; Hoshino, Kazuo; Ibano, Kenzo; Lang, Tee Long; Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional SOL-divertor plasma fluid simulation code which considers anisotropy of ion temperature has been developed so as to deal with sheath theory self-consistently. In our fluid modeling, explicit use of boundary condition for Mach number M at divertor plate, e.g., M = 1, becomes unnecessary. In order to deal with the Bohm condition and the sheath heat transmission factors at divertor plate self-consistently, we introduced a virtual divertor (VD) model which sets an artificial region beyond divertor plates and artificial sinks for particle, momentum and energy there to model the effects of the sheath region in front of the divertor plate. Validity of our fluid model with VD model is confirmed by showing that simulation results agree well with those from a kinetic code regarding the Bohm condition, ion temperature anisotropy and supersonic flow. We also show that the strength of artificial sinks in VD region does not affect profiles in plasma region at least in the steady state and that sheath heat transmission factors can be adjusted to theoretical values by VD model. Validity of viscous flux is also investigated.

  8. Pattern formation of anisotropic molecules on surfaces under non-equilibrium conditions as described by a minimum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Andreas; Jana, Pritam Kumar; Lied, Fabian

    2013-06-01

    The self-organization of lipophilic chain molecules on surfaces in vacuum deposition experiments has been recently studied by Monte Carlo simulations of a coarse grained microscopic model system. Surprisingly, the final potential energy depends in a non-monotonous way on the chosen flux and the surface temperature. Here we introduce a schematic model which contains the relevant physical ingredients of the microscopic model and which elucidates the origin of this anomalous non-equilibrium effect. Intra-cluster effects, reflecting the chain arrangement within one cluster, and inter-cluster effects, based on the distribution of chains among the different formed clusters, are taken into account. This schematic model is solved numerically as well as via analytical means. From the analytical solutions, it is possible to understand quantitatively for which interaction parameters the observed anomalies can indeed be observed. The generality of the observed phenomena is stressed. It is related to the concept of kinetic trapping, which often occurs during self-assembly.

  9. Electrical Wave Propagation in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle Based on Analytical Description of Cardiac Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergey F.; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher–Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  10. On mixed and displacement finite element models of a refined shear deformation theory for laminated anisotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    An improved plate theory that accounts for the transverse shear deformation is presented, and mixed and displacement finite element models of the theory are developed. The theory is based on an assumed displacement field in which the inplane displacements are expanded in terms of the thickness coordinate up to the cubic term and the transverse deflection is assumed to be independent of the thickness coordinate. The governing equations of motion for the theory are derived from the Hamilton's principle. The theory eliminates the need for shear correction factors because the transverse shear stresses are represented parabolically. A mixed finite element model that uses independent approximations of the displacements and moments, and a displacement model that uses only displacements as degrees of freedom are developed. A comparison of the numerical results for bending with the exact solutions of the new theory and the three-dimensional elasticity theory shows that the present theory (and hence the finite element models) is more accurate than other plate-theories of the same order.

  11. Electrical wave propagation in an anisotropic model of the left ventricle based on analytical description of cardiac architecture.

    PubMed

    Pravdin, Sergey F; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher-Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  12. Three-dimensional shear velocity anisotropic model of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Landès, Matthieu; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2015-01-01

    We cross correlate 4 years of seismic noise from the seismic network of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) to measure the group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. We average measurements from vertical and radial components to obtain 577 Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The transverse components provided 395 Love wave dispersion curves. We regionalize the group velocities measurements into 2-D velocity maps between 0.4 and 8 s. Finally, we locally inverted these maps for a pseudo 3-D anisotropic shear-velocity model down to 3 km below the sea level using a Neighborhood Algorithm. The 3-D isotropic shear-wave model shows three distinct high-velocity anomalies surrounded by a low-velocity ring. The anomaly located below the present "Plaine des Sables" could be related to an old intrusive body at the location of the former volcanic center before it migrated toward its present location. The second high-velocity body located below the summit of the volcano likely corresponds to the actual preferential dyke intrusion zone as highlighted by the seismicity. The third high-velocity anomaly located below the "Grandes Pentes" and the "Grand Brûlé" areas and is an imprint of the solidified magma chamber of the dismantled "Les Alizés" Volcano. Radial anisotropy shows two main anomalies: positive anisotropy above sea level highlighting the recent edifice of Piton de la Fournaise with an accumulation of horizontal lava flows and the second one below the sea level with a negative anisotropy corresponding to the ancient edifice of Piton de la Fournaise dominated by intrusions of vertical dykes.

  13. Reviews Book: Enjoyable Physics Equipment: SEP Colorimeter Box Book: Pursuing Power and Light Equipment: SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher Equipment: Sciencescope GLE Datalogger Equipment: EDU Logger Book: Physics of Sailing Book: The Lightness of Being Software: Logotron Insight iLog Studio iPhone Apps Lecture: 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Enjoyable Physics Mechanics book makes learning more fun SEP Colorimeter Box A useful and inexpensive colorimeter for the classroom Pursuing Power and Light Account of the development of science in the 19th centuary SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher An excellent resource for teaching about projectiles GLE Datalogger GPS software is combined with a datalogger EDU Logger Remote datalogger has greater sensing abilities Logotron Insight iLog Studio Software enables datlogging, data analysis and modelling iPhone Apps Mobile phone games aid study of gravity WORTH A LOOK Physics of Sailing Book journeys through the importance of physics in sailing The Lightness of Being Study of what the world is made from LECTURE The 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture presents the physics of fusion WEB WATCH Planet Scicast pushes boundaries of pupil creativity

  14. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5) that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information. PMID:26057524

  15. Anisotropic spinfoam cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennert, Julian; Sloan, David

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of a homogeneous, anisotropic universe are investigated within the context of spinfoam cosmology. Transition amplitudes are calculated for a graph consisting of a single node and three links—the ‘Daisy graph’—probing the behaviour a classical Bianchi I spacetime. It is shown further how the use of such single node graphs gives rise to a simplification of states such that all orders in the spin expansion can be calculated, indicating that it is the vertex expansion that contains information about quantum dynamics.

  16. Cosmological signatures of anisotropic spatial curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Thiago S.; Mena Marugán, Guillermo A.; Carneiro, Saulo

    2015-07-01

    If one is willing to give up the cherished hypothesis of spatial isotropy, many interesting cosmological models can be developed beyond the simple anisotropically expanding scenarios. One interesting possibility is presented by shear-free models in which the anisotropy emerges at the level of the curvature of the homogeneous spatial sections, whereas the expansion is dictated by a single scale factor. We show that such models represent viable alternatives to describe the large-scale structure of the inflationary universe, leading to a kinematically equivalent Sachs-Wolfe effect. Through the definition of a complete set of spatial eigenfunctions we compute the two-point correlation function of scalar perturbations in these models. In addition, we show how such scenarios would modify the spectrum of the CMB assuming that the observations take place in a small patch of a universe with anisotropic curvature.

  17. Anisotropic charged core envelope star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study a charged compact object with anisotropic pressures in a core envelope setting. The equation of state is quadratic in the core and linear in the envelope. There is smooth matching between the three regions: the core, envelope and the Reissner-Nordström exterior. We show that the presence of the electric field affects the masses, radii and compactification factors of stellar objects with values which are in agreement with previous studies. We investigate in particular the effect of electric field on the physical features of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 in the core envelope model. The gravitational potentials and the matter variables are well behaved within the stellar object. We demonstrate that the radius of the core and the envelope can vary by changing the parameters in the speed of sound.

  18. Gravitational baryogenesis after anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence, it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  19. Consideration for the dynamic depolarization in the effective-medium model for description of optical properties for anisotropic nanostructured semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Golovan, L. A.; Zabotnov, S. V. Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2009-02-15

    The effective-medium model has been generalized within the dipole approximation, with allowance for the shape anisotropy and dynamic depolarization of semiconductor nanoparticles. The calculations revealed nonmonotonic dependences for the birefringence and dichroism on the nanoparticle size. Comparison of the measured and calculated refractive index dispersion of birefringent porous silicon layers in the near-IR region indicates that consideration for the dynamic depolarization gives a better description of the optical properties for this material in comparison with the generally used effective-medium electrostatic approximation.

  20. Drift of Scroll Wave Filaments in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergei; Dierckx, Hans; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Scroll waves are three-dimensional vortices which occur in excitable media. Their formation in the heart results in the onset of cardiac arrhythmias, and the dynamics of their filaments determine the arrhythmia type. Most studies of filament dynamics were performed in domains with simple geometries and generic description of the anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Recently, we developed an analytical model of fibre structure and anatomy of the left ventricle (LV) of the human heart. Here, we perform a systematic study of the dynamics of scroll wave filaments for the cases of positive and negative tension in this anatomical model. We study the various possible shapes of LV and different degree of anisotropy of cardiac tissue. We show that, for positive filament tension, the final position of scroll wave filament is mainly determined by the thickness of the myocardial wall but, however, anisotropy attracts the filament to the LV apex. For negative filament tension, the filament buckles, and for most cases, tends to the apex of the heart with no or slight dependency on the thickness of the LV. We discuss the mechanisms of the observed phenomena and their implications for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26539486

  1. A viscoplastic theory for anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouailhas, D.; Freed, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the development of a unified, cyclic, viscoplastic model for anisotropic materials. The first part of the paper presents the foundations of the model in the framework of thermodynamics with internal variables. The second part considers the particular case of cubic symmetry, and addresses the cyclic behavior of a nickel-base single-crystal superalloy, CMSX-2, at high temperature (950 C).

  2. Wave simulation in anisotropic, saturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Carcione, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Porous media are anisotropic due to bedding, compaction and the presence of aligned microcracks and fractures. Here, I assume that the skeleton (and not the solid itself) is anisotropic. The rheological model also includes anisotropic tortuosity and permeability. The poroelastic equations are based on a transversely isotropic extension of Biot`s theory, and the problem is of plane strain type, i.e., two dimensional, and describes qP - qS propagation. In the high-frequency case, the (two) viscodynamic operators are approximated by Zener relaxation functions, that allow a close differential formulation of Biot`s equation of motion. The propagation is solved numerically, with a direct grid method and a time splitting integration algorithm, allowing the solution of the stiff part of the differential equations in closed analytical form. Snapshots in sandstone show that three waves propagate when the fluid is ideal (zero viscosity): the fast compressional and shear waves and the slow compressional wave. Anisotropic tortuosity has not a major influence on the faster modes, but significantly affects the slow wavefront. On the other hand, when the fluid is viscous, the slow wave becomes diffusive and appears as a static mode at the source location.

  3. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Anisotropic thermal diffusion in magnetized plasmas is an important physical phenomena for a diverse set of physical conditions ranging from astrophysical plasmas to MFE and ICF. Yet numerically simulating this phenomenon accurately poses significant challenges when the computational mesh is misaligned with respect to the magnetic field. Particularly when the temperature gradients are unresolved, one frequently finds entropy violating solutions with heat flowing from cold to hot zones for χ∥ /χ⊥ >=102 which is substantially smaller than the range of interest which can reach 1010 or higher. In this talk we present a new implicit algorithm for solving the anisotropic thermal diffusion equations and demonstrate its characteristics on what has become a fairly standard set of test problems in the literature. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-5687A.

  4. Theoretical investigation on the magnetic and electric properties in TbSb compound through an anisotropic microscopic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ranke, P. J.; Ribeiro, P. O.; Carvalho, A. Magnus G.; Alho, B. P.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Nobrega, E. P.; Caldas, A.; de Sousa, V. S. R.; Lopes, P. H. O.; de Oliveira, N. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report the strong correlations between the magnetoresistivity and the magnetic entropy change in the cubic antiferromagnetic TbSb compound. The theoretical investigation was performed through a microscopic model which takes into account the crystalline electrical field anisotropy, exchange coupling interactions between the up and down magnetic sublattices, and the Zeeman interaction. The easy magnetization directions changes from ⟨001⟩ to ⟨110⟩ and then to ⟨111⟩ observed experimentally was successfully theoretically described. Also, the calculation of the temperature dependence of electric resistivity showed good agreement with the experimental data. Theoretical predictions were calculated for the temperature dependence of the magnetic entropy and resistivity changes upon magnetic field variation. Besides, the difference in the spin up and down sublattices resistivity was investigated.

  5. Propagation properties of an optical vortex carried by a Bessel-Gaussian beam in anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Li, Jiangting; Huang, Qingqing

    2016-08-01

    Rytov theory was employed to establish the transmission model for the optical vortices carried by Bessel-Gaussian (BG) beams in weak anisotropic turbulence based on the generalized anisotropic von Karman spectrum. The influences of asymmetry anisotropic turbulence eddies and source parameters on the signal orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode detection probability of partially coherent BG beams in anisotropic turbulence were discussed. Anisotropic characteristics of the turbulence could enhance the OAM mode transmission performance. The spatial partially coherence of the beam source would increase turbulent aberration's effect on the optical vortices. BG beams could dampen the influences of the turbulence because of their nondiffraction and self-healing characteristics. PMID:27505641

  6. Anisotropic Nanomechanics of Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Nanostructured "Skin" Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, KyeongJae

    2000-01-01

    The stiffness and plasticity of boron nitride nanotubes are investigated using generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics and ab-initio total energy methods. Due to boron-nitride BN bond buckling effects, compressed zigzag BN nanotubes are found to undergo novel anisotropic strain release followed by anisotropic plastic buckling. The strain is preferentially released towards N atoms in the rotated BN bonds. The tubes buckle anisotropically towards only one end when uniaxially compressed from both. A "skin-effect" model of smart nanocomposite materials is proposed which will localize the structural damage towards the 'skin' or surface side of the material.

  7. Quantitative Permeability Prediction for Anisotropic Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Q.; Thompson, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Pore-scale modeling as a predictive tool has become an integral to both research and commercial simulation in recent years. Permeability is one of the most important of the many properties that can be simulated. Traditionally, permeability is determined using Darcy's law, based on the assumption that the pressure gradient is aligned with the principal flow direction. However, a wide variety of porous media exhibit anisotropic permeability due to particle orientation or laminated structure. In these types of materials, the direction of fluid flow is not aligned with the pressure gradient (except along the principal directions). Thus, it is desirable to predict the full permeability tensor for anisotropic materials using a first-principles pore-scale approach. In this work, we present a fast method to determine the full permeability tensor and the principal directions using a novel network modeling algorithm. We also test the ability of network modeling (which is an approximate method) to detect anisotropy in various structures. Both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods and network modeling have emerged as effective techniques to predict rock properties. CFD models are more rigorous but computationally expensive. Network modeling involves significant approximations but can be orders-of-magnitude more efficient computationally, which is important for both speed and the ability to model larger scales. This work uses network modeling, with simulations performed on two types of anisotropic materials: laminated packings (with layers of different sized particles) and oriented packings (containing particles with preferential orientation). Pore network models are created from the porous media data, and a novel method is used to determine the permeability tensor and principal flow direction using pore network modeling. The method is verified by comparing the calculated principal directions with the known anisotropy and also by comparing permeability with values from CFD

  8. EARA2014 (East Asia Radially Anisotropic Model Based on Adjoint Tomography) and its Interpretations: Insights to the Formation of the Hangai Dome and the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Niu, F.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    EARA2014 -a 3-D radially anisotropic model of the crust and mantle beneath East Asia down to 900 km depth- is developed by adjoint tomography based on a spectral element method. The data set used for the inversion comprises 1.7 million frequency-dependent traveltime measurements from waveforms of 227 earthquakes recorded by 1869 stations. After 20 iterations, the new model (named EARA2014) exhibits sharp and detailed wave speed anomalies with improved correlations with surface tectonic units compared to previous models. As part of tectonic interpretations of EARA2014, we investigated the seismic wavespeed anomalies beneath two prominent uplifted regions in East Asia: (1) Hangai Dome, an intra-continental low-relief surface with more than 2 km elevation in central Mongolia, and (2) Tibetan Plateau, a vast continental-margin surface with an average elevation of 4.5 km in west China. We discover beneath Hangai Dome a deep low shear wavespeed (low-V) conduit indicating a slightly warmer (54 K-127 K) upwelling from the transition zone. We propose that the mantle upwelling induced decompression melting in the uppermost mantle and that excess heat associated with melt transport modified the lithosphere that isostatically compensates the surface uplift of Hangai Dome at upper mantle depths (> 80 km). On the other hand, we observe no discernable focused deep mantle upwelling directly beneath Tibetan Plateau, which is instead dominated by a strong high-V structure, appearing below 100 km depth and extending to the bottom of the mantle transition zone. However, we find a very strong and localized low-V anomaly beneath the Tibetan Plateau in the crust and uppermost mantle (at depths of ~50 km and 100 km) mainly confined within the Songpan Ganzi Fold Belt and the northern Qiangtang Block. This low-V anomaly is spatially linked to a low-V anomaly beneath the Chuandian Block in the same depth range, which is fed by a deep mantle upwelling directly beneath Hainan Volcano in south

  9. Constructing 3D isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic crustal models across USArray using Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity: inferring continental stress field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F. C.; Schmandt, B.; Tsai, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray Transportable Array (TA) has provided a great opportunity for imaging the detailed lithospheric structure beneath the continental US. In this presentation, we will report our recent progress on constructing detailed 3D isotropic and anisotropic crustal models of the contiguous US using Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity measurements across TA. In particular, we will discuss our recent methodology development of extracting short period Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh-wave H/V (horizontal to vertical) amplitude ratios, using multicomponent noise cross-correlations. To retain the amplitude ratio information between vertical and horizontal components, for each station, we perform daily noise pre-processing (temporal normalization and spectrum whitening) simultaneously for all three components. For each station pair, amplitude measurements between cross-correlations of different components (radial-radial, radial-vertical, vertical-radial and vertical-vertical) are then used to determine the Rayleigh-wave H/V ratios at the two station locations. Measurements from all available station pairs are used to determine isotropic and directionally dependent Rayleigh-wave H/V ratios at each location between 8- and 24-second period. The isotropic H/V ratio maps, combined with previous longer period Rayleigh-wave H/V ratio maps from earthquakes and Rayleigh-wave phase velocity maps from both ambient noise and earthquakes, are used to invert for a new 3-D isotropic crustal and upper-mantle model in the western United States. The new model has an outstanding vertical resolution in the upper crust and tradeoffs between different parameters are mitigated. A clear 180-degree periodicity is observed in the directionally dependent H/V ratio measurements for many locations where upper crustal anisotropy is likely strong. Across the US, good correlation is observed between the inferred fast directions in the upper crust and documented maximum

  10. Generalized anisotropic turbulence spectra and applications in the optical waves' propagation through anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2015-11-16

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have shown that the atmospheric turbulence exhibits both anisotropic and non-Kolmogorov properties. In this work, two theoretical atmosphere refractive-index fluctuations spectral models are derived for optical waves propagating through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. They consider simultaneously the finite turbulence inner and outer scales and the asymmetric property of turbulence eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane throughout the path. Two anisotropy factors which parameterize the asymmetry of turbulence eddies in both horizontal and vertical directions are introduced in the orthogonal xy-plane, so that the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence eddies in the xy-plane is no longer required. Deviations from the classic 11/3 power law behavior in the spectrum model are also allowed by assuming power law value variations between 3 and 4. Based on the derived anisotropic spectral model and the Rytov approximation theory, expressions for the variance of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Calculations are performed to analyze the derived spectral models and the variance of AOA fluctuations. PMID:26698490

  11. Simple recurrence matrix relations for multilayer anisotropic thin films.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, E

    2000-01-01

    Generalized Abelès relations for one anisotropic thin film [E. Cojocaru, Appl. Opt. 36, 2825-2829 (1997)] are developed for light propagation from an isotropic medium of incidence (with refractive index n(0)) within a multilayer anisotropic thin film coated onto an anisotropic substrate. An immersion model is used for which it is assumed that each layer is imaginatively embedded between isotropic gaps of zero thickness and refractive index n(0). This model leads to simple expressions for the resultant transmitted and reflected electric field amplitudes at interfaces. They parallel the Abelès recurrence relations for layered isotropic media. These matrix relations include multiple reflections while they deal with total fields. They can be applied directly to complex stacks of isotropic and anisotropic thin films. PMID:18337882

  12. a New Approach to Bulk Wave Propagation in Anisotropic Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tverdokhlebov, Andrey

    A new approach to a theoretical description of ultrasonic bulk wave propagation through anisotropic media is developed from the retarded potential representation which was obtained for the Green's function of the elastic wave equation in anisotropic media. The general formulation of the problem and the method of solution are presented. On the basis of the theoretical development, a quantitative model was obtained that yields and properly describes all major features of the phenomena of an anisotropic filter influence. A comparison with other contemporary methods and models for the quantitative evaluation of the bulk wave propagation in anisotropic media is outlined and briefly discussed. The experimental proof of principle was established by ultrasonic measurements performed on centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) and unidirectional graphite fiber -epoxy composite specimens. The experimental technique used a skip-distance arrangement of the identical quasi -point probes serving as a sender and a receiver. Consistent experimental results were attained allowing us to consider the suggested experimental arrangements as a basis for the future development of NDE technique for anisotropic material characterization. Three different types of pilot computer software were developed from this generalized retarded potential model. The results of the simulation runs turn out to be self- and mutually consistent and supported by experiments. The phenomena, such as beam skewing, beam splitting, beam focusing, unsymmetrical beams and other anisotropic effects, some of which have been already known from earlier experimental observations, emerge as computational results of the software developed from the model.

  13. Improved Beam Theory for Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The behavior of beams made of anisotropic material was investigated in order to develop an appropriate model of such behavior. Closed form solutions of the problem were derived using two alternative approaches. In the first approach, the axial displacements are expanded as a series of eigenwarpings. In the second approach, the axial stresses are expanded as a series of eigenwarpings. A finite element solution was also derived using the same displacement field as in the first approach.

  14. Anisotropic Bianchi types VIII and IX locally rotationally symmetric cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Assad, M.J.D.; Soares, I.D.

    1983-10-15

    We present a class of exact cosmological solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations, which are anisotropic and spatially homogeneous of Bianchi types VIII and IX, and class IIIb in the Stewart-Ellis classification of locally rotationally symmetric models. If we take the electromagnetic field equal to zero, a class of Bianchi types VIII/IX spatially homogeneous anisotropic cosmological solutions with perfect fluid is obtained.

  15. An engineered anisotropic nanofilm with unidirectional wetting properties.

    PubMed

    Malvadkar, Niranjan A; Hancock, Matthew J; Sekeroglu, Koray; Dressick, Walter J; Demirel, Melik C

    2010-12-01

    Anisotropic textured surfaces allow water striders to walk on water, butterflies to shed water from their wings and plants to trap insects and pollen. Capturing these natural features in biomimetic surfaces is an active area of research. Here, we report an engineered nanofilm, composed of an array of poly(p-xylylene) nanorods, which demonstrates anisotropic wetting behaviour by means of a pin-release droplet ratchet mechanism. Droplet retention forces in the pin and release directions differ by up to 80 μN, which is over ten times greater than the values reported for other engineered anisotropic surfaces. The nanofilm provides a microscale smooth surface on which to transport microlitre droplets, and is also relatively easy to synthesize by a bottom-up vapour-phase technique. An accompanying comprehensive model successfully describes the film's anisotropic wetting behaviour as a function of measurable film morphology parameters. PMID:20935657

  16. Autofocus imaging: Experimental results in an anisotropic austenitic weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.; Hunter, A.

    2012-05-01

    The quality of an ultrasonic array image, especially for anisotropic material, depends on accurate information about acoustic properties. Inaccuracy of acoustic properties causes image degradation, e.g., blurring, errors in locating of reflectors and introduction of artifacts. In this paper, for an anisotropic austenitic steel weld, an autofocus imaging technique is presented. The array data from a series of beacons is captured and then used to statistically extract anisotropic weld properties by using a Monte-Carlo inversion approach. The beacon and imaging systems are realized using two separated arrays; one acts as a series of beacons and the other images these beacons. Key to the Monte-Carlo inversion scheme is a fast forward model of wave propagation in the anisotropic weld and this is based on the Dijkstra algorithm. Using this autofocus approach a measured weld map was extracted from an austenitic weld and used to reduce location errors, initially greater than 6mm, to less than 1mm.

  17. Sub-GLE Solar Particle Events and the Implications for Lightly-Shielded Systems Flown During an Era of Low Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William; Rojdev, Kristina; Matzkind, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Many of the large space missions must be very rigorous in their designs to reduce risk from radiation damage as much as possible. Some ways of reducing this risk have been to build in multiple redundancies, purchase/develop radiation hardened electronics parts, and plan for worst case radiation environment scenarios. These methods work well for these ambitious missions that can afford the costs associated with these meticulous efforts. However, there have been more small spacecraft and CubeSats with smaller duration missions entering the space arena, which can take some additional risks, but cannot afford to implement all of these risk-reducing methods. Therefore, one way to quantify the radiation exposure risk for these smaller spacecraft would be to investigate the radiation environment pertinent to the mission to better understand these radiation exposures, rather than always designing to the infrequent, worst-case environment. In this study, we have investigated 34 historical solar particle events (1974-2010) that occurred during a time period when the sun spot number (SSN) was less than 30. These events contain Ground Level Events (GLE), sub-GLEs, and sub-sub-GLEs(sup 1-3). GLEs are extremely energetic solar particle events (SPEs) having proton energies often extending into the several GeV range and producing secondary particles in the atmosphere, mostly neutrons, observed with ground station neutron monitors. Sub-GLE events are less energetic, extending into the several hundred MeV range, but without producing detectable levels of secondary atmospheric particles. Sub-sub GLEs are even less energetic with an observable increase in protons at energies greater than 30 MeV, but no observable proton flux above 300 MeV. The spectra for these events were fitted using a double power law fit in particle rigidity, called the Band fit method. The differential spectra were then input into the NASA Langley Research Center HZETRN 2005, which is a high-energy particle

  18. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  19. Soft particles with anisotropic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurtenberger, Peter

    Responsive colloids such as thermo- or pH-sensitive microgels are ideal model systems to investigate the relationship between the nature of interparticle interactions and the plethora of self-assembled structures that can form in colloidal suspensions. They allow for a variation of the form, strength and range of the interaction potential almost at will. While microgels have extensively been used as model systems to investigate various condensed matter problems such as glass formation, jamming or crystallization, they can also be used to study systems with anisotropic interactions. Here we show results from a systematic investigation of the influence of softness and anisotropy on the structural and dynamic properties of strongly interacting suspensions. We focus first on ionic microgels. Due to their large number of internal counterions they possess very large polarisabilities, and we can thus use external electrical ac fields to generate large dipolar contributions to the interparticle interaction potential. This leads to a number of new crystal phases, and we can trigger crystal-crystal phase transitions through the appropriate choice of the field strength. We then show that this approach can be extended to more complex particle shapes in an attempt to copy nature's well documented success in fabricating complex nanostructures such as virus shells via self assembly. European Research Council (ERC-339678-COMPASS).

  20. Highly anisotropic Dirac fermions in square graphynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lizhi; Wang, Zhengfei; Rao, Jiansheng; Li, Ziheng; Huang, Wulin; Wang, Zhiming; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Feng

    Recently, there have been intense search of new 2D materials, and one especially appealing class of 2D materials is the all-carbon allotropes of Dirac materials. Here, we predict a new family of 2D carbon allotropes, square graphynes (S-graphynes) that exhibit highly anisotropic Dirac Fermions, using first-principle calculations within density functional theory. The equal-energy contour of their 3D band structure shows a crescent shape, and the Dirac crescent has varying Fermi velocities from 0.6 x 105 to 7.2 x 105 m/s along different k directions. Near the Fermi level, the Dirac crescent can be nicely expressed by an extended 2D Dirac model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, tight-binding band fitting reveals that the Dirac crescent originates from the next-nearest-neighbor interactions between C atoms. Our findings enrich the Dirac physics founded in other 2D Dirac systems, and offer a new design mechanism for creating Dirac band by tuning the interaction range. We envision that the highly anisotropic Dirac crescent may be exploited in all-carbon-based electronic devices for manipulating anisotropic electron propagation.

  1. Highly anisotropic Dirac fermions in square graphynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lizhi; Wang, Zhengfei; Rao, Jiansheng; Li, Ziheng; Huang, Wulin; Wang, Zhiming; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Feng

    Recently, there have been intense search of new 2D materials, and one especially appealing class of 2D materials is the all-carbon allotropes of Dirac materials. Here, we predict a new family of 2D carbon allotropes, square graphynes (S-graphynes) that exhibit highly anisotropic Dirac Fermions, using first-principle calculations within density functional theory. The equal-energy contour of their 3D band structure shows a crescent shape, and the Dirac crescent has varying Fermi velocities from 0.6 ×105 to 7.2 ×105 m/s along different k directions. Near the Fermi level, the Dirac crescent can be nicely expressed by an extended 2D Dirac model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, tight-binding band fitting reveals that the Dirac crescent originates from the next-nearest-neighbor interactions between C atoms. Our findings enrich the Dirac physics founded in other 2D Dirac systems, and offer a new design mechanism for creating Dirac band by tuning the interaction range. We envision that the highly anisotropic Dirac crescent may be exploited in all-carbon-based electronic devices for manipulating anisotropic electron propagation.

  2. ARTc: Anisotropic reflectivity and transmissivity calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Reza; Schmitt, Douglas R.

    2016-08-01

    While seismic anisotropy is known to exist within the Earth's crust and even deeper, isotropic or even highly symmetric elastic anisotropic assumptions for seismic imaging is an over-simplification which may create artifacts in the image, target mis-positioning and hence flawed interpretation. In this paper, we have developed the ARTc algorithm to solve reflectivity, transmissivity as well as velocity and particle polarization in the most general case of elastic anisotropy. This algorithm is able to provide reflectivity solution from the boundary between two anisotropic slabs with arbitrary symmetry and orientation up to triclinic. To achieve this, the algorithm solves full elastic wave equation to find polarization, slowness and amplitude of all six wave-modes generated from the incident plane-wave and welded interface. In the first step to calculate the reflectivity, the algorithm solves properties of the incident wave such as particle polarization and slowness. After calculation of the direction of generated waves, the algorithm solves their respective slowness and particle polarization. With this information, the algorithm then solves a system of equations incorporating the imposed boundary conditions to arrive at the scattered wave amplitudes, and thus reflectivity and transmissivity. Reflectivity results as well as slowness and polarization are then tested in complex computational anisotropic models to ensure their accuracy and reliability. ARTc is coded in MATLAB ® and bundled with an interactive GUI and bash script to run on single or multi-processor computers.

  3. Anisotropic perturbations due to dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Moss, Adam

    2006-08-01

    A variety of observational tests seem to suggest that the Universe is anisotropic. This is incompatible with the standard dogma based on adiabatic, rotationally invariant perturbations. We point out that this is a consequence of the standard decomposition of the stress-energy tensor for the cosmological fluids, and that rotational invariance need not be assumed, if there is elastic rigidity in the dark energy. The dark energy required to achieve this might be provided by point symmetric domain wall network with P/ρ=-2/3, although the concept is more general. We illustrate this with reference to a model with cubic symmetry and discuss various aspects of the model.

  4. A transitioning universe with anisotropic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anil Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a model of transitioning universe with minimal interaction between perfect fluid and anisotropic dark energy in Bianchi I space-time. The two sources are assumed to minimally interacted and therefore their energy momentum tensors are conserved separately. The explicit expression for average scale factor are considered in hybrid form that gives time varying deceleration parameter which describes both the early and late time physical features of universe. We also discuss the physical and geometrical properties of the model derived in this paper. The solution is interesting physically as it explain accelerating universe as well as singularity free universe.

  5. Ordered Self-Similar Patterns in Anisotropic Stochastic Growth.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-07-01

    We propose an anisotropic stochastic growth model to rationalize the anisotropic self-assembly of supramolecules to form elongated two-dimensional ribbon structures in a recent experiment. The model exhibits distinct growth scenarios that are critically controlled by the ratio of the transverse and the longitudinal growth rate. In the regime of suppressed transverse growth, the model generates the experimentally observed elongated structures through layer-by-layer growing. We further observe the convergence of rough clusters toward smooth regular elliptic patterns by averaging over a number of independent growth processes. Remarkably, these resulting elliptic clusters are self-similar in each instantaneous moment in the growth process. Statistical analysis suggests that the realization of such ordered patterns does not rely on the delicate coordination of different parts in the cluster growth. The self-similarity phenomenon derived from this idealized model may have wider implications, notably in the designed clustering of various elementary building blocks with anisotropic interactions. PMID:27003104

  6. Anisotropic Damage Analysis of HY100 Steel Under Quasistatic Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-01-01

    The effect of MnS inclusion orientation on damage evolution and fracture toughness in HYlOO steel is investigated in the context of anisotropic damage modeling at the continuum level. Experimental notched-bar data sets are analyzed and modeled using finite element calculations with constitutive behavior that assumes isotropic elastoplastic behavior in conjunction with anisotropic damage.

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of a thermal dendrite using the phase field method with automatic anisotropic and unstructured adaptive finite element meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkis, C.; Silva, L.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Plapp, M.

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic growth is computed with automatic adaptation of an anisotropic and unstructured finite element mesh. The energy conservation equation is formulated for solid and liquid phases considering an interface balance that includes the Gibbs-Thomson effect. An equation for a diffuse interface is also developed by considering a phase field function with constant negative value in the liquid and constant positive value in the solid. Unknowns are the phase field function and a dimensionless temperature, as proposed by [1]. Linear finite element interpolation is used for both variables, and discretization stabilization techniques ensure convergence towards a correct non-oscillating solution. In order to perform quantitative computations of dendritic growth on a large domain, two additional numerical ingredients are necessary: automatic anisotropic unstructured adaptive meshing [2,[3] and parallel implementations [4], both made available with the numerical platform used (CimLib) based on C++ developments. Mesh adaptation is found to greatly reduce the number of degrees of freedom. Results of phase field simulations for dendritic solidification of a pure material in two and three dimensions are shown and compared with reference work [1]. Discussion on algorithm details and the CPU time will be outlined.

  8. Superlens from complementary anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. X.; Tam, H. L.; Wang, F. Y.; Cheah, K. W.

    2007-12-01

    Metamaterials with isotropic property have been shown to possess novel optical properties such as a negative refractive index that can be used to design a superlens. Recently, it was shown that metamaterials with anisotropic property can translate the high-frequency wave vector k values from evanescence to propagating. However, electromagnetic waves traveling in single-layer anisotropic metamaterial produce diverging waves of different spatial frequency. In this work, it is shown that, using bilayer metamaterials that have complementary anisotropic property, the diverging waves are recombined to produce a subwavelength image, i.e., a superlens device can be designed. The simulation further shows that the design can be achieved using a metal/oxide multilayer, and a resolution of 30 nm can be easily obtained in the optical frequency range.

  9. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  10. Simulating convergent extension by way of anisotropic differential adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Mark; Jones, Gerald L; Glazier, James A

    2003-05-21

    Simulations using the Extended Potts Model suggest that anisotropic differential adhesion can account for convergent extension, as observed during embryonic development of the frog Xenopus laevis for example. During gastrulation in these frogs, convergent extension produces longitudinal tissue growth from latitudinal elongation and migration of aligned constituent cells. The Extended Potts Model employs clustered points on a grid to represent subdivided cells with probabilistic displacement of cell boundaries such that small changes in energy drive gradual tissue development. For modeling convergent extension, simulations include anisotropic differential adhesion: the degree of attachment between adjacent elongated cells depends on their relative orientation. Without considering additional mechanisms, simulations based on anisotropic differential adhesion reproduce the hallmark stages of convergent extension in the correct sequence, with random fluctuations as sufficient impetus for cell reorganization. PMID:12727459

  11. Cosmic parallax as a probe of late time anisotropic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Quercellini, Claudia; Cabella, Paolo; Balbi, Amedeo; Amendola, Luca

    2009-09-15

    Cosmic parallax is the change of angular separation between a pair of sources at cosmological distances induced by an anisotropic expansion. An accurate astrometric experiment like Gaia could observe or put constraints on cosmic parallax. Examples of anisotropic cosmological models are Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi void models for off-center observers (introduced to explain the observed acceleration without the need for dark energy) and Bianchi metrics. If dark energy has an anisotropic equation of state, as suggested recently, then a substantial anisotropy could arise at z < or approx. 1 and escape the stringent constraints from the cosmic microwave background. In this paper we show that such models could be constrained by the Gaia satellite or by an upgraded future mission.

  12. 2D seismic reflection tomography in strongly anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guangnan; Zhou, Bing; Li, Hongxi; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zelin

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltime tomography is an effective method to reconstruct underground anisotropic parameters. Currently, most anisotropic tomographic methods were developed under the assumption of weak anisotropy. The tomographic method proposed here can be implemented for imaging subsurface targets in strongly anisotropic media with a known tilted symmetry axis, since the adopted ray tracing method is suitable for anisotropic media with arbitrary degree. There are three kinds of reflection waves (qP, qSV and qSH waves) that were separately used to invert the blocky abnormal body model. The reflection traveltime tomographiy is developed here because a surface observation system is the most economical and practical way compared with crosswell and VSP. The numerical examples show that the traveltimes of qP reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}13},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully. Traveltimes of qSV reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully, with the exception of the {{c}13}, since it is less sensitive than other parameters. Traveltimes of qSH reflection wave also have inverted parameters {{c}44} \\text{and} {{c}66} successfully. In addition, we find that the velocity sensitivity functions (derivatives of phase velocity with respect to elastic moduli parameters) and raypath illuminating angles have a great influence on the qualities of tomograms according to the inversion of theoretical models. Finally, the numerical examples confirm that the reflection traveltime tomography can be applied to invert strongly anisotropic models.

  13. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  14. Anisotropic local modification of crystal field levels in Pr-based pyrochlores: a muon-induced effect modeled using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Foronda, F R; Lang, F; Möller, J S; Lancaster, T; Boothroyd, A T; Pratt, F L; Giblin, S R; Prabhakaran, D; Blundell, S J

    2015-01-01

    Although muon spin relaxation is commonly used to probe local magnetic order, spin freezing, and spin dynamics, we identify an experimental situation in which the measured response is dominated by an effect resulting from the muon-induced local distortion rather than the intrinsic behavior of the host compound. We demonstrate this effect in some quantum spin ice candidate materials Pr(2)B(2)O(7) (B=Sn, Zr, Hf), where we detect a static distribution of magnetic moments that appears to grow on cooling. Using density functional theory we show how this effect can be explained via a hyperfine enhancement arising from a splitting of the non-Kramers doublet ground states on Pr ions close to the muon, which itself causes a highly anisotropic distortion field. We provide a quantitative relationship between this effect and the measured temperature dependence of the muon relaxation and discuss the relevance of these observations to muon experiments in other magnetic materials. PMID:25615502

  15. Configurational temperature and local properties of the anisotropic Gay-Berne liquid crystal model: Applications to the isotropic liquid/vapor interface and isotropic/nematic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Morineau, Denis; Lefort, Ronan; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Molecular simulations in the isothermal statistical ensembles require that the macroscopic thermal and mechanical equilibriums are respected and that the local values of these properties are constant at every point in the system. The thermal equilibrium in Monte Carlo simulations can be checked through the calculation of the configurational temperature, {k_BT_{conf}={< |nabla _r U({r}^N)|2>}/{< nabla _r{^2} U({r}^N) >}}, where nabla _r is the nabla operator of position vector r. As far as we know, T_{conf} was never calculated with the anisotropic Gay-Berne potential, whereas the calculation of T_{conf} is much more widespread with more common potentials (Lennard Jones, electrostatic, …). We establish here an operational expression of the macroscopic and local configurational temperatures, and we investigate locally the isotropic liquid phase, the liquid / vapor interface, and the isotropic-nematic transition by Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Configurational temperature and local properties of the anisotropic Gay-Berne liquid crystal model: applications to the isotropic liquid/vapor interface and isotropic/nematic transition.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Morineau, Denis; Lefort, Ronan; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-01-21

    Molecular simulations in the isothermal statistical ensembles require that the macroscopic thermal and mechanical equilibriums are respected and that the local values of these properties are constant at every point in the system. The thermal equilibrium in Monte Carlo simulations can be checked through the calculation of the configurational temperature, k(B)T(conf)=<|∇(r)U(r(N))|(2)>/<∇(r) (2)U(r(N))>, where ∇(r) is the nabla operator of position vector r. As far as we know, T(conf) was never calculated with the anisotropic Gay-Berne potential, whereas the calculation of T(conf) is much more widespread with more common potentials (Lennard Jones, electrostatic, ...). We establish here an operational expression of the macroscopic and local configurational temperatures, and we investigate locally the isotropic liquid phase, the liquid / vapor interface, and the isotropic-nematic transition by Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:21261339

  17. Anisotropic texture of ice sheet surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Benjamin E.; Raymond, Charles F.; Scambos, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the magnitude and spatial organization of small-scale surface features (the surface texture) of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The texture is revealed in shaded relief maps of digital elevation models because surface slopes emphasize short-wavelength topography. We show that the surface slope components parallel to and perpendicular to the ice flow direction of ice sheets are both qualitatively and quantitatively different from one another. The parallel component variations are larger in magnitude than the perpendicular component variations, and features in maps of the parallel component are elongated perpendicular to the ice flow direction, while features in maps of the perpendicular component are elongated at a diagonal to the ice flow direction. These properties may be explained by a simple model of glacier dynamics in which a linearly viscous slab of ice flows over a random, isotropic, red noise bed. In this model an anisotropic surface results from an isotropic bed because the surface anisotropy derives from the anisotropic transfer of bed topography to the surface by viscous flow dynamics. The modeling results suggest that analysis of surface texture magnitude and anisotropy can be used to identify areas of sliding ice from surface topography data alone and can be used to roughly estimate sliding rates where bed topography is known.

  18. Hedgehogs in a three-dimensional anisotropic spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Thordur

    1983-06-01

    We study a continuum version of a classical anisotropic spin model in three dimensions with three component spins. We prove the existence of topological defects, called hedgehogs, which are analogous to the vortices in the two-dimensional xy-model and have a logarithmically divergent action. Bounds for the interaction energy of a hedgehog and an antihedgehog are derived.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  20. The traces of anisotropic dark energy in light of Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona, Wilmar; Kunz, Martin; Hollenstein, Lukas E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@zhaw.ch

    2014-07-01

    We study a dark energy model with non-zero anisotropic stress, either linked to the dark energy density or to the dark matter density. We compute approximate solutions that allow to characterise the behaviour of the dark energy model and to assess the stability of the perturbations. We also determine the current limits on such an anisotropic stress from the cosmic microwave background data by the Planck satellite, and derive the corresponding constraints on the modified growth parameters like the growth index, the effective Newton's constant and the gravitational slip.

  1. Multiple anisotropic collisions for advection-diffusion Lattice Boltzmann schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a symmetrized framework for the analysis of the anisotropic advection-diffusion Lattice Boltzmann schemes. Two main approaches build the anisotropic diffusion coefficients either from the anisotropic anti-symmetric collision matrix or from the anisotropic symmetric equilibrium distribution. We combine and extend existing approaches for all commonly used velocity sets, prescribe most general equilibrium and build the diffusion and numerical-diffusion forms, then derive and compare solvability conditions, examine available anisotropy and stable velocity magnitudes in the presence of advection. Besides the deterioration of accuracy, the numerical diffusion dictates the stable velocity range. Three techniques are proposed for its elimination: (i) velocity-dependent relaxation entries; (ii) their combination with the coordinate-link equilibrium correction; and (iii) equilibrium correction for all links. Two first techniques are also available for the minimal (coordinate) velocity sets. Even then, the two-relaxation-times model with the isotropic rates often gains in effective stability and accuracy. The key point is that the symmetric collision mode does not modify the modeled diffusion tensor but it controls the effective accuracy and stability, via eigenvalue combinations of the opposite parity eigenmodes. We propose to reduce the eigenvalue spectrum by properly combining different anisotropic collision elements. The stability role of the symmetric, multiple-relaxation-times component, is further investigated with the exact von Neumann stability analysis developed in diffusion-dominant limit.

  2. Isotropic and anisotropic bouncing cosmologies in Palatini gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Barragan, Carlos; Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2010-10-15

    We study isotropic and anisotropic (Bianchi I) cosmologies in Palatini f(R) and f(R,R{sub {mu}{nu}R}{sup {mu}{nu}}) theories of gravity with a perfect fluid and consider the existence of nonsingular bouncing solutions in the early universe. We find that all f(R) models with isotropic bouncing solutions develop shear singularities in the anisotropic case. On the contrary, the simple quadratic model R+aR{sup 2}/R{sub P}+R{sub {mu}{nu}R}{sup {mu}{nu}/}R{sub P} exhibits regular bouncing solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic cases for a wide range of equations of state, including dust (for a<0) and radiation (for arbitrary a). It thus represents a purely gravitational solution to the big bang singularity and anisotropy problems of general relativity without the need for exotic (w>1) sources of matter/energy or extra degrees of freedom.

  3. Anisotropic charge Kondo effect in a triple quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gwangsu; Park, Jinhong; Lee, S-S B; Sim, H-S

    2014-12-01

    We predict that an anisotropic charge Kondo effect appears in a triple quantum dot, when the system has twofold degenerate ground states of (1,1,0) and (0,0,1) charge configurations. Using bosonization and refermionization methods, we find that at low temperature the system has the two different phases of massive charge fluctuations between the two charge configurations and vanishing fluctuations, which are equivalent with the Kondo-screened and ferromagnetic phases of the anisotropic Kondo model, respectively. The phase transition is identifiable by electron conductance measurement, offering the possibility of experimentally exploring the anisotropic Kondo model. Our charge Kondo effect has a similar origin to that in a negative-U Anderson impurity. PMID:25526143

  4. Anisotropic Charge Kondo Effect in a Triple Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Gwangsu; Park, Jinhong; Lee, S.-S. B.; Sim, H.-S.

    2014-12-01

    We predict that an anisotropic charge Kondo effect appears in a triple quantum dot, when the system has twofold degenerate ground states of (1,1,0) and (0,0,1) charge configurations. Using bosonization and refermionization methods, we find that at low temperature the system has the two different phases of massive charge fluctuations between the two charge configurations and vanishing fluctuations, which are equivalent with the Kondo-screened and ferromagnetic phases of the anisotropic Kondo model, respectively. The phase transition is identifiable by electron conductance measurement, offering the possibility of experimentally exploring the anisotropic Kondo model. Our charge Kondo effect has a similar origin to that in a negative-U Anderson impurity.

  5. Velocity of Light in Anisotropic Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    The task of the present study is to describe local anisotropic spacetime and to discuss the possibility of its experimental detection. Anisotropic spacetime is treated as the flat isotropic Minkowski space with anisotropic perturbations. A determination of the components of the metric tensor is bound up with measurements of the velocity of light in different directions.

  6. Fracture toughness of anisotropic graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.; Kehne, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Fracture toughness measurements have been made at 0, 30, 45, 60, and 90/sup 0/ from the extrusion axis on a reasonably anisotropic graphite, grade AGOT. It was found that the fracture toughness did not vary appreciably with orientation. An observed variation in strength was found to be the result of defect orientation.

  7. Anisotropic star on pseudo-spheroidal spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanpal, B. S.; Thomas, V. O.; Pandya, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    A new class of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations representing anisotropic distribution of matter on pseudo-spheroidal spacetime is obtained. The parameters appearing in the model are restricted through physical requirements of the model. It is found that the models given in the present work is compatible with observational data of a wide variety of compact objects like 4U 1820-30, PSR J1903+327, 4U 1608-52, Vela X-1, PSR J1614-2230, SMC X-4, Cen X-3. A particular model of pulsar PSR J1614-2230 is studied in detail and found that it satisfies all physical requirements needed for physically acceptable model.

  8. Gravitomagnetic Instabilities in Anisotropically Expanding Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, Kostas; Kuiroukidis, Apostolos; Papadopoulos, Demetrios B.; Vlahos, Loukas

    Gravitational instabilities in a magnetized Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe, in which the magnetic field was assumed to be too weak to destroy the isotropy of the model, are known and have been studied in the past. Accordingly, it became evident that the external magnetic field disfavors the perturbations' growth, suppressing the corresponding rate by an amount proportional to its strength. However, the spatial isotropy of the FRW universe is not compatible with the presence of large-scale magnetic fields. Therefore, in this paper we use the general-relativistic version of the (linearized) perturbed magnetohydrodynamic equations with and without resistivity, to discuss a generalized Jeans criterion and the potential formation of density condensations within a class of homogeneous and anisotropically expanding, self-gravitating, magnetized fluids in curved space-time. We find that, for a wide variety of anisotropic cosmological models, gravitomagnetic instabilities can lead to subhorizontal, magnetized condensations. In the nonresistive case, the power spectrum of the unstable cosmological perturbations suggests that most of the power is concentrated on large scales (small k), very close to the horizon. On the other hand, in a resistive medium, the critical wave-numbers so obtained, exhibit a delicate dependence on resistivity, resulting in the reduction of the corresponding Jeans lengths to smaller scales (well bellow the horizon) than the nonresistive ones, while increasing the range of cosmological models which admit such an instability.

  9. Decorrelation of anisotropic flow along the longitudinal direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Petersen, Hannah; Qin, Guang-You; Roy, Victor; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-04-01

    The initial energy density distribution and fluctuations in the transverse direction lead to anisotropic flow of final hadrons through collective expansion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Fluctuations along the longitudinal direction, on the other hand, can result in decorrelation of anisotropic flow in different regions of pseudorapidity ( η . Decorrelation of the 2nd- and 3rd-order anisotropic flow with different η gaps for final charged hadrons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is studied in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model with fully fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The decorrelation is found to consist of both a linear twist and random fluctuation of the event plane angles. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies. Our study also calls into question some of the current experimental methods for measuring anisotropic flow and the quantitative extraction of transport coefficients through comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations that do not include longitudinal fluctuations.

  10. Effective medium approximations for anisotropic composites with arbitrary component orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ohad; Cherkaev, Elena

    2013-10-01

    A Maxwell Garnett approximation (MGA) and a symmetric effective medium approximation (SEMA) are derived for anisotropic composites of host-inclusion and symmetric-grains morphologies, respectively, with ellipsoidal grains of arbitrary intrinsic, shape and orientation anisotropies. The effect of anisotropy on the effective dielectric tensor is illustrated in both cases. The MGA shows negative and non-monotonic off-diagonal elements for geometries where the host and inclusions are not mutually aligned. The SEMA leads to an anisotropy-dependent nonlinear behaviour of the conductivity as a function of volume fraction above a percolation threshold of conductor-insulator composites, in contrast to the well-known linear behaviour of the isotropic effective medium model. The percolation threshold obtained for composites of aligned ellipsoids is isotropic and independent of the ellipsoids aspect ratio. Thus, the common identification of the percolation threshold with the depolarization factors of the grains is unjustified and a description of anisotropic percolation requires explicit anisotropic geometric characteristics.

  11. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite

    PubMed Central

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X. Z.; Matsui, Y.; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E. Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-01-01

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La0.69Ca0.31MnO3, leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a “colossal” AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings. PMID:19706504

  12. Magnetic alignment of plant cell microfibrils and their anisotropic elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Sakaida, Hidetaka; Iino, Masaaki

    2010-06-01

    The magnetic alignment of microfibrils on a single regenerated plant cell surface subjected to magnetic fields and its anisotropic cell surface area expansivity modulus (area modulus) were studied. The magnetic alignment around the equator of the cell (the polar axis parallel to the magnetic field) was confirmed by a 2-dim Fourier analysis of images from a scanning electron microscope, and these were expressed by a theoretical magnetic order parameter for anisotropic relative magnetic permeability of 3×10-27, while the microfibrils near the pole did not show any such magnetic alignment. The magnetic field anisotropically stiffened the cell surface. The stiffness around the equator was greater than that around the pole. The magnetic field dependences of the area modulus agreed with the mechanical model.

  13. Investigation of Porosity Evolution and Orthotropic Axes on Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Raheleh Mohammad

    Advancement of porosities that happens in shear deformation of anisotropic materials is investigated by Dr. Kweon. As the hydrostatic stress in shear deformation is zero, in the solid mechanics' researches it is proved several times that porosity will not be expanded in shear deformation. Dr. Kweon showed that this statement can be wrong in large deformation of simple shear. He proposed anisotropic ductile fracture model to show that hydrostatic stress becomes nonzero and porosities are increased in the simple shear deformation of anisotropic materials. This study investigates the effect of the evolution of anisotropy which means the rotation of the orthotropic axes onto the porosity changes. Hill coefficient shows that how orthotropic materials indicate different ductile fracture manners in shear deformation. Also the effect of void aspect ratio on change of porosity is investigated. It has been found that the interaction among porosity, the matrix anisotropy and void aspect ratio play a crucial role in the ductile damage of porous materials.

  14. MHz gravitational waves from short-term anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2016-04-01

    We reveal the universality of short-term anisotropic inflation. As a demonstration, we study inflation with an exponential type gauge kinetic function which is ubiquitous in models obtained by dimensional reduction from higher dimensional fundamental theory. It turns out that an anisotropic inflation universally takes place in the later stage of conventional inflation. Remarkably, we find that primordial gravitational waves with a peak amplitude around 10-26~ 10-27 are copiously produced in high-frequency bands 10 MHz~100 MHz. If we could detect such gravitational waves in future, we would be able to probe higher dimensional fundamental theory.

  15. Stopping power of an electron gas with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelemelia, O. V.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of motion of a heavy charged particle in the electron gas with an anisotropic velocity distribution is developed within the quantum-field method. The analytical expressions for the dielectric susceptibility and the stopping power of the electron gas differs in no way from well-known classic formulas in the approximation of large and small velocities. Stopping power of the electron gas with anisotropic temperature in the framework of the quantum-field method is numerically calculated for an arbitrary angle between directions of the motion of the projectile particle and the electron beam. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the dielectric model approach.

  16. Anisotropically inflating universes in a scalar-tensor theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, W. F.; Lin, I.-C.

    2009-02-15

    We show that a Brans-Dicke model admits some anisotropically inflating solutions which are identical to the solutions found in a higher derivative pure gravity theory. These inflating solutions were shown to break the cosmic no-hair theorem such that they do not approach the de Sitter universe at large times. The stability conditions of these solutions in this scalar-tensor theory are shown explicitly in this paper. It is shown that there exist unstable modes of the anisotropic perturbations. Therefore the inflating solutions are unstable in the scalar-tensor theory.

  17. Dissipative spherical collapse of charged anisotropic fluid in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, H. Rizwana; Noureen, Ifra

    2014-02-01

    This manuscript is devoted to the study of the combined effect of a viable model and the electromagnetic field on the instability range of gravitational collapse. We assume the presence of a charged anisotropic fluid that dissipates energy via heat flow and discuss how the electromagnetic field, density inhomogeneity, shear, and phase transition of astrophysical bodies can be incorporated by a locally anisotropic background. The dynamical equations help to investigate the evolution of self-gravitating objects and lead to the conclusion that the adiabatic index depends upon the electromagnetic background, mass, and radius of the spherical objects.

  18. Twisting of nanowires induced by anisotropic surface stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Shan; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Wang, Gang-Feng; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2008-05-01

    Many natural and synthetic quasi-one-dimensional materials are of helical or twisting shape and understanding the physical mechanisms underlying the asymmetric shape is of both theoretical and technological significances. In this letter, we pointed out that anisotropic surface stresses present as a possible reason for the formation of some micro-/nanohelices. Using Gurtin's theory of surface elasticity, we quantitatively investigated the twisting deformation of nanowires due to anisotropic surface stresses. The present model can also elucidate the formation of some other helical materials at micro- and nanoscales, e.g., twisting lamellae in polymer spherulites, spiraled bacteria, and flagella.

  19. Documentation and verification of VST2D; a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heat-solute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heatsolute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic, 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density (VST2D). VST2D was developed to help understand the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on quantity and quality of variably saturated ground-water systems. The model solves simultaneously for one or more dependent variables (pressure, temperature, and concentration) at nodes in a horizontal or vertical mesh using a quasi-linearized general minimum residual method. This approach enhances computational speed beyond the speed of a sequential approach. Heterogeneous and anisotropic conditions are implemented locally using individual element property descriptions. This implementation allows local principal directions to differ among elements and from the global solution domain coordinates. Boundary conditions can include time-varying pressure head (or moisture content), heat, and/or concentration; fluxes distributed along domain boundaries and/or at internal node points; and/or convective moisture, heat, and solute fluxes along the domain boundaries; and/or unit hydraulic gradient along domain boundaries. Other model features include temperature and concentration dependent density (liquid and vapor) and viscosity, sorption and/or decay of a solute, and capability to determine moisture content beyond residual to zero. These features are described in the documentation together with development of the governing equations, application of the finite-element formulation (using the Galerkin approach), solution procedure, mass and energy balance considerations, input requirements, and output options. The VST2D model was verified, and results included solutions for problems of water transport under isohaline and isothermal conditions, heat transport under isobaric and isohaline conditions, solute transport under isobaric and isothermal conditions, and coupled water

  20. Modeling of anisotropic two-dimensional materials monolayer HfS{sub 2} and phosphorene metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiwon

    2015-06-07

    Ballistic transport characteristics of metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) based on anisotropic two-dimensional materials monolayer HfS{sub 2} and phosphorene are explored through quantum transport simulations. We focus on the effects of the channel crystal orientation and the channel length scaling on device performances. Especially, the role of degenerate conduction band (CB) valleys in monolayer HfS{sub 2} is comprehensively analyzed. Benchmarking monolayer HfS{sub 2} with phosphorene MOSFETs, we predict that the effect of channel orientation on device performances is much weaker in monolayer HfS{sub 2} than in phosphorene due to the degenerate CB valleys of monolayer HfS{sub 2}. Our simulations also reveal that at 10 nm channel length scale, phosphorene MOSFETs outperform monolayer HfS{sub 2} MOSFETs in terms of the on-state current. However, it is observed that monolayer HfS{sub 2} MOSFETs may offer comparable, but a little bit degraded, device performances as compared with phosphorene MOSFETs at 5 nm channel length.