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Sample records for anisotropic plasma heating

  1. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  2. Kinetic dissipation and anisotropic heating in a turbulent collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2009-03-15

    The kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. At large length scales, the evolution of the hybrid simulations is very similar to MHD, with magnetic power spectra displaying scaling similar to a Kolmogorov scaling of -5/3. At small scales, differences from MHD arise, as energy dissipates into heat almost exclusively through the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum of the hybrid simulation shows a break where linear theory predicts that the Hall term in Ohm's law becomes significant, leading to dispersive kinetic Alfven waves. A key result is that protons are heated preferentially in the plane perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, creating a proton temperature anisotropy of the type observed in the corona and solar wind.

  3. Anisotropic electron-distribution function in inverse-bremsstrahlung-heated plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bendib, A; Bendib-Kalache, K; Cros, B; Maynard, G

    2016-04-01

    The electron-distribution function in homogeneous plasmas heated by a high-frequency laser field is calculated in velocity space from the Vlasov-Landau equation. The kinetic model is valid for moderate laser intensity defined by the relevant parameter α=v_{0}^{2}/v_{t}^{2}<0.5 where v_{0} and v_{t} are the peak velocity of oscillation in the high-frequency electric field and the thermal velocity, respectively. The results obtained constitute an improvement of the results reported in the literature devoted to weak electric field intensities. The electron-distribution function is calculated solving the kinetic equation with the use of the Legendre polynomial expansion within the laser field dipole approximation. It results in an infinite set of equations for the isotropic component f_{0}(v) and the anisotropic components f_{n≥1}(v) that we have solved numerically with appropriate truncation. For the second anisotropy f_{2}(v), we found that its maximum increases from the weak electric field intensity (α<0.01) to a moderate one (α=0.5) by a factor f_{2max}(α=0.5)/f_{2max}(α=0.01)≈48. Applications to the radiation pressure, electromagnetic instabilities, and photoabsorption are also considered. PMID:27176419

  4. Anisotropic electron-distribution function in inverse-bremsstrahlung-heated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendib, A.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G.

    2016-04-01

    The electron-distribution function in homogeneous plasmas heated by a high-frequency laser field is calculated in velocity space from the Vlasov-Landau equation. The kinetic model is valid for moderate laser intensity defined by the relevant parameter α =v02/vt2<0.5 where v0 and vt are the peak velocity of oscillation in the high-frequency electric field and the thermal velocity, respectively. The results obtained constitute an improvement of the results reported in the literature devoted to weak electric field intensities. The electron-distribution function is calculated solving the kinetic equation with the use of the Legendre polynomial expansion within the laser field dipole approximation. It results in an infinite set of equations for the isotropic component f0(v ) and the anisotropic components fn ≥1(v ) that we have solved numerically with appropriate truncation. For the second anisotropy f2(v ) , we found that its maximum increases from the weak electric field intensity (α <0.01 ) to a moderate one (α =0.5 ) by a factor f2 max(α =0.5 ) / f2 max(α =0.01 ) ≈48 . Applications to the radiation pressure, electromagnetic instabilities, and photoabsorption are also considered.

  5. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  6. THE ANISOTROPIC TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON DILUTE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Devlen, Ebru

    2011-04-20

    We examine the linear stability analysis of a hot, dilute, and differentially rotating plasma by considering anisotropic transport effects. In dilute plasmas, the ion Larmor radius is small compared with its collisional mean free path. In this case, the transport of heat and momentum along the magnetic field lines becomes important. This paper presents a novel linear instability that may be more powerful and greater than ideal magnetothermal instability and ideal magnetorotational instability in the dilute astrophysical plasmas. This type of plasma is believed to be found in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters and radiatively ineffective accretion flows around black holes. We derive the dispersion relation of this instability and obtain the instability condition. There is at least one unstable mode that is independent of the temperature gradient direction for a helical magnetic field geometry. This novel instability is driven by the gyroviscosity coupled with differential rotation. Therefore, we call it gyroviscous-modified magnetorotational instability (GvMRI). We examine how the instability depends on signs of the temperature gradient and the gyroviscosity and also on the magnitude of the thermal frequency and on the values of the pitch angle. We provide a detailed physical interpretation of the obtained results. The GvMRI is applicable not only to the accretion flows and ICM but also to the transition region between cool dense gas and the hot low-density plasma in stellar coronae, accretion disks, and the multiphase interstellar medium because it is independent of the temperature gradient direction.

  7. Phonon heat conduction in layered anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnich, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal properties of anisotropic crystals are of both fundamental and practical interest, but transport phenomena in anisotropic materials such as graphite remain poorly understood because solutions of the Boltzmann equation often assume isotropy. Here, we extend an analytic solution of the transient, frequency-dependent Boltzmann equation to highly anisotropic solids and examine its predictions for graphite. We show that this simple model predicts key results, such as long c -axis phonon mean free paths and a negative correlation of cross-plane thermal conductivity with in-plane group velocity, that were previously observed with computationally expensive molecular-dynamics simulations. Further, using our analytic solution, we demonstrate a method to reconstruct the anisotropic mean free path spectrum of crystals with arbitrary dispersion relations without any prior knowledge of their harmonic or anharmonic properties using observations of quasiballistic heat conduction. These results provide a useful analytic framework to understand thermal transport in anisotropic crystals.

  8. Transport equations for multicomponent anisotropic space plasmas - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to present a unified approach to the study of transport phenomena in multicomponent anisotropic space plasmas. In particular, a system of generalized transport equations is presented that can be applied to widely different plasma flow conditions. The generalized transport equations can describe subsonic and supersonic flows, collision-dominated and collisionless flows, plasma flows in rapidly changing magnetic field configurations, multicomponent plasma flows with large temperature differences between the interacting species, and plasma flows that contain anisotropic temperature distributions. In addition, if Maxwell's equations of electricity and magnetism are added to the system of transport equations, they can be used to model electrostatic shocks, double layers, and magnetic merging processes. These transport equations also contain terms which act to regulate both the heat flow and temperature anisotropy, processes which appear to be operating in the solar wind.

  9. Ballooning stability of anisotropic, rotating plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X.-H.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1990-01-01

    The linearized equation of motion is given in a Lagrangian representation for a rotating plasma with anisotropic pressure. A WKB theory is developed for large-n ballooning modes in an axisymmetric configuration with field-aligned and rigid toroidal flows. In the presence of field-aligned flows, it is shown that a resonance occurs which is strongly suggestive of a generalized mirror instability. In the presence of toroidal rotation, a possible stabilizing effect is identified for P(normal) greater than P(parallel). Finally, as a special case of the theory, the necessary and sufficient conditions for stability in a static, anisotropic plasma are obtained.

  10. Local thermodynamics of a magnetized, anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Mahajan, S. M.; Morrison, P. J.

    2013-02-15

    An expression for the internal energy of a fluid element in a weakly coupled, magnetized, anisotropic plasma is derived from first principles. The result is a function of entropy, particle density and magnetic field, and as such plays the role of a thermodynamic potential: it determines in principle all thermodynamic properties of the fluid element. In particular it provides equations of state for the magnetized plasma. The derivation uses familiar fluid equations, a few elements of kinetic theory, the MHD version of Faraday's law, and certain familiar stability and regularity conditions.

  11. Tokamak plasma equilibrium problems with anisotropic pressure and rotation and their numerical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. A. Martynov, A. A. Medvedev, S. Yu. Poshekhonov, Yu. Yu.

    2015-03-15

    In the MHD tokamak plasma theory, the plasma pressure is usually assumed to be isotropic. However, plasma heating by neutral beam injection and RF heating can lead to a strong anisotropy of plasma parameters and rotation of the plasma. The development of MHD equilibrium theory taking into account the plasma inertia and anisotropic pressure began a long time ago, but until now it has not been consistently applied in computational codes for engineering calculations of the plasma equilibrium and evolution in tokamak. This paper contains a detailed derivation of the axisymmetric plasma equilibrium equation in the most general form (with arbitrary rotation and anisotropic pressure) and description of the specialized version of the SPIDER code. The original method of calculation of the equilibrium with an anisotropic pressure and a prescribed rotational transform profile is proposed. Examples of calculations and discussion of the results are also presented.

  12. Tokamak plasma equilibrium problems with anisotropic pressure and rotation and their numerical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Martynov, A. A.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Poshekhonov, Yu. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    In the MHD tokamak plasma theory, the plasma pressure is usually assumed to be isotropic. However, plasma heating by neutral beam injection and RF heating can lead to a strong anisotropy of plasma parameters and rotation of the plasma. The development of MHD equilibrium theory taking into account the plasma inertia and anisotropic pressure began a long time ago, but until now it has not been consistently applied in computational codes for engineering calculations of the plasma equilibrium and evolution in tokamak. This paper contains a detailed derivation of the axisymmetric plasma equilibrium equation in the most general form (with arbitrary rotation and anisotropic pressure) and description of the specialized version of the SPIDER code. The original method of calculation of the equilibrium with an anisotropic pressure and a prescribed rotational transform profile is proposed. Examples of calculations and discussion of the results are also presented.

  13. Effects of anisotropic heat conduction on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional solidification influenced by anisotropic heat conduction has been considered. The interfacial energy balance was derived to account for the heat transfer in one direction (x or y) depending on the temperature gradient in both the x and y directions. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of the Stefan number, aspect ratio, initial superheat, and thermal conductivity ratios on the solidification rate. Because of the imposed boundary conditions, the interface became skewed and sometimes was not a straight line between the interface position at the upper and lower adiabatic walls (spatially nonlinear along the height). This skewness depends on the thermal conductivity ratio k(yy)/k(yx). The nonlinearity of the interface is influenced by the solidification rate, aspect ratio, and k(yy/k(yx).

  14. Current collection in an anisotropic collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wei-Wei

    1992-01-01

    A general method is given to derive the current-potential relations in anisotropic plasmas. Orbit limit current is assumed. The collector is a conductive sphere or an infinite cylinder. Any distribution which is an arbitrary function of the velocity vector can be considered as a superposition of many mono-energetic beams whose current-potential relations are known. The results for two typical pitch angle distributions are derived and discussed in detail. The general properties of the current potential relations are very similar to that of a Maxwellian plasma except for an effective temperature which varies with the angle between the magnetic field and the charging surface. The conclusions are meaningful to generalized geometries.

  15. Current collection in an anisotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wei-Wei

    1990-01-01

    A general method is given to derive the current-potential relations in anisotropic plasmas. Orbit limit current is assumed. The collector is a conductive sphere or an infinite cylinder. Any distribution which is an arbitrary function of the velocity vector can be considered as a superposition of many mono-energetic beams whose current-potential relations are known. The results for two typical pitch angle distributions are derived and discussed in detail. The general properties of the current potential relations are very similar to that of a Maxwellian plasma except for an effective temperature which varies with the angle between the magnetic field and the charging surface. The conclusions are meaningful to generalized geometries.

  16. Quarkonium states in an anisotropic QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Guo Yun; Mocsy, Agnes; Strickland, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We consider quarkonium in a hot quantum chromodynamics (QCD) plasma which, due to expansion and nonzero viscosity, exhibits a local anisotropy in momentum space. At short distances the heavy-quark potential is known at tree level from the hard-thermal loop resummed gluon propagator in anisotropic perturbative QCD. The potential at long distances is modeled as a QCD string which is screened at the same scale as the Coulomb field. At asymptotic separation the potential energy is nonzero and inversely proportional to the temperature. We obtain numerical solutions of the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation for this potential. We find that quarkonium binding is stronger at nonvanishing viscosity and expansion rate, and that the anisotropy leads to polarization of the P-wave states.

  17. Renormalized anisotropic exchange for representing heat assisted magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yipeng; Liu, Zengyuan; Victora, R. H.

    2015-05-07

    Anisotropic exchange has been incorporated in a description of magnetic recording media near the Curie temperature, as would be found during heat assisted magnetic recording. The new parameters were found using a cost function that minimized the difference between atomistic properties and those of renormalized spin blocks. Interestingly, the anisotropic exchange description at 1.5 nm discretization yields very similar switching and magnetization behavior to that found at 1.2 nm (and below) discretization for the previous isotropic exchange. This suggests that the increased accuracy of anisotropic exchange may also reduce the computational cost during simulation.

  18. Nonlinear theory of slow dissipative layers in anisotropic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ballai, I.; Ruderman, M.S.; Erdelyi, R.

    1998-01-01

    The solar coronal plasma is a well-known example of a plasma with strongly anisotropic dissipative coefficients. The main dissipative processes in the solar corona are strongly anisotropic thermal conductivity and viscosity. Ruderman and Goossens [Astrophys. J. {bold 471}, 1015 (1996)] developed a linear theory of driven slow resonant waves in plasmas with strongly anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity. Linear theory shows that in the slow dissipative layer the amplitudes of oscillations become very large for high Reynolds and Pecklet numbers, so that nonlinearity may be important. In the present paper the nonlinear behavior of driven magnetohydrodynamic waves in the slow dissipative layer in plasmas with strongly anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity is studied. The nonlinear governing equation for wave variables in the dissipative layer is derived. The nonlinear connection formulae, which are extensions of the linear connection formulae first introduced in the theory of resonant magnetohydrodynamic waves by Sakurai, Goossens, and Hollweg [Solar Phys. {bold 133}, 127 (1991)], are derived. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Whistler Solitons in Plasma with Anisotropic Hot Electron Admixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Gallagher, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse modulation instability of whistler waves in plasma, with a small admixture of hot anisotropic electrons, is discussed. If the hot particles temperature anisotropy is positive, it is found that, in such plasma, longitudinal perturbations can lead to soliton formation for frequencies forbidden in cold plasma. The soliton is enriched by hot particles. The frequency region unstable to transverse modulation in cold plasma in the presence of hot electrons is divided by stable domains. For both cases the role of hot electrons is more significant for whistlers with smaller frequencies.

  20. Probing strongly coupled anisotropic plasmas from higher curvature gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Viktor; Misobuchi, Anderson Seigo

    2016-06-01

    We consider five-dimensional AdS-axion-dilaton gravity with a Gauss-Bonnet term and use a black brane solution displaying spatial anisotropy as the gravity dual of a strongly coupled anisotropic plasma. We compute several observables relevant to the study of the plasma, namely, the drag force, the jet quenching parameter, the quarkonium potential, and the thermal photon production. The effects of higher derivative corrections and of the anisotropy are discussed and compared with previous results.

  1. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; D. Spong; R. Majeski; M. Zarnstorff

    2003-02-28

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3 MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows.

  2. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-18

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.

  3. Performance enhancement of IPMC by anisotropic plasma etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok Hwan; Kim, Chul-Jin; Hwang, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Sung-Joo; Yang, Hyun-Seok; Park, No-Cheol; Park, Young-Pil; Park, Kang-Ho; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Choi, Nak-Jin

    2009-03-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs) of EAP actuators is famous for its good property of response and durability. The performance of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs) is an important issue which is affected by many factors. There are two factors for deciding the performance of IPMC. By treating anisotropic plasma etching process to 6 models of the IPMCs, enhanced experimental displacement and force results are obtained. Plasma patterning processes are executed by changing the groove and the land length of 6 patterns. The purpose of the present investigation is to find out the major factor which mainly affects the IPMC performance. Simulations using ANSYS have been executed to compare with the experimental results about the values and the tendency of data. Experimental and simulating data of the performances seem to have similar tendency. In the next part of the paper, we observed the other properties like capacitance, resistance and stiffness of 6 plasma patterned IPMCs. And we observed that the stiffness is the major factor which affects the performance of IPMCs. As we seen, our problem has been reduced to investigate about the property of stiffness. We suggest that the stiffness is largely changed mainly because of the different thickness of Platinum stacked of the groove and the land part which are produced by anisotropic plasma etching processes. And we understand that anisotropic plasma patterned IPMCs of better performance can be applied to various applications.

  4. Analysis of stability of a homogeneous state of anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V. Yu. Chernova, T. G. Stepanov, S. E.

    2015-04-15

    Small-amplitude waves in collisionless magnetized plasma are considered in the framework of one-fluid anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics with allowance for the anisotropy of the pressure and thermal flux. Stability of a homogeneous plasma state is analyzed using an eighth-order dispersion relation. Restrictions on the parameters of the homogeneous state at which the dispersion relation has no complex roots at any value of the angle between the wave vector and the unperturbed magnetic field are obtained. The applied method also makes it possible to determine the types of unstable waves.

  5. A hybrid simulation study of magnetic reconnection in anisotropic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun; Li, Yi; Lu, Quan-ming; Wang, Shui

    2003-10-01

    The process of magnetic reconnection in anisotropic plasmas is studied numerically using a 2-dimensional, 3-component hybrid simulation. The results of the calculation show that, when the plasma pressure in the direction perpendicular to magnetic field is larger than that in the parallel direction (e.g. P ⊥/P ‖ = 1.5 ), instability may greatly increase, speeding up the rate of reconnection. When P⊥ is smaller than P‖, (e.g., when P ⊥/P ‖ = 0.6 ), fire hose instability appears, which will restrain the tearing mode instability and the process of magnetic reconnection.

  6. On the drift magnetosonic waves in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Naim, Hafsa; Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-10-15

    A generalized dispersion relation of obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic waves is derived by using the gyrokinetic theory for anisotropic low beta plasmas. The stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is performed to understand the stabilization mechanism of the drift magnetosonic instability and the estimation of the growth rate is also presented. It is noted that the growth rate of the drift instability enhances for small anisotropy (A{sub e,i} = T{sub ⊥e,i}/T{sub ∥e,i} < 1) whereas it is suppressed for large anisotropy (A{sub e,i} > 1)

  7. Adiabatically reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations for a cylindrical plasma with an anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nebogatov, V. A.; Pastukhov, V. P.

    2013-06-15

    A closed set of reduced equations describing low-frequency nonlinear flute magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convection and the resulting nondiffusive processes of particle and energy transport in a weakly collisional cylindrical plasma with an anisotropic pressure is derived. The Chew-Goldberger-Low anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics is used as the basic dynamic model, because this model is applicable to describing flute convection in a cylindrical plasma column even in the low-frequency limit. The reduced set of equations was derived using the method of adiabatic separation of fast and slow motions. It is shown that the structure of the adiabatic transformation and the corresponding velocity field are identical to those obtained earlier in the isotropic MHD model. However, the derived heat transfer equations differ drastically from the isotropic pressure model. In particular, they indicate a tendency toward maintaining different radial profiles of the longitudinal and transverse pressures.

  8. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  9. Wave instabilities in an anisotropic magnetized space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalilov, N. S.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Staude, J.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We study wave instability in an collisionless, rarefied hot plasma (e.g. solar wind or corona). We consider the anisotropy produced by the magnetic field, when the thermal gas pressures across and along the field become unequal. Methods: We apply the 16-moment transport equations (obtained from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation) including the anisotropic thermal fluxes. The general dispersion relation for the incompressible wave modes is derived. Results: It is shown that a new, more complex wave spectrum with stable and unstable behavior is possible, in contrast to the classic fire-hose modes obtained in terms of the 13-moment integrated equations.

  10. Analytical modeling of equilibrium of strongly anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2013-08-15

    Theoretical analysis of equilibrium of anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators is presented. The anisotropy is assumed strong, which includes the cases with essentially nonuniform distributions of plasma pressure on magnetic surfaces. Such distributions can arise at neutral beam injection or at ion cyclotron resonance heating. Then the known generalizations of the standard theory of plasma equilibrium that treat p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} (parallel and perpendicular plasma pressures) as almost constant on magnetic surfaces are not applicable anymore. Explicit analytical prescriptions of the profiles of p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} are proposed that allow modeling of the anisotropic plasma equilibrium even with large ratios of p{sub ‖}/p{sub ⊥} or p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ‖}. A method for deriving the equation for the Shafranov shift is proposed that does not require introduction of the flux coordinates and calculation of the metric tensor. It is shown that for p{sub ⊥} with nonuniformity described by a single poloidal harmonic, the equation for the Shafranov shift coincides with a known one derived earlier for almost constant p{sub ⊥} on a magnetic surface. This does not happen in the other more complex case.

  11. Heat kernel for flat generalized Laplacians with anisotropic scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamiya, A.; Pinzul, A.

    2014-06-01

    We calculate the closed analytic form of the solution of heat kernel equation for the anisotropic generalizations of flat Laplacian. We consider a UV as well as UV/IR interpolating generalizations. In all cases, the result can be expressed in terms of Fox-Wright psi-functions. We perform different consistency checks, analytically reproducing some of the previous numerical or qualitative results, such as spectral dimension flow. Our study should be considered as a first step towards the construction of a heat kernel for curved Hořava-Lifshitz geometries, which is an essential ingredient in the spectral action approach to the construction of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity.

  12. Bulk viscosity of anisotropically expanding hot QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Vinod

    2011-11-01

    The bulk viscosity, {zeta} and its ratio with the shear viscosity, {zeta}/{eta} have been studied in an anisotropically expanding pure glue plasma in the presence of turbulent color fields. It has been shown that the anisotropy in the momentum distribution function of gluons, which has been determined from a linearized transport equation eventually leads to the bulk viscosity. For the isotropic (equilibrium) state, a recently proposed quasiparticle model of pure SU(3) lattice QCD equation of state has been employed where the interactions are encoded in the effective fugacity. It has been argued that the interactions present in the equation of state, significantly contribute to the bulk viscosity. Its ratio with the shear viscosity is significant even at 1.5T{sub c}. Thus, one needs to take in account the effects of the bulk viscosity while studying the hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon plasma in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Radiative heat transfer in anisotropic many-body systems: Tuning and enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Nikbakht, Moladad

    2014-09-07

    A general formalism for calculating the radiative heat transfer in many body systems with anisotropic component is presented. Our scheme extends the theory of radiative heat transfer in isotropic many body systems to anisotropic cases. In addition, the radiative heating of the particles by the thermal bath is taken into account in our formula. It is shown that the radiative heat exchange (HE) between anisotropic particles and their radiative cooling/heating (RCH) could be enhanced several order of magnitude than that of isotropic particles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the HE and RCH can be tuned dramatically by particles relative orientation in many body systems.

  14. Plasma heat pump and heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-08-15

    A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of volume V (V{sub P}<plasma heat and vice versa. Two applications of this theory are, first we propose a pumping device which heats plasmas by an adiabatic/isothermal compression of fields. Heating power ranging from a few hundred watts to a few kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of P{sub E} are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

  15. Plasma Heating: An Advanced Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Mercury and Apollo spacecraft shields were designed to protect astronauts from high friction temperatures (well over 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit) when re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. It was necessary to test and verify the heat shield materials on Earth before space flight. After exhaustive research and testing, NASA decided to use plasma heating as a heat source. This technique involves passing a strong electric current through a rarefied gas to create a plasma (ionized gas) that produces an intensely hot flame. Although NASA did not invent the concept, its work expanded the market for commercial plasma heating systems. One company, Plasma Technology Corporation (PTC), was founded by a member of the team that developed the Re-entry Heating Simulator at Ames Research Center (ARC). Dr. Camacho, President of PTC, believes the technology has significant environmental applications. These include toxic waste disposal, hydrocarbon, decomposition, medical waste disposal, asbestos waste destruction, and chemical and radioactive waste disposal.

  16. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  17. Anisotropic confinement effects in a two-dimensional plasma crystal.

    PubMed

    Laut, I; Zhdanov, S K; Räth, C; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2016-01-01

    The spectral asymmetry of the wave-energy distribution of dust particles during mode-coupling-induced melting, observed for the first time in plasma crystals by Couëdel et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 053108 (2014)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.89.053108], is studied theoretically and by molecular-dynamics simulations. It is shown that an anisotropy of the well confining the microparticles selects the directions of preferred particle motion. The observed differences in intensity of waves of opposed directions are explained by a nonvanishing phonon flux. Anisotropic phonon scattering by defects and Umklapp scattering are proposed as possible reasons for the mean phonon flux. PMID:26871180

  18. Turbulent anomalous transport and anisotropic electron heating in a return current system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang Wu; Buechner, Joerg

    2011-02-15

    Anisotropic electron heating due to self-generated electromagnetic turbulences is observed in collisionless return current plasmas. The corresponding energy conversion, electron heating, and associated anomalous momentum transport are investigated by means of a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code. The return current model consists of two counterstreaming electron beams with different temperatures and a stationary ion background. First, a general multifluid dispersion analyzer is presented in a clear matrix form that allows to study electron streaming instabilities. The numerical simulation confirms the predicted electrostatic electron-electron acoustic instability. Generating electromagnetic waves, the system evolves into a nonlinear stage. As a result, the electron drifts are slowed down due to turbulence-induced anomalous momentum exchange. Localized electric and magnetic field fluctuations play major roles in the energy conversion. Perpendicular electron heating follows the growth of magnetic field perturbations and the slowing of the electron drifts. Parallel and perpendicular electron heating occurs at different time scales. It is shown that the longer lasting perpendicular electron heating is caused by preheated parallel electron flows. The deflection of the preheated parallel electron flows in the localized turbulences, which is essentially a two-dimensional effect, leads to perpendicular electron heating even after the saturation of parallel electron heating. We conclude that the self-generated magnetic turbulence dominates the anomalous transport process in the late stage of return current system evolution.

  19. Observations of Anisotropic Ion Temperature during RF Heating in the NSTX Edge

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Biewer; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; C.K. Phillips; J.R. Wilson

    2003-05-19

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge with both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during the presence of high power HHFW RF heating in He plasmas, with the poloidal T(sub)i roughly twice the toroidal T(sub)i. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations have temperatures of 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively. This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (in both He II and C III ions), and is well correlated with the period of RF power application to the plasma. The temperature of the edge ions is observed to increase with the applied RF power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3MW. The ion heating mechanism from HHFW RF power has not yet been identified.

  20. Perpendicular ion heating by anisotropic whistler turbulence at electron scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Nariyuki, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic energy spectrum in the solar wind turbulence is observed in very broad scale range, extending from Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scales to electron scales. The frequency spectrum observed at a position of spacecraft has a power-law feature, but its index is different depending on the frequency range. In low frequencies (< 0.1Hz) corresponding to the MHD scales in the solar wind at 1AU, where the Taylor hypothesis (scale size = solar wind speed / observed frequency) is assumed, the power-law index -5/3 is typically observed. This scale range is referred to as the inertial range. At higher frequencies, which correspond to the shorter scales, the power-law spectrum tends to be steeper than the inertial range. The steeper spectrum is considered to be due to the dissipation and/or dispersion effect of kinetic-wave turbulence. Many authors have discussed nonlinear properties and dissipation processes of the kinetic-wave turbulence at the ion and electron scales in theory, simulation, and observation. By using particle-in-cell simulation that includes kinetic effects of both ions and electrons, we study the ion heating by anisotropic whistler turbulence at electron scales that is of the order of electron inertial length. Whistler turbulence cascades their fluctuation energy in wavenumber space more preferentially to the perpendicular direction to the background magnetic field than parallel. The highly obliquely propagating whistler waves have electric fluctuations at wavenumbers perpendicular to the background magnetic field. By interacting with the perpendicular electric fluctuations, the ions are stochastically scattered into the perpendicular direction. Our simulation results show that whistler turbulence can transfer their fluctuation energy into not only electrons but also the perpendicular energy of ions. It suggests that whistler turbulence even at the electron scales contributes the perpendicular heating of protons in the solar wind. Whistler turbulence could

  1. Nuclear modification factor in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Mahatsab; Bhattacharya, Lusaka; Roy, Pradip

    2011-10-01

    We calculate the nuclear modification factor (RAA) of light hadrons by taking into account the initial state momentum anisotropy of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) expected to be formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Such an anisotropy can result from the initial rapid longitudinal expansion of the matter. A phenomenological model for the space-time evolution of the anisotropic QGP is used to obtain the time dependence of the anisotropy parameter ξ and the hard momentum scale, phard. The result is then compared with the PHENIX experimental data to constrain the isotropization time scale, τiso for fixed initial conditions (FIC). It is shown that the extracted value of τiso lies in the range 0.5⩽τiso⩽1.5. However, using a fixed final multiplicity (FFM) condition does not lead to any firm conclusion about the extraction of the isotropization time. The present calculation is also extended to contrast with the recent measurement of nuclear modification factor by the ALICE collaboration at s=2.76 TeV. It is argued that in the present approach, the extraction of τiso at this energy is uncertain and, therefore, refinement of the model is necessary. The sensitivity of the results on the initial conditions has been discussed. We also present the nuclear modification factor at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies with s=5.5 TeV.

  2. Alfven waves in dusty plasmas with plasma particles described by anisotropic kappa distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Juli, M. C. de

    2012-12-15

    We utilize a kinetic description to study the dispersion relation of Alfven waves propagating parallelly to the ambient magnetic field in a dusty plasma, taking into account the fluctuation of the charge of the dust particles, which is due to inelastic collisions with electrons and ions. We consider a plasma in which the velocity distribution functions of the plasma particles are modelled as anisotropic kappa distributions, study the dispersion relation for several combinations of the parameters {kappa}{sub Parallel-To} and {kappa}{sub Up-Tack }, and emphasize the effect of the anisotropy of the distributions on the mode coupling which occurs in a dusty plasma, between waves in the branch of circularly polarized waves and waves in the whistler branch.

  3. PLASMA HEATING AND CONFINING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Bratenahl, Al.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1962-02-13

    ABS> A device is designed for generating, heating, and containing a very pure electrical plasma. Plasma purity is maintained by preventing the hot plasma from contacting insulators, which are a principal source of impurities in prior constructions. An insulator is disposed at each end of a pair of long coaxial cylinders forming an annular chamber therebetween. High voltage is applied between the cylinders and an axial magnetic field is created therethrough. At a middle position on the inner cylinder, a fastopening valve releases a quantity of gas into the chamber, and before the gas can diffuse to the distant insulators, a discharge occurs between the cylinders and plasma is formed in the central region of the chamber away from the insulators. (AEC)

  4. Ion-cyclotron instability in current-carrying Lorentzian (kappa) and Maxwellian plasmas with anisotropic temperatures: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Grossbard, N. J.

    2011-09-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability has so far been studied for Maxwellian plasma with isotropic and anisotropic temperatures. Since satellite-measured particle velocity distributions in space are often better modeled by the generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distributions and since temperature anisotropy is quite common in space plasmas, theoretical analysis of the current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability is carried out in this paper for electron-proton plasma with anisotropic temperatures, where the particle parallel velocity distributions are modeled by kappa distributions and the perpendicular velocity distributions are modeled by Maxwellian distributions. Stability properties of the excited ion cyclotron modes and, in particular, their dependence on electron to ion temperature ratio and ion temperature anisotropy are presented in more detail. For comparison, the corresponding results for bi-Maxwellian plasma are also presented. Although the stability properties of the ion cyclotron modes in the two types of plasmas are qualitatively similar, significant quantitative differences can arise depending on the values of {kappa}{sub e} and {kappa}{sub i}. The comparative study is based on the numerical solutions of the respective linear dispersion relations. Quasilinear estimates of the resonant ion heating rates due to ion-cyclotron turbulence in the two types of plasma are also presented for comparison.

  5. Understanding anisotropic plasma etching of two-dimensional polystyrene opals for advanced materials fabrication.

    PubMed

    Akinoglu, Eser M; Morfa, Anthony J; Giersig, Michael

    2014-10-21

    Anisotropic deformation of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated (O2/Ar) plasma is observed for radio frequency (rf) plasma and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). A facile model based on a ratio of completely isotropic and completely anisotropic etching is presented to describe the anisotropy of the etching process and is implemented to determine the height of the spheroid-shaped polystyrene particles. In our systems, we find the plasma etching to be 54% isotropic in the rf plasma and 79% isotropic in the ICP. With this model, the maximum material deposition thickness for nanofabrication with plasma-etched nanosphere lithography or colloid lithography can be predicted. Moreover, the etching of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated plasma is investigated versus the etching time, gas flow, gas composition, temperature, substrate material, and particle size. The results of this study allow precise shape tuning during the fabrication of nanostructured surfaces with size-dependent properties for bionic, medical, and photonic applications. PMID:24580644

  6. An implicit scheme for solving the anisotropic diffusion of heat and cosmic rays in the RAMSES code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Commerçon, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are subject to a tight connection between magnetic fields and the diffusion of particles, which leads to an anisotropic transport of energy. Under the fluid assumption, this effect can be reduced to an advection-diffusion equation, thereby augmenting the equations of magnetohydrodynamics. We introduce a new method for solving the anisotropic diffusion equation using an implicit finite-volume method with adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping in the ramses code. We apply this numerical solver to the diffusion of cosmic ray energy and diffusion of heat carried by electrons, which couple to the ion temperature. We test this new implementation against several numerical experiments and apply it to a simple supernova explosion with a uniform magnetic field.

  7. Plasma heating of Io's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pospieszalska, M. K.; Johnson, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo, molecule-tracking program was constructed to describe the structure of Io's atmosphere in the region penetrated by ions from the plasma torus. This region is shown to exhibit high temperatures, consistent with corona observations, independent of whether significant UV heating also occurs. The atmospheric structure is determined near the exobase, which is the region responsible for the supply of the Io torus.

  8. Anisotropic heat transport in reversed shear configurations: shearless Cantori barriers and nonlocal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasevski, D.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2012-10-01

    Heat transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion. In Ref.footnotetext D. del-Castillo-Negrete, and L. Chac'on, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106, 195004 (2011); Phys. Plasmas 19, 056112 (2012). we proposed a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method to study this problem in the strongly anisotropic (χ=0) regime. The LG method bypasses the need to discretize the transport operators on a grid and it is applicable to general parallel flux closures and 3-D magnetic fields. Here we apply the LG method to parallel transport (with local and nonlocal parallel flux closures) in reversed shear magnetic field configurations known to exhibit robust transport barriers in the vicinity of the extrema of the q-profile. By shearless Cantori (SC) we mean the invariant Cantor sets remaining after the destruction of toroidal flux surfaces with zero magnetic shear, q^'=0. We provide numerical evidence of the role of SC in the anomalously slow relaxation of radial temperature gradients in chaotic magnetic fields with no transport barriers. The spatio-temporal evolution of temperature pulses localized in the reversed shear region exhibits non-diffusive self-similar evolution and nonlocal effective radial transport.

  9. Quark-gluon plasma phenomenology from anisotropic lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skullerud, Jon-Ivar; Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; Amato, Alessandro; Burnier, Yannis; Evans, P. Wynne M.; Giudice, Pietro; Hands, Simon; Harris, Tim; Kelly, Aoife; Kim, Seyong; Lombardo, Maria Paola; Oktay, Mehmet B.; Rothkopf, Alexander; Ryan, Sinéad M.

    2016-01-01

    The FASTSUM collaboration has been carrying out simulations of Nf = 2 + 1 QCD at nonzero temperature in the fixed-scale approach using anisotropic lattices. Here we present the status of these studies, including recent results for electrical conductivity and charge diffusion, and heavy quarkonium (charm and beauty) physics.

  10. Multi-band near-field radiative heat transfer between two anisotropic fishnet metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Liu, Linhua

    2015-06-01

    We study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metal-insulator-metal sandwiched-like fishnet metamaterials (FMMs) by fluctuation electrodynamics. Results show that multi-band heat flux between the fishnet metamaterials is achieved, which is attributed to the thermally excited surface modes within the FMM. Apart from the electric response mode of the near-field heat flux, magnetic modes are also existed, which are related with the excitations of the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating on the outer surface of metal (external SPPs) and along the inner metal-dielectric interface (internal SPPs). Moreover, we show that the electromagnetic parameters of this anisotropic fishnet metamaterial depend on the angles θ of the incident light when heating the fishnet metamaterial, and thus the overall effect of the anisotropic FMM parameters is considered to predict the near-field radiative heat transfer. Different external-SPPs and internal-SPPs modes are excited at different frequencies which is attributed to the anisotropic electromagnetic response of FMM, which open new frequency channels of the near-field radiative heat transfer. This kind of anisotropic metamaterial should assist in thermal management in nanoscale.

  11. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  12. Relativistic and non-relativistic analysis of whistler-mode waves in a hot anisotropic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, S. S.; Sumner, A. E.; Temme, N. M.

    1992-02-01

    The dispersion equation for parallel whistler-mode propagation in a hot anisotropic plasma is analysed numerically in both weakly relativistic and nonrelativistic approximations under the assumption that wave growth or damping does not influence the wave refractive index. The results of this analysis are compared with the results of an asymptotic analysis of the same equation, and the range of applicability of the latter results is specified. It is pointed out that relativistic effects lead to a decrease in the range of frequencies for which instability occurs. For a moderately anisotropic plasma (T/T = 2) relativistic effects lead to an increase in the maximum value of the increment of instability.

  13. The residual zonal flows in anisotropic tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun

    2016-06-01

    The gyro-kinetic equation is analytically solved based on the anisotropic two-temperature distribution, in which the ions' parallel temperature is a flux function while the perpendicular temperature depends on the poloidal angle. The residual level of collisionless zonal flows (ZFs) is derived and calculated in the large aspect circular limit. Our result shows that the anisotropy plays a remarkable role in determining the residual value of ZFs. Even weak anisotropy can significantly change the residual level.

  14. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

    1984-01-10

    This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

  15. An asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian algorithm for the time-dependent anisotropic heat transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Luis; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory D.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a Lagrangian numerical algorithm for a time-dependent, anisotropic temperature transport equation in magnetized plasmas in the large guide field regime. The approach is based on an analytical integral formal solution of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) transport equation with sources, and it is able to accommodate both local and non-local parallel heat flux closures. The numerical implementation is based on an operator-split formulation, with two straightforward steps: a perpendicular transport step (including sources), and a Lagrangian (field-line integral) parallel transport step. Algorithmically, the first step is amenable to the use of modern iterative methods, while the second step has a fixed cost per degree of freedom (and is therefore scalable). Accuracy-wise, the approach is free from the numerical pollution introduced by the discrete parallel transport term when the perpendicular to parallel transport coefficient ratio X /X becomes arbitrarily small, and is shown to capture the correct limiting solution when ε = X⊥L2/X1L2 → 0 (with L∥∙ L⊥ , the parallel and perpendicular diffusion length scales, respectively). Therefore, the approach is asymptotic-preserving. We demonstrate the capabilities of the scheme with several numerical experiments with varying magnetic field complexity in two dimensions, including the case of transport across a magnetic island.

  16. Modeling anisotropic flow and heat transport by using mimetic finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele; Willbrand, Karen; Büsing, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Modeling anisotropic flow in porous or fractured rock often assumes that the permeability tensor is diagonal, which means that its principle directions are always aligned with the coordinate axes. However, the permeability of a heterogeneous anisotropic medium usually is a full tensor. For overcoming this shortcoming, we use the mimetic finite difference method (mFD) for discretizing the flow equation in a hydrothermal reservoir simulation code, SHEMAT-Suite, which couples this equation with the heat transport equation. We verify SHEMAT-Suite-mFD against analytical solutions of pumping tests, using both diagonal and full permeability tensors. We compare results from three benchmarks for testing the capability of SHEMAT-Suite-mFD to handle anisotropic flow in porous and fractured media. The benchmarks include coupled flow and heat transport problems, three-dimensional problems and flow through a fractured porous medium with full equivalent permeability tensor. It shows firstly that the mimetic finite difference method can model anisotropic flow both in porous and in fractured media accurately and its results are better than those obtained by the multi-point flux approximation method in highly anisotropic models, secondly that the asymmetric permeability tensor can be included and leads to improved results compared the symmetric permeability tensor in the equivalent fracture models, and thirdly that the method can be easily implemented in existing finite volume or finite difference codes, which has been demonstrated successfully for SHEMAT-Suite.

  17. Instabilities of collisionless current sheets revisited: The role of anisotropic heating

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, P. A. Kilian, P. Büchner, J.

    2014-11-15

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the anisotropic heating on the spontaneous instability and evolution of thin Harris-type collisionless current sheets, embedded in antiparallel magnetic fields. In particular, we explore the influence of the macroparticle shape-function using a 2D version of the PIC code ACRONYM. We also investigate the role of the numerical collisionality due to the finite number of macroparticles in PIC codes. It is shown that it is appropriate to choose higher order shape functions of the macroparticles compared to a larger number of macroparticles per cell. This allows to estimate better the anisotropic electron heating due to the collisions of macroparticles in a PIC code. Temperature anisotropies can stabilize the tearing mode instability and trigger additional current sheet instabilities. We found a good agreement between the analytically derived threshold for the stabilization of the anisotropic tearing mode and other instabilities, either spontaneously developing or initially triggered ones. Numerical effects causing anisotropic heating at electron time scales become especially important for higher mass ratios (above m{sub i}/m{sub e}=180). If numerical effects are carefully taken into account, one can recover the theoretical estimated linear growth rates of the tearing instability of thin isotropic collisionless current sheets, also for higher mass ratios.

  18. RF plasma heating in toroidal fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Golant, V.E.; Fedorov, V.I. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present book is to provide, in seven chapters, a unified overview of the methods for rf heating of plasmas in toroidal fusion experiments. In Chapter 1 the problem of plasma heating in tokamaks and stellarators is formulated and the requirements for auxiliary heating techniques are described. This chapter also contains a brief review of the results of research on tokamaks and stellarators. Chapter 2 is devoted to a theoretical description of the principal physical effects involved in the rf heating of plasmas, especially the characteristics of wave propagation, of the mechanisms by which waves are absorbed and plasma heating takes place, and of the nonlinear effects that accompany heating. The primary emphasis is on a qualitative physical picture of these effects. Chapters 3-6, in turn, deal with the major rf heating techniques currently under investigation, electron cyclotron (ECH), ion cyclotron (ICH), lower hybrid (LHH), and Alfven wave heating. In each of these chapters the main schemes for heating are described, the results of theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are discussed, the technology of the heating systems is briefly described, and experimental work published through the end of 1984 is reviewed. Finally, in Chapter 7 the different rf heating techniques are compared; they are contrasted with neutral beam injection, and the feasibility of adiabatic compression as a means of heating plasmas is examined. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter of this book. 246 refs.

  19. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  20. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  1. Complexity Induced Anisotropic Bimodal Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    The "physics of complexity" in space plasmas is the central theme of this exposition. It is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from the plasma resonances can be the source for the coexistence of nonpropagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes. Non-Gaussian probability distribution functions of the intermittent fluctuations from direct numerical simulations are obtained and discussed. Power spectra and local intermittency measures using the wavelet analyses are presented to display the spottiness of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations and the non-uniformity of coarse-grained dissipation that can lead to magnetic topological reconfigurations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization group is applied to the study of the scaling properties of such type of multiscale fluctuations. Charged particle interactions with both the propagating and nonpropagating portions of the intermittent turbulence are also described.

  2. Anisotropic N=4 Super-Yang-Mills Plasma and Its Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mateos, David; Trancanelli, Diego

    2011-09-02

    We present a type-IIB supergravity solution dual to a spatially anisotropic finite-temperature N=4 super-Yang-Mills plasma. The solution is static and completely regular. The full geometry can be viewed as a renormalization group flow from an ultraviolet anti-de Sitter geometry to an infrared Lifshitz-like geometry. The anisotropy can be equivalently understood as resulting from a position-dependent {theta} term or from a nonzero number density of dissolved D7-branes. The holographic stress tensor is conserved and anisotropic. The presence of a conformal anomaly plays an important role in the thermodynamics. The phase diagram exhibits homogeneous and inhomogeneous (i.e., mixed) phases. In some regions the homogeneous phase displays instabilities reminiscent of those of weakly coupled plasmas. We comment on similarities with QCD at finite baryon density and with the phenomenon of cavitation.

  3. Jump conditions at fast shocks in an anisotropic magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, D. F.; Erkaev, N. V.; Biernat, H. K.; Mühlbachler, S.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we report on the variations of the magnetic field strength and the plasma parameters across a fast shock as functions of upstream Alfvén Mach numbers and pressure anisotropy downstream of the shock. In our study we consider an oblique shock where the angle between the magnetic field vector and the normal vector upstream of the shock is chosen to be 45°. We further use two threshold conditions of plasma instabilities as additional equations to bound the range of the pressure anisotropy, p⊥/ p|, i.e., the criterion of the mirror instability and that of the fire—hose instability. We found that the variations of the parallel pressure, the parallel temperature, as well as the tangential component of the velocity are most sensitive to the pressure anisotropy downstream of the shock, whereas the variations of the plasma density, the normal velocity, the magnetic field strength, and perpendicular pressure and temperature with respect to the magnetic field show much less pronounced dependence on the anisotropy.

  4. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  5. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  6. Imaginary part of the static gluon propagator in an anisotropic (viscous) QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Guo, Yun; Strickland, Michael

    2009-06-01

    We determine viscosity corrections to the retarded, advanced and symmetric gluon self-energies and to the static propagator in the weak-coupling ''hard loop'' approximation to high-temperature QCD. We apply these results to calculate the imaginary part of the heavy-quark potential which is found to be smaller (in magnitude) than at vanishing viscosity. This implies a smaller decay width of quarkonium bound states in an anisotropic plasma.

  7. Drag force of Anisotropic plasma at finite U(1) chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Long; Ge, Xian-Hui; Wu, Shang-Yu

    2016-05-01

    We perform the calculation of the drag force acting on a massive quark moving through an anisotropic N=4 SU(N) Super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a U(1) chemical potential. We present the numerical results for any value of the anisotropy and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of the anisotropy. We find the effect of the chemical potential or charge density will enhance the drag force for our charged solution.

  8. Electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Booth, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    We revisit the problem of electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), and propose a method for quantifying the level of collisionless and collisional heating in plasma simulations. The proposed procedure, based on the electron mechanical energy conservation equation, is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulations of a number of single and multi-frequency CCPs operated in regimes of research and industrial interest. In almost all cases tested, the total electron heating is comprised of collisional (ohmic) and pressure heating parts. This latter collisionless component is in qualitative agreement with the mechanism of electron heating predicted from the recent re-evaluation of theoretical models. Finally, in very electrically asymmetric plasmas produced in multi-frequency discharges, we observe an additional collisionless heating mechanism associated with electron inertia.

  9. Leaky unstable modes and electromagnetic radiation amplification by an anisotropic plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and a photoionized plasma slab with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution is studied. It is shown that the fields of leaky modes are amplified due to the development of aperiodic instability in the slab, which leads to an increase in both the reflected and transmitted fields. The transmitted field can significantly increase only if the slab thickness does not exceed the ratio of the speed of light to the electron plasma frequency, whereas there is no upper bound on the slab thickness for the reflected signal to be amplified.

  10. Anisotropic thermal expansion effects in plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Herman, H.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal expansion properties of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8-wt pct Y2O3 coatings, detached from the substrate, have been examined. Coatings were heat-treated in air or in argon. Anisotropic effects in the longitudinal (planar to the substrate surface) and transverse (perpendicular to the substrate surface) directions were measured and related to the coating structure. The thermal expansion coefficient of the coating is discussed in terms of the material's properties, such as the crack network and interlamellar boundary distribution. A precise model for the expansion behavior of coatings still needs attention, since no description of all of the contributing variables exists. A quantitative analysis of thermal properties of coatings will aid in future design and modeling of coating systems.

  11. Nanoparticle heating in atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Nicolaas; Aydil, Eray; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    The plasma environment offers a number of attractive properties that allow for the generation of nanoparticle materials that are otherwise hard to produce by other means. Among these are the generally high temperatures that nanoparticles can attain within plasmas, enabling the generation of nanocrystals of high melting point materials. In low pressure discharges, these high temperatures are the result of energetic surface reactions that strongly heat the small nanoparticles combined with the relatively slow heat transfer to the neutral gas. At atmospheric pressure, the nanoparticle intrinsic temperature is much more closely coupled to the neutral gas temperature. We study the heating of nanoparticles in atmospheric pressure plasmas based on a Monte Carlo simulation that takes into account the most important plasma-surface reactions as well as the conductive cooling of nanoparticles through the neutral gas. We find that, compared to low pressure plasmas, significantly higher plasma densities and densities of reactive species are required in order to achieve nanoparticle temperatures comparable to those in low pressure plasmas. These findings have important implications for the application of atmospheric pressure plasmas for the synthesis of nanoparticle materials. This work was supported by the DOE Plasma Science Center for Predictive Control of Plasma Kinetics.

  12. The properties of MHD waves and instabilities in solar plasmas with anisotropic temperature and thermal fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Dzhalilov, Namig

    As confirmed by observations, the temperature anisotropy relative to the magnetic field and the thermal fluxes are typical characteristics of the collisionless and magnetized plasma of the solar corona and solar wind. The properties of such plasma are described in terms of the anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics based on the kinetic equation under the 16-moment approximation. MHD waves and instabilities in the collisionless solar plasma have been analyzed under the aforementioned approximation taking into account the anisotropy of the plasma pressure along and across the magnetic field and the thermal flux along the field. It is established that the thermal flux results in the asymmetry of phase velocities of the compressible wave modes with respect to the outer magnetic field, in a strong interaction between the modes (particularly, between the retrograde modes propagating against the magnetic field), and in oscillatory in-stability of these modes. The thresholds of the mirror and fire-hose instabilities coincide with their kinetic expressions; the increments coincide qualitatively. At a certain propagation angle, the resonance interaction of three retrograde modes (fast sound, slow magnetosound, and slow sound ones) under the occurrence conditions of the classical aperiodic fire-hose instability gives rise to the oscillatory "fire-hose" instability of compressible modes, whose maximum increment may exceed the maximum increment of the classical fire-hose instability. A good agreement of the results obtained in terms of anisotropic MHD with the low-frequency limit of the kinetic description allows us to consider the applied approximation adequate for the description of large-scale dynamics of collisionless anisotropic solar plasma and to use it in the study of waves and instabilities in magnetic tubes and other magnetic features in the solar corona, magnetic reconnection, etc.

  13. Amplification of whistler waves propagating through inhomogeneous, anisotropic, mirror-confined hot-electron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guest, G.E.; Miller, R.L.

    1988-12-01

    A fully relativistic local dispersion relation for whistler waves has been solved at closely spaced points along the magnetic field lines of a 2:1 magnetic mirror in which a highly anisotropic, spatially inhomogeneous, hot-electron plasma is confined. The limiting plasma parameters for convective (spatial)= growth have been determined numerically and used to identify plasma conditions leading to maximum amplification of input microwave signals introduced in the form of whistler waves. The maximum gain has been evaluated numerically for a range of values of the hot-electron plasma within which all major stability criteria are satisfied. Very high gains (approx.40 dB) are indicated over the entire range of beta investigated.

  14. On the ordinary mode and whistler mode instabilities in the degenerate anisotropic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Z.; Hussain, A.; Murtaza, G.; Tsintsadze, N. L.

    2014-03-15

    Employing Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations, we have investigated the O-mode and whistler mode instability in a degenerate anisotropic magnetoplasma environment and compared the results to those reported for classical plasmas. We propose the excitation of a new banded type of instability for the O-mode case, which grows at some particular values of temperature anisotropy and external magnetic field. For the case of whistler wave, we observe instability saturation mechanism similar to the case of classical plasmas. The existence of both O-mode and whistler mode instability has been observed only for some specific range of unstable wavenumbers. The possible excitation of such instabilities in solid state plasma has been discussed, particularly for semiconductor and semimetal plasmas.

  15. Anisotropic heat transport in nanoconfined polyamide-6,6 oligomers: atomistic reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Hossein; Mohammadzadeh, Laila; Mehdipour, Nargess

    2012-03-14

    While polymers are known as thermal insulators, recent studies show that stretched single chains of polymers have a very high thermal conductivity. In this work, our new simulation scheme for simulation of heat flow in nanoconfined fluids [H. Eslami, L. Mohammadzadeh, and N. Mehdipour, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064703 (2011)] is employed to study the effect of chain ordering (stretching) on the rate of heat transfer in polyamide-6,6 nanoconfined between graphene surfaces. Our results for the heat flow in the parallel direction (the plane of surfaces) show that the coefficient of thermal conductivity depends on the intersurface distance and is much higher than that of the bulk polymer. A comparison of results in this work with our former findings on the heat flow in the perpendicular direction, with the coefficient of heat conductivity less than the bulk sample, reveal that well-organized polymer layers between the confining surfaces show an anisotropic heat conduction; the heat conduction in the direction parallel to the surfaces is much higher than that in the perpendicular direction. The origin of such anisotropy in nanometric heat flow is shown to be the dramatic anisotropy in chain conformations (chain stretching) beside the confining surfaces. The results indicate that the coefficients of heat conductivity in both directions, normal and parallel to the surfaces, depend on the degree of polymer layering between the surfaces and the pore width. PMID:22423855

  16. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasmas using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2014-12-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic tokamak plasmas is theoretically analyzed by using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation. The bi-Maxwellian distribution function for guiding-center ions is assumed to obtain a self-consistent form, yielding pressures satisfying the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) anisotropic equilibrium condition. The double adiabatic model gives the dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which agrees well with the one derived from gyro-kinetic equation. The GAM frequency increases with the ratio of pressures, p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, and the Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}. MHD result shows a low-frequency zonal flow existing for all p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, while according to the kinetic dispersion relation, no low-frequency branch exists for p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}≳ 2.

  17. Numerical modeling of waveguide heated microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, S.; Schwer, D.A.; Merkle, C.L.

    1993-12-01

    Waveguide-heated microwave plasmas for space propulsion applications are analyzed by a two-dimensional numerical solution of the combined Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations. Two waveguide configurations -- one purely transmitting and the other with a reflecting end wall -- are considered. Plasma stability and absorption characteristics are studied and contrasted with the characteristic of resonant cavity heated plasmas. In addition, preliminary estimates of the overall efficiency and the thrust and specific impulse of the propulsion system are also made. The computational results are used to explain experimental trends and to better understand the working of these devices.

  18. APPARATUS FOR HEATING A PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.

    1962-01-01

    The system contemplates the use of ion cyclotron motions for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a confining magnetic field such as is found in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. Oppositely directed windings are provided for producing ion-accelerating fields having a time and spatial periodicity and these have the advantage of producing ion cyclotron motions without the development of space charges which preclude the efficient energy transfer to the plasma. (AEC)

  19. Low beta equilibrium and stability for anisotropic pressure closed field line plasma confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V.P.; Ilgisonis, V.I.; Subbotin, A.A.

    1994-05-01

    General formalism is developed to analyze the equilibrium and stability of low beta anisotropic pressure plasmas confined in closed field line magnetic systems. The formalism allows one to consider rather general magnetic systems with nonuniform axis curvature and longitudinal profiles of toroidal and multipole poloidal field. It also allows having a strong pressure anisotropy corresponding to enhanced plasma pressure in mirror cells of the system. As an example of such a system the authors consider the recently proposed linked mirror neutron source (LMNS). Application of the above formalism to the LMNS analysis confirms most of the preliminary results, however, they obtain a considerable reduction of mirror cell axis curvature and an appreciable ellipticity of plasma cross-section in the mirror cell midplane. They have also optimized the longitudinal pressure and magnetic field distribution.

  20. Anisotropic Specific Heat of CoNb2O6 in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Takeshi; Shinkawa, Kohtaro; Ishikawa, Masayasu; Miyatani, Kazuo; Saito, Kazuhiro; Kohn, Kay

    1994-07-01

    We investigated the successive magnetic phase transitions of CoNb2O6 at 2.9 K and 1.9 K by measuring the specific heat, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization of poly- and single-crystalline samples. The specific heat measurements performed in external magnetic fields up to about 1.5 kOe disclosed the Ising-like nature of the transitions and tremendous anisotropic magnetic-field dependence due to the low-dimensional character. Moreover, the specific heat and ac magnetic susceptibility data imply another magnetic state below 1 K. These consequences suggest a very interesting magnetic phase diagram, resulting from the competing single-ion anisotropy and exchange interactions in this compound.

  1. Anisotropic distribution function of minority tail ions generated by strong ion-cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S.; Colestock, P.

    1989-05-01

    The highly anisotropic particle distribution function of minority tail ions driven by ion-cyclotron resonance heating at the fundamental harmonic is calculated in a two-dimensional velocity space. It is assumed that the heating is strong enough to drive most of the resonant ions above the in-electron critical slowing-down energy. Simple analytic expressions for the tail distribution are obtained fro the case when the Doppler effect is sufficiently large to flatten the sharp pitch angle dependence in the bounce averaged qualilinear heating coefficient, D/sub b/, and for the case when D/sub b/ is assumed to be constant in pitch angle and energy. It is found that a simple constant-D/sub b/ solution can be used instead of the more complicated sharp-D/sub b/ solution for many analytic purposes. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Effects of anisotropic conduction and heat pipe interaction on minimum mass space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Lund, Kurt O.

    1991-01-01

    Equations are formulated for the two dimensional, anisotropic conduction of heat in space radiator fins. The transverse temperature field was obtained by the integral method, and the axial field by numerical integration. A shape factor, defined for the axial boundary condition, simplifies the analysis and renders the results applicable to general heat pipe/conduction fin interface designs. The thermal results are summarized in terms of the fin efficiency, a radiation/axial conductance number, and a transverse conductance surface Biot number. These relations, together with those for mass distribution between fins and heat pipes, were used in predicting the minimum radiator mass for fixed thermal properties and fin efficiency. This mass is found to decrease monotonically with increasing fin conductivity. Sensitivities of the minimum mass designs to the problem parameters are determined.

  3. Anisotropic thermal-diffusivity measurements by a new laser-spot-heating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hideyuki; Baba, Tetsuya; Okaji, Masahiro

    2001-12-01

    A new technique to measure thermal diffusivities of solid materials, including their anisotropic behaviours, has been developed. The technique is based on periodic heating: an intensity-modulated laser beam is focused to make a small heat spot on the front side of a thin-plate specimen and the excited temperature waves are detected by a thin thermocouple attached onto its rear side. The phase lag of temperature waves is monitored as a function of the distance between the heated spot and the sensing point. The accuracy and the applicability of the present technique were well verified by using two kinds of isotropic reference samples, an austenitic stainless steel and pure copper. The typical uncertainty is estimated to be 5% at room temperature. This technique was applied to evaluate the highly anisotropic thermal diffusivity of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Its anisotropy, Dab/Dc (the ratio of the in-plane thermal diffusivity to the out-of-plane one), was observed to be about 220.

  4. Magnetorotational instability in a collisionless plasma with heat flux vector and an isotropic plasma with self-gravitational effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao; Wu, Zhengwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-09-01

    The linear stability of a differential rotating magnetized plasma is analyzed in the collisionless approximation along with heat flux vector. The dispersion relation is derived and simplified cases are discussed with instability criteria presented. Anisotropic pressures are shown to not only alter the classical instability criterion but also induce new unstable regions. The shear rotating instability in a collisional magnetized plasma with a scalar kinetic pressure in the presence of self-gravitational effect is then considered. Three cases are discussed specifically according to the general dispersion relation. The effects of Jeans term and compressibility on the local shear instability induced by differential rotation are examined and the analytic instability criteria are presented.

  5. Magnetorotational instability in a collisionless plasma with heat flux vector and an isotropic plasma with self-gravitational effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Haijun; Wu Zhengwei; Cao Jintao; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-09-15

    The linear stability of a differential rotating magnetized plasma is analyzed in the collisionless approximation along with heat flux vector. The dispersion relation is derived and simplified cases are discussed with instability criteria presented. Anisotropic pressures are shown to not only alter the classical instability criterion but also induce new unstable regions. The shear rotating instability in a collisional magnetized plasma with a scalar kinetic pressure in the presence of self-gravitational effect is then considered. Three cases are discussed specifically according to the general dispersion relation. The effects of Jeans term and compressibility on the local shear instability induced by differential rotation are examined and the analytic instability criteria are presented.

  6. Dispersive Alfvén waves in a plasma with anisotropic superthermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Hu, T. P.

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion of dispersive Alfvén wave in a low β plasma with anisotropic superthermal particles modeled by a bi-nonextensive distribution is derived from a kinetic way. The effect of anisotropic temperature on inertial Alfvén wave is so small that it is negligible. However, it will play an important role on the property of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW). The numerical results reveal that the presence of superthermal electrons in the small wavenumber limit will lead the damping rate of the KAW bigger than the one with Maxwellian distribution. Whereas, the damping rate of KAW in the large wavenumber limit will decrease with the presence of superthermal electrons. When the effect of electron anisotropic temperature overwhelms the effect of finite ion gyroradius in the small wavenumber regime, the damping rate of KAW grows with the presence of electron temperature anisotropy. On the other hand, when the effects of finite ion gyroradius play a dominant role in the large wavenumber regime, the damping rate of KAW increases with the effective perpendicular and parallel electron temperatures.

  7. Plasma arc heated secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.; Paulson, B.; Schlienger, M.; Goerz, D.; Kerns, J.; Vernazza, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a secondary combustion chamber (SCC) for hazardous waste treatment systems that uses a plasma arc torch as the heat source. Developed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Retech, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the unit is intended primarily to handle the off-gas from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. ft is designed to heat the effluent gas which may contain volatile organic compounds, and maintain the gas temperature above 1000 C for two seconds or more. The benefits of using a plasma arc gas heater are described in comparison to a conventional fossil fuel heated SCC. Thermal design considerations are discussed. Analysis and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness in destroying hazardous compounds and reducing the total volume of gaseous emissions.

  8. RF plasma heating improvement with EBG surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, Saul; Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    High impedance surfaces or electromagnetic band gap (EBG) surfaces have proved themselves to be useful in wireless communications applications due to their unique characteristics such as no propagating surface wave support, no conduction of RF current for a given bandwidth, in-phase electromagnetic reflection and non-inverted image of the electric charge in front of them [1]. These characteristics make possible to design compact antennas achieving better performance in terms of radiation and input impedance. ICRF plasma heating antennas in fusion experiments can take advantage of using EBG surfaces. One of the main issues in ICRF plasma heating is the low power coupling of the plasma facing antenna. The adoption of EBG surfaces in the antenna structure and the advantages offered by a predictive designing tool as TOPICA [2] offer the possibility to improve significantly the coupled power to plasma. [1] IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech., vol. 47, pp. 2059--2074, Nov. 1999. [2] Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476.

  9. Numerical study of heat and mass transfer in an anisotropic porous enclosure due to constant heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, P.; Eswaran, V.; Singh, P.

    1998-12-01

    Combined heat and mass transfer in porous media occurs in many natural phenomena and engineering applications, such as the migration of moisture through air contained in insulation, the spreading of chemical pollutants in saturated soil, and the extraction of geothermal energy. Here, double-diffusive natural convective flow within a rectangular enclosure has been studied for an anisotropic porous medium using a non-Darcy extension. The principal direction of the permeability tensor has been taken oblique to the gravity vector. The spectral element method has been used to solve the problem numerically. The method has been validated using existing analytical and numerical results. Parametric studies are presented for isotropic and anisotropic cases for different fundamental parameters, e.g., buoyancy ratio, Lewis number, Rayleigh number, Darcy number. The results show that anisotropy causes significant changes in the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. In particular, the present analysis shows that permeability orientation angle has a significant effect on the flow rate and, consequently, on the heat and mass transfer.

  10. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  11. Monte Carlo prediction of radiative heat transfer in inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nongray media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jeff T.; Howell, John R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo solution technique has been formulated to predict the radiative heat transfer in three-dimensional, inhomogeneous participating media which exhibit spectrally dependent emission and absorption and anisotropic scattering. Details of the technique and selected numerical sensitivities are discussed. The technique was applied to a problem involving a medium composed of a gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen and suspended carbon particles. A homogeneous medium was modeled to examine the effect of total pressure and carbon-particle concentration on radiative heat transfer. Variation in total pressure, over the range studied, had minimal effect on the amount of heat radiated to the enclosure walls and on the radiative-flux distribution within the medium. Increases in the carbon particle concentration produced significantly higher heat fluxes at the boundaries and altered the radiative flux distribution. The technique was then applied to an inhomogeneous medium to examine effects of specific temperature and carbon particle concentration distributions on radiative heat transfer. For the inhomogeneous conditions examined, the largest radiative flux divergence occurs near the center of the medium and the regions near some enclosure walls act as energy sinks.

  12. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K

    2008-08-01

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808 nm wavelength and an output power up to 50 W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge. PMID:19044350

  13. Plasma treatment of heat-resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. A.; Kosmachev, P. V.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Bezukhov, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    Refractory lining of thermal generating units is exposed to chemical, thermal, and mechanical attacks. The degree of fracture of heat-resistant materials depends on the chemical medium composition, the process temperature and the material porosity. As is known, a shortterm exposure of the surface to low-temperature plasma (LTP) makes possible to create specific coatings that can improve the properties of workpieces. The aim of this work is to produce the protective coating on heat-resistant chamotte products using the LTP technique. Experiments have shown that plasma treatment of chamotte products modifies the surface, and a glass-ceramic coating enriched in mullite is formed providing the improvement of heat resistance. For increasing heat resistance of chamotte refractories, pastes comprising mixtures of Bacor, alumina oxide, and chamot were applied to their surfaces in different ratios. It is proved that the appropriate coating cannot be created if only one of heat-resistant components is used. The required coatings that can be used and recommended for practical applications are obtained only with the introduction of powder chamot. The paste composition of 50% chamot, 25% Bacor, and 25% alumina oxide exposed to plasma treatment, has demonstrated the most uniform surface fusion.

  14. Plasma waves in a relativistic, strongly anisotropic plasma propagated along a strong magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onishchenko, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    The dispersion properties of plasma waves in a relativistic homogeneous plasma propagated along a strong magnetic field are studied. It is shown that the non-damping plasma waves exist in the frequency range omega sub p or = omega or = omega sub L. The values of omega sub p and omega sub L are calculated for an arbitrary homogeneous relativistic function of the particle distribution. In the case of a power ultrarelativistic distribution, it is shown that, if the ultrarelativistic tail of the distribution drops very rapidly, slightly damping plasma waves are possible with the phase velocity (omega/K)c.

  15. Plasma heating with crossing relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratan, Naren; Sircombe, Nathan; Ceurvorst, Luke; Kasim, Muhammad; Sadler, James; Bingham, Robert; Trines, Raoul; Norreys, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Plasma heating by relativistic electron beams is a powerful tool with applications including the heating of inertial confinement fusion targets and the study of matter in extreme conditions. We discuss the use of two relativistic electron beams to efficiently heat the plasma ions where the beams cross by using beam-plasma instabilities and non-linear wave coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. Energy from the electron beams is coupled to the plasma ions as the beams become unstable and drive Langmuir waves which couple non-linearly to ion-acoustic waves which are then damped . Results of linear growth rate calculations are presented for the system of two crossing electron beams demonstrating a broad spectrum of unstable modes. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell simulations in two space and two momentum dimensions have been performed which demonstrate the non-linear coupling of the electron beam energy into ion-acoustic waves and the energy cascade to the background ions. Time-frequency analysis is applied to analyze the non-linear coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in wave phase space. Structural properties of the strong turbulence produced at late times are analyzed.

  16. The anisotropic redistribution of free energy for gyrokinetic plasma turbulence in a Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Alejandro Bañón; Teaca, Bogdan; Jenko, Frank

    2016-04-01

    For a Z-pinch geometry, we report on the nonlinear redistribution of free energy across scales perpendicular to the magnetic guide field, for a turbulent plasma described in the framework of gyrokinetics. The analysis is performed using a local flux-surface approximation, in a regime dominated by electrostatic fluctuations driven by the entropy mode, with both ion and electron species being treated kinetically. To explore the anisotropic nature of the free energy redistribution caused by the emergence of zonal flows, we use a polar coordinate representation for the field-perpendicular directions and define an angular density for the scale flux. Positive values for the classically defined (angle integrated) scale flux, which denote a direct energy cascade, are shown to be also composed of negative angular sections, a fact that impacts our understanding of the backscatter of energy and the way in which it enters the modeling of sub-grid scales for turbulence. A definition for the flux of free energy across each perpendicular direction is introduced as well, which shows that the redistribution of energy in the presence of zonal flows is highly anisotropic.

  17. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  18. Investigation on broadband propagation characteristic of terahertz electromagnetic wave in anisotropic magnetized plasma in frequency and time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yuan; Han, Yiping; Ai, Xia; Liu, Xiuxiang

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave in an anisotropic magnetized plasma by JE convolution-finite difference time domain method. The anisotropic characteristic of the plasma, which leads to right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) and right-hand circularly polarized (LCP) waves, has been taken into account. The interaction between electromagnetic waves and magnetized plasma is illustrated by reflection and transmission coefficients for both RCP and LCP THz waves. The effects of both the magnetized plasma thickness and the external magnetized field are analyzed and numerical results demonstrate that the two factors could influence the THz wave greatly. It is worthy to note that besides the reflection and transmission coefficients in the frequency domain, the waveform of the electric field in the time domain varying with thicknesses and external magnetic fields for different polarized direction has been studied.

  19. A new phase for the anisotropic N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Elliot; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2015-09-01

    Black hole solutions of type IIB supergravity have been previously constructed that describe the N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma with an anisotropic spatial deformation. The zero temperature limit of these black holes approach a Lifshitz-like scaling solution in the infrared. We show that these black holes become unstable at low temperature and we construct a new class of black hole solutions which are thermodynamically preferred. The phase transition is third order and incorporates a spontaneous breaking of the SO(6) global symmetry down to SO(4) × SO(2). The critical exponents for the phase transition are given by ( α, β, γ, δ) = (-1, 1, 1, 2) which differ from the standard mean-field exponents usually seen in holography. At low temperatures the black holes approach a novel kind of scaling behaviour in the far IR with spatial anisotropy and hyperscaling violation. We show that the new ground states are thermal insulators in the direction of the anisotropy.

  20. Phase transitions of an anisotropic N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma via holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Elliot

    2016-07-01

    Black hole solutions of type IIB supergravity were previously found that are dual to N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma with an anisotropic spatial deformation. In the zero temperature limit, these black holes approach a Liftshitz like scaling solution in the IR. It was recently shown that these black holes are unstable, and at low temperatures there is a new class of black hole solutions that are thermodynamically preferred. We extend this analysis, by considering consistent truncations of the Kaluza-Klein reduction of IIB supergravity on a five-sphere that preserves multiple scalar and U(1) gauge fields. We show that the previously constructed black holes become unstable at low temperatures, and construct new classes of exotic black hole solutions. We study the DC thermo-electric conductivity of these U(1) charged black holes, and find a diverging DC conductivity at zero temperature due to the divergence of the gauge field coupling.

  1. Three discontinuous Galerkin schemes for the anisotropic heat conduction equation on non-aligned grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, M.; Wiesenberger, M.; Stegmeir, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present and discuss three discontinuous Galerkin (dG) discretizations for the anisotropic heat conduction equation on non-aligned cylindrical grids. Our non-aligned scheme relies on a self-adjoint local dG (LDG) discretization of the elliptic operator. It conserves the energy exactly and converges with arbitrary order. The pollution by numerical perpendicular heat fluxes decreases with superconvergence rates. We compare this scheme with aligned schemes that are based on the flux-coordinate independent approach for the discretization of parallel derivatives. Here, the dG method provides the necessary interpolation. The first aligned discretization can be used in an explicit time-integrator. However, the scheme violates conservation of energy and shows up stagnating convergence rates for very high resolutions. We overcome this partly by using the adjoint of the parallel derivative operator to construct a second self-adjoint aligned scheme. This scheme preserves energy, but reveals unphysical oscillations in the numerical tests, which result in a decreased order of convergence. Both aligned schemes exhibit low numerical heat fluxes into the perpendicular direction and are superior for flute-modes with finite parallel gradients. We build our argumentation on various numerical experiments on all three schemes for a general axisymmetric magnetic field, which is closed by a comparison to the aligned finite difference (FD) schemes of Stegmeir et al. (2014) and Stegmeir et al. (submitted for publication).

  2. Asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian approach for modeling anisotropic transport in magnetized plasmas for arbitrary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory

    2012-10-01

    Modeling electron transport in magnetized plasmas is extremely challenging due to the extreme anisotropy between parallel (to the magnetic field) and perpendicular directions (χ/χ˜10^10 in fusion plasmas). Recently, a Lagrangian Green's function approach, developed for the purely parallel transport case,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011)^,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, 19, 056112 (2012) has been extended to the anisotropic transport case in the tokamak-ordering limit with constant density.footnotetextL. Chac'on, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, C. Hauck, JCP, submitted (2012) An operator-split algorithm is proposed that allows one to treat Eulerian and Lagrangian components separately. The approach is shown to feature bounded numerical errors for arbitrary χ/χ ratios, which renders it asymptotic-preserving. In this poster, we will present the generalization of the Lagrangian approach to arbitrary magnetic fields. We will demonstrate the potential of the approach with various challenging configurations, including the case of transport across a magnetic island in cylindrical geometry.

  3. Ion heating in a plasma focus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Gary, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Ion acceleration and heating in a plasma focus were investigated by the numerical integration of the three-dimensional equations of motion. The electric and magnetic fields given were derived from experimental data. The results obtained show that during the collapse phase of focus formation, ions are efficiently heated to temperatures of several keV. During the phase of rapid current reduction, ions are accelerated to large velocities in the axial direction. The results obtained with the model are in general agreement with experimental results.

  4. FREQUENCY CONTROL OF RF HEATING OF GASEOUS PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Herold, E.W.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to the heating of gaseous plasma by radiofrequency ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The cyclotron resonance frequencies are varied and this invention provides means for automatically controlling the frequency of the radiofrequency to maximize the rate of heating. To this end, a servo-loop is provided to sense the direction of plasma heating with frequency and a control signal is derived to set the center frequency of the radiofrequency energy employed to heat the plasma. (AEC)

  5. The heating of plasma focus electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, E.; Frignani, M.; Mannucci, S.; Rocchi, F.; Sumini, M.; Tartari, A.

    2006-02-01

    Plasma focus (PF) technology development today is strictly related to the possibility of a high frequency repetitive working regime. One of the more relevant obstacles to this goal is the heating of structural components due to direct interaction with plasma. In this paper, temperature decay measurements of the inner electrode of a 7 kJ Mather type PF are presented. Data from several series of shots at different bank energies are analysed and compared with theoretical and numerical models. Two possible scale laws are derived from the experimental data to correlate thermal deposition with bank energy. It is found that a fraction of about 10% of total energy is released to the inner electrode. Finally, after some considerations about the cooling and heating mechanisms, an analysis on maximum temperature sustained by materials is presented.

  6. Investigation of anisotropic photonic band gaps in three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals containing the uniaxial material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, the dispersive properties of three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) composed of anisotropic dielectric (the uniaxial material) spheres immersed in homogeneous magnetized plasma background with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered. The equations for calculating the anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and two flatbands regions can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field on the dispersive properties of the 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in 3D MPPCs with fcc lattices and the complete PBGs can be found compared to the conventional 3D MPPCs doped by the isotropic material. The bandwidths of PBGs can be tuned by introducing the magnetized plasma into 3D PCs containing the uniaxial material. It is also shown that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field, respectively. The locations of flatbands regions cannot be manipulated by any parameters except for the plasma frequency and external magnetic field. Introducing the uniaxial material can obtain the complete PBGs as the 3D MPPCs with high symmetry and also provides a way to design the tunable devices.

  7. Theory of ballooning-mirror instabilities for anisotropic pressure plasmas in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Qian, Q.

    1993-09-01

    This paper deals with a kinetic-MHD eigenmode stability analysis of low frequency ballooning-mirror instabilities for anisotropic pressure plasmas in the magnetosphere. The ballooning mode is a dominant transverse wave driven unstable by pressure gradient in the bad curvature region. The mirror mode with a dominant compressional magnetic field perturbation is excited when the product of plasma beta and pressure anisotropy is large. The field-aligned eigenmode equations take into account the coupling of the transverse and compressional components of the perturbed magnetic field and describe the coupled ballooning-mirror mode. Because the energetic trapped ions precess very rapidly across the {rvec B} field, their motion becomes very rigid with respect to low frequency MHD perturbations with symmetric structure of parallel perturbed magnetic field {delta}B{sub {parallel}} and electrostatic potential {Phi} along the north-south ambient magnetic field, and the symmetric ballooning-mirror mode is shown to be stable. On the other hand, the ballooning-mirror mode with antisymmetric {delta}B{sub {parallel}}, and {Phi} structure along the north-south ambient magnetic field is only weakly influenced by energetic trapped particle kinetic effects due to rapid trapped particle bounce motion and has the lowest instability threshold determined by MHD theory. With large plasma beta ({beta}{sub {parallel}} {ge} O(1)) and pressure anisotropy (P{sub {perpendicular}}/P{sub {parallel}} > 1) at equator the antisymmetric ballooning-mirror mode structures resemble the field-aligned wave structures of the multisatellite observations of a long lasting compressional Pc 5 wave event during November 14--15, 1979 [Takahashi et al.]. The study provides the theoretical basis for identifying the internal excitation mechanism of ULF (Pc 4-5) waves by comparing the plasma stability parameters computed from the satellite particle data with the theoretical values.

  8. Inertial-range kinetic turbulence in pressure-anisotropic astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Chen, C. H. K.; Abel, I. G.; Cowley, S. C.

    2015-10-01

    > A theoretical framework for low-frequency electromagnetic (drift-)kinetic turbulence in a collisionless, multi-species plasma is presented. The result generalises reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) and kinetic RMHD (Schekochihin et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser., vol. 182, 2009, pp. 310-377) to the case where the mean distribution function of the plasma is pressure-anisotropic and different ion species are allowed to drift with respect to each other - a situation routinely encountered in the solar wind and presumably ubiquitous in hot dilute astrophysical plasmas such as the intracluster medium. Two main objectives are achieved. First, in a non-Maxwellian plasma, the relationships between fluctuating fields (e.g. the Alfvén ratio) are order-unity modified compared to the more commonly considered Maxwellian case, and so a quantitative theory is developed to support quantitative measurements now possible in the solar wind. Beyond these order-unity corrections, the main physical feature of low-frequency plasma turbulence survives the generalisation to non-Maxwellian distributions: Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations are energetically decoupled, with the latter passively advected by the former; the Alfvénic cascade is fluid, satisfying RMHD equations (with the Alfvén speed modified by pressure anisotropy and species drifts), whereas the compressive cascade is kinetic and subject to collisionless damping (and for a bi-Maxwellian plasma splits into three independent collisionless cascades). Secondly, the organising principle of this turbulence is elucidated in the form of a conservation law for the appropriately generalised kinetic free energy. It is shown that non-Maxwellian features in the distribution function reduce the rate of phase mixing and the efficacy of magnetic stresses, and that these changes influence the partitioning of free energy amongst the various cascade channels. As the firehose or mirror instability thresholds are approached, the dynamics

  9. Heat and Products Induced by Plasma Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tadahiko Mizuno; Tadayoshi Ohmori; Tadashi Akimoto; Akito Takahashi

    2000-11-12

    Plasma is formed on an electrode surface when a metal cathode is polarized in high-voltage electrolysis in a liquid electrolyte. When a liquid electrolyte is polarized at high voltage (70 to 500 V), it gives rise to an electric discharge and a plasma state. We measured the output heat and input electric power in real time by a method that combined open cell isoperibolic calorimetry and flow calorimetry. Takahashi et al. hypothesize a nuclear reaction induced by photon activation on the cathode element. We have attempted to explain the experimental results by a mechanism that produces no radioactive materials or weak radioactive emission. We applied the Takahashi theory developed for Pd and Au electrodes to the case of a W electrode. We have first reported that the distribution for their reaction product showed clearly one or two peaks that consisted of the mass number around 52 for the case of Pd and 64 and 120 for Au. This paper mainly pertains to the metal electrode. With a tungsten electrode, one peak in the anomalous elements is for the major elements from 40 to 65, and the other is from 100 to 120. The total mass of elements generated during excess heat evolution was on the order of 1 mg. Based on this mass, according to conventional laws of fission and fusion, 'commensurate' heat would have been on the order of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} J. The actual excess heat was typically estimated at 10{sup 5}-several orders of magnitude less than the expected value. It is still difficult to calculate the actual weight loss of the reactive material before and after the reaction. However, we can say that the total energy generated was much less than the value calculated from the produced weight. We conclude that the photofission mechanism explains the amount of excess heat and the distribution of the element generation during the electrochemical treatment.

  10. The influence of thermophysical properties of an anisotropic heat-element substrate on the value of thermal emf in the stationary thermal mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Popov, P. A.; Reznikov, B. I.; Sakharov, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal and thermoelectric processes in anisotropic heat elements located on substrates made of different materials have been numerically simulated. It is shown that, when an invariable heat flux passes through a heat element, the thermophysical properties of the substrate and heat transfer coefficient at its rear surface affect significantly the temperature distribution and the value of generated thermal emf.

  11. ICRF heating in reactor grade plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Bures, M.; Cottrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Sack, C.H.; Start, D.F.H.; Taroni, A. ); Hellsten, T. ); Koch, R. ); Moreau, D. )

    1990-01-01

    Impurity influxes in JET discharges due to ICRH have been reduced to insignificant levels. This has allowed high quality H-modes to be produced with ICRH alone and has enhanced the density limit which is now the same as the NBI limit. Improvement in the deuterium fuel fraction has led to the generation of 100kW of non thermal {sup 3}He-D fusion power. Alpha-particle simulations using MeV ions created by ICRH show classical energy loss and suggest that {alpha}-heating in a reactor will be highly efficient. A clear demonstration of TTMP damping of the fast wave in high beta plasmas has been achieved. A broadband ICRH system is proposed for NET/ITER which will allow fast wave current drive and central ion heating for burn control and ignition. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Bram; Koren, Barry; de Blank, Hugo J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  13. The right circular polarized waves in the three-dimensional anisotropic dispersive photonic crystals consisting of the magnetized plasma and uniaxial material as the Faraday effects considered

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Shao-Bin E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Tang, Yi-Jun; Zhen, Jian-Ping

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, the properties of the right circular polarized (RCP) waves in the three-dimensional (3D) dispersive photonic crystals (PCs) consisting of the magnetized plasma and uniaxial material with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, which the homogeneous anisotropic dielectric spheres (the uniaxial material) immersed in the magnetized plasma background, as the Faraday effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is parallel to the external magnetic field at any time). The equations for calculating the anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) for the RCP waves in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and a flatbands region can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, anisotropic dielectric filling factor, plasma frequency, and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the properties of first two anisotropic PBGs for the RCP waves are investigated in detail, respectively. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in fcc lattices at U and W points, and the complete PBGs for the RCP waves can be achieved compared to the conventional 3D dispersive PCs composed of the magnetized plasma and isotropic material. It is also shown that the first two anisotropic PBGs can be tuned by those parameters as mentioned above. Those PBGs can be enlarged by introducing the uniaxial material into such 3D PCs as the Faraday effects are considered.

  14. 3D Plasma Equilibrium and Stability with Hot Particle Anisotropic Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Hirshman, S. P.; Merkel, P.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H. F. G.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Narushima, Y.

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic pressure free-boundary three-dimsnsional (3D) equilibrium code ANI-MEC with nested magnetic flux surfaces has been developed as an extension of the VMEC2000 code. The preconditioning algorithm included is exploited to allow the computation of equilibrium states with radial force balance error improvements exceeding 4 orders of magnitude compared with the non-conditioned results. Large off-axis energetic particle deposition has been applied in a 2-field period quasiaxisymmetric stellarator reactor at <{beta}>{approx_equal}4.5% to test the limitations of the code. The hot particle pressures are roughly uniform around the flux surfaces when p{sub parallel}>p{sub perpendicular}. The fast particle perpendicular pressures localise in the region of deposition for p{sub perpendicular}>p{sub parallel}, while the energetic particle parallel pressures concentrate on the low-field side. Two anisotropic pressure models for global fluid stability implemented in the TERPSICHORE code have been applied to the LHD Heliotron for a sequence of equilibria with fixed <{beta}{sub dia}>{approx_equal}5%(<{beta}{sub th}>{approx_equal}3.5%) varying the fast particle temperature ratio T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular}. Global magnetohydrodynamic modes are quasi-stable according to the model with rigid hot particle layers, while they become stabilised according to the fully interacting energetic particle model with increasing T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular}. As T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular} approaches 3, however, the n = 1 mode family becomes unstable. A transition from a nearly stable quasi-external ballooning-interchange structure to a weakly unstable internal kink mode takes place. The investigation of beam-driven fusion in a Heliotron system is broached. A background plasma with cold ions and warm electrons at <{beta}{sub ith}>{approx_equal}1% is examined with fixed T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular} = 10 in which the hot particle contribution to <{beta

  15. Plasma heating for containerless and microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Man, Kin F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for plasma heating of levitated samples to be used in containerless microgravity processing is disclosed. A sample is levitated by electrostatic, electromagnetic, aerodynamic, or acoustic systems, as is appropriate for the physical properties of the particular sample. The sample is heated by a plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. A ground plate is provided to help direct the plasma towards the sample. In addition, Helmholtz coils are provided to produce a magnetic field that can be used to spiral the plasma around the sample. The plasma heating system is oriented such that it does not interfere with the levitation system.

  16. Theoretical studies on plasma heating and confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three principal topics are covered in this final report: Stabilization of low frequency modes of an axisymmetric compact torus plasma confinement system, such as, spheromaks and FRC'S, by a population of large orbit axis encircling energetic ions. Employing an extension of the energy principle' which utilizes a Vlasov description for the energetic 'ion component, it has been demonstrated that short wavelength MHD type modes are stabilized while the long wavelength tilt and precessional modes are marginally stable. The deformation of the equilibrium configuration by the energetic ions results in the stabilization of the tilt mode for spheromaks. Formation of Ion Rings and their coalescence with spheromaks. A two dimensional electromagnetic PIC codes has been developed for the study of ion ring formation and its propagation, deformation and slowing down in a cold plasma. It has been shown that a ring moving at a speed less than the Alfven velocity can merge with a stationary spheromak. Anomalous transport from drift waves in a Tokomak. The Direct Interaction Approximation in used to obtain incremental transport coefficients for particles and heat for drift waves in a Tokomak. It is shown that the transport matrix does not obey Onsager's principle.

  17. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  18. Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at High Temperature Determined by Ultrasonic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qin; Zhu, Jianguo; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are of great scientific and technological significance for the design and fabrication of TBC systems. The ultrasonic method combined with a sing-around method for mechanical properties measurement of TBC is deduced and the elastic modulus can be determined in the spray, or longitudinal, direction, and the transverse direction. Tested specimens of plasma-sprayed TBC are detached from the substrate and treated with thermal exposure at 1400 °C. The elastic moduli along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the TBCs are measured by different types of ultrasonic waves combined with a sing-around method, while the Poisson's ratio is also obtained simultaneously. The experimental results indicate that the magnitude of longitudinal elastic modulus is larger than that of the transverse one, and thus the plasma-sprayed TBC has an anisotropic mechanical property. Moreover, the elastic moduli along both longitudinal and transverse directions change with high-temperature exposure time, which consists of a rapid increasing stage followed by a slow decreasing stage. In addition, the magnitude of Poisson's ratio increases slightly from 0.05 to 0.2 with the high-temperature exposure time. Generally, the microstructures in the plasma-sprayed coatings and their evolution in a high-temperature environment are the main causes of the varying anisotropic mechanical properties.

  19. An anisotropic character of nonlinear fluxes not involved in the plasma energy transport in the Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byunghoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae; Lee, Gun Bok

    2015-04-01

    Fluxes of both the vorticity and the plasma density due to the nonlinear E × B convective derivatives are divided into two parts. One part, which is almost isotropic, is well known to engage in the transfer of energies from the energy-producing scale where the phase mismatch between the density and the electric potential is large. The other part, in the Fourier space , is found to be highly anisotropic. If it is summed over k y , the result is nearly random around zero in k x while the sum over k x is approximately proportional to k y . In Fourier space, such anisotropic fluxes are found to be closely related to the gradients of the squares of the vorticity and the electric potential, respectively. We argue that the advecting velocities in Fourier space may be predicted on dimensional grounds.

  20. Full-wave Simulations of ICRF Heating in Toroidal Plasma with Non-Maxwellian Distribution Functions in the FLR Limit

    SciTech Connect

    E.J. Valeo, C.K. Phillips, H. Okuda, J.C. Wright, P.T. Bonoli, L.A. Berry, and the RF SciDAC Team

    2007-07-18

    At the power levels required for signicant heating and current drive in magnetically-con ned toroidal plasma, modi cation of the particle distribution function from a Maxwellian shape is likely [T.H. Stix, Nucl. Fusion, 15:737 1975], with consequent changes in wave propagation and in the location and amount of absorption. In order to study these e ects computationally, the nite-Larmor-radius, full-wave, hot-plasma toroidal simulation code, TORIC [M. Brambilla. Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 41:1, 1999], has been extended to allow the prescription of arbitrary velocity distributions of the form ƒ (ν||, ν⊥, Ψ, θ). For H minority heating of a D-H plasma with anisotropic Maxwellian H distributions, the fractional H absorption varies signi cantly with changes in parallel temperature but is essentially independent of perpendicular temperature.

  1. Plasma heating via adiabatic magnetic compression-expansion cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, K.; Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of collisionless plasmas in closed adiabatic magnetic cycle comprising of a quasi static compression followed by a non quasi static constrained expansion against a constant external pressure is proposed. Thermodynamic constraints are derived to show that the plasma always gains heat in cycles having at least one non quasi static process. The turbulent relaxation of the plasma to the equilibrium state at the end of the non quasi static expansion is discussed and verified via 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations. Applications of this scheme to heating plasmas in open configurations (mirror machines) and closed configurations (tokamak, reverse field pinche) are discussed.

  2. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  3. Instability of field-aligned electron-cyclotron waves in a magnetic mirror plasma with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishanov, N. I.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    > Dispersion characteristics have been analysed for field-aligned electron-cyclotron waves (also known as right-hand polarized waves, extraordinary waves or whistlers) in a cylindrical magnetic mirror plasma including electrons with anisotropic temperature. It is shown that the instability of these waves is possible only in the range below the minimal electron-cyclotron frequency, which is much lower than the gyrotron frequency used for electron-cyclotron resonance power input into the plasma, under the condition where the perpendicular temperature of the resonant electrons is larger than their parallel temperature. The growth rates of whistler instability in the two magnetized plasma models, where the stationary magnetic field is either uniform or has a non-uniform magnetic mirror configuration, are compared.

  4. Two-Dimensional Hybrid Models of Inhomogeneous Expanding Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Turbulent Wave Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozak, N.; Ofman, L.; Vinas, A. F.; Maneva, Y. G.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing observations of solar wind plasma show that heavy ions are hotter than protons and that their temperature is anisotropic. In-situ observations of fast solar wind streams at distances of 0.29 AU and beyond by Helios and recently at ~1 AU by STEREO, ACE, and Wind spacecraft provide direct evidence for the presence of turbulent Alfven wave spectrum and of left-hand polarized ion-cyclotron waves in the coronal plasma. The latter can produce temperature anisotropies by resonant absorption and perpendicular heating of the ions. Furthermore, measurements indicate that Ti,⊥>>Ti,‖, contrary to what is expected in purely adiabatic expansion of the solar wind plasma, which predicts the opposite effect due to conservation of magnetic moment of the expanding ions. Future Solar Probe+ mission will provide in-situ observations of solar wind plasma close to the Sun where it is expected to be inhomogeneous on small scales. Here, we study the heating and the acceleration of solar wind ions (H+, He++) in inhomogeneous plasma with a turbulent spectrum of Alfvénic fluctuations using 2.5D hybrid code. The 2-D model allows us to explore inhomogeneities in the plasma and obliquely propagating waves. We extend previous work (Ofman 2010; Ofman et al. 2011) by including the expansion of the solar wind and study its effect on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling, and on the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background wind. We also study the effects of inhomogeneous drift on the heating of the ions. We compare our results to the available observations.

  5. The Voigt effects in the anisotropic photonic band gaps of three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals doped by the uniaxial material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) for three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) composed of anisotropic dielectric (the uniaxial material) spheres immersed in homogeneous magnetized plasma background with simple-cubic lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered. The equations for calculating the anisotropic PBGs in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and two flatband regions can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency on the characteristics of anisotropic PBGs for the three-dimensional MPPCs are studied in detail and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in simple-cubic lattices and the complete PBGs can be found compared to the conventional three-dimensional MPPCs doped by the isotropic material. The bandwidths of PBGs can be enlarged by introducing the magnetized plasma into three-dimensional PCs containing the uniaxial material. It is also shown that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency. The locations of flatband regions cannot be tuned by any parameters except for the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency. Introducing the uniaxial material in three-dimensional magnetized plasma-dielectric photonic crystals can enlarge the PBGs and also provide a way to obtain the complete PBGs as the three-dimensional MPPCs with high symmetry.

  6. Viscous effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Bose, D.

    1999-10-01

    A transport model is developed for nonlocal effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors. The model is based on the electron momentum equation derived from the Boltzmann equation, retaining anisotropic stress components which in fact are viscous stresses. The resulting model consists of transport equations for the magnitude of electron velocity oscillation and terms representing energy dissipation due to viscous stresses in the electron energy equation. In this model, electrical current is obtained in a nonlocal manner due to viscous effects, instead of Ohm's law or the electron momentum equation without viscous effects, while nonlocal heating of electrons is represented by the viscous dissipation. Computational results obtained by two-dimensional numerical simulations show that nonlocal determination of electrical current indeed is important, and viscous dissipation becomes an important electron heating mechanism at low pressures. It is suspected that viscous dissipation in inductively coupled plasma reactors in fact represents stochastic heating of electrons, and this possibility is exploited by discussing physical similarities between stochastic heating and energy dissipation due to the stress tensor.

  7. Strongly-coupled plasmas formed from laser-heated solids

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M.; Bergeson, S. D.; Hart, G.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ion temperatures in laser-produced plasmas formed from solids with different initial lattice structures. We show that the equilibrium ion temperature is limited by a mismatch between the initial crystallographic configuration and the close-packed configuration of a strongly-coupled plasma, similar to experiments in ultracold neutral plasmas. We propose experiments to demonstrate and exploit this crystallographic heating in order to produce a strongly coupled plasma with a coupling parameter of several hundred. PMID:26503293

  8. Strongly-coupled plasmas formed from laser-heated solids.

    PubMed

    Lyon, M; Bergeson, S D; Hart, G; Murillo, M S

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ion temperatures in laser-produced plasmas formed from solids with different initial lattice structures. We show that the equilibrium ion temperature is limited by a mismatch between the initial crystallographic configuration and the close-packed configuration of a strongly-coupled plasma, similar to experiments in ultracold neutral plasmas. We propose experiments to demonstrate and exploit this crystallographic heating in order to produce a strongly coupled plasma with a coupling parameter of several hundred. PMID:26503293

  9. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion.

    PubMed

    Betti, R; Christopherson, A R; Spears, B K; Nora, R; Bose, A; Howard, J; Woo, K M; Edwards, M J; Sanz, J

    2015-06-26

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ. PMID:26197131

  10. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  11. Alpha heating and burning plasmas in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  12. Turbulence and Proton–Electron Heating in Kinetic Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, William H.; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Wan, Minping; Wu, P.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of particle-in-cell simulations of kinetic plasma turbulence reveals a connection between the strength of cascade, the total heating rate, and the partitioning of dissipated energy into proton heating and electron heating. A von Karman scaling of the cascade rate explains the total heating across several families of simulations. The proton to electron heating ratio increases in proportion to total heating. We argue that the ratio of gyroperiod to nonlinear turnover time at the ion kinetic scales controls the ratio of proton and electron heating. The proposed scaling is consistent with simulations.

  13. Further testing of anisotropic plasma turbulence theory with spacecraft observations of the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerlin, E. J.; Wicks, R.; Forman, M. A.; Salem, C. S.; Roberts, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We use magnetic field observations from the fast solar wind made by the Ulysses, Wind, and Cluster spacecraft to measure the anisotropic scaling of the full power-spectra-tensor of inertial range turbulence in the solar wind. We use the results to make the most rigorous test of anisotropic turbulence theories thus far by solar wind observations. We compare the diagonal and off-diagonal terms of the tensor at different scales to reveal the different effects of sampling causing the projection of the anisotropic spectrum into the spacecraft observation frame. There is clear indication of anisotropy similar to "critical balance" in the inertial range, but the most striking result is the departure from the inertial range behavior observed at smaller scales in the "dissipation range".

  14. Plasma heating and hot ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Agren, O.

    2012-06-19

    Possibilities of plasma heating and sloshing ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids are briefly reviewed. Sloshing ions, i.e. energetic ions with a velocity distribution concentrated to a certain pitch-angle, play an important role in plasma confinement and generation of fusion neutrons in mirror machines. Neutral beam injection (NBI) is first discussed as a method to generate sloshing ions. Numerical results of NBI modeling for a stellarator-mirror hybrid are analyzed. The sloshing ions could alternatively be sustained by RF heating. Fast wave heating schemes, i.e. magnetic beach, minority and second harmonic heating, are addressed and their similarities and differences are described. Characteristic features of wave propagation in mirror hybrid devices including both fundamental harmonic minority and second harmonic heating are examined. Minority heating is efficient for a wide range of minority concentration and plasma densities; it allows one to place the antenna aside from the hot ion location. A simple-design strap antenna suitable for this has good performance. However, this scenario is appropriate only for light minority ions. The second harmonic heating can be applied for the heavy ion component. Arrangements are similar for minority and second harmonic heating. The efficiency of second harmonic heating is influenced by a weaker wave damping than for minority heating. Numerical calculations show that in a hybrid reactor scaled mirror machine the deuterium sloshing ions could be heated within the minority heating scheme, while the tritium ions could be sustained by second harmonic heating.

  15. ICRF Heated Long-Pulse Plasma Discharges in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Notake, T.; Torii, Y.; Okada, H.; Ichimura, M.; Higaki, H.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Yanping; Yoon, J. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD Experimental Group

    2006-01-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge for more than 30 min. was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8× 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. Total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ, which was a quarter of the prepared RF heating energy. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by shifting the magnetic axis inward and outward.

  16. Heating and cooling of the earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic-field models based on pressure equilibrium in the quiet magnetotail require nonadiabatic cooling of the plasma as it convects inward or a decrease of the flux tube content. Recent in situ observations of plasma density and temperature indicate that, during quiet convection, the flux tube content may actually increase. Thus the plasma must be cooled during quiet times. The earth plasma sheet is generally significantly hotter after the expansion phase of a substorm than before the plasma sheet thinning begins and cools during the recovery phase. Heating mechanisms such as reconnection, current sheet acceleration, plasma expansion, and resonant absorption of surface waves are discussed. It seems that all mechanisms are active, albeit in different regions of the plasma sheet. Near-earth tail signatures of substorms require local heating as well as a decrease of the flux tube content. It is shown that the resonant absorption of surface waves can provide both.

  17. Graphics processing unit (GPU)-based computation of heat conduction in thermally anisotropic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, C. A.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2013-01-01

    Numerical modeling of anisotropic media is a computationally intensive task since it brings additional complexity to the field problem in such a way that the physical properties are different in different directions. Largely used in the aerospace industry because of their lightweight nature, composite materials are a very good example of thermally anisotropic media. With advancements in video gaming technology, parallel processors are much cheaper today and accessibility to higher-end graphical processing devices has increased dramatically over the past couple of years. Since these massively parallel GPUs are very good in handling floating point arithmetic, they provide a new platform for engineers and scientists to accelerate their numerical models using commodity hardware. In this paper we implement a parallel finite difference model of thermal diffusion through anisotropic media using the NVIDIA CUDA (Compute Unified device Architecture). We use the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti as our primary computing device which consists of 384 CUDA cores clocked at 1645 MHz with a standard desktop pc as the host platform. We compare the results from standard CPU implementation for its accuracy and speed and draw implications for simulation using the GPU paradigm.

  18. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  19. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W.; Chiu, Shiu-Chu; Parks, Paul; Rawls, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  20. Direct heating of imploded plasma in the fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahara, Atsushi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Mima, Kunioki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mori, Yohitaga; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi

    2016-03-01

    We propose the direct heating of an imploded plasma core by ultra-intense lasers in inertial confinement fusion, to increase the heating coupling efficiency. In this scheme, both fast-electrons and fast-ions heat the plasma core. Experiments using this direct heating scheme has been carried out at GXII and LFEX laser facility at Osaka Univeristy. To model this direct heating scheme, we developed the 1D simulation model and carried out simulations using the experimental conditions. Comparison between results of the simulation and the experimental observations validates the simulation model. We show that even in the unoptimized experimental conditions used in simulations, our calculations show that the maximum temperature, 1.6 keV, of the CD plasma.

  1. Plasma Heating and Flow in an Auroral Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Austin, B.; Kintner, P. M.; Bonnell, J.

    1996-01-01

    We report direct observations of the three-dimensional velocity distribution of selected topside ionospheric ion species in an auroral context between 500 and 550 km altitude. We find heating transverse to the local magnetic field in the core plasma, with significant heating of 0(+), He(+), and H(+), as well as tail heating events that occur independently of the core heating. The 0(+) velocity distribution departs from bi-Maxwellian, at one point exhibiting an apparent ring-like shape. However, these observations are shown to be aliased within the auroral arc by temporal variations that arc not well-resolved by the core plasma instrument. The dc electric field measurements reveal superthermal plasma drifts that are consistent with passage of the payload through a series of vortex structures or a larger scale circularly polarized hydromagnetic wave structure within the auroral arc. The dc electric field also shows that impulsive solitary structures, with a frequency spectrum in the ion cyclotron frequency range, occur in close correlation with the tail heating events. The drift and core heating observations lend support to the idea that core ion heating is driven at low altitudes by rapid convective motions imposed by the magnetosphere. Plasma wave emissions at ion frequencies and parallel heating of the low-energy electron plasma are observed in conjunction with this auroral form; however, the conditions are much more complex than those typically invoked in previous theoretical treatments of superthermal frictional heating. The observed ion heating within the arc clearly exceeds that expected from frictional heating for the light ion species H(+) and He(+), and the core distributions also contain hot transverse tails, indicating an anomalous transverse heat source.

  2. Axial laser heating of three meter theta pinch plasma columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Lowenthal, D. D.

    1980-10-01

    A 3-m long plasma column formed and confined by a fast rising solenoidal field was irradiated from one end by a powerful pulsed CO2 laser. It was found that beam trapping density minima could be maintained for the length of the laser pulse if the plasma diameter exceeded about 1.5 cm. The erosion of the density minimum was governed by classical diffusion processes. Three meter long plasmas in 2.6 cm bore plasma tubes could be fairly uniformly heated by 3.0 kJ of CO2 laser irradiation. Best results were obtained when heating began before or during the theta pinch implosion phase and the plasma fill pressure exceeded 1.0 torr H2. Plasma line energies of about 1 kJ/m could be obtained in a magnetic field rising to 6 T in 4.7 microseconds.

  3. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  4. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  5. Plasma Heating Simulation in the VASIMR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; ChangDiaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Carter, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the recent development in the simulation of the ion-cyclotron acceleration of the plasma in the VASIMR experiment. The modeling is done using an improved EMIR code for RF field calculation together with particle trajectory code for plasma transport calculat ion. The simulation results correlate with experimental data on the p lasma loading and predict higher ICRH performance for a higher density plasma target. These simulations assist in optimizing the ICRF anten na so as to achieve higher VASIMR efficiency.

  6. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Anisotropic thermal diffusion in magnetized plasmas is an important physical phenomena for a diverse set of physical conditions ranging from astrophysical plasmas to MFE and ICF. Yet numerically simulating this phenomenon accurately poses significant challenges when the computational mesh is misaligned with respect to the magnetic field. Particularly when the temperature gradients are unresolved, one frequently finds entropy violating solutions with heat flowing from cold to hot zones for χ∥ /χ⊥ >=102 which is substantially smaller than the range of interest which can reach 1010 or higher. In this talk we present a new implicit algorithm for solving the anisotropic thermal diffusion equations and demonstrate its characteristics on what has become a fairly standard set of test problems in the literature. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-5687A.

  7. Neutral beam heating of detached plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Strachan, J.D.; Schivell, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Budny, R.; McNeill, D.H.; Bell, M.G.; Boody, F.P.

    1989-05-01

    Detached plasmas on TFTR have been heated with neutral beam auxiliary power for the first time. At beam powers above 2 MW the detached plasmas in TFTR expand and reattach to the limiters. Deuterium and/or impurity gas puffing can be used to maintain plasmas in the detached state at powers of over 5 MW. Transient events were observed in a number of these plasmas, including a confinement-related delay in evolution of the edge emissivity and some phenomena which appear similar to those seen in the H-mode. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Plasma-assisted synthesis and high-resolution characterization of anisotropic elemental and bimetallic core–shell magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Magnetically anisotropic as well as magnetic core–shell nanoparticles (CS-NPs) with controllable properties are highly desirable in a broad range of applications. With this background, a setup for the synthesis of heterostructured magnetic core–shell nanoparticles, which relies on (optionally pulsed) DC plasma gas condensation has been developed. We demonstrate the synthesis of elemental nickel nanoparticles with highly tunable sizes and shapes and Ni@Cu CS-NPs with an average shell thickness of 10 nm as determined with scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. An analytical model that relies on classical kinetic gas theory is used to describe the deposition of Cu shell atoms on top of existing Ni cores. Its predictive power and possible implications for the growth of heterostructured NP in gas condensation processes are discussed. PMID:24778973

  9. Plasma β Scaling of Anisotropic Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Flux Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2014-03-01

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of "spaghetti"-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  10. Plasma β scaling of anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind flux tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima E-mail: amitava@princeton.edu

    2014-03-10

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of 'spaghetti'-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  11. Plasma Heating and Sustainment with ICRH on W7AS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; Hartmann, D. A.; Lyon, J. F.

    1996-11-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) has successfully been demonstrated on the W7AS stellarator. A novel antenna, located on the high-field side of the torus, was designed to excite a narrow spectrum of k_allel≈ 6 m-1 fast waves. About 80% of the power radiated from the antenna was accounted for in the plasma. No significant increase in the impurity content of the plasma was observed. In second harmonic heating the diamagnetic energy W_dia increased about 10% (0.6 kJ). For H-minority heating of an ECRH deuterium target plasma (H/D ≈ 10%), W_dia increased about 15% (1 kJ) and T_D(0) rose from 300 eV to 400 eV. With H-minority heating it was possible to sustain an ECRH-created plasma with ICRH alone. The duration was limited solely by arcing in the transmission lines or antenna feeds. A steady state condition was obtained about 200 msec into the ICRH-only phase of the discharge. Typical parameters were W_dia = 2 kJ, ≈ 4×10^19 m-3, T_e(0) = 300 eV, and T_D(0) = 350 eV. The plasma profile was narrower and had steeper edges than in comparable ECRH plasmas.

  12. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  13. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-01

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  14. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  15. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

    1999-05-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current.

  16. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  17. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  18. Numerical simulation of plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Chan, C. B.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating in a diverging flux tube are investigated with numerical simulation. The heating is found to drive a host of plasma processes, in addition to the well-known phenomenon of ion conics. The downward electric field near the reverse shock generates a doublestreaming situation consisting of two upflowing ion populations with different average flow velocities. The electric field in the reverse shock region is modulated by the ion-ion instability driven by the multistreaming ions. The oscillating fields in this region have the possibility of heating electrons. These results from the simulations are compared with results from a previous study based on a hydrodynamical model. Effects of spatial resolutions provided by simulations on the evolution of the plasma are discussed.

  19. Strong electron heating in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, Elena; Zelenyi, Lev; Kronberg, Elena; Daly, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Strong perturbations of the Plasma Sheet (PS) magnetic field in the course of magnetic dipolarization are often followed by the generation of magnetic turbulence and plasma heating. Various plasma instabilities and waves can be excited during these processes, which may affect ion and electron velocity distributions in a different way. We have analyzed 70 crossings of the central PS by Cluster spacecraft (s/c) at -19 < X < -8 Re in 2001-2005. We have found that in 32 intervals the ratio of Tion/Tele dropped in the central PS down to <3.0, which denotes significant electron heating. The detailed analysis of these crossings showed that in majority of these events strong magnetic dipolarizations and magnetic turbulence were observed. In the present study we discuss possible mechanisms of such strong electron heating.

  20. Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.

    2012-08-15

    The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

  1. ICRF Heating and Beta Enhancement of HBT-EP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R.; Cates, C.; Klein, A.; Liu, Y.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; Shilov, M.; Stillits, N.

    2004-11-01

    We describe experiments using the HBT-EP dual strap, inside launch ICRF heating system. RF heating is applied at 4.5MHz to deuterium discharges with 20 percent hydrogen minority species in order to heat electrons in the strongly damped mode-conversion regime. Experiments to date have shown antenna loading with plasmas pre-programmed to be strongly limited on the high field side (HFS) limiter. A HFS triple probe measures electron temperature and density near the antenna, and an RF pickup coil is employed to measure the fluctuating wave magnetic field. Experiments to date indicate that increased plasma density near the antenna improves coupling significantly. We will report on our progress in improving antenna-plasma coupling using the radial position feedback control system (RPFCS) in conjunction with the bias probe to achieve high plasma density near the antenna. Any bias probe induced H-modes may also help increase antenna coupling by increasing the plasma density near the edge. Progress on analysis and diagnosis of the antenna-oscillator circuit and loading measurements and current status of measurable RF heating will be presented.[1] [1] Collaboration with J. Hosea, R. Wilson, R. Budny, S. Paul et al., PPPL

  2. Anisotropic radiative transfer problem in optically thick, strongly magnetized plasma: A comparison of results

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, G.G.; Shibanov, Y.A.; Silantev, N.A.; Nagel, W.

    1985-04-01

    Recently developed methods for solving the coherent radiative transferproblem in a strongly magnetized plasma are compared and analyzed for the caseof a semi-infinite, homogeneous plasma with the magnetic field perpendicular to the surface. The work of Meszaros and Bonazzola is shown to contain some errors. The accuracy of numerical methods proposed by Silant'ev and Nagel is investigated for various plasma parameters and photon energies. The coupled diffusion approximation developed by Nagel and Kaminker et al. appears to give quite satisfactory results and seems to be more efficient in many cases than direct numerical methods.

  3. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  4. About MHD heating of plasmaspheric and ionospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V. A.; Buechner, J.; Kirchner, T.

    In recent years, the possibility has been considered to provide supplementary MHD heating to a Tokamak plasma on the basis of an approach involving resonant mode conversion of a magnetosonic wave into a kinetic Alfven wave. The present paper has the objective to study Alfven resonance heating under magnetospheric conditions. The conducted investigation takes into account the damping of an Alfven wave in the ionosphere, a phenomenon, which has not been considered in some previous studies. The employed model is not restricted to the consideration of an approximation of the plasma density by a linear profile, and arbitrary, smooth characteristics are contemplated. The employed model of the magnetosphere corresponds to the model described by Southwood (1974). The rate of energy dissipation at the point of Alfven resonance is calculated, and Joule heating of the ionosphere caused by dissipation of resonant Alfven waves is estimated. MHD waves of sufficient intensity can induce anomalous heating of plasmaspheric particles near the point of resonance.

  5. An RF heated tandem mirror plasma propulsion study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.F.; Yao, X.; Peng, S.; Krueger, W.A.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results on a tandem mirror hybrid plume rocket involving a three-stage system of plasma injection, heating, and subsequent injection through a magnetic nozzle are presented. In the experiments, a plasma is created by breaking down the gas with electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2 kW in the central cell, and the ion species is then heated to high temperatures with ion cyclotron resonance heating at 10 kW in the end cell. A Langmuir probe measured an electron density of 2.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu m and a temperature of 100 eV in the central cell and an ion density of 1.25 x 10 to the 17th/cu m and a temperature of 500 eV in the end cell. 6 refs.

  6. Angular distribution and polarization of the continuum emission in anisotropic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, M.; Jacquet, L.; Pratt, R. H.

    1989-06-01

    This study illustrates the interest of continuum spectra resolved in angle and polarization for investigating the anisotropy of a plasma. After discussing the validity of two types of relatively simple atomic bremsstrahlung cross sections, we establish easily usable expressions for the continuum emissivity coefficients (emission due to bremsstrahlung and direct radiative recombination) appropriate for electron distributions of a plasma with toroidal symmetry. In the example of a tokamak plasma, the distribution functions for the superthermal electrons were obtained from a Monte Carlo code. The simulated and experimental spectra (measured only in one direction of observation and with no polarization resolution) are in good agreement. The theoretical evaluations show the interest of more detailed measurements. The predicted dependence of the intensity of radiation on the direction of observation and the predicted polarization are large, and they would be a good means to probe the evaluation of the electron distributions in detail and, more generally, to diagnose the anisotropy of the free electrons in plasmas.

  7. Ion drag force on a small grain in highly collisional weakly anisotropic plasma: Effect of plasma production and loss mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, M.; Khrapak, S. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-05-15

    The ion drag force acting on a small absorbing grain has been calculated in highly collisional plasma with slowly drifting ions taking into account plasma production and loss processes in the vicinity of the grain. It is shown that the strength of the plasma production and loss mechanisms not only affects the magnitude of the ion drag force, but also determines the direction of the force. The parameter regimes for the ''positive'' and ''negative'' ion drag forces have been identified. In addition, the qualitative features of the electric potential distribution around the grain in isotropic conditions (in the absence of the ion drift) are investigated.

  8. Dissipation and turbulent heating of plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 1 observations of plasma waves in the dayside Jovian magnetosphere which show a correlation with measurements of localized concentrations of cool thermal plasma are presented. This moderately intense broadband electrostatic noise is shown to be of sufficient intensity to accelerate superthermal ions to energies approximately 1 keV and higher. This process can account for the extensive heating of plasma in the magnetosphere and can energize a fraction of heavy ions to injection threshold for a high-energy second stage acceleration mechanism. A brief discussion of the relation of this noise to Jovian magnetospheric dynamics is included.

  9. Heating mechanisms and mode changes in helicon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingboe, Albert R.

    1996-10-01

    Measurements of plasma wave fields and time-dependent (within the rf cycle) warm electron density give insight into near-resonant transit time heating of electrons in a helicon plasma source. Experimentally, rf power and magnetic field are found to determine the mode of coupling (E, H, or Wave (A. R. Ellingboe and R. W. Boswell, Physics of Plasmas, July (1996).)) with significant warm electron density only in W mode. A second Wave mode which yields an order of magnitude increase in warm electron current is identified as the second axial eigenmode of the antenna. The turn-on of the second axial eigenmode prior to the second radial eigenmode is predicted by the ANTENA computer code(B. McVey, Plasma Fusion Center, Massachesetts Institute of Technology, Report No. PFC/RR-84-12). Orbit code modeling of the wave-particle interaction finds that increased plasma and/or neutral density significantly degrades interaction because of collisions.

  10. ICRF heating of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.

    1995-03-01

    The first experiments to heat D-T plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have been performed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These experiments have two major objectives: to study the RF physics of ICRF-heated D-T plasmas and to enhance the performance of D-T discharges. Experiments have been conducted at 43 MHz with out-of-phase current strap excitation to explore n{sub T}/n{sub e} concentrations up to approximately 40%. In these experiments n{sub T}/n{sub e} was limited by D recycling from the carbon walls. The location of the T resonance was varied by changing the toroidal magnetic field, and the RF power was modulated (f{sub mod}=5-10 Hz) to elucidate competing heating mechanisms. Up to 5.8 MW of ICRF heating has been coupled into D-T plasmas. The addition of 5.5 MW of ICRF heating to a D-T supershot resulted in an increase in central ion temperature from 26 to 36 keV and an increase in central electron temperature from 8 to 10.5 keV. Up to 80% of the absorbed ICRF power was coupled directly to ions, in good agreement with computer code predictions. These results extrapolate to efficient T heating in future devices such as ITER.

  11. Pre-equilibrium dilepton production from an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2008-09-15

    We calculate leading-order dilepton yields from a quark-gluon plasma that has a time-dependent anisotropy in momentum space. Such anisotropies can arise during the earliest stages of quark-gluon plasma evolution due to the rapid longitudinal expansion of the created matter. Two phenomenological models for the proper-time dependence of the parton hard momentum scale, p{sub hard}, and the plasma anisotropy parameter, {xi}, are constructed that describe the transition of the plasma from its initial nonequilibrium state to an isotropic thermalized state. The first model constructed interpolates between 1+1 dimensional free streaming at early times and 1+1 dimensional ideal hydrodynamical expansion at late times. In the second model we include the effect of collisional broadening of the parton distribution functions in the early-time pre-equilibrium stage of plasma evolution. We find for both cases that for fixed initial conditions high-energy dilepton production is enhanced by pre-equilibrium emission. When the models are constrained to fixed final pion multiplicity the dependence of the resulting spectra on the assumed plasma isotropization time is reduced. Using our most realistic collisionally broadened model we find that high-transverse-momentum dilepton production would be enhanced by at most 40% at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and 50% at the CERN Large Hadron Collider if one assumes an isotropization/thermalization time of 2 fm/c. Given sufficiently precise experimental data this enhancement could be used to determine the plasma isotropization time experimentally.

  12. Tridimensional Burning Structures Associated with Anisotropic Thermal Conductivities in Magnetically Confined and Pulsar Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Coppi, B.; Sonnino, G.

    2015-11-01

    A surprising result of the most recent theory of the thermonuclear instability, which can take place in D-T plasmas close to ignition, is that it can develop with tridimensional structures emerging from an axisymmetric toroidal confinement configurations. These structures are helical filaments (``snakes'') that are localized radially around a given rational magnetic surface. Until now well known analyses of fusion burning processes in magnetically confined plasmas, that include the thermonuclear instability, have been carried out by 1+1/2 D transport codes and, consequently, the onset of tri-dimensional structures has not been investigated. The importance of the electron thermal conductivities anisotropy is pointed out also for the inhomogeneous thermonuclear burning of plasmas on the surface of pulsars and for the formation of the observed bright spots on some of them. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  13. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral impurity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Eubank, H.P.; Firestone, M.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Singer, C.E.; Weisheit, J.

    1981-03-01

    The utility of neutral beams of A greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, accelerated to approx. 1 MeV/AMU and neutralized, is explored for heating toroidally confined plasmas. Such beams offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based upon positive or negative hydrogen ions at 100 to 200 keV/AMU.

  14. Advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Vogel, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Continuing research has resulted in significant advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology which extend and enhance its potential for broad range of uses in chemical processing, materials development and testing, and development of large illumination sources. Summaries of these advances are briefly described.

  15. Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Roytershteyn, V; Karimabadi, H; Parashar, T; Wu, P; Shay, M

    2015-05-01

    High resolution, fully kinetic, three dimensional (3D) simulation of collisionless plasma turbulence shows the development of turbulence characterized by sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales. The nonlinear evolution is initialized with a long wavelength isotropic spectrum of fluctuations having polarizations transverse to an imposed mean magnetic field. We present evidence that these current sheet structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger currents signify higher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J·E, electron, and proton temperatures, and conditional averages of these quantities based on local electric current density. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previous results from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequency solar wind observational data, are discussed. PMID:25978241

  16. Radio-frequency heating of the coronal plasma during flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A model is developed for the radio-frequency (RF) heating of soft X-ray emitting plasma in solar flares due to absorption of amplified cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying approximately 10 to the 27th to approximately 10 to the 30th erg/s, is generated through maser emission following partial precipitation of electrons in one or more flaring loops. The maser operates in a large number of small regions, each producing an 'elementary burst' (EB) of short duration. This radiation propagates either directly or after reflection to the second-harmonic absorption layer, where it is absorbed by thermal electrons. The properties of EBs and the heating of the electrons in the absorption layer are discussed in detail. RF heating and evaporation models for the production of soft X-ray emitting plasma are compared. Properties of the RF heating model that explain observed features are energy transport across field lines, rapid heating (in approximately 1 s) of coronal plasma to approximately 3 x 10 to the 7th K, and instigation of turbulent velocities up to the ion sound speed.

  17. Kinetic description of rotating Tokamak plasmas with anisotropic temperatures in the collisionless regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2011-11-15

    A largely unsolved theoretical issue in controlled fusion research is the consistent kinetic treatment of slowly-time varying plasma states occurring in collisionless and magnetized axisymmetric plasmas. The phenomenology may include finite pressure anisotropies as well as strong toroidal and poloidal differential rotation, characteristic of Tokamak plasmas. Despite the fact that physical phenomena occurring in fusion plasmas depend fundamentally on the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics, their consistent kinetic treatment remains still essentially unchallenged to date. The goal of this paper is to address the problem within the framework of Vlasov-Maxwell description. The gyrokinetic treatment of charged particles dynamics is adopted for the construction of asymptotic solutions for the quasi-stationary species kinetic distribution functions. These are expressed in terms of the particle exact and adiabatic invariants. The theory relies on a perturbative approach, which permits to construct asymptotic analytical solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell system. In this way, both diamagnetic and energy corrections are included consistently into the theory. In particular, by imposing suitable kinetic constraints, the existence of generalized bi-Maxwellian asymptotic kinetic equilibria is pointed out. The theory applies for toroidal rotation velocity of the order of the ion thermal speed. These solutions satisfy identically also the constraints imposed by the Maxwell equations, i.e., quasi-neutrality and Ampere's law. As a result, it is shown that, in the presence of nonuniform fluid and EM fields, these kinetic equilibria can sustain simultaneously toroidal differential rotation, quasi-stationary finite poloidal flows and temperature anisotropy.

  18. Whistler Emission and Absorption Coefficients from AN Anisotropic, Multi-Component Plasma Including Dielectric Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leid, Terrence Vincent

    The emission of electron cyclotron radiation parallel to the magnetic field direction near the fundamental frequency from a fully ionized, multi-component plasma, is investigated for finite (omega)(,p)/(omega)(,c) within the Klimontovich formalism. Each species may have T(,(PARLL)) different from T(,(PERP)) and may possess a loss cone. We use a bi- maxwellian with an analytic loss cone for each component. In addition, the source function for a multi-component plasma is calculated. We find that for a Maxwellian distribution function the emission coefficient is that of a system of shielded charges. It is shown that only in the case of a tenuous Maxwellian plasma is the source function the Rayleigh-Jeans blackbody intensity. For the case of the Maxwellian we present experimental evidence for finite density emission, (omega)('2)(,p)/(omega)('2) >> (beta). We have constructed a computer code that solves the radiative transfer equation. The resulting power spectra are used as an aid in extracting from experimental data the temperature and density of the various components of the TMX-Upgrade end cell plasma. The code compares both the Ellis-Tsakiris scheme for computing the emission coefficient for a multi-component plasma and the finite density multi -component emission coefficient. The Ellis- Tsakiris scheme estimates the emission coefficient by assuming. that each species radiates independently of each other.('1) Results are presented for the case of the TMX -Upgrade tandem mirror device. ('1)R. F. Ellis and G. D. Tsakiris, Nucl. Fusion 23, 1115 (1984).

  19. In-depth plasma-wave heating of dense plasma irradiated by short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, M; Hill, E G; Evans, R G; Rose, S J; Rozmus, W

    2014-12-19

    We investigate the mechanism by which relativistic electron bunches created at the surface of a target irradiated by a very short and intense laser pulse transfer energy to the deeper parts of the target. In existing theories, the dominant heating mechanism is that of resistive heating by the neutralizing return current. In addition to this, we find that large amplitude plasma waves are induced in the plasma in the wake of relativistic electron bunches. The subsequent collisional damping of these waves represents a source of heating that can exceed the resistive heating rate. As a result, solid targets heat significantly faster than has been previously considered. A new hybrid model, capable of reproducing these results, is described. PMID:25554889

  20. Raman amplification in plasma: Wavebreaking and heating effects

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J. P.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-11-15

    A three-wave model has been developed to investigate the influence of wavebreaking and thermal effects on the Raman amplification in plasma. This has been benchmarked against a particle-in-cell code with positive results. A new regime, the 'thermal chirp' regime, has been identified and illustrated. Here the shift in plasma resonance due to heating of the plasma by a monochromatic pump allows a probe pulse to be amplified and compressed without significant pump depletion. In regimes where damping dominates, it is found that inverse bremsstrahlung dominates at high densities, and improved growth rates may be achieved by preheating the plasma. At low densities or high pump intensities, wavebreaking acts to limit amplification. The inclusion of thermal effects can dramatically reduce the peak attainable intensity because of the reduced wavebreaking limit at finite temperatures.

  1. Plasma heating and emission of runaway charged particles in a plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbahani, R. A.; Hirose, A.; Xiao, C.

    2016-03-01

    The required experimental E-field across plasma to generate significant runaway electrons and hard X-rays during the pinch phase and the phase with anomalous resistance has been investigated in a dense plasma focus. The plasma voltage and inductance have been measured in a plasma focus with two different anode tip structures. The results show a significant generation of charged particles and hard X-rays at smaller E-field across the plasma column in the phase of anomalous resistances compared to the pinch phase. Plasma heating process may enhance the rate of runaway-charged-particle generation due to the combined effects of a reduced Dreicer field and the avalanche effects during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  2. ION HEATING IN INHOMOGENEOUS EXPANDING SOLAR WIND PLASMA: THE ROLE OF PARALLEL AND OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ozak, N.; Ofman, L.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-01-20

    Remote sensing observations of coronal holes show that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic. In-situ observations of fast solar wind streams provide direct evidence for turbulent Alfvén wave spectrum, left-hand polarized ion-cyclotron waves, and He{sup ++} - proton drift in the solar wind plasma, which can produce temperature anisotropies by resonant absorption and perpendicular heating of the ions. Furthermore, the solar wind is expected to be inhomogeneous on decreasing scales approaching the Sun. We study the heating of solar wind ions in inhomogeneous plasma with a 2.5D hybrid code. We include the expansion of the solar wind in an inhomogeneous plasma background, combined with the effects of a turbulent wave spectrum of Alfvénic fluctuations and initial ion-proton drifts. We study the influence of these effects on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling and on the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background wind. We find that inhomogeneities in the plasma lead to enhanced heating compared to the homogenous solar wind, and the generation of significant power of oblique waves in the solar wind plasma. The cooling effect due to the expansion is not significant for super-Alfvénic drifts, and is diminished further when we include an inhomogeneous background density. We reproduce the ion temperature anisotropy seen in observations and previous models, which is present regardless of the perpendicular cooling due to solar wind expansion. We conclude that small scale inhomogeneities in the inner heliosphere can significantly affect resonant wave ion heating.

  3. Asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian approach for modeling anisotropic transport in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2012-03-01

    Modeling electron transport in magnetized plasmas is extremely challenging due to the extreme anisotropy between parallel (to the magnetic field) and perpendicular directions (the transport-coefficient ratio χ/χ˜10^10 in fusion plasmas). Recently, a novel Lagrangian Green's function method has been proposedfootnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011); D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, submitted (2011) to solve the local and non-local purely parallel transport equation in general 3D magnetic fields. The approach avoids numerical pollution, is inherently positivity-preserving, and is scalable algorithmically (i.e., work per degree-of-freedom is grid-independent). In this poster, we discuss the extension of the Lagrangian Green's function approach to include perpendicular transport terms and sources. We present an asymptotic-preserving numerical formulation, which ensures a consistent numerical discretization temporally and spatially for arbitrary χ/χ ratios. We will demonstrate the potential of the approach with various challenging configurations, including the case of transport across a magnetic island in cylindrical geometry.

  4. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Petrovich, Cristobal; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (`rotochemical heating'). This effect has previously been studied by Fernández & Reisenegger for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our predictions with the surface temperature of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and upper limits for 21 classical pulsars, we find the millisecond pulsar can be only explained by the models with the effectively largest energy gaps (type B models), the classical pulsars require with the gap models that vanish for some angle (type C) and two different envelope compositions. Thus, no single model for neutron superfluidity can simultaneously account for the thermal emission of all available observations of non-accreting neutron stars, possibly due to our neglect of proton superconductivity.

  5. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  6. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  7. Polarized Heα Radiation by Anisotropic Fast Electron Transport in Ultra-Intense Laser Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, T.; Kai, T.; Koike, F.; Nakazaki, S.; Nishimura, H.; Inubushi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J.; Malka, G.; Boscheron, A.; Casner, A.; Koenig, M.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K.

    2009-09-01

    In fast ignition research, the transport dynamics of fast electrons is one of the critical issues. Fast electrons generated by an intense laser pulse show a highly anisotropic velocity distribution. To gain insight into the anisotropy of the velocity distribution of fast electrons, polarized x-ray spectroscopy has been proposed. The polarization spectroscopy of Cl Heα radiation was experimentally demonstrated at 1017 W/cm2 (˜100 mJ in 130 fs), and a new time-dependent atomic population kinetics code was also developed. It predicts that the high polarization arises only in a low-density region of the target plasma. Additional x-ray polarization measurements were done at 101717-18 W/cm2 (˜10 J in ˜1 ps). Polarization was measured as a function of the overcoat thickness of a target. The polarization is negative in the shallow region near the target surface, and becomes near zero at the laser intensity of ˜1018 W/cm2. At ˜1017 W/cm2, the polarization varies from negative to positive, and finally zero along with an increase in the overcoat thickness.

  8. Sawtooth stability in neutral beam heated plasmas in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Pinches, S. D.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; TEXTOR Team; de Bock, M.

    2008-03-01

    The experimental sawtooth behaviour in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas in TEXTOR is described. It is found that the sawtooth period is minimized with a low NBI power oriented in the same direction as the plasma current. As the beam power is increased in the opposite direction to the plasma current, the sawtooth period increases to a maximum before it begins to shorten once more. Results from both magnetohydrodynamic stability modelling including toroidal flows and modelling of the kinetic effects of the fast ions resulting from NBI heating are also presented. This model combining the gyroscopic and kinetic effects upon the stability of the n = 1 internal kink mode—thought to be associated with sawtooth oscillations—qualitatively recovers the sawtooth behaviour exhibited in the experiment. It is proposed that the sawtooth period is minimized in the co-NBI direction at the point at which the stabilization of the kink mode due to rotation is weakest. This occurs when the plasma rotation induced by the NBI balances the intrinsic rotation of the plasma. The sawtooth behaviour in the counter-NBI regime is attributed to a subtle balance of the competing stabilization from the toroidal rotation and destabilization from the presence of energetic ions.

  9. Anomalous resistivity and heating in current-driven plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, E. Y.

    1999-05-01

    A theory is presented of anomalous resistivity and particle heating in current-driven plasma accelerators such as the magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPDT). An electromagnetic dielectric tensor is used for a current-carrying, collisional and finite-beta plasma and it is found that an instability akin to the generalized lower hybrid drift instability (GLHDI) exists for electromagnetic modes (i.e., with finite polarization). Weak turbulence theory is then used to develop a second-order description of the heating rates of particles by the waves and the electron-wave momentum exchange rate that controls the anomalous resistivity effect. It is found that the electron Hall parameter strongly scales the level of anomalous dissipation for the case of the MPDT plasma. This scaling has recently been confirmed experimentally [Phys. Plasmas 5, 3581 (1997)]. Polynomial expressions of the relevant transport coefficients cast solely in terms of macroscopic parameters are also obtained for including microturbulence effects in numerical plasma fluid models used for thruster flow simulation.

  10. Cold plasma heating in the plasma sheet boundary layer - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, David; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1990-01-01

    Satellite observations in recent years have confirmed that the plasma sheet boundary layer is a permanent feature of the earth's magnetotail located between the lobe and central plasma sheet during both quiet and active magnetic periods. Distinct features of the boundary layer include field aligned ion beams and intense electrostatic emissions known as broadband electrostatic noise. Since the plasma sheet boundary layer is a spatial feature of the magnetotail, within it will occur thermal mixing of the resident warm boundary layer plasma with inflowing (convecting) cold ionospheric plasma. A theoretical study involving linear theory and nonlinear numerical particle simulations is presented which examines ion beam instabilities in the presence of a thermally mixed hot and cold background plasma. It is found that the free energy in the ion beams can heat the cool ionospheric plasma to ambient plasma sheet boundary layer temperatures via broadband electrostatic noise. These results, along with recent observational reports that ionospheric outflow can account for measured plasma sheet densities, suggest that the ionospheric role in plasma sheet dynamics and content may be as large as the solar wind.

  11. Interaction of adhered metallic dust with transient plasma heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Bykov, I.; Rudakov, D.; De Angeli, M.; Vignitchouk, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bardin, S.; van der Meiden, H.; Vernimmen, J.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-06-01

    The first study of the interaction of metallic dust (tungsten, aluminum) adhered on tungsten substrates with transient plasma heat loads is presented. Experiments were carried out in the Pilot-PSI linear device with transient heat fluxes up to 550 MW m‑2 and in the DIII-D divertor tokamak. The central role of the dust-substrate contact area in heat conduction is highlighted and confirmed by heat transfer simulations. The experiments provide evidence of the occurrence of wetting-induced coagulation, a novel growth mechanism where cluster melting accompanied by droplet wetting leads to the formation of larger grains. The physical processes behind this mechanism are elucidated. The remobilization activity of the newly formed dust and the survivability of tungsten dust on hot surfaces are documented and discussed in the light of implications for ITER.

  12. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  13. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-12-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  14. Magnetic-divertor stabilization of an axisymmetric plasma with anisotropic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasagawa, Y.; Katanuma, I.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Cho, T.; Pastukhov, V. P.

    2006-12-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic stabilization of an axisymmetric mirror plasma with a magnetic divertor is studied. An equation is found for the flute modes, which includes the stabilizing influence of ion temperature anisotropy and nonparaxial magnetic fields, as well as a finite ion Larmor radius. It is shown that if the density profile is sufficiently gentle, then the nonparaxial configuration can stabilize all modes as long as ion temperature is radially uniform. This can be demonstrated even when the density vanishes on the separatrix and even for small ion Larmor radii. It is found, however, that the ion temperature gradient makes the unstable region wider; high ion temperature is required to stabilize the flute mode.

  15. Reflection of electromagnetic radiation from plasma with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2013-08-15

    The reflection of a test electromagnetic pulse from the plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of a circularly polarized high-power radiation pulse is analyzed using the kinetic approach to describe electron motion. It is shown that the reflected pulse is significantly amplified due to the development of Weibel instability. The amplification efficiency is determined by the maximum value of the instability growth rate, which depends on the degree of anisotropy of the photoelectron distribution function.

  16. Obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a magnetized plasma for different types of anisotropic kappa distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, M. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Murtaza, G.; Aqeel, D.; Javed, S.; Zahra, M.

    2015-12-01

    By using the kinetic theory, the dispersion relation of obliquely propagating electrostatic waves are discussed for three types of kappa distribution function: 1) loss-cone-bi-kappa-Maxwellian distribution, 2) current carrying Bi-kappa-Maxwellian distribution and 3) product-bi-kappa distribution. The effects of kappa-index, loss-cone index, streaming velocity and the temperature anisotropy on the Harris instability is highlighted for their possible application to explain the banded emissions observed in the terrestrial magnetosphere and in the magnetospheres of other planets, e.g., Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and in Io's plasma torus.

  17. Plasma Heating and Ultrafast Semiconductor Laser Modulation Through a Terahertz Heating Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.

    2000-01-01

    Electron-hole plasma heating and ultrafast modulation in a semiconductor laser under a terahertz electrical field are investigated using a set of hydrodynamic equations derived from the semiconductor Bloch equations. The self-consistent treatment of lasing and heating processes leads to the prediction of a strong saturation and degradation of modulation depth even at moderate terahertz field intensity. This saturation places a severe limit to bandwidth achievable with such scheme in ultrafast modulation. Strategies for increasing modulation depth are discussed.

  18. Structure of intermediate shocks in collisionless anisotropic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics plasma models

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.

    2013-10-15

    The existence of discontinuities within the double-adiabatic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model is discussed. These solutions are transitional layers where some of the plasma properties change from one equilibrium state to another. Under the assumption of traveling wave solutions with velocity C and propagation angle θ with respect to the ambient magnetic field, the Hall-MHD model reduces to a dynamical system and the waves are heteroclinic orbits joining two different fixed points. The analysis of the fixed points rules out the existence of rotational discontinuities. Simple considerations about the Hamiltonian nature of the system show that, unlike dissipative models, the intermediate shock waves are organized in branches in parameter space, i.e., they occur if a given relationship between θ and C is satisfied. Electron-polarized (ion-polarized) shock waves exhibit, in addition to a reversal of the magnetic field component tangential to the shock front, a maximum (minimum) of the magnetic field amplitude. The jumps of the magnetic field and the relative specific volume between the downstream and the upstream states as a function of the plasma properties are presented. The organization in parameter space of localized structures including in the model the influence of finite Larmor radius is discussed.

  19. Numerical simulations of anisotropic plasmas using a modified ZEUS-MP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Benjamin; Tangri, Varun; Sarkar, Aveek; Perez, Jean; Sharma, Prateek

    2012-10-01

    Three dimensional linear and nonlinear simulations of collisionless one-fluid plasmas with pressure anisotropy are presented using the Chew- Goldberger-Low (CGL-MHD) and double-isothermal models. For this purpose, the code ZEUS-MP [J. C. Hayes et. al. The APJ Supplement Series 165 (2006) 188.] has been modified. Major modifications include a changed method of characteristics, new compressive and non-compressive forces, and a ``hard wall'' limit on pressure anisotropy that is intended to mimic the effects of plasma micro-instabilities that limit the temperature anisotropy. For purposes of validation, more than 100 test simulations of linear waves (Alfven, slow and fast), instabilities (firehose and mirror) and nonlinear vortices (Orszag-Tang) are presented for a number of initial conditions and parameters. Finally, this model is used to investigate the way that Alfven-wave turbulence leads to a spreading of the temperature-anisotropy probability distribution in the solar wind. Analysis is completed with a detailed analysis of the fluctuation data.

  20. The polarization electric field and its effects in an anisotropic rotating magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Spatial variations of density and temperature along a magnetic field line are evaluated for a plasma undergoing adiabatic motion in a rotating magnetosphere. The effects of centrifugal and gravitational forces are accounted for, as is anisotropy in the pitch angle distribution functions of individual species. A polarization electric field is invoked to eliminate the net electric charge density resulting from the aforementioned mass dependent forces and different anisotropies. The position of maximum density in a two-component, electron-ion plasma is determined both in the absence and in the presence of the polarization effect and compared. A scale height, generalized to include anisotropies, is derived for the density fall-off. The polarization electric field is also included in the parallel guiding center equation; equilibrium points are determined and compared in both individual and average senses with the position of density maximum. Finally a transverse (to magnetic field lines) electric component is deduced as a consequence of dissimilar charge neutralization on adjacent field lines. The E x B velocity resultant from such a 'fringing' electric field is calculated and compared with the magnitude of other drifts.

  1. Wave-Particle Decorrelation and Transport of Anisotropic Turbulence in Collisionless Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Chen, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.

    2007-12-31

    Comprehensive analysis of the largest first-principles simulations to date shows that stochastic wave-particle decorrelation is the dominant mechanism responsible for electron heat transport driven by electron temperature gradient turbulence with extended radial streamers. The transport is proportional to the local fluctuation intensity, and phase-space island overlap leads to a diffusive process with a time scale comparable to the wave-particle decorrelation time, determined by the fluctuation spectral width. This kinetic time scale is much shorter than the fluid time scale of eddy mixing.

  2. Fast collisionless reconnection and electron heating in strongly magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, N F; Schekochihin, A A; Zocco, A

    2013-07-12

    Magnetic reconnection in strongly magnetized (low-beta), weakly collisional plasmas is investigated by using a novel fluid-kinetic model [Zocco and Schekochihin, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102309 (2011)] which retains nonisothermal electron kinetics. It is shown that electron heating via Landau damping (linear phase mixing) is the dominant dissipation mechanism. In time, electron heating occurs after the peak of the reconnection rate; in space, it is concentrated along the separatrices of the magnetic island. For sufficiently large systems, the peak reconnection rate is cE(∥)(max) ≈ 0.2v(A)B(y,0), where v(A) is the Alfvén speed based on the reconnecting field B(y,0). The island saturation width is the same as in magnetohydrodynamics models except for small systems, when it becomes comparable to the kinetic scales. PMID:23889411

  3. Anisotropic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} waveguide etching using inductively coupled plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Muttalib, Muhammad Firdaus A. Chen, Ruiqi Y.; Pearce, Stuart J.; Charlton, Martin D. B.

    2014-07-01

    Smooth and vertical sidewall profiles are required to create low loss rib and ridge waveguides for integrated optical device and solid state laser applications. In this work, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed to produce high quality low loss tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) waveguides. A mixture of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and O{sub 2} gas are used in combination with chromium (Cr) hard mask for this purpose. In this paper, the authors make a detailed investigation of the etch process parameter window. Effects of process parameters such as ICP power, platen power, gas flow, and chamber pressure on etch rate and sidewall slope angle are investigated. Chamber pressure is found to be a particularly important factor, which can be used to tune the sidewall slope angle and so prevent undercut.

  4. Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2010-10-15

    A generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions is derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, we can derive the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r,q) distributions in a straightforward manner. The dispersion relations now become dependent upon the spectral indices {kappa} and (r,q) for the kappa and the generalized (r,q) distribution, respectively. Our results show how the non-Maxwellian dispersion curves deviate from the Maxwellian depending upon the values of the spectral indices chosen. It may be noted that the (r,q) dispersion relation is reduced to the kappa distribution for r=0 and q={kappa}+1, which, in turn, is further reducible to the Maxwellian distribution for {kappa}{yields}{infinity}.

  5. Generation and Sustainment of Plasma Rotation by ICRF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, F. W.

    2000-10-01

    When tokamak plasmas are heated by the fundamental minority ion-cyclotron process, they are observed to rotate toroidally, even though this heating process introduces negligable angular momentum. This work proposes and evaluates a physics mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. The argument has two elements. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a v_tor = 0 boundary condition at the plasma surface and a torque-density source. When the source consists of separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a finite central rotation velocity results, even though the volume integrated torque density - the angular momentum input - vanishes. Secondly, ions energized by the ICRF process can generate separated regions of positive and negative torque density. Heating increases their banana widths which leads to radial energetic-particle transport that must be balanced by neutralizing radial currents and a j_rB_pR torque density in the bulk plasma. Additional, comparable torque density results from collisional transfer of mechanical angular momentum from energetic particles to the bulk plasma and particle loss through banana particles impacting the wall. Monte-Carlo calculations utilizing the ORBIT code evaluate all sources of torque density and rigorously assure that no net angular momentum is introduced. Two models of ICRF heating, diffusive and instantaneous, give similar results. When the resonance location is on the LFS, the calculated rotation has the magnitude, profile, and co-current sense of Alcator C-Mod observations. For HFS resonance locations, the model predicts counter-current rotation. Scans of rotational profiles vs. resonance location, initial energy, particle loss, pitch, and qm will be presented as will the location of the velocity shear layer its scaling to a reactor.

  6. Compound sawtooth study in ohmically heated TFTR plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; McGuire, K.; Colchin, D.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.; Hill, K.; Kiraly, J.; Pare, V.; Taylor, G.; Sauthoff, N.

    1985-09-01

    Compound sawtooth activity has been observed in ohmically heated, high current, high density TFTR plasmas. Commonly called ''double sawteeth,'' such sequences consist of a repetitive series of subordinate relaxations followed by a main relaxation with a different inversion radius. The period of such compound sawteeth can be as long as 100 msec. In other cases, however, no compound sawteeth or bursts of them can be observed in discharges with essentially the same parameters.

  7. Heat transfer in a fissioning uranium plasma reactor cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two schemes are investigated by which a fission-heated uranium plasma located in the central cavity of a test reactor could be insulated to keep its temperature above condensation in a neutron flux of 10 to the 15th power neutrons/(sq cm)(sec) or less. The first scheme was to use a mirrored cavity wall to reflect the thermal radiation back into the plasma. The second scheme was to seed the transpirational cavity wall coolant so as to make it opaque to thermal radiation, thus insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall. The analysis showed that a mirrored cavity wall must have a reflectivity of over 95 percent or that seeded argon must be used as the wall coolant to give an acceptable operating margin above fuel condensation conditions.

  8. Nonlinear heating of underdense collisional plasma by a laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abari, M. Etehadi; Shokri, B.

    2011-05-15

    The nonlinear interaction of a laser pulse with a homogenous unmagnetized underdense plasma, taking ohmic heating and the effects of ponderomotive force into account, is theoretically studied. Since the ponderomotive force modifies the electrons density and temperature distribution, the nonlinear dielectric permittivity of plasma is obtained in non-relativistic regime. Furthermore, electric and magnetic fields, electron density, temperature distribution, and the effective permittivity variations are obtained in terms of plasma length by making use the steady state solutions of the Maxwell and hydrodynamic equations. It is shown that the oscillations wave length of electric and magnetic fields decreases when the laser intensity increases. At the same time, in this case, electron density oscillations become highly peaked. Also, the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillations increase and their wavelength decreases.

  9. Influence of Multiple Ionization on Studies of Nanoflare Heated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-04-01

    The spectrum emitted by a plasma depends on the charge state distribution (CSD) of the gas. This, in turn, is determined by the corresponding rates for electron-impact ionization and recombination. Current CSD calculations for solar physics do not account for electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI), a process in which multiple electrons are ejected by a single electron-ion collision. We have estimated the EIMI cross sections for all charge states of iron using a combination of the available experimental data and semi-empirical formulae. We then modeled the CSD and observed the influence of EIMI compared to only including single ionization. One case of interest for solar physics is nanoflare heating. Recent work has attempted to predict the spectra of impulsively heated plasmas in order to identify diagnostics arising from non-equilibrium ionization that can constrain the nanoflare properties, but these calculations have ignored EIMI. Our findings suggest that EIMI can have a significant effect on the CSD of a nanoflare-heated plasma, changing the ion abundances by up to about 50%.

  10. MHD discontinuities in solar flares: Continuous transitions and plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledentsov, L. S.; Somov, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The boundary conditions for the ideal MHD equations on a plane discontinuity surface are investigated. It is shown that, for a given mass flux through a discontinuity, its type depends only on the relation between inclination angles of a magnetic field. Moreover, the conservation laws on a surface of discontinuity allow changing a discontinuity type with gradual (continuous) changes in the conditions of plasma flow. Then there are the so-called transition solutions that satisfy simultaneously two types of discontinuities. We obtain all transition solutions on the basis of the complete system of boundary conditions for the MHD equations. We also found the expression describing a jump of internal energy of the plasma flowing through the discontinuity. Firstly, this allows constructing a generalized scheme of possible continuous transitions between MHD discontinuities. Secondly, it enables the examination of the dependence of plasma heating by plasma density and configuration of the magnetic field near the discontinuity surface, i.e., by the type of the MHD discontinuity. It is shown that the best conditions for heating are carried out in the vicinity of a reconnecting current layer near the areas of reverse currents. The result can be helpful in explaining the temperature distributions inside the active regions in the solar corona during flares observed by modern space observatories in soft and hard X-rays.

  11. Analysis of a microwave-heated planar propagating hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, J.P.; Micci, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    The heating of a gas to high temperatures by absorption of microwave radiation has been proposed as a potential electrothermal rocket propulsion system. One possible mode of microwave energy absorption is by means of a planar plasma region propagating toward the source of the microwave radiation. Such a planar propagating plasma can be spatially stabilized by a gas stream flowing in the same direction as the microwave radiation with a velocity equal to the plasma propagation velocity. A one-dimensional analysis of the microwave-heated planar propagating plasma for hydrogen gas was developed to predict maximum gas temperatures and propagation velocities. The governing electromagnetic and energy equations were numerically integrated with temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of equilibrium hydrogen. The propagation velocity eigenvalue was solved by means of an iterative technique. Temperature distribution in the gas, propagation velocities, and percent power absorbed, reflected and transmitted, were obtained as a function of incident microwave power at a frequency of 2.45 GHza for hydrogen gas pressures of 1 and 10 atm. 19 references.

  12. Adiabatic-drift-loss modification of the electromagnetic loss-cone instability for anisotropic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhl, B.; Treumann, R. A.

    1980-09-01

    Observation of the adiabatic behavior of energetic particle pitch-angle distributions in the magnetosphere in the past indicated the development of pronounced minima or drift-loss cones on the pitch-angle distributions centered at angles between particle velocity and magnetic field of approximately 90 deg in connection with storm-time changes in magnetospheric convection and magnetic field. Using a model of a drift-modified loss-cone distribution (MLCD) of the butterfly type, the linear stability of electromagnetic whistler or ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field has been investigated. The instability is shown to be quenched at high frequencies less than the marginally stable frequency, which is equal to A/(A + 1), where A is the thermal anisotropy. This quenching becomes stronger the higher are the respective parallel hot particle thermal velocity and cold plasma density. Particles around pitch-angles of approximately 90 deg are identified as generating electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the marginally stable frequency. It is concluded that the absence of electromagnetic VLF and ELF noise during times when MLCD develops is the result of the shift of the unstable spectrum to low frequencies.

  13. Jet-conversion photons from an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Lusaka; Roy, Pradip

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the pT distributions of jet-conversion photons from a quark-gluon plasma with pre-equilibrium momentum-space anisotropy. A phenomenological model has been used for the time evolution of the hard momentum scale phard(τ) and anisotropy parameter ξ(τ). As a result of pre-equilibrium momentum-space anisotropy, we find significant modification of the jet-conversion photon pT distribution. For example, with fixed initial condition pre-equilibrium anisotropy, we predict a significant enhancement of the jet-photon pT distribution in the entire region, whereas for pre-equilibrium anisotropy with fixed final multiplicity (FFM), suppression of the jet-conversion photon pT distribution is observed. The results with FFM (as it is the most realistic situation) have been compared with high pT PHENIX photon data. It is found that the data are reproduced well if the isotropization time lies within 1.5 fm/c.

  14. Rapidity distribution of photons from an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Lusaka; Roy, Pradip

    2010-05-01

    We calculate rapidity distribution of photons due to Compton and annihilation processes from quark gluon plasma with pre-equilibrium momentum-space anisotropy. We also include contributions from hadronic matter with late-stage transverse expansion. A phenomenological model has been used for the time evolution of hard momentum scale, phard(τ), and anisotropy parameter, ξ(τ). As a result of pre-equilibrium momentum-space anisotropy, we find significant modification of photons rapidity distribution. For example, with the fixed initial condition (FIC) free-streaming (δ=2) interpolating model we observe significant enhancement of photon rapidity distribution at fixed pT, where as for FIC collisionally broadened (δ=2/3) interpolating model the yield increases till y~1. Beyond that suppression is observed. With fixed final multiplicity (FFM) free-streaming interpolating model we predict enhancement of photon yield which is less than the case of FIC. Suppression is always observed for FFM collisionally broadened interpolating model.

  15. Scintillation of radio astronomical sources due to anisotropic inhomogeneities in the ionospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bezrodnyi, V.G.

    1988-02-01

    We have investigated the properties of scintillation of sources of cosmic radio emission due to inhomogeneities in the ionospheric F-region. The inhomogeneities are elongated along the geomagnetic field lines. We show that when the line of sight coincides with the magnetic field direction, we should observe an increase in the magnitude of the scintillation index. The amount of the increase, as well as the angular range in which it occurs, depend on the explicit shape of the spectrum of spatial scales of the inhomogeneities. We have given consideration to models which have been adopted in the literature for three-dimensional and two-dimensional anisotropy in the ionospheric turbulence. Based on this analysis, we propose a diagnostic method for the inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma. It is based on multifrequency measurements of the scintillation index of radio astronomical sources which culminate near the direction of the geomagnetic field lines at the latitude of the observing point. We establish the limits which are imposed on our proposed method because of the finite dimensions of the sources.

  16. Voyager observations of lower hybrid noise in the Io plasma torus and anomalous plasma heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kurth, W. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    A study of Voyager 1 electric field measurements obtained by the plasma wave instrument in the Io plasma torus has been carried out. A survey of the data has revealed the presence of persistent peaks in electric field spectra in the frequency range 100-600 Hz consistent with their identification as lower hybrid noise for a heavy-ion plasma of sulfur and oxygen. Typical wave intensities are 0.1 mV/m, and the spectra also show significant Doppler broadening, Delta omega/omega approximately 1. A theoretical analysis of lower hybrid wave generation by a bump-on-tail ring distribution of ions is given. The model is appropriate for plasmas with a superthermal pickup ion population present. A general methodology is used to demonstrate that the maximum plasma heating rate possible through anomalous wave-particle heat exchange is less than approximately 10 to the -14th ergs per cu cm per s. Although insufficient to meet the power requirement of the EUV-emitting warm torus, the heating rate is large enough to maintain a low-density (0.01-0.1 percent) superthermal electron population of keV electrons, which may lead to a small but significant anomalous ionization effect.

  17. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  18. Ne IX line G-ratio in a non-Maxwellian and anisotropic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferouani, A. K.; Inal, M. K.; Csanak, G.

    2013-04-01

    We have theoretically studied how the presence of a small proportion of energetic beam electrons mixed to a bulk of Maxwellian electrons in a hot plasma affects the temperature-dependent intensity ratio G = (x + y + z)/w of the helium-like triplet intercombination (x, y) and forbidden (z) lines to the singlet resonance line (w). By modelling the electron distribution function as a combination of a Maxwellian isotropic component and a monoenergetic beam component, detailed calculations of the G ratio of the Ne8 + lines have been performed for temperatures Te of the Maxwellian component and kinetic energies e0 of the beam component in the ranges 106-107 K and 1.5-25 keV, respectively. A magnetic sublevel-to-magnetic sublevel collisional-radiative model has been used for determining the populations of the upper magnetic sublevels of the four lines at an electron density below 1013 cm-3. Excitations from the ground 1s2 1S0 and metastable 1s2s 3S1 magnetic sublevels to the 1snl (n = 2-4) magnetic sublevels as well as the inner-shell ionization of the lithium-like ion in its ground level were taken into account. All basic atomic data, including the radiative transition probabilities and the collisional excitation and ionization cross sections, were computed using the flexible atomic code. It is found that the contribution of a 5% fraction of the beam component can reduce the G ratio by a factor of 30 at Te = 106 K and of 2.4 at Te = 3 × 106 K. Our calculations also indicate that the effect of directionality of the beam component on G is negligible for e0 above ˜10 keV and that for a given Te, G is practically insensitive to variations in e0 above ˜7 keV.

  19. Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2013-07-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Zi = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (κ = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (κ = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ≈ 4×108 V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter κ = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

  20. Self-gravitating rotating anisotropic pressure plasma in presence of Hall current and electrical resistivity using generalized polytrope laws

    SciTech Connect

    Prajapati, R. P.; Chhajlani, R. K.; Soni, G. D.

    2008-06-15

    The effects of uniform rotation, finite electrical resistivity, electron inertia, and Hall current on the self-gravitational instability of anisotropic pressure plasma with generalized polytrope laws have been studied. A general dispersion relation is obtained with the help of the relevant linearized perturbed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations incorporating the relevant contributions of various effects of the problem using the method of normal mode analysis. The general dispersion relation is further reduced for the special cases of rotation; i.e., parallel and perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. The longitudinal and transverse modes of propagation are discussed separately for investigation of condition of instability. The effects of rotation, Hall current, finite electron inertia, and polytropic indices are discussed on the gravitational, ''firehose,'' and ''mirror'' instabilities. The numerical calculations have been performed to obtain the dependence of the growth rate of the gravitational unstable mode on the various physical parameters involved. The finite electrical resistivity, rotation, and Hall current have a stabilizing influence on the growth rate of the unstable mode of wave propagation. The finite electrical resistivity removes the effect of magnetic field and polytropic index from the condition of instability in the transverse mode of propagation for both the cases of rotation. It is also found that the Jeans criterion of gravitational instability depends upon rotation, electron inertia, and polytropic indices. In the case of transverse mode of propagation with the axis of rotation parallel to the magnetic field, it is observed that the region of instability and the value of the critical Jeans wavenumber are larger for the Chew-Goldberger-Low set of equations in comparison with the MHD set of equations. The stability of the system is discussed by applying Routh-Hurwitz criterion. The inclusion of rotation or Hall current or both

  1. The Conversion of Large-Scale Turbulent Energy to Plasma Heat In Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of violent events and instabilities at large scales into plasma heat. The turbulent cascade transfers this energy from the large scales at which the motions are driven down to small scales, and this essentially fluid process can be understood in terms of nonlinear wave-wave interactions. At sufficiently small scales, for which the dynamics is often weakly collisional, collisionless mechanisms damp the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, and this essentially kinetic process can be understood in terms of linear wave-particle interactions. In this talk, I will summarize the possible channels of the turbulent dissipation in a weakly collisional plasma, and present recent results from kinetic numerical simulations of plasma turbulence. Finally, I will discuss strategies for the definitive identification of the dominant dissipation channels using spacecraft measurements of turbulence in the solar wind.

  2. Versatile and Rapid Plasma Heating Device for Steel and Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, G.S.

    2006-03-14

    The main objective of the research was to enhance steel and aluminum manufacturing with the development of a new plasma RPD device. During the project (1) plasma devices were manufactured (2) testing for the two metals were carried out and (3) market development strategies were explored. Bayzi Corporation has invented a Rapid Plasma Device (RPD) which produces plasma, comprising of a mixture of ionized gas and free electrons. The ions, when they hit a conducting surface, deposit heat in addition to the convective heat. Two generic models called the RPD-Al and RPD-S have been developed for the aluminum market and the steel market. Aluminum melting rates increased to as high as 12.7 g/s compared to 3 g/s of the current industrial practice. The RPD melting furnace operated at higher energy efficiency of 65% unlike most industrial processes operating in the range of 13 to 50%. The RPD aluminum melting furnace produced environment friendly cleaner melts with less than 1% dross. Dross is the residue in the furnace after the melt is poured out. Cast ingots were extremely clean and shining. Current practices produce dross in the range of 3 to 12%. The RPD furnace uses very low power ~0.2 kWh/Lb to melt aluminum. RPDs operate in one atmosphere using ambient air to produce plasma while the conventional systems use expensive gases like argon, or helium in air-tight chambers. RPDs are easy to operate and do not need intensive capital investment. Narrow beam, as well as wide area plasma have been developed for different applications. An RPD was developed for thermal treatments of steels. Two different applications have been pursued. Industrial air hardening steel knife edges were subjected to plasma beam hardening. Hardness, as measured, indicated uniform distribution without any distortion. The biggest advantage with this method is that the whole part need not be heated in a furnace which will lead to oxidation and distortion. No conventional process will offer localized

  3. Transverse ion heating in multicomponent plasmas. [in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Okuda, H.; Kim, S. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for plasma modes which can occur only in a multicomponent plasma and not in pure electron-ion plasma. The addition of ions creates a new instability near the ion-ion hybrid mode whose frequency is adequate for the wave to interact with oxygen ions. To study heating of ions (such as ionospheric oxygen ions) in presence of auroral electrons, several numerical simulations were carried out using a one-dimensional electrostatic code in a magnetic field. It was found that in the presence of electrons drifting along auroral field lines into the ionosphere, the ion-ion hybrid mode can be driven unstable when the electron drift speed is too small to excite the lower hybrid instability. Since the ion-ion mode has a smaller frequency than that of the lower hybrid waves, it can couple to the heavy ions, resulting in a substantial heating of heavy ions; on the other hand, because of their frequencies, the lower hybrid waves can accelerate only light ion species.

  4. Alpha-Heating and a Burning Plasma State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Milovich, J.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.

    2014-10-01

    L. R. BENEDETTI, D. BRADLEY, D. FITTINGHOFF, N. IZUMI, S. KHAN, R. TOWN (LLNL) G. GRIM, N. GULER, G. KYRALA, F. MERRILL, C. WILDE, P. VOLEGOV (LANL) High-foot implosions show net fuel gains and significant alpha-heating [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)] using a per shot analysis of NIF data with a static reconstruction of the implosion energetics [e.g. Cerjan et al., PoP 20 (2013)]. Inference of the alpha-heating contribution to the yield is made using a simulation database of DT implosions and the one-to-one correspondence of yield amplification and normalized Lawson criteria [Patel et al., APS-DPP, (2013); Patel et al. this conf.]. A dynamic semi-analytic model for the DT self-heating rate can be constructed that can more directly be used, with data, to determine the degree of bootstrapping occuring in implosions. Here we propose that the suite of high-foot data demonstrate a scaling of fusion yield performance versus energy absorbed that provides an alternate proof of significant alpha-particle self-heating. This analysis shows that recent high-foot implosions are alpha-heating dominated and thus have achieved a `burning-plasma' state. Work performed under the auspices of U.S. Dept. of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. The effect of plasma shear flow on drift Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma and on anomalous heating of ions by ion cyclotron turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Young Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, Vladimir V.; Mikhailenko, Vladimir S.

    2016-01-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows. The levels of the drift--Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of the scattering of ions by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same effect of the scattering of ions by electromagnetic turbulence, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating, resulted from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence. In the same way, the phenomena of the ion cyclotron turbulence and anomalous anisotropic heating of ions by ion cyclotron plasma turbulence has numerous practical applications in physics of the near-Earth space plasmas. Using the methodology of the shearing modes, the kinetic theory of the ion cyclotron turbulence of the plasma with transverse current with strong velocity shear has been developed.

  6. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, a spherical capsule of cryogenic DT is accelerated inward at a high velocity. Near stagnation, a dense hot spot is formed where the deuterium and tritium ions begin to fuse, creating a 3.5-MeV alpha particle per reaction. These alpha particles deposit energy back into the plasma, thereby increasing the pressure, temperature, and reaction rate. This feedback process is called ``alpha heating,'' and ignition is a direct consequence of this thermal instability. The onset of a burning-plasma regime occurs when the total alpha-particle energy produced exceeds the shell compression work. Using an analytic compressible-shell model for the implosion, it is found that the onset of the burning-plasma regime is a unique function of the neutron yield enhancement caused by alpha particles for any target, direct or indirect drive. This yield enhancement can then be inferred from experimentally measureable quantities, such as the Lawson parameter. From this analysis, the onset of a burning plasma occurs at yields exceeding 50 kJ for implosions at the National Ignition Facility. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center).

  7. Intermittent dissipation and heating in 3D kinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Parashar, T.; Wu, P.; Shay, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of collisionless dissipation has been hotlydebated in recent years, with alternative ideas posed interms of various wave modes, such as kinetic Alfven waves,whistlers, linear Vlasov instabilities, cyclotron resonance,and Landau damping. Here we use large scale, fully kinetic3D simulations of collisionless plasma turbulence which showthe development of turbulence characterized by sheet-likecurrent density structures spanning a range of scales.We present evidence that these structures are sites for heatingand dissipation, and that stronger current structures signifyhigher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J.E, electron and proton temperatures, and PVI of the magnetic field. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma,like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due tocurrent sheet formation, leading to the expectationthat heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmasmay be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previousresults from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequencysolar wind observational data will also be discussed.

  8. RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) accelerators for heating thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, R.H.; Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been developed to generate high-current ion beams for a wide variety of applications. It has also been suggested that this type of accelerator could be used to produce megawatt ion beams to heat thermonuclear reactor plasmas. For a tokamak reactor, an RFQ accelerator can be designed to provide negative deuterium ions that are neutralized before injection through the tokamak magentic field. Also, it may be possible to use singly charged, positive, heavier ions that trasverse the magnetic field with minimal deflection and then become multiply ionized upon striking the tokamak plasma. We present preliminary RFQ beam-dynamics designs for both deuterium and oxygen ions.

  9. Identification of higher frequency plasma waves inside a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex responsible for plasma heating and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetopause marks the boundary between the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma. Understanding the dynamics of the plasma processes at the magnetopause boundary is crucial to the study of plasma transport into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have shown that there exists a temperature asymmetry in the plasma sheet. During northward IMF, the cold component ions are 30-40% hotter in the dawn flank plasma sheet compared to the dusk flank. However, the mechanisms responsible are still not entirely clear. Recent work has shown that reconnection in Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices can transport plasma into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have also shown that mode conversion at the magnetopause can generate kinetic Alfvén wave activity. Both magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity can heat plasma. For the first time we have determined from observations the dispersion relation of higher frequency waves responsible for plasma mixing and heating within a KH vortex.

  10. Plasma-ion Induced Sputtering and Heating of Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.

    2007-05-01

    Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere and an atmospheric mass to solid mass ratio comparable to that of Venus. Atmospheres equivalent in size to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). Therefore, the use of Cassini data to determine the present erosion rate of Titan's atmosphere provides an important end point for studying the erosion and heating of planetary and satellite atmospheres by an ambient plasma. In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005; Michael and Johnson 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that are used to interpret Cassini data at Titan. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., " The magnetospheric plasmadriven evolution of satellite atmospheres" Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael, M. and R.E. Johnson, "Energy deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere", Planetary & Space Sci.53, 1510-1514 (2005). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann, "Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003).

  11. Application of rf-thruster technique for fusion plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freisinger, J.; Loeb, H. W.

    On the basis of RF ion thruster devices, a family of RF injector generators (RIGs) for the heating of fusion plasmas up to the temperature of thermonuclear burn has been developed. Hydrogen ion beams of 10-40 amps can be accelerated by means of the RIGs to 30 kV, so that ion beam densities of more than 250 mA/sq cm are achievable at uniform profiles within only 1 deg of divergence angle. The use of electrodeless quartz ionizers yields a very high atomic ion fraction, low admixture of impurities, long lifetime, high reliability, simple mechanical elements, and easy control.

  12. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D/sup 0/ formed from D/sup -/. The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV.

  13. Plasma heating and current drive using intense, pulsed microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-01-01

    The use of powerful new microwave sources, e.g., free-electron lasers and relativistic gyrotrons, provide unique opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. These high-power, pulsed sources have a number of technical advantages over conventional, low-intensity sources; and their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. This paper reports theoretical progress both in modeling absorption and current drive for intense pulses and in analyzing some of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities and nonlinear self-focusing. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak plasmas: enhanced heat loss due to cross-scale coupling of plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of heat in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is dominated by the complex nonlinear dynamics of plasma turbulence. In magnetically confined plasmas used for fusion energy research, turbulence is responsible for cross-field transport that limits the performance of tokamak reactors. We report a set of novel gyrokinetic simulations that capture ion and electron-scale turbulence simultaneously, revealing the dynamics of cross-scale energy transfer and zonal flow modification that give rise to heat losses. Multi-scale simulations are required to match experimental ion and electron heat fluxes and electron profile stiffness, establishing the applicability of the newly discovered physics to experiment. Importantly, these results provide a likely explanation for the loss of electron heat from tokamak plasmas, the ‘great unsolved problem’ (Bachelor et al (2007 Plasma Sci. Technol. 9 312-87)) in plasma turbulence and the projected dominant loss channel in ITER.

  15. Heat capacity measurements on UBe13 in rotated magnetic fields: Anisotropic response in the normal state and absence of nodal quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yusei; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Amitsuka, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-02-01

    In order to gain insight into the superconducting (SC) gap of UBe13, we studied its quasiparticle excitations by means of heat-capacity measurements. Quite unexpectedly, we found the isotropic C(H) ∝ H behavior in low fields at low temperatures, implying the absence of nodal quasiparticle excitations. This result indicates that the SC gap in UBe13 is fully open over the Fermi surfaces. Furthermore, we observed a characteristic oscillation of heat capacity both in the SC and non-Fermi-liquid normal states above ∼2 T, and the angular variation of heat capacity possibly originates from anisotropic magnetic response of the heavy-electron state. Our result regarding the low-energy quasiparticle excitations in the SC and normal states will be a clue to understand the unusual nature of UBe13.

  16. Plasma-ion-induced sputtering and heating of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Michael, M.; Tucker, O. J.; Shematovich, V. I.; Luhmann, J. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere and an atmosphere mass to solid mass ratio comparable to that of Venus. Atmospheres equivalent in size to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). Therefore, the fact that data from the Cassini spacecraft can be used to determine the present erosion rate of Titan's atmosphere by the plasma trapped in Saturn's magnetosphere provides an exciting end point for studying the erosion and heating of planetary and satellite atmospheres by an ambient plasma. In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005; Michael and Johnson 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that can, in principal, be employed in interpreting Cassini data at Titan. It is shown that the globally averaged flux of magnetospheric and pickup ions deposit more energy in Titan's upper atmosphere than solar radiation. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated and compared to available Cassini data. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., " The magnetospheric plasma- driven evolution of satellite atmospheres" Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael, M. and R.E. Johnson, "Energy deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere", Planetary & Space Sci.53, 1510-1514 (2005). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175

  17. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D.

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  18. Accelerating piston action and plasma heating in high-energy density laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. C.; Wilks, S. C.; Baring, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    In the field of high-energy density physics (HEDP), lasers in both the nanosecond and picosecond regimes can drive conditions in the laboratory relevant to a broad range of astrophysical phenomena, including gamma-ray burst afterglows and supernova remnants. In the short-pulse regime, the strong light pressure (>Gbar) associated ultraintense lasers of intensity I > 1018 W/cm2 plays a central role in many HEDP applications. Yet, the behavior of this nonlinear pressure mechanism is not well-understood at late time in the laser-plasma interaction. In this paper, a more realistic treatment of the laser pressure 'hole boring' process is developed through analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. A simple Liouville code capturing the phase space evolution of ponderomotively-driven ions is employed to distill effects related to plasma heating and ion bulk acceleration. Taking into account these effects, our results show that the evolution of the laser-target system encompasses ponderomotive expansion, equipartition, and quasi-isothermal expansion epochs. These results have implications for light piston-driven ion acceleration scenarios, and astrophysical applications where the efficiencies of converting incident Poynting flux into bulk plasma flow and plasma heat are key unknown parameters.

  19. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating and flow generation in deuterium{endash}tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.C.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Nazikian, R.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Schilling, G.; von Goeler, S.; Bush, C.E.; Hanson, G.R.

    1998-05-01

    Recent radio-frequency heating experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Hawryluk {ital et al.}, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 33}, 1509 (1991)] have focused on developing tools for both pressure and current profile control in deuterium{endash}tritium (DT) plasmas. A new antenna was added to investigate pressure profile control utilizing direct ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating. This was the first time direct IBW heating was explored on TFTR. Plasma heating and driven poloidal flows are observed. Previously heating and current drive via mode-converted IBW waves had been demonstrated in non-DT plasmas but efforts in DT plasmas had been unsuccessful. This lack of success had been ascribed to the presence of a small {sup 7}Li minority ion population. In the most recent experiments {sup 6}Li was used exclusively for machine conditioning and mode-conversion heating consistent with theory is now observed in DT plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Ultra-rapid plasma freezing with halocarbon heat transfer liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.H.; Comerchero, V.

    1988-03-15

    A process of freezing plasma is described comprising the steps of exposing thin wall containers of plasma to be frozen to direct contact with a heat transfer liquid selected from the group consisting of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (CFC 113) and mixtures of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (Freon 113) and at least one of the fluorocarbons perfluoropentane (C/sub 5/F/sub 12/), perfluorohexane (C/sub 6/F/sub 14/), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/), perfluoroheptane (C/sub 7/F/sub 16/), perfluoromonomethyldimethylcyclohexanes (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/C/sub 8/F/sub 16/), perfluorodecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/), mixed perfluorodecalin and methyldecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/+C/sub 11/F/sub 20/), and perfluorinatd polyethers ((OCF(CF/sub 3/)CF/sub 2/)/sub n/ - (OCF/sub 2/)/sub m/, and maintaining the liquid at a temperature sufficiently low enough to freeze the plasma in the desired amount of time.

  1. Negative specific heat of a magnetically self-confined plasma torus

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.-H.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the thermodynamic maximum-entropy principle predicts negative specific heat for a stationary, magnetically self-confined current-carrying plasma torus. Implications for the magnetic self-confinement of fusion plasma are considered. PMID:12576553

  2. Electron heating in capacitively coupled RF plasmas: a unified scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-02-01

    Electron heating in radio-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (RF-CCP) is studied from first principles. The starting points are the electron equations of continuity and motion, with ionization neglected but electric and pressure forces and elastic collisions with the neutral background taken into account. Poisson’s equation self-consistently calculates the electric field; the ion density is assumed as a given. Postulating that the Debye length {λ\\text{D}} is small compared to the sheath length scale l and the applied frequency {ω\\text{RF}} is small compared to the electron plasma frequency {ω\\text{pe}} , an asymptotic expansion in the smallness parameter ε ={λ\\text{D}}/l∼ {ω\\text{RF}}/{ω\\text{pe}} is conducted. As has been demonstrated before (Brinkmann 2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 064002), this ansatz gives an expression—the smooth step model (SSM)—which yields (i) the space charge field in the unipolar region, (ii) the generalized Ohmic field in the ambipolar region, and (iii) a smooth interpolation for the rapid transition in between. Using the SSM and formulas for the electron density and the electron flux, expressions for the electric force and the electric power density are established which hold up to O≤ft(ε \\right) . Integrating over the sheath and taking the phase average, a representation for the total dissipated power is found as a sum of four physically distinct contributions. All terms correspond to electron heating mechanisms which are (explicitly or implicitly) already known but were so far discussed only within mutually incompatible frameworks.

  3. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong; Xiao, Y.; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  4. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Xiao, Y.; Holod, I.; Zhang, W. L.; Deng, Wenjun; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.; Kamath, Chandrika; Wichmann, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  5. On the different regimes of gas heating in air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the gas temperature in air (N2-20%O2) plasma discharges are presented for different values of the reduced electric field, E/N g, electron density n e, pressure and tube radius. This study is based on the solutions to the time-dependent gas thermal balance in a cylindrical geometry coupled to the electron, vibrational and chemical kinetics, for E/{{N}\\text{g}}=50 and 100 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V cm2), 109  ⩽  n e  ⩽  1011 cm-3, pressure in the range 1-20 Torr, and also considering different tube radius, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm. The competing role of different gas heating mechanisms is discussed in detail within the time range 0.01-100 ms. For times below 1 ms, gas heating occurs from O2 dissociation by electron impact through pre-dissociative excited states, e + O2  →  e + \\text{O}2*   →  e + 2O(3P) and …  →  e + O(3P) + O(1D), as well as through the quenching of N2 electronically excited states by O2. For longer times, simulation results show that gas heating comes from processes N(4S) + NO(X)  →  N2(X, v ~ 3) + O, N2(A) + O  →  NO(X) + N(2D), V-T N2-O collisions and the recombination of oxygen atoms at the wall. Depending on the given E/N g and n e values, each one of these processes can be an important gas-heating channel. The contribution of V-T N2-O exchanges to gas heating is important in the analysis of the gas temperature for different pressures and values of the tube radius. A global picture of these effects is given by the study of the fraction of the discharge power spent on gas heating, which is always ~15%. The values for the fractional power transferred to gas heating from vibrational and electronic excitation are also presented and discussed.

  6. Radio Frequency Field Calculations for Plasma Heating Simulations in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, A. V.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Carter, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    (VASIMR)1 is plasma heating by ion-cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). Mathematical simulation helps to design an ICRF antenna, i.e. make maximal absorption of RF power into the plasma in the resonance area. Another goal of a particle simulation is design of a magnetic nozzle and optimize the performance of VASIMR2. field in the plasma, 2) ion density and velocity, 3) ion-cyclotron radio-frequency electromagnetic field. The assumptions of quasineutral and collisionless plasma are based on the range of operating VASIMR parameters. Carlo simulations for systems of million of particles in a reasonable time and without the need for a powerful supercomputer. The particle to grid weighting method is used for calculating the ion density, which is used for recalculation of the electric potential and RF field. dimensional problem to a weighted sum over two-dimensional solutions. Absorption is introduced in the cold plasma model by adding an imaginary collision frequency to the RF driven frequency, which is equivalent to adding an imaginary particle mass in the dielectric tensor elements. static and RF fields using the VASIMR code2. The VASIMR and EMIR codes are then iterated to estimate the ICRF effects on the plasma density. The iteration is performed by calculating the RF fields with the EMIR code, and using these fields to follow nonlinear ion trajectories with the VASIMR code on the gyro-frequency time scale. The ion trajectories are used to generate RF power absorption values and a density input for the next EMIR calculation. The codes are iterated until the density profile becomes reasonably stable, then the collisional absorption parameter in the EMIR code is adjusted and the iteration is continued until the power deposited by the RF system matches the power absorbed by the ion trajectories in a global sense. electric field. The solved algebraic system of equations is represented by ill-conditioned 18-diagonal matrix with complex elements. Since early development of the

  7. Plasma-ion-induced Sputtering And Heating Of Titan'S Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.

    2006-09-01

    Plasma-ion-induced sputtering and heating of Titan's atmosphere O.J. Tucker (1), R.E. Johnson (1), M. Michael (1), V.I. Shematovich (1,2) J.H. Luhmann (3), S.A. Ledvina (3) (1) University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA (2) Institute of Astronomy RAS, Moscow 109017, Russia, (3) University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere. Atmospheres equivalent in size similar to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that can be employed in interpreting Cassini data at Titan. It is shown that the globally averaged flux of magnetospheric and pickup ions deposit more energy in Titan's upper atmosphere than solar radiation. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated and compared to available Cassini data. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., “ The magnetospheric plasma-driven evolution of satellite atmospheres” Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann,"Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003). 1

  8. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  9. Isotopic mass and alpha heating effects in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Sets of similar TFTR discharges with varying amounts of D and T are compared. The T content is altered by varying the mix of D and T NBI at approximately constant total NBI power. The total plasma current, toroidal field, central Z{sub eff}, and wall conditions are very similar in each set. The electron density profiles are approximately similar. The sets contain pairs of discharges with D-only and DT-NBI. Several sets also contain discharges with T-only NBI. The discharges are analyzed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Good agreement with measured parameters is achieved. Profiles are computed for the isotopic mass of the hydrogenic thermal species A, and for the hydrogenic thermal plus beam species A{sub tot}. Their volume averages increase approximately linearly as the fraction of T-NBI power increases, and they are slightly peaked for DT and T-only NBI discharges. The total energy and the total energy confinement time increase approximately linearly with A{sub tot} up to 30%. The beam fraction of the total energy at 0.5 sec of NBI remains relatively constant, {approx} 40--50% as A{sub tot} varies. The thermal ion fraction increases slightly, and the electron fraction decreases. The isotopic and alpha heating effects contribute in roughly equal amounts to the increase in central T{sub e}.

  10. Glass Strengthening via High-Intensity Plasma-Arc Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Harper, David C; Duty, Chad E; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of a high-intensity plasma-arc lamp was used to irradiate the surface of soda-lime silicate glass tiles to determine if an increase in strength could be achieved. The lamp had a power density of 3500 W/cm2, a processing area of 1 cm x 10 cm, irradiated near-infrared heating at a wavelength between 0.2 1.4 m, and was controlled to unidirectionally sweep across 50-mm-square tiles at a constant speed of 8 mm/s. Ring-on-ring (RoR) equibiaxial flexure and 4 pt uni-directional flexure testings of entire tiles were used to measure and compare failure stress distributions of treated and untreated glass. Even with non-optimized processing conditions, RoR failure stress increased by approximately 25% and the 4 pt bend failure stress increased by approximately 65%. Strengthening was due to a fire-polishing-like mechanism. The arc-lamp heat-treatment caused the location of the strength-limiting flaws in the 4-pt-bend tiles to change; namely, failure initiation occurred on the gage section surface for the treated glass whereas it occurred at a gage section edge for the untreated. Arc-lamp heat-treatment is attractive not only because it provides strengthening, but because it can (non-contact) process large amounts of glass quickly and inexpensively, and is a process that either a glass manufacturer or end-user can readily employ.