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Sample records for anita balloon-borne radio

  1. Observation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays with the ANITA balloon-borne radio interferometer.

    PubMed

    Hoover, S; Nam, J; Gorham, P W; Grashorn, E; Allison, P; Barwick, S W; Beatty, J J; Belov, K; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, C; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; DuVernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Vieregg, A G; Hast, C; Israel, M H; Javaid, A; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B C; Miki, C; Miočinović, P; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R J; Palladino, K; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Ruckman, L; Saltzberg, D; Seckel, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

    2010-10-01

    We report the observation of 16 cosmic ray events with a mean energy of 1.5 × 10¹⁹ eV via radio pulses originating from the interaction of the cosmic ray air shower with the Antarctic geomagnetic field, a process known as geosynchrotron emission. We present measurements in the 300-900 MHz range, which are the first self-triggered, first ultrawide band, first far-field, and the highest energy sample of cosmic ray events collected with the radio technique. Their properties are inconsistent with current ground-based geosynchrotron models. The emission is 100% polarized in the plane perpendicular to the projected geomagnetic field. Fourteen events are seen to have a phase inversion due to reflection of the radio beam off the ice surface, and two additional events are seen directly from above the horizon. Based on a likelihood analysis, we estimate angular pointing precision of order 2° for the event arrival directions. PMID:21230887

  2. Balloon borne Infrared Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-08-01

    We report on modeling of a balloon borne mission to survey the 1-5 micron region with sensitivity close to the zodiacal light limits in portions of this band. Such a survey is compelling for numerous science programs and is complimentary to the upcoming Euclid, WFIRST and other orbital missions. Balloons borne missions offer much lower cost access and rapid technological implementation but with much less exposure time and increased backgrounds. For some science missions the complimentary nature of these is extremely useful. .

  3. Balloon-Borne Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, D. M.; Murphy, G.; Strohbehn, K.; Keller, C. U.

    1996-03-01

    For about two weeks in 1995, the balloon-borne Flare Genesis Experiment will continuously observe the Sun well above the turbulent, image-blurring layers of the Earth's atmosphere. The polarization-free 80 cm telescope will supply images to a liquid-crystal based vector magnetograph, which will measure magnetic features at a resolution of 0.2 arcsec. An electrically tunable lithium-niobate Fabry-Perot provides a spectral resolution of about 0.015 nm. In a follow-up series of Antarctic balloon flights, the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE) will provide unprecedented details about sunspots, flares, magnetic elements, filaments, and the quiet solar atmosphere.

  4. Uncertainties in energy reconstruction of cosmic rays for ANITA III caused by differences in models of radio emission in atmospheric showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, Viatcheslav; Rauch, Brian; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Lam, Joe; Urdaneta, David; Wissel, Stephanie; Belov, Konstantin; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Anita Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The third flight of the high-altitude balloon-borne Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA III) was launched on a high-altitude balloon from McMurdo, Antarctica on December 17th, 2014 and flew for 22 days. It was optimized for the measurement of impulsive radio signals from the charged component of extensive air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays in the frequency range ~ 180 - 1200 MHz. In addition it is designed to detect radio impulses initiated by high-energy neutrinos interacting in the Antarctic ice, which was the primary objective of the first two ANITA flights. Based on an extensive set of Monte Carlo simulations of radio emissions from cosmic rays (CR) with the ZHAireS and CoREAS simulation packages, we estimate uncertainties in the electric fields at the payload due to different models used in the two packages. The uncertainties in the emission are then propagated through an algorithm for energy reconstruction of individual CR showers to assess uncertainties in the energy reconstruction. We also discuss optimization of this algorithm. This research is supported by NASA under Grant # NNX11AC49G.

  5. Telescope Systems for Balloon-Borne Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. (Editor); Witteborn, F. C. (Editor); Shipley, A. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on the use of balloons for scientific research are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) astronomical observations with balloon-borne telescopes, (2) orientable, stabilized balloon-borne gondola for around-the-world flights, (3) ultraviolet stellar spectrophotometry from a balloon platform, (4) infrared telescope for balloon-borne infrared astronomy, and (5) stabilization, pointing, and command control of balloon-borne telescopes.

  6. Balloon-borne transform spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    The design and construction of a high-resolution far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer for use on the Smithsonian balloon-borne one-meter telescope is described. The instrument will operate at a resolution of about 0.1 kayser in the region from 25 to 150 microns. It will be used to obtain spectra of Jupiter, Venus, Orion, and other H II and molecular cloud regions, as well as the terrestrial stratosphere.

  7. Overview and initial results from the ANITA HiCal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockham, Jessica; Anita Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) is a balloon-borne apparatus that surveys the Antarctic ice looking for radio signals produced by ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays. Neutrino signals originating from shower events in the ice and cosmic ray signals originating from shower events in the atmosphere arrive at ANITA after being, respectively, transmitted through or reflected from the ice surface. Since these signals interact with the air-ice interface, it is important to understand the impact of the transmission or reflection on the signal, specifically decoherence caused by surface roughness, in reconstructing the properties of the initial UHE particle. HiCal is a calibration pulsing unit employing a piezo-electric sparking device coupled to a dipole antenna that transmits a UHE-like impulsive signal. The first HiCal payload was launched on a second balloon in conjunction with ANITA-III, with the objective of transmitting pulses that would be received by ANITA both directly and as signals reflected from the ice surface. A ratio of the amplitudes of reflected to direct signals would provide a direct measurement of any decoherence effects caused by surface roughness. The design, testing, and initial results from the first HiCal flight will be discussed. NASA Grant NNX11AC47G.

  8. A balloon-borne integrating nephelometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S.; Apple, M.L. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-09-01

    A balloon-borne integrating nephelometer has been successfully developed and flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report details instrument design, calibration and data conversion procedure. Free and tethered balloon transport and telemetry systems are described. Data taken during March 1989 South-Central New Mexico free flight ascents are presented as vertical profiles of atmospheric particle scattering coefficient, temperature and balloon heading. Data taken during December 1989 Albuquerque, New Mexico tethered flights are also presented as vertical profiles. Data analysis shows superior instrument performance. 5 refs., 22 figs.

  9. Balloon borne optical disk mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanek, M. D.; Jennings, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    An on-board data recording system for balloon-borne interferometer using a vacuum operable, ruggedized WORM optical drive is presented. This system, as presently under development, provides 320 Mbytes of data storage (or approximately 11 hrs at the 64 kbits/sec telemetry rate of the experiment). It has the capability of recording the unmodified telemetry bit system as transmitted or doing some preprocessing of the data onboard. The system is compact and requires less than 28 watts of battery power to operate.

  10. Balloon-borne molecular oxygen search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Timothy C.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment is described that is designed to detect molecular oxygen in interstellar molecular clouds. Oxygen is the third most abundant element in our galaxy. The oxygen-bearing molecules that have been detected do not account for the expected oxygen abundance in molecular clouds. Molecular oxygen (O2) could be a major reservoir for the missing oxygen. At the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) in conjunction with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Bell Laboratories, a balloon-borne, millimeter-wavelength receiver with the capability of observing the primary isotopes of O2 (118, 750 MHz; N = 1, J = 1-0) and CO (115, 271 MHz; J = 1-0) has been designed, built, and flown. This system uses a superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixer and a digital auto-correlator spectrometer. The SIS spectrometer (SISS) has achieved a double sideband receiver temperature of 5 K and a spectral resolution of 1 km/s. Using the 1-meter primary mirror on the UCSB balloon-borne gondola, the SISS has an 11 arcsecond beam (FWHM). The first flight was executed in August 1993. Although pointing and cryogenic problems prevented taking astronomical data, it proved to be an excellent engineering flight.

  11. Planetary Science with Balloon-Borne Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremic, Tibor; Cheng, Andy; Hibbitts, Karl; Young, Eliot

    2015-01-01

    of the residual motion from the gondola that was not addressed by the gondolas coarse pointing systems. The mission met its primary science and engineering objectives. The results of the BOPPS mission will feed into the body of science knowledge but also feed into future planning for more science from balloon-borne platforms. A notional platform called Gondola for High-Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) has been explored and this concept platform can address a number of important decadal questions. This paper provides a summary of the assessment of potential balloon borne observations for planetary science purposes including where potential science contributions can be expected, the necessary performance characteristics of the platform, and other features required or desired. The BOPPS mission is summarized including descriptions of the main elements and key science and engineering results. The paper then briefly describes GHAPS, and the salient features that can make it a valuable tool for future planetary observations.

  12. The MIPAS balloon borne trace constitutent experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelhaf, H.; Vonclarmann, TH.; Fischer, H.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Fritzsche, CHR.; Piesch, CHR.; Rabus, D.; Seefeldner, M.; Voelker, W.

    1994-01-01

    A novel cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) has been developed for limb emission measurements in the mid IR-region from balloon-borne platforms. The FTS is a rapid scanning interferometer using a modified Michelson arrangement which allows a spectral resolution of 0.04 cm(exp -1) to be achieved. Solid carbon-dioxide cooling of the spectrometer and liquid-helium cooling of the detectors provide adequate sensitivity. The line of sight can be stabilized in terms of azimuth and elevation. A three-mirror off-axis telescope provides good vertical resolution and straylight rejection. Calibration is performed by high elevation and internal blackbody measurements. Four balloon flights were performed, two of them during spring turn-around 1989 and 1990 over mid-latitudes (Aire sur L'Adour, France, 44 deg N) and two near the northern polar circle in winter 1992 (Esrange, Sweden, 68 deg N). Limb emission spectra were collected from 32 km to 39 km floating altitudes covering tangent heights between the lower troposphere and the floating altitude. The trace gases CO2, H2O, O3, CH4, N2O, HNO3, N2O5, ClONO2, CF2Cl2, CFCl3, CHF2Cl, CCl4, and C2H6 have been identified in the measured spectra. The 1989 data have been analyzed to retrieve profiles of O3, HNO3, CFCl3 and CF2Cl2. The flights over Kiruna have provided the first ever reported profile measurements of the key reservoir species ClONO2 and N2O5 inside the polar vortex.

  13. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Daniel; Aboobaker, A. M.; Ade, P.; Aubin, F.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bandura, K.; Bao, C.; Borrill, J.; Didier, J.; Dobbs, M.; Gold, B.; Grain, J.; Grainger, W.; Hanany, S.; Helson, K.; Hillbrand, S. N.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, H.; Irwin, K.; Johnson, B.; Jaffe, A.; Jones, T. J.; Kisner, T.; Klein, J.; Korotkov, A.; Leach, S.; Lee, A. T.; Levinson, L.; Limon, M.; MacDermid, K.; Miller, A. D.; Milligan, M.; Pascale, E.; Raach, K.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B.; Sagiv, I.; Smecher, G.; Stompor, R.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, G. S.; Westbrook, B.; Zilic, K.

    2014-01-01

    The E and B Experiment (EBEX) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the CMB resulting from primordial gravitational waves, gravitational lensing, and Galactic dust emission. EBEX is the first balloon-borne astrophysical polarimeter to use a continuously rotating achromatic half-wave plate on a superconducting magnetic bearing and over 1000 transition edge sensor bolometers read out with SQUID amplifiers. The instrument completed an 11 day flight over Antarctica in January 2013 and data analysis is underway. We will provide an overview of the experiment and the Antarctic flight, and give an update on the analysis.

  14. Balloon-borne video cassette recorders for digital data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Althouse, W. E.; Cook, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A high-speed, high-capacity digital data storage system has been developed for a new balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope. The system incorporates sophisticated, yet easy to use and economical consumer products: the portable video cassette recorder (VCR) and a relatively newer item - the digital audio processor. The in-flight recording system employs eight VCRs and will provide a continuous data storage rate of 1.4 megabits/sec throughout a 40 hour balloon flight. Data storage capacity is 25 gigabytes and power consumption is only 10 watts.

  15. Balloon-borne video cassette recorders for digital data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Althouse, W. E.; Cook, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A high speed, high capacity digital data storage system was developed for a new balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope. The system incorporates economical consumer products: the portable video cassette recorder (VCR) and a relatively newer item - the digital audio processor. The in-flight recording system employs eight VCRs and will provide a continuous data storage rate of 1.4 megabits/sec throughout a 40 hour balloon flight. Data storage capacity is 25 gigabytes and power consumption is only 10 watts.

  16. Prototype TIGRE Compton γ-ray balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D.; O'Neill, T. J.; Akyüz, A.; Samimi, J.; Zych, A. D.

    2004-02-01

    A prototype balloon-borne telescope is being constructed for γ-ray observations in the MeV energy range. The Tracking and Imaging Gamma-Ray Experiment (TIGRE) uses multi-layers of thin silicon detectors to track and measure the energy losses of Compton recoil electrons. When combined with the direction and energy of the Compton scattered γ-ray a unique incident direction for each photon event is determined. This facilitates background rejection, improved sensitivity and image reconstruction. The converter/tracker also serves as an electron-positron pair detector for γ-rays up to 100 MeV. The initial continental US flight will be used to determine the sub-orbital atmospheric backgrounds and search for polarized γ-emission for the Crab pulsar. Longer southern hemisphere flights with an enhanced instrument will map out the 26Al emissions from the galactic center region.

  17. Collection of Stratospheric Samples using Balloon-Borne Payload System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Sreejith, A. G.; Kumble, Sheshashayi; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Kj, Nirmal; Suresh, Ambily; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere at stratospheric altitudes contains dust particles from soil lifted by weather, volcanic dust, man-made aerosols, IDP (Interplanetary Dust Particles) - remnants of comets and asteroids, and even interstellar dust. Satellite observations suggest that approximately 100--300 tons of cosmic dust enter Earth's atmosphere every day. However, very little is known about the microbial life in the upper atmosphere, where conditions are very much similar to that on Mars and possibly on some exoplanets. Stratosphere provides a good opportunity to study the existence or survival of biological life in these conditions. Despite the importance of this topic to astrobiology, stratospheric microbial diversity/survival remains largely unexplored, probably due to significant difficulties in the access and ensuring the absence of contamination of the samples. To conduct a detailed study into this, we are developing the balloon-borne payload system SAMPLE (Stratospheric Altitude Microbiology Probe for Life Existence) to collect dust samples from stratosphere and bring them in an hygienic and uncontaminated manner to a suitable laboratory environment, where further study will be conducted to establish the possibility of microbial life in the upper atmosphere. This balloon-borne payload system will rise through the atmosphere till it reaches an altitude of about 25-30 km above sea level. The payload consists of detachable pre-sterilized sampling chambers designed to collect and contain the dust samples and get them back to the surface without contamination during the flight, a microprocessor and a controller which will determine the altitude of the payload system to actively monitor the opening and closing of the sample collection chambers. For contamination control, we will have two extra chambers, one of which will fly but not open, and one will remain closed on the ground. Other onboard devices include environmental sensors, GPS tracking devices, cameras to monitor

  18. Status of EBEX, a Balloon Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubmayr, Johannes; EBEX Collaboration

    2006-12-01

    We discuss the status of EBEX, a NASA funded balloon-borne polarimeter equipped with 1462 bolometric transition edge sensor (TES) detectors and designed to measure the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. EBEX will scan 350 square degrees of the sky over a 14 day long-duration balloon flight. Given the expected sensitivity we will put a 2σ upper limit of r ≤ 0.03. The EBEX instrument employs a 1.5 meter Gregorian-type telescope giving 8 arcminute resolution. Three frequency bands at 150, 250 and 420 GHz provide strong leverage against polarized dust foreground. Systematic errors are controlled by modulating the input polarization with a continuously rotating achromatic half wave plate (AHWP). Signal is detected in 1462 independent polarimeters distributed over two focal planes such that both polarization states are detected simultaneously. A superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) allows smooth rotation of the AHWP with low heat dissipation suitable for a long duration balloon flight. The detectors are read out with a frequency domain multiplexing SQUID system.

  19. Demonstration of a Balloon Borne Arc-second Pointer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deweese, K.; Ward, P.

    Many designs for utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments have been proposed throughout the years A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement The test results of a demonstration prototype of the design with similar ability are also presented Discussion of a high fidelity controller simulation for design analysis is presented The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis A multiple controller scheme is utilized for coarse and fine pointing Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system with extensive flight history residing above the gondola structure A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors eliminating backlash problems An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static friction from the system dynamics A control scheme involving linear

  20. EBEX: a balloon-borne CMB polarization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichborn-Kjennerud, Britt; Aboobaker, Asad M.; Ade, Peter; Aubin, François; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bao, Chaoyun; Borrill, Julian; Cantalupo, Christopher; Chapman, Daniel; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Grain, Julien; Grainger, William; Hanany, Shaul; Hillbrand, Seth; Hubmayr, Johannes; Jaffe, Andrew; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Terry; Kisner, Theodore; Klein, Jeff; Korotkov, Andrei; Leach, Sam; Lee, Adrian; Levinson, Lorne; Limon, Michele; MacDermid, Kevin; Matsumura, Tomotake; Meng, Xiaofan; Miller, Amber; Milligan, Michael; Pascale, Enzo; Polsgrove, Daniel; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Raach, Kate; Sagiv, Ilan; Smecher, Graeme; Stivoli, Federico; Stompor, Radek; Tran, Huan; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory S.; Vinokurov, Yury; Yadav, Amit; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zilic, Kyle

    2010-07-01

    EBEX is a NASA-funded balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Observations will be made using 1432 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometric detectors read out with frequency multiplexed SQuIDs. EBEX will observe in three frequency bands centered at 150, 250, and 410 GHz, with 768, 384, and 280 detectors in each band, respectively. This broad frequency coverage is designed to provide valuable information about polarized foreground signals from dust. The polarized sky signals will be modulated with an achromatic half wave plate (AHWP) rotating on a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) and analyzed with a fixed wire grid polarizer. EBEX will observe a patch covering ~1% of the sky with 8' resolution, allowing for observation of the angular power spectrum from l = 20 to 1000. This will allow EBEX to search for both the primordial B-mode signal predicted by inflation and the anticipated lensing B-mode signal. Calculations to predict EBEX constraints on r using expected noise levels show that, for a likelihood centered around zero and with negligible foregrounds, 99% of the area falls below r = 0.035. This value increases by a factor of 1.6 after a process of foreground subtraction. This estimate does not include systematic uncertainties. An engineering flight was launched in June, 2009, from Ft. Sumner, NM, and the long duration science flight in Antarctica is planned for 2011. These proceedings describe the EBEX instrument and the North American engineering flight.

  1. A Balloon-Borne Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delene, David J.; Deshler, Terry; Wechsler, Perry; Vali, Gabor A.

    1997-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument was constructed for observations of vertical profiles of cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentrations, active at 1% supersaturation. Droplet concentration in the static thermal-gradient diffusion chamber is deduced from the amount of scattered laser light detected by a photodetector. The photodetector is calibrated using a video camera and computer system to count the number of droplets produced from NaCl aerosol. Preliminary data are available from nine early morning profiles obtained at Laramie, Wyoming, between June 1995 and January 1997. To complement the CCN measurements, instruments that measure condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosols with diameter greater than 0.30 micrometers (D(sub 0.3) were also included on the balloon package. CCN concentrations exhibited a general decrease from the surface to the top of the boundary layers, were generally uniform through well-mixed layers, and show variability above well-mixed layers. In general, the structure of the CCN profile appears to be closely related to the structure in the CN and D(sub 0.3) profiles. Summer profiles generally have CCN concentration greater than 200/cu cm up to 500 mbar, whereas winter profiles are less than 200/cu cm at all levels.

  2. BLAST: The Balloon-Borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, Mark; Ade, Peter; Bock, Jamie; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matt; Gunderson, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    BLAST is the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope. It will fly from a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform from Antarctica. The telescope design incorporates a 2 m primary mirror with large-format bolometer arrays operating at 250, 350 and 500 microns. By providing the first sensitive large-area (10 sq. deg.) sub-mm surveys at these wavelengths, BLAST will address some of the most important galactic and cosmological questions regarding the formation and evolution of stars, galaxies and clusters. Galactic and extragalactic BLAST surveys will: (1) identify large numbers of high-redshift galaxies; (2) measure photometric redshifts, rest-frame FIR luminosities and star formation rates thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the galaxies that produce the FIR and sub-mm background; (3) measure cold pre-stellar sources associated with the earliest stages of star and planet formation; (4) make high-resolution maps of diffuse galactic emission over a wide range of galactic latitudes. In addition to achieving the above scientific goals, the exciting legacy of the BLAST LDB experiment will be a catalogue of 3000-5000 extragalactic sub-mm sources and a 100 sq. deg. sub-mm galactic plane survey. Multi-frequency follow-up observations from SIRTF, ASTRO-F, and Herschel, together with spectroscopic observations and sub-arcsecond imaging from ALMA are essential to understand the physical nature of the BLAST sources.

  3. Precision Attitude Control for the BETTII Balloon-Borne Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Rinehart. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared interferometer to fly on a high altitude balloon. Operating at wavelengths of 30-90 microns, BETTII will obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets at angular resolutions down to less than half an arcsecond, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. This requires attitude control at a level ofless than a tenth of an arcsecond, a great challenge for a lightweight balloon-borne system. We have designed a precision attitude determination system to provide gondola attitude knowledge at a level of 2 milliarcseconds at rates up to 100Hz, with accurate absolute attitude determination at the half arcsecond level at rates of up to 10Hz. A mUlti-stage control system involving rigid body motion and tip-tilt-piston correction provides precision pointing stability to the level required for the far-infrared instrument to perform its spatial/spectral interferometry in an open-loop control. We present key aspects of the design of the attitude determination and control and its development status.

  4. Polarization analysis of a balloon-borne solar magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1987-01-01

    The main text of the report contains the particular results of our research which relate to the Experimental Vector Magnetograph (EXVM) and the Balloon-borne Vector Magnetograph (BVM). A brief overview of which elements in the EXVM and BVM that are relevant to this polarization analysis are presented. The possible meaning of the 10(exp -5) polarization specification for the BVM is discussed qualitatively. A recommendation of which polarization specification is most relevant for the BVM is provided. A diattenuation budget for the various surfaces in the BVM which will allow the polarization specification to be met is discussed. An explanation of the various coating specifications which are recommended is presented. Optical design of the EXVM and coating specification sheets for the BVM are presented. The appendices of this report contain the more general results of our research on the general topic of polarization aberrations. A general discussion of polarization aberration theory, in terms of the SAMEX solar magnetograph, and rigorous derivations for the Mueller matrices of optical systems are also presented in the appendices.

  5. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N.; Truch, M. D. P.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2008-07-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 μm. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30'' at 250 μm. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of ~30''; postflight pointing reconstruction to lesssim5'' rms is achieved. The onboard telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a preselected set of maps, with the option of manual override. In this paper we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hr flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hr, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, in 2006 December.

  6. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semisch, Christopher; BLAST Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital survey-experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between 3 arrays, observes simultaneously in broad-band (30%) spectral-windows at 250µm, 350µm, and 500µm. The optical design is based on a 2m diameter Cassegrain telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250µm. The gondola pointing system enables raster-like maps of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; post-flight pointing reconstruction to < 5" rms is also achieved. The on-board telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a pre-selected set of maps, with the option of manual intervention. Since a test-flight in 2003, BLAST has made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100-hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in June 2005, and a 250-hour, circumpolar-flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, in December 2006.

  7. Collecting Ground Samples for Balloon-Borne Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Zimmerman, Wayne; Wu, Jiunn Jenq

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system in a gondola containing scientific instruments suspended by a balloon over the surface of the Saturn moon Titan would quickly acquire samples of rock or ice from the ground below. Prototypes of a sample-collecting device that would be a major part of the system have been tested under cryogenic and non-cryogenic conditions on Earth. Systems like this one could also be used in non-cryogenic environments on Earth to collect samples of rock, soil, ice, mud, or other ground material from such inaccessible or hazardous locations as sites of suspected chemical spills or biological contamination. The sample-collecting device would be a harpoonlike device that would be connected to the balloon-borne gondola by a tether long enough to reach the ground. The device would be dropped from the gondola to acquire a sample, then would be reeled back up to the gondola, where the sample would be analyzed by the onboard instruments. Each prototype of the sample-collecting device has a sharp front (lower) end, a hollow core for retaining a sample, a spring for holding the sample in the hollow core, and a rear (upper) annular cavity for retaining liquid sample material. Aerodynamic fins at the rear help to keep the front end pointed downward. In tests, these prototype devices were dropped from various heights and used to gather samples of dry sand, moist sand, cryogenic water ice, and warmer water ice.

  8. Support of the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    A (256 x 1024)-pixel imaging ultraviolet Multi-mode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector system for flight was fabricated, evaluated, and environmentally tested for flight on the Balloon Borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrograph (BUSS). The goal of the program was to replace the existing SEC Vidicon with the pulse-counting MAMA detector in order to, first, improve the overall sensitivity of the BUSS telescope and spectrograph for observations of stars down to m sub v = 7 and fainter, and, second, to improve the spectral resolution and wavelength accuracy by eliminating the image drifts in the Vidicon caused by magnetic field effects. A sealed MAMA detector tube structure employing a remotely processed photocathode mounted on a window in proximity focus with the front face of the MCP was developed to avoid contamination produced by a noisy and unstable device. The configuration of the BUSS detector system in its flight ready configuration is shown. The quantum efficiency curve for the semi-transparent Cs2Te photocathode is also shown.

  9. Beam Tests of the Balloon-Borne ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganel, O.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, E. J.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Ellison, S.; Fazely, A.; Gould, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurement from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide crucial hints about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATTIC'S design centers on an 18 radiation length (X(sub Omnicron)) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75 lambda(sub int) graphite target. In September 1999 the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator, within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000 - January 2001, ATIC flew on the first of a series of long duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam-tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 GeV to 375 GeV, as well as signal linearity and collection efficiency estimates. We show how these results compare with expectations based on simulations, and their expected impacts on mission performance.

  10. A Balloon-borne Telescope for Planetary Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Taguchi, Makoto; Yoshida, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakano, Toshihiko; Fujimura, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Mutsumi

    2012-07-01

    This presentation reports the development status of the balloon-borne telescope(BBT) for planetary observations which is scheduled to launch in August 2012. The BBT flies in the stratosphere where the atmosphere is as 1/100 thin as that around the ground, and is higher than the ozone layer. The telescope can receive star light with the band from NIR to UV through less atmospheric distortions. Our project aims to take images of target planets from the BBT in such advantageous environment, and to observe atmospheric phenomena in other planets. As the technology demonstration, a prototype flight system with a 30cm diameter telescope was launched in 2009 in Japan. The second demonstration with an improved system is scheduled to launch in this August. With the improved flight system, the BBT is expected to take images of Venus with the resolution of as high as 0.2 arc-seconds in a few hours. Eventually, the BBT is planned to launch into the polar jet stream and to observe target planets in a few hundreds hours. For the following flight observation, the successor flight system is already being developed. In this presentation, the target planets and its science which the project aims are briefly introduced. And also the development status of the flight system for the next launch is introduced.

  11. The balloon-borne exoplanet spectroscopy experiment (BETSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, E.

    2015-10-01

    The balloon-borne exoplanet spectroscopy experiment (BETSE) is a proposed balloon spectrometer operating in the 1-5 μm band with spectral resolution of R = 100. Using a 50 cm diameter telescope, BETSE is desgnied to have sufficient sensitivity and control of systematics to measure the atmospheric spectra of representative sample of known hot Jupiters, few warm Neptunes, and some of the exoplanets TESS will soon begin to discover. This would for the first time allow us to place strict observational constraints on the nature of exo-atmospheres and on models of planetary formation. In a LDB flight from Antarctica, BETSE would be able to characterize the atmospheres of 20 planets. If a ULDB flight is available, the combination of a longer flight and night time operations would enable BETSE to ground-breakingly characterize the atmospheres of more than 40 planets. Prior to an LDB or ULDB flight, BETSE would be tested in a 24 hr flight from Fort Sumner, NM, in order to test all subsystems, also observing more than 4 planets with SNR greater than 5.

  12. Feasibility of observer system for determining orientation of balloon borne observational platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, N. J.; Gagliardi, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    An observer model for predicting the orientation of balloon borne research platforms was developed. The model was employed in conjunction with data from the LACATE mission in order to determine the platform orientation as a function of time.

  13. Balloon Borne Arc-Second Pointer Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Philip R.; DeWeese, Keith D.

    2003-01-01

    For many years scientists have been utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments. A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range. This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement. The foundation for a high fidelity controller simulation is presented. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is introduced for coarse and fine pointing. Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system, with extensive flight history, residing above the gondola structure. A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing, providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target. Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors, eliminating backlash problems. An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static fiction are provided. A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static fiction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. Results from a linear analysis of the total system and the high fidelity simulation are given. This paper establishes that the proposed control strategy can be made robustly stable with significant design margins. Also demonstrated is the efficacy of the proposed system in rejecting disturbances larger than those considered realistic. Finally, we see that sub arc-second pointing stability can be achieved for a large instrument pointing at an inertial target.

  14. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truch, Matthew D. P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Pascale, E.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; postflight pointing reconstruction to <5" rms is achieved. The onboard telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a preselected set of maps, with the option of manual override. On this poster, we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hour, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2006 December. The BLAST collaboration acknowledges the support of NASA through grants NAG5-12785, NAG5-13301, and NNGO-6GI11G, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Canada's Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Innovation Trust, the Puerto Rico Space Grant Consortium, the Fondo Institucional para la Investigacion of the University of Puerto Rico, and the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs.

  15. Radio Frequency Attenuation Length Estimates In Ice from Antarctic and Greenlandic Radar Depth Sounding Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockham, Mark

    2014-03-01

    The balloon-borne Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment is designed to detect in-ice neutrino collisions in Antarctica. These collisions produce radio waves that propagate upward to the suite of 32 horn antennas that constitute ANITA. The primary virtue of ANITA is the ability to simultaneously observe 1 million cubic kilometers of ice from its 38 kilometer altitude vantage point. The radio frequency signal strength observed at the balloon, however, depends on the radio frequency attenuation length of the ice through which the neutrino-generated signal must travel. Attenuation length is a location-specific ice property and varies mainly as a function of temperature and chemistry. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) project has data from many locations in Antarctica and Greenland produced by radar depth sounding. Using methods developed by analyzing the continuum signal in radar depth sounding data from Greenland, attenuation length estimates are compared to estimates derived from ice core data.

  16. Arc-Second Pointer for Balloon-Borne Astronomical Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Philip R.; DeWeese, Keith

    2004-01-01

    A control system has been designed to keep a balloon-borne scientific instrument pointed toward a celestial object within an angular error of the order of an arc second. The design is intended to be adaptable to a large range of instrument payloads. The initial payload to which the design nominally applies is considered to be a telescope, modeled as a simple thin-walled cylinder 24 ft (approx.= 7.3 m) long, 3 ft (approx.= 0.91 m) in diameter, weighing 1,500 lb (having a mass of .680 kg). The instrument would be mounted on a set of motor-driven gimbals in pitch-yaw configuration. The motors on the gimbals would apply the control torques needed for fine adjustments of the instrument in pitch and yaw. The pitch-yaw mount would, in turn, be suspended from a motor mount at the lower end of a pair of cables hanging down from the balloon (see figure). The motor in this mount would be used to effect coarse azimuth control of the pitch-yaw mount. A notable innovation incorporated in the design is a provision for keeping the gimbal bearings in constant motion. This innovation would eliminate the deleterious effects of static friction . something that must be done in order to achieve the desired arc-second precision. Another notable innovation is the use of linear accelerometers to provide feedback that would facilitate the early detection and counteraction of disturbance torques before they could integrate into significant angular-velocity and angular-position errors. The control software processing the sensor data would be capable of distinguishing between translational and rotational accelerations. The output of the accelerometers is combined with that of angular position and angular-velocity sensors into a proportional + integral + derivative + acceleration control law for the pitch and yaw torque motors. Preliminary calculations have shown that with appropriate gains, the power demand of the control system would be low enough to be satisfiable by means of storage

  17. Demonstration of a Balloon Borne Arc-Second Pointer Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWeese, Keith D.; Ward, Philip R.

    2006-01-01

    Many designs for utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments have been proposed throughout the years. A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range. This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement. The test results of a demonstration prototype of the design with similar ability are also presented. Discussion of a high fidelity controller simulation for design analysis is presented. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is utilized for coarse and fine pointing. Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system, with extensive flight history, residing above the gondola structure. A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing, providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target. Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors, eliminating backlash problems. An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided. A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static friction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. Results from a linear analysis of the total system and the high fidelity simulation are given. Results from a generalized demonstration prototype are presented. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware was used to demonstrate the efficacy and performance of the pointer design for a mock instrument. Sub-arcsecond pointing ability from a ground hang test setup

  18. Design and construction of a carbon fiber gondola for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, C.; Contaldi, C. C.; Crill, B. P.; Doré, O. P.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Holmes, W. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z. K.; Kuo, C.-L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Megerian, K. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Shariff, J. A.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2014-07-01

    We introduce the light-weight carbon fiber and aluminum gondola designed for the Spider balloon-borne telescope. Spider is designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and control of systematics in search of the imprint of inflation: a period of exponential expansion in the early Universe. The requirements of this balloon-borne instrument put tight constrains on the mass budget of the payload. The Spider gondola is designed to house the experiment and guarantee its operational and structural integrity during its balloon-borne flight, while using less than 10% of the total mass of the payload. We present a construction method for the gondola based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes with aluminum inserts and aluminum multi-tube joints. We describe the validation of the model through Finite Element Analysis and mechanical tests.

  19. Balloon-borne three-meter telescope for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hoffmann, William F.; Harper, Doyal A.

    1988-01-01

    The scientific objectives, engineering analysis and design, results of technology development, and focal-plane instrumentation for a two-meter balloon-borne telescope for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy are presented. The unique capabilities of balloon-borne observations are discussed. A program summary emphasizes the development of the two-meter design. The relationship of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is also discussed. Detailed treatment is given to scientific objectives, gondola design, the mirror development program, experiment accommodations, ground support equipment requirements, NSBF design drivers and payload support requirements, the implementation phase summary development plan, and a comparison of three-meter and two-meter gondola concepts.

  20. Far-Infrared Photometry with an 0.4-Meter Liquid Helium Cooled Balloon-Borne Telescope. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.4-meter aperture, liquid helium cooled multichannel far-infrared balloon-borne telescope was constructed to survey the galactic plane. Nine new sources, above a 3-sigma confidence level of 1300 Jy, were identified. Although two-thirds of the scanned area was more than 10 degrees from the galactic plane, no sources were detected in that region; all nine fell within 10 degrees and eight of those within 4 degrees of the galactic equator. Correlations with visible, compact H lines associated with radio continuum and with sources displaying spectra steeply rising between 11 and 20 microns were noted, while stellar objects were not detected.

  1. Feasibility of observer system for determining orientation of balloon borne observational platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, N. J.; Gagliardi, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The instantaneous orientation (i.e., the attitude) of the LACATE instrumentation platform with respect to a local vertical is discussed. An observer model for predicting the orientation of balloon-borne research platforms is described. Determination of the platform orientation as a function of time is addressed.

  2. Detailed requirements document for the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer decommutation and formatting programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brose, J. F.; Bourgeois, V.

    1975-01-01

    The requirements are defined for developing a decommutation and a data reformat program to process test data obtained by the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer used in a joint experiment with the Space Research Laboratory in the Netherlands. Background information and objectives are discussed.

  3. Submillimeter Astronomy Investigation of Line Specra (SAILS) - a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiffert, M. D.; Langer, W. D.; Lord, S. D.; Pearson, J.; McGrath, W. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Submillimeter Astronomy Investigation of Line Specra (SAILS) is a balloon-borne experiment under study for a 100 day ultra-long duration balloon mission. The experiment would survey the galactic plane with 1 arc minute angular resolution and 1 km/sec velocity resolution in the important submillimeter lines of CII, NII, and OI.

  4. Effect of wind gusts on the motion of a balloon-borne observation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, N. J.; Johanek, F. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of wind gusts on the magnitude of the pendulation angles of a balloon-borne observation platform is determined. A system mathematical model is developed and the solution of this model is used to determine the magnitude of the observation platforms pendulation angles.

  5. a Pinhole Sun Sensor for Balloon-Borne Experiment Attitude Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, A. L.; English, M.-P.; Tucker, G. S.; Pascale, E.; Gandilo, N.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the design, calibration and in-flight performance of a sun sensor, which is used to determine the attitude of a balloon-borne telescope. The device uses a position-sensitive detector (PSD) in a pinhole camera. By determining the position of the image of the Sun on the PSD, the orientation of the sun sensor and the boresight of the telescope relative to the Sun can be determined. The pinhole sun sensor (PSS) was first flown in the December 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope with Polarization (BLAST-Pol). In flight the PSS achieved an accuracy (combined azimuth and elevation) of about 0.18°. The accuracy could be improved by increasing the distance between the pinhole and the PSD, but the field-of-view of the PSS would be reduced.

  6. A four channel He-3 cooled balloon-borne bolometer radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Stephan

    1988-01-01

    A four channel He-3 cooled balloon-borne bolometer radiometer was constructed. The principal goal of the instrument is to measure the anisotropy of the 3 K cosmic background radiation on angular scales of 4 to 180 deg. The goal is to improve the sensitivity of the measurements to Delta T/T is less than .00001. A secondary goal is to survey the galactic thermal dust emission in the submillimeter range.

  7. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Balloon-borne three-meter telescope for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1986-01-01

    The study and revision of the gimbal design of the Three-Meter Balloon Borne Telescope (TMBBT) is discussed. Efforts were made to eliminate the alignment and limited rotation problems inherent in the flex-pivot design. A new design using ball bearings to replace the flex-pivots was designed and its performance analyzed. An error analysis for the entire gondola pointing system was also prepared.

  9. Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

  10. 'Santa Anita' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Santa Anita' Panorama (QTVR)

    This color mosaic taken on May 21, 25 and 26, 2004, by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was acquired from a position roughly three-fourths the way between 'Bonneville Crater' and the base of the 'Columbia Hills.' The area is within a low thermal inertia unit (an area that heats up and cools off quickly) identified from orbit by the Mars Odyssey thermal emission imaging system instrument. The rover was roughly 600 meters (1,968 feet) from the base of the hills.

    This mosaic, referred to as the 'Santa Anita Panorama,' is comprised of 64 pointings, acquired with six of the panoramic camera's color filters, including one designed specifically to allow comparisons between orbital and surface brightness data. A total of 384 images were acquired as part of this panorama. The mosaic is an approximate true-color rendering constructed from images using the camera's 750-, 530- and and 480-nanometer filters, and is presented at the full resolution of the camera.

  11. Search for Signatures of Inflation with the EBEX Balloon-Borne Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Shaul

    EBEX (E and B EXperiment) is a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. It is a long-duration payload equipped with an array of 1564 bolometric transition edge sensors. The unique combination of sensitivity, resolution and sky coverage enables unprecedented power to constrain inflationary models and to determine the amplitude of the matter power spectrum through measurement of the gravitational lensing of CMB photons. The experiment is optimized to take full advantage of the balloon-borne environment in its frequency coverage, and to measure the yet unknown properties of Galactic dust polarization. EBEX completed a test flight in June of 2009 from Ft. Sumner, NM, and a second end- to-end integration campaign in the summer of 2011. Important milestones have been achieved including the first operation of any transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer in a balloon-borne environment, the first demonstration of any multiplexed readout of TES bolometers in space-like conditions, the first operation of a polarimeter based on continuous rotation of a half-wave plate by means of a superconducting magnetic bearing, and validation of the EBEX optical system and end-to-end polarimetry. The EBEX instrument is now being readied for its first long duration flight, which is scheduled to take place in December 2012, just before the start of this proposed grant period. In this proposal we are requesting funding to analyze and publish the science data generated during the first EBEX science flight. In addition to its science goals EBEX is a technology pathfinder for other experiments and for a future NASA satellite mission. It continues to provide excellent training grounds for student and post-docs. Already 6 Ph.D. theses have been produced based on the project and 7 more are anticipated.

  12. Stratospheric free chlorine measured by balloon-borne in situ resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.; Grassl, H. J.; Shetter, R. E.; Margitan, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Eight balloon-borne in situ measurements of ClO in the stratosphere are analyzed and are compared with recent model calculations. While the use of in situ stratospheric studies of free radicals to test models by comparing observed and predicted concentration profiles is essential for a prognosis of changes in stratospheric ozone, resulting from future changes in stratospheric ozone, such studies provide only limited insight into the nature of stratospheric photochemistry, because natural variability and the large number of fast reactions which compete in the coupling among the key radicals frustrate a detailed comparison between a mean distribution provided by the models and an instantaneous distribution provided by a single observation.

  13. A secondary wobbling mechanism for a balloon-borne infrared telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Shibai, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Okuda, Haruyuki; Maihara, Toshinori

    1991-11-01

    A wobbling mechanism for a secondary mirror has been developed for a balloon-borne infrared telescope. Friction of the wobbling mechanism is negligibly small, and hence the wobbling mechanism is very reliable for the use in a severe environment at balloon altitudes. Motion is controlled by servo electronics, whose transfer function includes the second-order differential term of the error signal in order to improve the waveform. Good performance of the drive mechanism has been confirmed in two balloon flights in 1988 at an altitude of 31 km.

  14. Project of Antarctic Balloon-Borne Measurements of the CR spectrum above 1020 EV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Chernov, D. V.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Sysojeva, T. I.

    Relatively simple detector SPHERE (spherical mirror ˜ 1.5m2 and retina of 100 pixels) is presented for the Antarctic balloon-borne measurements of the CR spectrum. Long time winter flight make it possible to measure the spectrum above 1020 eV . Comparison with satellite and ISS projects of the nearest future show that the efficiency of this detector is sufficiently high. The energy threshold is less (˜ 1018 eV ). The accuracy of the energy definition is high as two methods are together the measurement of the EAS fluorescence track in the atmosphere and the measurement of the full flux of the EAS Cherenkov light.

  15. Balloon infrared astronomy platform (BIRAP). [development and characteristics of a balloon-borne attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeb, M. E.; True, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a balloon-borne attitude control system for infrared astronomy studies is discussed. The Balloon Infrared Astronomy Platform (BIRAP) is the result of the development effort. The BIRAP uses electronic gimballing for the offset pointing which eliminates a set of mechanical gimbals. Guide stars with visual magnitudes as low as plus 6 are used for fine tracking assuring that all areas of the sky can be covered. The BIRAP control concept uses a closed loop system in the airborne equipment with automatic update through a command link that can be operated either manually or automatically by a ground based computer.

  16. A cryogenically-cooled, balloon-borne far infrared survey telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The design and performance of the Arizona cryogenically-cooled, balloon-borne, multiband far infrared survey telescope are described. The 40 cm Cassegrain telescope is completely contained in a liquid helium dewar. The focal plane array consists of Fabry optics and four detectors which each have a 12 arc minute field of view. Both photoconductive and bolometer detectors are utilized at effective wavelengths of 20, 80, 100 and 150 microns. In 1977 the telescope was used to make multicolor large scale maps of 70 square degrees in the Cygnus X region and the W3 region.

  17. Balloon borne Antarctic frost point measurements and their impact on polar stratospheric cloud theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.; Hofmann, D. J.; Carpenter, J. R.; Harder, J. W.; Oltsmans, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon-borne frost point measurements were performed over Antarctica during September-October 1987 as part of the NOZE II effort at McMurdo. The results show water mixing ratios on the order of 2 ppmv in the 20 km region, suggesting that models of the springtime Antarctic stratosphere should be based on approximately 2 ppmv water vapor. Evidence indicating that some PSCs form at temperatures higher than the frost point in the 15 to 20 km region is discussed. This supports the binary HNO3-H2O theory of PSC composition.

  18. The BUSS spectrum of Beta Lyrae. [Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Sahade, J.; De Jager, C.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrum of Beta Lyrae from about 1975 to 3010 A taken with the Balloon-borne ultraviolet Stellar Spectrograph experiment in May 1976 at phase 0.61 P is analyzed. Results show the presence of N II semi-forbidden emission and provide evidence for about the same location, in the outer envelope of the system, of the layers responsible for the resonance Mg II doublet emissions and for the "narrow" H-alpha emission. In addition, three sets of absorption lines, P Cygni profiles of Fe III and broad Beals Type III emissions of Mg II, are found to be present.

  19. Development of position sensitive scintillation counter for balloon-borne hard x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Keisuke; Kunieda, Hideyo; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Shibata, Ryo; Nakamura, Tomokazu; Ohnishi, Katsuhiko; Kanou, Yasufumi; Miyata, Emi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2006-06-01

    We have been developing position sensitive scintillation counter as focal plane detector of hard X-ray telescope onboard a balloon borne experiment. This detector consists NaI(TI) scintillator and position sensitive photo-multiplier tube. Focal plane detector has to have high efficiency in hard X-ray region, enough position resolution and detection area. 3mm thickness of NaI(TI) scintillator can achieve almost 100% efficiency below 80 keV. We measured position resolved energy and position resolution in synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8 BL20B2. Position resolution of 2.4mm at 60keV is about half of plate scale of half power diameter of X-ray telescope. The detector has 6 cm diameter window and it corresponds to 25 arcmin field of view, and it is enough lager than the that of telescope, which is 12 arcmin in FWHM. Balloon borne experiment for observation of the background was performed on May 24, 2005 from Sanriku balloon center. We could obtain background data for 3 hours at altitude of 40 km.

  20. Balloon-borne cryogenic spectrometer for measurement of lower stratospheric trace constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J. C.; Kunde, V. G.; Hanel, R. A.; Walser, D.; Herath, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid-nitrogen cooled, multidetector Fourier transform spectrometer has been constructed to measure minor stratospheric constituents via high resolution, earth-limb emission spectroscopy from a balloon-borne platform. Cryogenic cooling, combined with the use of extrinsic silicon photoconductor detectors cooled to liquid-helium temperature, allows the detection of weak emission features of gaseous species. The spectrometer has two basic scan modes: the first mode records the continuous spectrum from 650-2100/cm with 0.2/cm resolution; the second simultaneously records four preselected narrow intervals (about 175/cm bandpass each) with 0.02/cm resolution, unapodized. Filtering of the interferogram signal is done by real-time, digital signal processing. The most important feature of this flat mirror Michelson system, with respect to remote balloon-borne operation, is the dynamic alignment system which maintains the relative parallelism of the two flat reflectors of the interferometer. Species identified to date in data obtained during a Nov. 6, 1984, flight include: CO2, O3, H2O, CH4, HNO3, N2O, NO2, NO, CCl3F (Freon-11) and CF2Cl2 (Freon-12).

  1. GRAINE project: The first balloon-borne, emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Kamada, Keiki; Mizutani, Saki; Nakagawa, Ryo; Ozaki, Keita; Rokujo, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    The GRAINE project (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) has been developed for the observation of cosmic γ-rays in the energy range 10 MeV-100 GeV with a precise (0.08°} at 1-2 GeV), polarization-sensitive, large-aperture-area (˜10 m^2) emulsion telescope by repeated long-duration balloon flights. In 2011, the first balloon-borne experiment was successfully performed with a 12.5 × 10cm^2 aperture area and 4.6 hour flight duration for a feasibility and performance test. Systematic detection, energy reconstruction, and timestamping of γ-ray events were performed across the whole area of the emulsion film, up to 45° incident zenith angle, down to 50 MeV γ-ray energy, with 97% detection reliability, 0.2 sec timestamp accuracy, and 98% timestamp reliability. A γ-ray data checking and calibration method was created using the γ-rays produced in the converter. We measured the atmospheric γ-ray flux in the energy range 50-300 MeV and obtained a first understanding of the cosmic γ-ray background. By combining the attitude data, we established a procedure for determining the γ-ray arrival direction in celestial coordinates. The first flight of the balloon-borne emulsion telescope confirmed its potential as a high-performance cosmic γ-ray detector.

  2. An assessment of image reconstruction from balloon-borne and the IRAS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Das, B.; Rengarajan, T. N.; Verma, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Angular resolution and structural information from the far-infrared mapping of astronomical sources (Galactic star forming regions, spiral galaxies, etc.) made using the TIFR 1 m balloon-borne telescope and the IRAS have been compared. The effective wavelengths of the TIFR two-band photometer are 58 and 150 microns. From IRAS, the survey COADD data, additional observations (AO's) made with the survey detectors with different Macros (DPS, DSD, DPM), as well as the chopped photometric channel (CPC) data have been considered here. The observed signals have been processed using different deconvolution strategies, either based on a maximum entropy method (MEM) developed at TIFR or the HiRes package developed at IPAC. Relative merits of each of these, under different conditions of signal to noise ratio, are highlighted. The following sources have been selected for illustration: Carina complex, W31 region, IRAS 10361-5830 (all Galactic), M101 and M81 (extragalactic). The main conclusions are: far-infrared maps from MEM deconvolution of balloon-borne data have the best angular resolution; MEM deconvolution of IRAS AO's gives resolution comparable to HiRes but with less amount of computation, though the dynamic range in MEM maps is less than in HiRes maps.

  3. Stratospheric BrO abundance measured by a balloon-borne submillimeterwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, R. A.; Millán, L.; Jarnot, R.; Monroe, R.; McLinden, C.; Kühl, S.; Puķīte, J.; Shiotani, M.; Suzuki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Goutail, F.; Pommereau, J. P.; Dorf, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of mixing ratio profiles of stratospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) were made using observations of BrO rotational line emission at 650.179 GHz by a balloon-borne SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) submillimeterwave heterodyne limb sounder (SLS). The balloon was launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico (34° N) on 22 September 2011. Peak mid-day BrO abundance varied from 16 ± 2 ppt at 34 km to 6 ± 4 ppt at 16 km. Corresponding estimates of total inorganic bromine (Bry), derived from BrO vmr (volume mixing ratio) using a photochemical box model, were 21 ± 3 ppt and 11 ± 5 ppt, respectively. Inferred Bry abundance exceeds that attributable solely to decomposition of long-lived methyl bromide and other halons, and is consistent with a contribution from bromine-containing very short lived substances, BryVSLS, of 4 ppt to 8 ppt. These results for BrO and Bry were compared with, and found to be in good agreement with, those of other recent balloon-borne and satellite instruments.

  4. Stratospheric BrO abundance measured by a balloon-borne submillimeterwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, R. A.; Millán, L.; Jarnot, R.; Monroe, R.; McLinden, C.; Kühl, S.; Pukīte, J.; Kasai, Y.; Goutail, F.; Pommereau, J. P.; Dorf, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2012-11-01

    Measurements of mixing ratio profiles of stratospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) were made using observations of BrO otational line emission at 650.179 GHz by a balloon-borne SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) submillimeterwave heterodyne receiver. The balloon was launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico (34°N) on 22 September 2011. Peak mid-day BrO abundance varied from 16 ± 2 ppt at 34 km to 6 ± 4 ppt at 16 km. Corresponding estimates of total inorganic bromine (Bry), derived from BrO vmr (volume mixing ratio) using a photochemical box model, were 21 ± 3 ppt and 11 ± 5 ppt, respectively. Inferred Bry abundance exceeds that attributable solely to decomposition of long-lived methyl bromide and other halons, and is consistent with a contribution from bromine-containing very short lived substances, BryVSLS, of 4 ppt to 8 ppt. These results for BrO and Bry were compared with, and found to be in good agreement with, those of other recent balloon-borne and satellite instruments.

  5. A mid-latitude balloon-borne observation of total odd nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument to measure total odd nitrogen NO(y) has been developed. A converter which enables catalytic conversion of NO(y) into nitric oxide on a heated gold surface is combined with a chemiluminescence detector. The conversion efficiency for NO2 was measured to be close to 100 percent at pressures between 60 and 7 mb. The major source of errors in the balloon-borne measurements are the uncertainties in the estimates of the sample flow rate and the zero level of the instrument. The NO(y) concentration was measured at altitudes between 12 and 28 km with a precision of about 25 percent on a balloon experiment conducted at latitude 44 deg N in June 1989. The NO(y) concentration has been measured to be 1.5 + or - 0.4, 3 + or - 0.7, 10 + or - 3, and 14 + or - 4 ppbv at altitudes of 17, 20, 25, and 28 km, respectively.

  6. [Measurements of CO2 Concentration Profile in Troposphere Based on Balloon-Borne TDLAS System].

    PubMed

    Yao, Lu; Liu, Wen-qing; Liu, Jian-guo; Kan, Rui-feng; Xu, Zhen-yu; Ruan, Jun; Yuan, Song

    2015-10-01

    The main source and sink of CO2 in the atmosphere are concentrated in the troposphere. It is of great significance to the study of CO2 flux and global climate change to obtain the accurate tropospheric CO2 concentration profile. For the characteristics of high resolution, high sensitivity and fast response of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), a compact balloon-borne system based on direct absorption was developed to detect the CO2 concentration profiles by use of the 2 004. 02 nm, R(16), v1+v3 line without the interfere of H2O absorption and the CO2 density of the number of molecules below 10 km in the troposphere was obtained. Due to the balloon-borne environment, a compact design of one single board integrated with laser driver, signal conditioning, spectra acquiring and concentration retrieving was developed. Limited by the working capability and hardware resources of embedded micro-processor, the spectra processing algorithm was optimized to reduce the time-cost. Compared with the traditional TDLAS sensors with WMS technique, this system was designed based on the direct absorption technique by means of an open-path Herriott cell with 20 m optical-path, which avoided the process of standardization and enhanced the environmental adaptation. The universal design of hardware and software platform achieved diverse gas measuring by changing the laser and adjusting some key parameters in algorithm. The concept of compact design helped to reduce the system's power and volume and balanced the response speed and measure precision. The power consumes below 1.5 W in room temperature and the volume of the single board is 120 mm x 100 mm x 25 mm, and the measurement accuracy is ± 0.6 x 10(-6) at 1.5 s response time. It has been proved that the system can realize high precision detection of CO2 profile at 15 m vertical resolution in troposphere and TDLAS is an available method for balloon-borne detection. PMID:26904819

  7. Antarctic balloon-borne detector of high-energy cosmic rays (SPHERE project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Korosteleva, E. E.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Maksimuk, O. A.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Chernikov, S. P.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Slavatinsky, S. A.; Shaulov, S. B.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2006-08-01

    The experiment SPHERE is based on a A.E. Chudakov's suggestion to use a new method for investigations of the energy spectrum of ultrahigh-energy primary cosmic rays. A small device lifted up off a snowed surface of the Earth detects Cherenkov light of an extensive air shower that is reflected from the surface. A contemporary status of the experiment SPHERE, a description of the method, the first measurements of the background night starlight in the region of the Russian Antarctic station Novolazarevskaya are presented. A relatively simple detector SPHERE-2 including a spherical mirror of the diameter 1.5 m and a 100-pixel retina is developed for Antarctic balloon-borne measurements of the cosmic ray spectrum. A long-time winter flight makes it possible to measure the spectrum above 1020 eV. A comparison with satellite and ISS projects of the nearest future shows that efficiency of this detector is sufficiently high.

  8. Balloon-borne imagery of the solar granulation. II - The lifetime of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehltretter, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Phenomenological aspects of the temporal evolution of photospheric granulation are reported as derived from time series of granulation photographs obtained during a flight of a balloon-borne telescope. The distribution of granule lifetime probabilities is determined, and it is found that the data can be represented by an exponential decrease with a 'decay constant' of 5.9 min. The general properties of granular evolution are described along with the way individual granules evolve with time. The most common type of granule is shown to be a medium-sized or small fragment, and it is suggested that all granules are produced by fragmentation of preexisting granules. The relative frequencies of granule destruction by fragmentation, fading, and merging are determined to be 51%, 21%, and 28%, respectively. An average radial velocity of 0.8 km/s is computed for conglomerates with an average diameter of 2.25 arcsec.

  9. Balloon-Borne, High-Energy Astrophysics: Experiences from the 1960s to the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2008-01-01

    Observational high-energy astrophysics in the hard-x-ray and gamma-ray regions owes its development and initial successes to the balloon-borne development of detector systems, as well as pioneering observations, primarily in the timeframe from the 1960s to the 1990s. I will describe some of the first observations made by the Rice University balloon group in the 1960s, including the impetus for these observations. The appearance of SN 1987a led to several balloon-flight campaigns, sponsored by NASA, from Alice Springs, Australia in 1987 and 1988. During the 1980s, prototypes of instruments for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory were flown on many balloon flights, which greatly enhanced the success of that mission.

  10. Instrumental background in balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometers and techniques for its reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumental background in balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometers is presented. The calculations are based on newly available interaction cross sections and new analytic techniques, and are the most detailed and accurate published to date. Results compare well with measurements made in the 20 keV to 10 MeV energy range by the Goddard Low Energy Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LEGS). The principal components of the continuum background in spectrometers with GE detectors and thick active shields are: (1) elastic neutron scattering of atmospheric neutrons on the Ge nuclei; (2) aperture flux of atmospheric and cosmic gamma rays; (3) beta decays of unstable nuclides produced by nuclear interactions of atmospheric protons and neutrons with Ge nuclei; and (4) shield leakage of atmospheric gamma rays. The improved understanding of these components leads to several recommended techniques for reducing the background.

  11. Analysis of Data from the Balloon Borne Gamma RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid K.; Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.

    2016-04-01

    The Gamma Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE), a balloon borne polarimeter for 50~300 keV gamma rays, successfully flew in 2011 and 2014. The main goal of these balloon flights was to measure the gamma ray polarization of the Crab Nebula. Analysis of data from the first two balloon flights of GRAPE has been challenging due to significant changes in the background level during each flight. We have developed a technique based on the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to estimate the background for the Crab observation. We found that the background depended mostly on the atmospheric depth, pointing zenith angle and instrument temperatures. Incorporating Anti-coincidence shield data (which served as a surrogate for the background) was also found to improve the analysis. Here, we present the calibration data and describe the analysis done on the GRAPE 2014 flight data.

  12. Dual-Polarization-Sensitive Kinetic Inductance Detectors for Balloon-borne Sub-millimeter Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubmayr, J.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Brevik, J. A.; Cho, H. M.; Che, G.; Devlin, M.; Dober, B.; Gao, J.; Galitzki, N.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Li, D.; Mauskopf, P.; Pappas, D. P.; Van Lanen, J.; Vissers, M. R.

    2014-08-01

    We are developing arrays of kinetic inductance detectors for sub-millimeter polarimetry that will be deployed on the BLAST balloon-borne instrument. The array is feedhorn-coupled, and each pixel contains two lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) made of TiN. The absorbing, inductive sections of the LEKID-pair are orthogonal, which allows simultaneous measurement of both horizontal and vertical polarizations within one spatial pixel. In this paper, we show efficient absorption in TiN films when coupled to waveguide at room temperature and present dark measurements of single polarization devices with varying capacitor geometries. We show that it will be difficult to achieve background-limited performance in BLAST with stoichiometric TiN films with T K, and that non-stoichiometric films with lower T will be required.

  13. GPS-aided gravimetry at 30 km altitude from a balloon-borne platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarewicz, Andrew R.; Evans, Alan G.

    1989-01-01

    A balloon-borne experiment, flown at 30 km altitude over New Mexico, was used to test dynamic differential Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking in support of gravimetry at high-altitudes. The experiment package contained a gravimeter (Vibrating String Accelerometer), a full complement of inertial instruments, a TI-4100 GPS receiver and a radar transponder. The flight was supported by two GPS receivers on the ground near the flight path. From the 8 hour flight, about a forty minute period was selected for analysis. Differential GPS phase measurements were used to estimate changes in position over the sample time interval, or average velocity. In addition to average velocity, differential positions and numerical averages of acceleration were obtained in three components. Gravitational acceleration was estimated by correcting for accelerations due to translational motion, ignoring all rotational effects.

  14. Balloon-Borne Hard X-Ray Spectrometer Using CdTe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Tsuneta, S.; Tamura, T.; Kumagai, K.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kohara, N.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Mori, K.

    2008-08-01

    Spectroscopic observation of solar flares in the hard X-ray energy range, particularly the 20 ˜ 100 keV region, is an invaluable tool for investigating the flare mechanism. This paper describes the design and performance of a balloon-borne hard X-ray spectrometer using CdTe detectors developed for solar flare observation. The instrument is a small balloon payload (gondola weight 70 kg) with sixteen 10×10×0.5 mm CdTe detectors, designed for a 1-day flight at 41 km altitude. It observes in an energy range of 20-120 keV and has an energy resolution of 3 keV at 60 keV. The second flight on 24 May 2002 succeeded in observing a class M1.1 flare.

  15. New method for scanning spacecraft and balloon-borne/space-based experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    A new method is presented for scanning balloon-borne experiments, free-flying spacecraft, and gimballed experiments mounted to the space shuttle or the space station. It uses rotating-unbalanced-mass (RUM) devices for generating circular, line, or raster scan patterns and an auxiliary control system for target acquisition, keeping the scan centered on the target, and producing complementary motion for raster scanning. It is ideal for applications where the only possible way to accomplish the required scan is to physically scan the entire experiment or spacecraft as in X-ray and gamma ray experiments. In such cases, this new method should have advantages over prior methods in terms of either power, weight, cost, performance, stability, or a combination of these.

  16. Large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne studies of neutrons and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, A. D.; Herzo, D.; Koga, R.; Millard, W. A.; Moon, S.; Ryan, J.; Wilson, R.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1975-01-01

    A large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne research is described. It measures the flux, energy and direction of 2-100 MeV neutrons and 0.5-30 MeV gamma rays. These measurements are made using time-of-flight and pulse height analysis techniques with two large tanks of mineral oil liquid scintillator. Results from Monte Carlo calculations of the efficiency, energy resolution and angular resolution are presented and the electronics implementation for the processing of 80 photomultiplier tubes signals will be discussed. The detector weighs 800 kg with a large part of this weight being the liquid scintillator (320 kg). It will be flown at 3 mbars for flight durations up to 40 hours. The first flight is planned for Spring, 1975.

  17. Balloon-borne three-meter telescope for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, G. G.

    1985-01-01

    This is the second Semiannual Report submitted under Grant NAGW-509 for the development of a Balloon-Borne Three-Meter Telescope for Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy. It covers the period 1 March 1984 through 31 August 1984. This grant covers work at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), University of Arizona (UA) and the University of Chicago (UC). SAO is responsible for program management, the gondola structure including the attitude control and aspect systems, mechanical systems, and telemetry and command systems; the UA is responsible for optics design and fabrication; the UC is responsible for determining provisions for focal-plane instrumentation. SAO and the UA share responsibility for the ground support data and control computer.

  18. Balloon-borne three-meter telescope for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, G. G.

    1985-01-01

    Presented are scientific objectives, engineering analysis and design, and results of technology development for a Three-Meter Balloon-Borne Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Telescope. The scientific rationale is based on two crucial instrumental capabilities: high angular resolution which approaches eight arcseconds at one hundred micron wavelength, and high resolving power spectroscopy with good sensitivity throughout the telescope's 30-micron to 1-mm wavelength range. The high angular resolution will allow us to resolve and study in detail such objects as collapsing protostellar condensations in our own galaxy, clusters of protostars in the Magellanic clouds, giant molecular clouds in nearby galaxies, and spiral arms in distant galaxies. The large aperture of the telescope will permit sensitive spectral line measurements of molecules, atoms, and ions, which can be used to probe the physical, chemical, and dynamical conditions in a wide variety of objects.

  19. Stratospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical measurements by balloon-borne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, W. S.; Mcgee, T. J.; Hudson, R. D.; Caudill, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment is reported in which a balloon-borne lidar system was used to measure ozone and the hydroxyl radical in the stratosphere by two lidar techniques. Ozone was measured in the 20-37 km altitude range using differential absorption lidar, and the hydroxyl radical was measured in the 34-37 km range using remote laser-induced fluorescence. Ozone concentrations were determined with a vertical resolution of 0.5 km, and in addition, horizontally resolved ozone measurements with 0.15-km resolution were obtained over a 2-km range. The temporal variation of the hydroxyl radical concentration ranged from 40 parts/trillion shortly after noon to about 5 parts/trillion two hours after sunset. Possible modifications to the system are discussed which can yield an improvement in the sensitivity of between one and two orders of magnitude, thus permitting measurements of the hydroxyl radical in the 20-30-km altitude range.

  20. A balloon-borne 102-cm telescope for far-infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1990-01-01

    In the early 1970's, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the University of Arizona engaged in a cooperative program to develop a balloon-borne 102-cm telescope capable of carrying out far infrared (40 to 250 micron) observations of astronomical interest above the earth's atmosphere. Since 1972, the telescope has flown and successfully recovered a total of nineteen times. Thirteen of the flights produced high-quality astronomical data, resulting in more than 92.5 hours of photometric and spectroscopic observations of numerous objects, such as H 2 regions, dark clouds, molecular clouds, a planetary nebula, a galaxy, the galactic center, the planets, and an asteroid. From the launch site in Palestine, Texas, sources as far south as -50 degrees declination were observed. The balloon-borne telescope was one of the most sensitive instruments ever used for observation in the far infrared region of the spectrum. It was most productive in producing high resolution maps of large areas (typically square degrees) centered on known H 2 regions, molecular clouds, and dark cloud complexes. In many cases, these scans produced the first far infrared maps of these regions, and many new sources were discovered. The results have led to a better understanding of the distribution of gas and dust in these regions, the evolution of H 2 regions, and the processes of star formation in giant molecular clouds. The following topics are presented: (1) the focal plane instrumentation; (2) the history and flight record; (3) scientific results and publications; (4) eduational aspects; and (5) future planes.

  1. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun Balloon-Borne Telescope: Astrophysical Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeff; Kurt, Dietz; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Douglas; Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert

    2014-01-01

    On September 21, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, or HEROES, balloon-borne x-ray telescope launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's site in Ft. Summer, NM. The flight lasted for approximately 27 hours and the observational targets included the Sun and astrophysical sources GRS 1915+105 and the Crab Nebula. Over the past year, the HEROES team upgraded the existing High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES Project is a multi-NASA Center effort with team members at both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and is led by Co-PIs (one at each Center). The HEROES payload consists of the hard X-ray telescope HERO, developed at MSFC, combined with several new systems. To allow the HEROES telescope to make observations of the Sun, a new solar aspect system was added to supplement the existing star camera for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter was added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations and two alignment monitoring systems were added for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. This mission was funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands-On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  2. Balloon-borne laser spectrometer measurements of NO2 with gas absorption sensitivities below 10 to the -5th

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.; Webster, Christopher R.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared spectra of NO2 recorded during a recent flight of the Balloon-borne Laser In-Situ Sensor instrument have been analyzed to determine sensitivity limits for various signal integration times. Implications for direct detection of ClO, HOCl, H2O2, COF2, OH, and HO2 are discussed.

  3. Computer program design specifications for the Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) science data decommutation program (BAPS48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Balloon-Borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) Science Data Docummutation Program (BAPS48) is a pulse code modulation docummutation program that will format the BUSS science data contained on a one inch PCM tracking tape into a seven track serial bit stream formatted digital tape.

  4. Characteristics of Four Upward-Pointing Cosmic-Ray-like Events Observed with ANITA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, P. W.; Nam, J.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Hoover, S.; Allison, P.; Banerjee, O.; Beatty, J. J.; Belov, K.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Bugaev, V.; Cao, P.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dailey, B.; Deaconu, C.; Cremonesi, L.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Duvernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Fox, B. D.; Goldstein, D.; Gordon, J.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C. L.; Hill, B.; Hughes, K.; Hupe, R.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kowalski, J.; Lam, J.; Learned, J. G.; Liewer, K. M.; Liu, T. C.; Link, J. T.; Lusczek, E.; Matsuno, S.; Mercurio, B. C.; Miki, C.; Miočinović, P.; Mottram, M.; Mulrey, K.; Naudet, C. J.; Ng, J.; Nichol, R. J.; Palladino, K.; Rauch, B. F.; Reil, K.; Roberts, J.; Rosen, M.; Rotter, B.; Russell, J.; Ruckman, L.; Saltzberg, D.; Seckel, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Stafford, S.; Stockham, J.; Stockham, M.; Strutt, B.; Tatem, K.; Varner, G. S.; Vieregg, A. G.; Walz, D.; Wissel, S. A.; Wu, F.; Anita Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report on four radio-detected cosmic-ray (CR) or CR-like events observed with the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA), a NASA-sponsored long-duration balloon payload. Two of the four were previously identified as stratospheric CR air showers during the ANITA-I flight. A third stratospheric CR was detected during the ANITA-II flight. Here, we report on characteristics of these three unusual CR events, which develop nearly horizontally, 20-30 km above the surface of Earth. In addition, we report on a fourth steeply upward-pointing ANITA-I CR-like radio event which has characteristics consistent with a primary that emerged from the surface of the ice. This suggests a possible τ -lepton decay as the origin of this event, but such an interpretation would require significant suppression of the standard model τ -neutrino cross section.

  5. Characteristics of Four Upward-Pointing Cosmic-Ray-like Events Observed with ANITA.

    PubMed

    Gorham, P W; Nam, J; Romero-Wolf, A; Hoover, S; Allison, P; Banerjee, O; Beatty, J J; Belov, K; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Bugaev, V; Cao, P; Chen, C; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dailey, B; Deaconu, C; Cremonesi, L; Dowkontt, P F; DuVernois, M A; Field, R C; Fox, B D; Goldstein, D; Gordon, J; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hill, B; Hughes, K; Hupe, R; Israel, M H; Javaid, A; Kowalski, J; Lam, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Liu, T C; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B C; Miki, C; Miočinović, P; Mottram, M; Mulrey, K; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R J; Palladino, K; Rauch, B F; Reil, K; Roberts, J; Rosen, M; Rotter, B; Russell, J; Ruckman, L; Saltzberg, D; Seckel, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Stafford, S; Stockham, J; Stockham, M; Strutt, B; Tatem, K; Varner, G S; Vieregg, A G; Walz, D; Wissel, S A; Wu, F

    2016-08-12

    We report on four radio-detected cosmic-ray (CR) or CR-like events observed with the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA), a NASA-sponsored long-duration balloon payload. Two of the four were previously identified as stratospheric CR air showers during the ANITA-I flight. A third stratospheric CR was detected during the ANITA-II flight. Here, we report on characteristics of these three unusual CR events, which develop nearly horizontally, 20-30 km above the surface of Earth. In addition, we report on a fourth steeply upward-pointing ANITA-I CR-like radio event which has characteristics consistent with a primary that emerged from the surface of the ice. This suggests a possible τ-lepton decay as the origin of this event, but such an interpretation would require significant suppression of the standard model τ-neutrino cross section. PMID:27563945

  6. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and a VLF antenna system.

  7. Initial Results from the ANITA 2006-2007 Balloon Flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /UC, Irvine

    2011-11-16

    We report initial results of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos. ANITA flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses that might be due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. In our initial high-threshold robust analysis, no neutrino candidates are seen, with no physics background. In a non-signal horizontal-polarization channel, we do detect 6 events consistent with radio impulses from extensive air showers, which helps to validate the effectiveness of our method. Upper limits derived from our analysis now begin to eliminate the highest cosmogenic neutrino models.

  8. Balloon-borne measurement of the aerosol size distribution from an Icelandic flood basalt eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, D.; Roberts, T. J.; Carboni, E.; Ilyinskaya, E.; Pfeffer, M.; Dagsson Waldhauserova, P.; Schmidt, A.; Berthet, G.; Jegou, F.; Renard, J.-B.; Ólafsson, H.; Bergsson, B.; Yeo, R.; Fannar Reynisson, N.; Grainger, R. G.; Galle, B.; Conde, V.; Arellano, S.; Lurton, T.; Coute, B.; Duverger, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We present in situ balloon-borne measurements of aerosols in a volcanic plume made during the Holuhraun eruption (Iceland) in January 2015. The balloon flight intercepted a young plume at 8 km distance downwind from the crater, where the plume is ∼15 min of age. The balloon carried a novel miniature optical particle counter LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) which measures particle number concentration and size distribution in the plume, alongside a meteorological payload. We discuss the possibility of calculating particle flux by combining LOAC data with measurements of sulfur dioxide flux by ground-based UV spectrometer (DOAS). The balloon passed through the plume at altitude range of 2.0-3.1 km above sea level (a.s.l.). The plume top height was determined as 2.7-3.1 km a.s.l., which is in good agreement with data from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) satellite. Two distinct plume layers were detected, a non-condensed lower layer (300 m thickness) and a condensed upper layer (800 m thickness). The lower layer was characterized by a lognormal size distribution of fine particles (0.2 μm diameter) and a secondary, coarser mode (2.3 μm diameter), with a total particle number concentration of around 100 cm-3 in the 0.2-100 μm detection range. The upper layer was dominated by particle centered on 20 μm in diameter as well as containing a finer mode (2 μm diameter). The total particle number concentration in the upper plume layer was an order of magnitude higher than in the lower layer. We demonstrate that intercepting a volcanic plume with a meteorological balloon carrying LOAC is an efficient method to characterize volcanic aerosol properties. During future volcanic eruptions, balloon-borne measurements could be carried out easily and rapidly over a large spatial area in order to better characterize the evolution of the particle size distribution and particle number concentrations in a volcanic plume.

  9. Balloon-Borne Observations of BrO in the Tropical Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, L.; Butz, A.; Dorf, M.; Kreycy, S.; Prados, C.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2009-04-01

    Due to the ozone destroying capabilities of bromine bearing compounds, the stratospheric budget of inorganic bromine is of major interest for modelling ozone depletion and assessing the future evolution of the ozone layer. It has recently been shown that the contribution of very short-lived substances (VSLS) to the bromine budget enhances ozone depletion at mid-latitudes and polar regions. Here we report for the first time on observations of the diurnal variation in stratospheric BrO by means of balloon-borne limb scanning observations. When combined with photochemical modelling, new insight into the photochemistry of stratospheric bromine and its budget is obtained. In particular we report on observations made during three balloon soundings at tropical northeastern Brazil (5°S, 43°W) in June 2005 and June 2008 from deployments of the LPMA/DOAS (Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere/Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer), IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) payloads. Our measurements reveal that the diurnal cycle of BrO is primarily controlled by the reaction with NO2, and the photolysis of BrONO2 at daytime. Assimilation of our BrO measurements to photochemical modelling indicates that total stratospheric bromine is in agreement with the amount inferred by our direct sun observations, therefore providing further evidence for the importance of brominated very short-lived species (VSLS) for total stratospheric bromine.

  10. Status of the Balloon-Borne X-ray Polarimetry Mission X-Calibur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric; Kislat, Fabian; Stuchlik, David; Okajima, Takashi; de Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2016-04-01

    We report on the status of the balloon borne hard X-ray polairmetry mission X-Calibur. The missions combines a focussing hard X-ray mirror from the InFOCuS collaboration with a scattering polarimeter and the WASP (Wallops Arc Second Pointer) pointing system. The mission is scheduled for a conventonal ~1 day balloon flight in Fall 2016 and a long duration (~30 day) balloon flight from McMurdo (Ross Island) in 2018/2019. X-Calibur will allow us to measure ~5% polarization fractions for strong sources with a Crab-like enegry spectra and fluxes. The science targets of the first balloon flights will include the stellar mass black holes GRS 1915+105 and Cyg X-1, Her X-1, Sco X-1, and the Crab nebula and pulsar. The long duration balloon flight will target several X-ray binaries and the extragalactic mass accreting supermassive black hole Cen A. In this contribution we give an update on the status of the mission, and the expected science return.

  11. A Novel Anti-Stealth Technique Based on Stratospheric Balloon-Borne Radar in Heterogeneous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbary, Mohamed; Zong, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) of a stealth target model like F-117A can be improved by multichannel stratospheric balloon-borne bistatic radar at higher aspect angle. The potential problem is that the stealth target may produce range walk in clutter heterogeneous environments, thus it is difficult to determine the range ambiguity under quadratic range cell migration (QRCM). In this paper, a novel detection technique known as hybrid modified fractional-radon Fourier transform (MFrRFT) and knowledge-aided space-time adaptive processes (KA-STAP) is proposed to impact this kind of problem simultaneously. KA-STAP is applied to suppress the non-homogeneous clutter in the received data, and MFrRFT is used to eliminate the QRCM along with the second-order keystone transform (SOKT), so as to estimate the range ambiguity and compensate the stealth target's range walk. The hybrid MFrRFT/KA-STAP scheme is simple and applicable to the small RCS of fast stealth target with a long-time coherent integration. Finally, to achieve high accuracy of locating stealth target, a non-parametric detection technique based on Legendre orthogonal polynomials is applied to reconstruct the probability density function (pdf) of real RCS data predicted by physical optics (PO) approximation method.

  12. GRAPE: A Balloon-Borne Hard X-ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; McConnell, M. L.; Legere, J. S.; Macri, J. R.; Ryan, J. M.; Narita, T.

    2006-06-01

    We present the current status of the gamma-ray polarimetry experiment (GRAPE) project to measure linear polarization in solar flares in the hard X-ray range (50-300 keV). Polarimetry measurements offer a new way to measure the extent to which energetic electrons in flares are beamed, which has important implications for particle acceleration models. Each GRAPE detector consists of an array of plastic scintillators and high-Z calorimeter crystals read out by a single multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). X-ray photons Compton scatter in the plastic elements and are subsequently absorbed in the calorimeter elements, and the azimuthal scattering angle and total energy are recorded. The degree of asymmetry in the distribution of scatter angles reveals the degree of linear polarization in the incident X-rays. We present our latest laboratory test results and describe plans for a balloon flight of a prototype and for a full balloon-borne science payload. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that an array of 25 GRAPE detectors carried on a scientific balloon would be sensitive to polarization levels of 5% or less for a M5 flare in a 5 minute exposure.

  13. The nuclear compton telescope: A balloon-borne soft γ-ray spectrometer, polarimeter, and imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Jean, P.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; von Ballmoos, P.; Madden, N. W.; Luke, P. N.; Amman, M.; Burks, M. T.; Hull, E. L.; Craig, W.; Ziock, K.

    2001-10-01

    Our collaboration has begun the design and development of a prototype high resolution Compton telescope utilizing 3-D imaging germanium detectors. The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray (0.2-15 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. NCT is a prototype design for the Advanced Compton Telescope, to study gamma-ray radiation with very high spectral resolution, moderate angular resolution, and high sensitivity. The instrument has a novel, ultra-compact design optimized for studying nuclear line emission in the critical 0.5-2 MeV range, and polarization in the 0.2-0.5 MeV range. We have proposed to develop and fly NCT on a conventional US balloon flight in Summer of 2004. This first flight will perform gamma-ray polarization measurements the Crab nebula, Crab pulsar, and Cyg X-1, and 26Al emission from the Cygnus Region. This flight will critically test the novel instrument technologies and analysis techniques we have developed for high resolution Compton telescopes, and qualify the payload to begin a series of ~10-day long duration ballon flights from Alice Springs, Australia starting in Spring 2005. .

  14. Balloon-borne DOAS measurements for the validation of SCIAMACHY UV/Vis data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenberger, R.; Bösch, H.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dorf, M.; Hirsekorn, M.; Platt, U.; Payan, S.; Weidner, F.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2001-08-01

    Level 1 and 2 ENVISAT products with a particular emphasis on the SCIAMACHY data products "solar irradiances" and "atmospheric trace gas profiles" will be validated by means of LPMA/DOAS (Laboratoire de Physique Moléculaire et Applications/Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) balloon-borne measurements. The balloon flights will be conducted at different latitudes and seasons in order to allow us to validate the products for a manifold of different geophysical conditions. The simultaneous direct Sun spectroscopic measurements of the French (LPMA) FTIR and the German (IUP-HD) DOAS from the same balloon platform are ideally suited to validate the SCIAMACHY products since the balloon spectrometers essentially cover the same wavelength range as the SCIAMACHY instrument. The balloon instruments share the sun-pointing devices, i.e. the azimuth control of the gondola and a sun-tracker as well, and so they intrinsically observe the same air masses in which either line-of-sight absorption and/or profiles of O3, NO2, NO3, BrO, OClO, IO, CO, CO2, N2O and others will be measured.

  15. High resolution imaging and polarimetry with SUNRISE, a balloon-borne stratospheric solar observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthol, Peter; Chares, Bernd; Deutsch, Werner; Feller, Alex; Gandorfer, Achim; Grauf, Bianca; Hirzberger, Johann; Meller, Reinhard; Riethmueller, Tino; Schuessler, Manfred; Solanki, Sami K.; Knoelker, Michael; Martinez Pillet, Valentin; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Title, Alan

    SUNRISE is an international collaboration for the development and operation of a meter-class balloon-borne stratospheric solar observatory. Prime science goal is the study of structure and dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and the interaction of the magnetic field with convective plasma flows. These processes are studied by high resolution imaging in the UV and polarimetry at visible wavelengths. The instrument has been successfully launched on June 8, 2009 from ESRANGE, Kiruna, Northern Sweden. During the more than 5 days flight about 1.5 TByte of scientific data were collected. The paper gives an overview of the instrument and mission, examples of the scientific output will also be presented. SUNRISE is a joint project of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung (MPS), Katlenburg-Lindau, with the Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik (KIS), Freiburg, the High-Altitude Observatory (HAO), Boulder, the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab. (LMSAL), Palo Alto, and the Spanish IMaX consortium.

  16. The Half Wave Plate Rotator for the BLAST-TNG Balloon-Borne Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Hananiel; Ashton, Peter; Novak, Giles; Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Galitzki, Nicholas; Ade, Peter; Doyle, Simon; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Tucker, Carole E.

    2016-01-01

    The Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST-TNG) is an experiment designed to map magnetic fields in molecular clouds in order to study their role in the star formation process. The telescope will be launched aboard a high-altitude balloon in December 2016 for a 4-week flight from McMurdo station in Antarctica. BLAST-TNG will measure the polarization of submillimeter thermal emission from magnetically aligned interstellar dust grains, using large format arrays of kinetic inductance detectors operating in three bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns, with sub-arcminute angular resolution. The optical system includes an achromatic Half Wave Plate (HWP), mounted in a Half Wave Plate rotator (HWPr). The HWP and HWPr will operate at 4 K temperature to reduce thermal noise in our measurements, so it was crucial to account for the effects of thermal contraction at low temperature in the HWPr design. It was also equally important for the design to meet torque requirements while minimizing the power from friction and conduction dissipated at the 4 K stage. We also discuss our plan for cold testing the HWPr using a repurposed cryostat with a Silicon Diode thermometer read out by an EDAS-CE Ethernet data acquisition system.

  17. Balloon-borne observations of lower stratospheric water vapor at Syowa Station, Antarctica in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Naohiko; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Nakamura, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Balloon-borne observations of lower stratospheric water vapor were conducted with the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer (CFH) in July, September, and November 2013 at Syowa Station (69.0oS, 39.6oE) in the Antarctic. High-precision and high vertical resolution data of water vapor concentration up to an altitude of about 28 km were obtained successfully except for a contamination in the observation of July 2013. A comparison between the CFH and coincident satellite (i.e., Aura/MLS) observations showed a good agreement within their uncertainty. A position of Syowa Station relative to the stratospheric polar vortex edge varied depending on both the observation date and altitude. Temperature and pressure histories of the observed air parcels were examined by 10-day backward trajectories. These analyses clearly demonstrated that most air parcels observed in the lower stratosphere above Syowa Station experienced final dehydration inside the polar vortex. On the other hand, a clear signature of rehydration or incomplete dehydration was also observed around a 25 hPa pressure level in the observation of July 2013.

  18. Large-Area Balloon-Borne Polarized Gamma Ray Observer (PoGO)

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, V.; Chen, P.; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Mizuno, T.; Ng, J.; Tajima, H.; Thurston, T.; Bogaert, G.; Fukazawa, Y.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Barbier, L.; Bloser, P.; Harding, A.; Hunter, S.; Krizmanic, J.; Mitchell, J.; Streitmatter, R.; Fernholz, R.; Groth, E.; /NASA, Goddard /Princeton U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Kista /Stockholm U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /Yamagata U.

    2005-06-30

    We are developing a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGO), to measure polarization of soft gamma rays (30-200 keV) using asymmetry in azimuth angle distribution of Compton scattering. PoGO is designed to detect 10% polarization in 100mCrab sources in a 6-8 hour observation and bring a new dimension to studies on gamma ray emission/transportation mechanism in pulsars, AGNs, black hole binaries, and neutron star surface. The concept is an adaptation to polarization measurements of well-type phoswich counter consisting of a fast plastic scintillator (the detection part), a slow plastic scintillator (the active collimator) and a BGO scintillator (the bottom anti-counter). PoGO consists of close-packed array of 217 hexagonal well-type phoswich counters and has a narrow field-of-view ({approx} 5 deg{sup 2}) to reduce possible source confusion. A prototype instrument has been tested in the polarized soft gamma-ray beams at Advanced Photon Source (ANL) and at Photon Factory (KEK). On the results, the polarization dependence of EGS4 has been validated and that of Geant4 has been corrected.

  19. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 145 mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bolometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  20. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Stiehl, gregory M.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  1. Balloon-borne observations of stratospheric aerosol in Antarctica from 1972 to 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Stratospheric levels of particles with r or = 0.15 microns were monitored with optical particle counters in approximately monthly balloon soundings at Laramie, Wyoming (41 deg N) since 1971. These measurements were used to characterize the background stratospheric aerosol layer and the disturbed layer following major volcanic eruptions. Levels of particles with r or = 0.01 microns have also been measured with balloon-borne counters since 1973. The latter are collectively called condensation nuclei (CN) as they are characteristic of aerosol in the early stages of growth. While they dominate the size distribution in the tropsophere, they are a trace species in the undisturbed stratosphere. From 1972 until 1980, annual balloon soundings from McMurdo Station (78 deg S) and/or Amundsen-Scott Station (90 deg S), in Antarctica, have also been conducted to crudely monitor Southern Hemisphere aerosol levels. These measurements were continued in 1983 and 1984. Profiles of r 0.15 microns aerosol concentrations as measured during January at the south pole from 1972 to 1975 and in 1980 are given. The former are typical of undisturbed conditions and indicate the small degree of variability under these conditions. The latter indicates the effect of minor volcanic activity, visible in the 10 to 15 km region.

  2. Reel Down - A balloon borne winch system for stratospheric sounding from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, N. L.; Anderson, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A balloon-borne winch system has been developed and flight tested which permits the repetitive lowering and hoisting of a stratospheric sampling payload for distances of up to 20 km from a float altitude of 35-40 km. This new approach to in situ stratospheric measurements permits multiple scans of various depths and velocities, closely spaced over a period of hours or days, thus dramatically increasing observational effectiveness. The motor driven winch permits control of ascent velocities from 0-9 m/s with energy derived from a large battery; for descent, the motors are used as generators, velocity is controlled over the same range, and the energy is dumped radiatively to space. The 1.75 mm diameter tether is of braided Kevlar construction with a nylon jacket; it exhibits a 2900 N break strength. Both the winch and the payload suspended by the tether are fully instrumented to evaluate potentially destructive system-induced dynamics and the effects of stratospheric wind shears. The system was successfully flight tested by lowering a 62 kg payload for a distance of 12 km from a float altitude of 38.5 km and hoisting it back up again, both at velocities ranging between 5-9 m/s. Observations indicated minimal system-induced dynamical effects, and no adverse effects due to the 8 m/s wind shear present during flight.

  3. Super-TIGER: A Balloon-Borne Instrument to Probe Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is a balloon-borne instrument under construction for a long-duration flight from Antarctica in 2012. It is designed to measure the relative abundances of the ultra-heavy (UH) Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with individual-element resolution from _{30}Zn to _{42}Mo and make exploratory measurements through _{56}Ba, as well as the energy spectra of the GCR from _{10}Ne to _{29}Cu between 0.8 and 10 GeV/nucleon. The UH measurements will test the OB association origin model of the GCR, as well as the model of preferential acceleration of refractory elements. The GCR spectrum measurements will probe for microquasars or other sources that could superpose spectral features. Super-TIGER is a ˜ 4 × larger evolution of the preceding TIGER instrument, and is comprised of two independent modules with a total area of 5.4 m^{2}. A combination of plastic scintillation detectors, acrylic and silica-aerogel Cherenkov detectors, and scintillating fiber hodoscopes are used to resolve particle charge, kinetic energy per nucleon, and trajectory. Refinements in the Super-TIGER design over TIGER, including reduced material in the beam, give it a collecting power that is ˜ 6.4× larger. This paper will report on the instrument development status, the expected flight performance, and the scientific impact of the anticipated Super-TIGER GCR measurements. This research was supported by NASA under Grant NNX09AC17G

  4. HX-POL-A Balloon-Borne Hard X-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczynski, H.; Garson, A., III; Martin, J.; Li, Q.; Beilicke, M.; Dowkontt, P.; Lee, K.; Wulf, E.; Kurfess, J.; Novikova, E. I.; De Geronimo, G.; Baring, M. G.; Harding, A. K.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the design and estimated performance of a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter called HX-POL. The experiment uses a combination of Si and Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors to measure the polarization of 50 keV-400 keV X-rays from cosmic sources through the dependence of the angular distribution of Compton scattered photons on the polarization direction. On a one-day balloon flight, HX-POL would allow us to measure the polarization of bright Crab-like sources for polarization degrees well below 10%. On a longer (15-30 day) flight from Australia or Antarctica, HX-POL would be be able to measure the polarization of bright galactic X-ray sources down to polarization degrees of a few percent. Hard X-ray polarization measurements provide unique venues for the study of particle acceleration processes by compact objects and relativistic outflows. In this paper, we discuss the overall instrument design and performance. Furthermore, we present results from laboratory tests of the Si and CZT detectors. Index Terms Gamma-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy detectors, polarization, semiconductor radiation detectors, X-ray astronomy, X-ray astronomy detectors.

  5. Preliminary results from SPIRALE balloon-borne in situ stratospheric measurements during 2009 polar summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, V.; Huret, N.; Berthet, G.; Krysztofiak, G.; Thiéblemont, R.; Robert, C.

    2010-12-01

    The SPIRALE (french acronym for infrared absorption spectroscopy by tunable laser diodes) balloon-borne instrument has been launched twice within 17 days in the polar region (Kiruna, Sweden, 67.9°N - 21.1°E) during summer, at the beginning and at the end of august 2009. In situ measurements of the trace gases O3, CH4, CO, OCS, N2O, HNO3, NO2 and HCl have been performed between 10 and 34 km height, with very high vertical resolution (~5 m). The stratospheric profiles of these species present specific structures associated with tropical intrusion in the low levels. The both flight results are compared between each other in order to evaluate the impact of the turn-around occurring during this season on the chemical composition of the stratosphere. Their interpretation is made with the help of results from several modelling tools and available satellite data. SPIRALE flights were part of the balloon campaign conducted by CNES within the frame of the StraPolÉté project funded by French agencies ANR, CNES and IPEV, contributing to the International Polar Year.

  6. Balloon borne Antarctic frost point measurements and their impact on polar stratospheric cloud theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.; Hofmann, D. J.; Carpenter, J. R.; Harder, J. W.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    The first balloon-borne frost point measurements over Antarctica were made during September and October, 1987 as part of the NOZE 2 effort at McMurdo. The results indicate water vapor mixing ratios on the order of 2 ppmv in the 15 to 20 km region which is somewhat smaller than the typical values currently being used significantly smaller than the typical values currently being used in polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) theories. The observed water vapor mixing ratio would correspond to saturated conditions for what is thought to be the lowest stratospheric temperatures encountered over the Antarctic. Through the use of available lidar observations there appears to be significant evidence that some PSCs form at temperatures higher than the local frost point (with respect to water) in the 10 to 20 km region thus supporting the nitric acid theory of PSC composition. Clouds near 15 km and below appear to form in regions saturated with respect to water and thus are probably mostly ice water clouds although they could contain relatively small amounts of other constituents. Photographic evidence suggests that the clouds forming above the frost point probably have an appearance quite different from the lower altitude iridescent, colored nacreous clouds.

  7. Design and Implementation of an experiment-specific Payload Orientation Platform for balloon-borne Experiment .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarajan, Anand; Rodi, Ashish; Ojha, Devendra

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the mesospheric dynamics and its coupling to the upper atmospheric regions above, a Balloon-borne optical Investigation of Regional-atmospheric Dynamics (BIRD) experiment was jointly conducted by Physical Research Laboratory Ahmedabad and Boston University, on 08 March 2010 from TIFR Balloon Facility, Hyderabad. Along with the BIRD payload, a nano payload of University of York, Canada was also flown for aerosol studies during sunset. The balloon carrying a 335kg BIRD payload was launched at 1052 hrs, reached a float altitude of 34.8km amsl at 1245 hrs and was allowed to float till 1825 hrs before it was parachuted down. To achieve the experimental objectives, it was essential that the payload Gandola, comprising of two optical spectrographs, is programmed to rotate azimuthally in 3 steps of 30 degrees each from East-West (E-W) to North-South (N-S) direction, stop at each step for 5 minutes for data acquisition, return to the original E-W position and keep repeating the sequence continuously with a provision to start or stop the orientation from Ground station through telecommand. To meet these unique requirements, we designed developed and implemented a Payload Orientation Platform (POP), using flux-gate magnetometer for direction-finding, which worked satisfactorily in the BIRD flight. This paper presents an overview of the POP implemented, focuses on the design considerations of the associated electronics and finally presents the results of the performance during the entire balloon flight.

  8. Balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer: Acquisition, tracking and command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) which is carried to an altitude of 40 km by a 15 million cubic foot balloon for night-time observations of ultraviolet stellar spectra is discussed. The BUSS optical system, comprising an 0.40 m aperture Cassegrain telescope and an Ebert-Fastie spectrometer, points at various selected stars and focuses a portion of their spectra on the photocathode of an image dissector tube. The spectral region between 2,775 Angstroms and 2,825 Angstroms is sampled by the detector at 0.25 Angstroms increments using photon counting techniques. The pointing system for the payload uses a pair of orthogonal magnetometers which sense the earth's magnetic field for an aximuth reference, and a platform potentiometer for an elevation reference. This pointing system places the target star within the 3x1 degree field of view of an outer optical star tracker. The outer star tracker is then used to point the entire instrument to within one arc minute of the target star.

  9. A High Sensitivity Balloon-Borne Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter PoGOLite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Craig, W.; Madejski, G.; Ng, J.; Tajima, H.; Varner, G.; Carlson, P.; Klamra, W.; Pearce, M.; Bjornsson, C.; Larsson, S.; Ryde, F.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Mizuno, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2006-09-01

    Development status of a new balloon-borne polarimeter, PoGOLite, will be presented. PoGOLite is designed to detect 10% polarization of a 100 mCrab source in one 6 hour balloon observation in the 25 keV - 100 keV energy range. Its design is based on the well-type phoswich counter technology. Polarization is measured by recording Compton scattering and photo-absorption in an array of 217 phoswich detector cells made of plastic and BGO scintillators, surrounded by active BGO shields. The design has been optimized through 4 rounds of tests at synchrotron beams and a proton beam, and flight model production has began: it can reduce the large background produced by cosmic-ray particles to about 10 mCrab level in most of its energy coverage. Potential systematic instrumental bias to the polarization measurement will be removed by rotating the polarimeter telescope around its axis. We plan to observe northern sky sources including the Crab pulsar/nebula, Cygnus X-1, and Hercules X-1 in the first flight scheduled in 2009. Our future plans include long duration balloon flights from Sweden to North America, and launching within a few weeks of gamma-ray flare detection from jet sources such as Mkn 501 by GLAST.

  10. BLASTbus electronics: general-purpose readout and control for balloon-borne experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, S. J.; Ade, P. A.; Amiri, M.; Angilè, F. E.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Doré, O. P.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J. P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S. R.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Holmes, W. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z. D.; Klein, J.; Korotkov, A. L.; Kuo, C. L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Matthews, T. G.; Megerian, K. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T. A.; Mroczkowski, T. K.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Nutter, D.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Thomas, N. E.; Trangsrud, A.; Truch, M. D.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present the second generation BLASTbus electronics. The primary purposes of this system are detector readout, attitude control, and cryogenic housekeeping, for balloon-borne telescopes. Readout of neutron transmutation doped germanium (NTD-Ge) bolometers requires low noise and parallel acquisition of hundreds of analog signals. Controlling a telescope's attitude requires the capability to interface to a wide variety of sensors and motors, and to use them together in a fast, closed loop. To achieve these different goals, the BLASTbus system employs a flexible motherboard-daughterboard architecture. The programmable motherboard features a digital signal processor (DSP) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA), as well as slots for three daughterboards. The daughterboards provide the interface to the outside world, with versions for analog to digital conversion, and optoisolated digital input/output. With the versatility afforded by this design, the BLASTbus also finds uses in cryogenic, thermometry, and power systems. For accurate timing control to tie everything together, the system operates in a fully synchronous manner. BLASTbus electronics have been successfully deployed to the South Pole, and own on stratospheric balloons.

  11. PoGOLite - a circumpolar balloon-borne mission for hard X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark

    Mark Pearce For the PoGOLite Collaboration. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Dept. of Physics, Stockholm, Sweden. pearce@kth.se Abstract Emission processes in astrophysical systems can yield polarised hard X-rays. The orientation of the polarisation plane is a powerful probe of the physical environment around compact astrophysical sources. Despite the wealth of sources accessible to polarisation measurements, and the importance of these measurements, it is 40 years since the last dedicated mission for X-ray polarimetry of point sources. PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-100 keV energy band. Polarisation is determined using coincident Compton scattering and photo-absorption in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. PoGOLite was launched from the Esrange Space Center on July 12th 2013 with the Crab nebula and pulsar as primary observation targets. The mission was terminated on July 25th after an almost complete circumpolar flight. The PoGOLite mission was conducted as a collaboration between Swedish, Japanese, Russian and US scientific teams. The PoGOLite circumpolar mission will be reviewed and the outcome of the 2013 flight discussed.

  12. The Debris Disk Explorer: A Balloon-Borne Coronagraph for Observing Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lewis C. Jr; Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk structure, and explore the physics and history of debris disks by characterizing the size and composition of disk dust. The DDX instrument is a 0.75-m diameter off-axis telescope and a coronagraph carried by a stratospheric balloon. DDX will take high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a month-long science flight launched from New Zealand. The long flight will fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to DDX. It will achieve a raw contrast of 10(exp -7), with a processed contrast of 10(exp -8). A technology benefit of DDX is that operation in the near-space environment will raise the Technology Readiness Level of internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  13. Measurements of springtime Antarctic ozone depletion and development of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The research described herein consists of two parts. The first part is a description of the design of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer to measure ozone and the results of a flight using this instrument. The second part describes modifications made on the standard commercially available electrochemical ozonesonde and the results of some experiments performed both in the laboratory and during stratospheric balloon flights. Using this modified ECC system, 33 successful balloon flights were made at McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the austral spring of 1986 to study the temporal and vertical development of the so-called Antarctic Ozone Hole. Photometric measurements of ozone in the atmosphere can be accomplished by exploiting 253.65 nanometer absorption feature of ozone. Using a single light source and beam splitting optics, matched optical paths can be generated through two absorption cells. The ozonesonde data gave a very clear picture of the development of the Ozone Hole. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Depletion occurs between about 12 and 20 km. (2) The most efficient region of ozone depletion decreases in altitude with time. Height profiles show subregions where ozone removal is highly efficient. (3) At 18 km, the ozone mixing ratio decays with a half-life of 25 days.

  14. Comparison of mechanical cryocoolers versus stored cryogens for balloon-borne observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Christopher G.

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relative mass required in the use of stored cryogens and mechanical cryocoolers, for cooling of detectors and optics in stratospheric-balloon-borne observatories. Lofted mass per unit heat removed from a cryogenic instrument is calculated, as a function of temperature, for three cooling approaches: (a) the use of stored cryogens; (b) use of an acoustic-Stirling ('pulse tube') mechanical cryocooler powered by electric storage batteries; and (c) the same cryocooler with solar-electric energy collection partially or fully replacing storage batteries. For the latter case, the mission duration at which the systems masses are equal is also found. Principal conclusions are (1) stored cryogens can provide cooling for lower mass than storage-battery-operated cryocoolers over most of the temperature range considered, but the difference is not large; (2) solar-conversion systems can be the lower-mass option at higher temperature, but the mission duration for equal mass increases rapidly below ∼30 K.

  15. Origin of non-spherical particles in the boundary layer over Beijing, China: based on balloon-borne observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Yamada, Maromu; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Zhang, Daizhou; Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhenzhu; Lei, Hengchi; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-10-01

    Vertical structures of aerosols from the ground to about 1,000 m altitude in Beijing were measured with a balloon-borne optical particle counter. The results showed that, in hazy days, there were inversions at approximately 500-600 m, below which the particulate matters were well mixed vertically, while the concentration of particles decreased sharply above the mixing layer. Electron microscopic observation of the particles collected with the balloon-borne impactor indicates that the composition of particles is different according to weather conditions in the boundary mixing layer of Beijing city and suggests that dust particles are always dominant in coarse-mode particles. Interestingly, sea-salt particles are frequently identified, suggesting the importance of marine air inflow to the Beijing area even in summer. The Ca-rich spherical particles are also frequently identified, suggesting chemical modification of dust particle by NOx or emission of CaO and others from local emission. Additionally, those types of particles showed higher concentration above the mixing layer under the relatively calm weather condition of summer, suggesting the importance of local-scale convection found in summer which rapidly transported anthropogenic particles above the mixing layer. Lidar extinction profiles qualitatively have good consistency with the balloon-borne measurements. Attenuation effects of laser pulse intensity are frequently observed due to high concentration of particulate matter in the Beijing atmosphere, and therefore quantitative agreement of lidar return and aerosol concentration can be hardly observed during dusty condition. Comparing the depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements with the balloon-borne measurements, the contribution of the dry sea-salt particles, in addition to the dust particles, is suggested as an important factor causing depolarization ratio in the Beijing atmosphere. PMID:25537163

  16. Low-frequency (f less than about 1 Hz) stratospheric electrical noise measured by balloon-borne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, I. B.; Mohl Madsen, M.; Dangelo, N.

    1983-01-01

    Low-frequency (f less than about 1 Hz) stratospheric electrical noise is occasionally observed by balloon-borne sensors. The phenomenon occurs 1-3 percent of the time, with maximum incidence during the morning hours. It appears to be related to fluctuations of the electrical conductivity of the medium around the balloons, produced by air turbulence due to the wind shear and/or gravity waves.

  17. A Balloon-Borne Telescope System for Planetary Atmosphere and Plasma Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kanazawa, T.; Shoji, Y.; Sawakami, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Sato, T.; Sakanoi, T.

    2007-12-01

    A telescope floating in the polar stratosphere can continuously monitor planets for more than 24 hours. Thin, clear and stable air of the stratosphere makes it possible to observe planets in a condition free from cloud with fine seeing and high atmospheric transmittance. Moreover, a balloon-borne telescope system is less expensive compared with a huge terrestrial telescope or a direct planetary probe mission. Targets of a balloon-borne telescope system will extend over various atmospheric and plasma phenomena on almost all the planets, i.e., a sodium tail of Mercury, lightning, airglow and aurora in the atmospheres of Venus, Jupiter and Saturn, escaping atmospheres of the Earth-type planets, satellite-induced luminous events in the Jovian atmosphere, etc. The first target is global dynamics of the Venusian atmosphere by detecting cloud motion in UV and NIR imagery. A decoupling mechanism and a pair of control moment gyros (CMGs) are mounted at the top of the gondola. The decoupling mechanism isolates the gondola from a balloon and also transfers an excess angular momentum of the CMGs to the balloon. The attitude of the gondola is stabilized at a constant sun azimuthal angle so that a solar cell panel faces to the sun. A 300 mm F30 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope is installed at the bottom of the gondola. DC/DC converters, a PC, a high voltage power supply for a piezo-electrically moving mirror and digital video recorders are contained in a sealed cell. The azimuthal angle is detected by a sun-sensor. A PC processes sensor output to control DC motors used in the decoupling mechanism and CMGs with an accuracy in azimuthal attitude of about 0.5 deg. The two-axis gimbal mount of the telescope is controlled by the same PC, guiding an object within a field-of-view of a guide telescope. Residual tracking error is detected by a position sensitive photomultiplier tube and corrected by the two-axis moving mirror installed in the optical system. The optical path is divided into

  18. In Situ Balloon-Borne Ice Particle Imaging in High-Latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time, these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from the Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating and validating passive and active remote sensors. Ice particles of sizes below 100 µm are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. Furthermore, artefacts are produced by shattering of particles on the leading surfaces of the aircraft probes when particles several hundred microns or larger are present. Here, we report on a series of balloon-borne in situ measurements that were carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The method used here avoids these issues experienced with the aircraft probes. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument, data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always unused section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 µm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 µm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 µm and larger. For particles that are 20 µm (12 pixel) in size or larger, the shape can be recognized. The sampling volume, 130 cm3 s-1, is well defined and independent of particle size. With the encountered number concentrations of between 4 and 400 L-1, this required about 90- to 4-s sampling times to

  19. Balloon borne measurements of aerosol and cloud particles over Japan during PACDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Orikasa, N.; Nagai, T.; Murakami, M.; Tajiri, T.; Saito, A.; Yamashita, K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the preliminary result of the balloon borne measurements of the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties over Tsukuba (36.1°N, 140.1°E), Japan, on 10 and 22 May 2007. The purpose of the measurement is to study the influence of Asian mineral dust on ice clouds formation in the middle and upper troposphere. The balloon measured the vertical distributions of aerosol number size distribution (0.13 to 3.9 μm in threshold radius, 8 sizes) by use of the optical particle counter, cloud size (10 μ m to 5 mm in the longest dimension), shape, and number concentration by use of the hydrometer videosonde, humidity by use of SnowWhite hygrometer, and temperature and pressure by use of Meisei RS-01G radiosonde between altitudes of 0 and 16 km. The aerosol size distribution showed bimodal distribution with mode radii of <0.13 μm (fine mode) and about 0.8 μm (coarse mode) over the troposphere (0-13.5 km in altitude). The number concentrations ranged from 150 to 1 cm-3 in the fine mode and from 3 to 0.1 cm-3 in the coarse mode. High depolarization ratio (>10%) obtained from the ground-based Raman lidar measurement revealed the presence of nonspherical dust in the coarse mode. Columnar, bullet-like, and irregular ice crystals with 10-400 μm in size were detected between altitudes of 8 and 13 km on 10 May and 10 and 13 km on 22 May. The maximum crystal concentration was 0.15 cm-3. We discuss the possibility of the formation of the ice cloud from the dust based on the result of the measurements.

  20. InFOCuS: A Balloon-borne Hard X-ray Imaging Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, Hans A.; Tueller, J.; Furuzawa, A.; Koss, M.; Kunieda, H.; Ogasaka, Y.; Okajima, T.

    2009-01-01

    InFOCuS is a new generation balloon-borne hard X-ray telescope with focusing optics and spectroscopy. After several successful flights in recent years it is being refurbished for a 2010 flight from Australia to map the hard X-ray emission from the galactic center region. in this poster, we present the status of the mirror, detectors and attitude control system. The grazing incidence optics consists of a depth-graded platinum-carbon multilayer mirror with an 8-meter focal length. It has an effective area of 78 cm(sup 2) at 30 keV. an angular resolution of 2.0 arcmin (HPD), and a field of view of 10 arcmin. The detector is a CdZnTe solid-state device capable of imaging spectroscopy. The detector is surrounded by a 3-cm thick CsI anti-coincidence shield to reduce background from particles and photons not incident along the mirror focal direction. The gondola is being reconfigured in a floating ball configuration to improve pointing control and allow the telescope to be pointed vertically. Tracking will be accomplished with a suite of on-axis and off-axis star cameras. The payload will be ready to fly from Alice Springs, Australia in Spring 2010. In this flight, InFOCuS will have the angular resolution and sensitivity to determine whether Sgr A* is the source of the hard X-rays detected by Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL and determine if there are other nearby hard X-ray sources.

  1. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne Telescope for Measuring Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    EBEX is a long-duration balloon-borne (LDB) telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It is designed to measure or place an upper limit on the inflationary B-mode signal, a signal predicted by inflationary theories to be imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves, to detect the effects of gravitational lensing on the polarization of the CMB, and to characterize polarized Galactic foreground emission. The payload consists of a pointed gondola that houses the optics, polarimetry, detectors and detector readout systems, as well as the pointing sensors, control motors, telemetry sytems, and data acquisition and flight control computers. Polarimetry is achieved with a rotating half-wave plate and wire grid polarizer. The detectors are sensitive to frequency bands centered on 150, 250, and 410 GHz. EBEX was flown in 2009 from New Mexico as a full system test, and then flown again in December 2012 / January 2013 over Antarctica in a long-duration flight to collect scientific data. In the instrumentation part of this thesis we discuss the pointing sensors and attitude determination algorithms. We also describe the real-time map making software, "QuickLook", that was custom-designed for EBEX. We devote special attention to the design and construction of the primary pointing sensors, the star cameras, and their custom-designed flight software package, "STARS" (the Star Tracking Attitude Reconstruction Software). In the analysis part of this thesis we describe the current status of the post-flight analysis procedure. We discuss the data structures used in analysis and the pipeline stages related to attitude determination and map making. We also discuss a custom-designed software framework called "LEAP" (the LDB EBEX Analysis Pipeline) that supports most of the analysis pipeline stages.

  2. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-ray balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, J.; Apple, J.; Chavis, K. S.; Dietz, K.; Holt, M.; Koehler, H.; Lis, T.; O'Connor, B.; Otero, M. R.; Pryor, J.; Ramsey, B.; Rinehart-Dawson, M.; Smith, L.; Sobey, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Christe, S.; Cramer, A.; Edgerton, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Shih, A.; Gregory, D.; Jasper, J.; Bohon, S.

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  3. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-Ray Balloon-Borne Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Apple, Jeff; StevensonChavis, Katherine; Dietz, Kurt; Holt, Marlon; Koehler, Heather; Lis, Tomasz; O'Connor, Brian; RodriquezOtero, Miguel; Pryor, Jonathan; Ramsey, Brian; Rinehart-Dawson, Maegan; Smith, Leigh; Sobey, Alexander; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Cramer, Alexander; Edgerton, Melissa; Rodriquez, Marcello; Shih, Albert; Gregory, Don; Jasper, John; Bohon, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist

  4. Transport of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone over India: Balloon-borne observations and modeling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, P. R.; Sahu, L. K.; Manchanda, R. K.; Sheel, V.; Deushi, M.; Kajino, M.; Schultz, M. G.; Nagendra, N.; Kumar, P.; Trivedi, D. B.; Koli, S. K.; Peshin, S. K.; Swamy, Y. V.; Tzanis, C. G.; Sreenivasan, S.

    2016-04-01

    This study describes the spatio-temporal variation of vertical profiles of ozone (O3) measured by balloon-borne ozonesondes over two tropical sites of Trivandrum (TVM) and Hyderabad (HYD) in India from January 2009 to December 2010. In the lower troposphere, the mixing ratios of O3 over HYD (18-66 ppbv) were similar to TVM (18-65 ppbv). In the free troposphere, the O3 mixing ratios over HYD were higher than those over TVM throughout the year. In the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) region (above 15 km), the mixing ratios of O3 over TVM were higher (83-358 ppbv) compared to those measured over HYD (89-216 ppbv). Prevailing of O3 laminae between about 14 and 17 km is seen for both sites for most profiles. A strong seasonal variation of O3 is observed in the lower stratosphere between 18 and 24 km over TVM, however, it is not pronounced for HYD. Transport of air masses from the biomass burning region of the central Africa, Southeast Asia and the Indo Gangetic plains (IGP) influenced and led to enhancements of lower and mid-tropospheric O3 over HYD and TVM while, the isentropic (325 K) potential vorticity (PV) at 100 hPa showed transport of O3-rich air from the lower stratosphere to the upper troposphere during winter and spring months over both sites. The free tropospheric O3 mixing ratios (FT-O3; 0-4 km) contribute substantially to the tropospheric column O3 (TCO) with an annual average fraction of 30% and reveal the similar seasonal variations over HYD and TVM. The vertical profiles of O3 obtained from the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) reanalysis and the Meteorological Research Institute-Chemistry Climate Model version 2 (MRI-CCM2) are compared with the ozonesonde data over both sites. The simulated magnitude, phase and vertical gradient of O3 from both MRI-CCM2 and MACC-II are in good agreement with measurements in the stratosphere while there are significant differences in the tropospheric columns.

  5. Mapping the southern polar cap with a balloon-borne millimeter-wave telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Thomas Mcfarland

    2003-10-01

    TopHat is a balloon-borne millimeter-wave telescope designed to make a map of a 48°-diameter region centered on the South Celestial Pole. The instrument consists of telescope optics, radiometer, rotational drive system, sun/earth shield, attitude and thermal sensors, and support electronics mounted on top of a 28-million cubic foot balloon, with a support gondola hanging below. The five-channel, single- pixel radiometer sits at the focus of an on-axis Cassegrain telescope with a 1-meter primary aperture. The detectors are monolithic, ion-implanted silicon bolometers, cooled to 265 mK by a sorption-pumped helium- 3 fridge. The five frequency bands have effective centers of 175, 245, 400, 460, and 630 GHz. The two lowest- frequency bands are designed to be sensitive to the 2.7 K Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), while the three highest bands are designed to monitor thermal emission from interstellar dust grains. Together with a modified Winston cone at the Cassegrain focus, the telescope optics define a beam designed to be steeper than gaussian with a full-width at half-maximum of 20', rendering TopHat in principle sensitive to fluctuations in the CMB from scales of less than a degree up to the diameter of the map (6 ≤ ℓ ≤ 600). TopHat was launched on 4 January 2001 from McMurdo Station, Antarctica as part of the NASA National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) Polar Long-Duration Balloon program and observed for four sidereal days until cryogens were exhausted. An unexpected ˜5° tilt in the mounting platform at the top of the balloon resulted in large scan-synchronous instrumental signals which were not removable at the level necessary to make an internally consistent measurement of the CMB power spectrum. Minimum-variance maps of the data in all five channels have been made and used to measure the integrated flux from three regions in the Magellanic Clouds, using a flux analysis technique that minimizes the aforementioned instrumental contamination. When

  6. A Balloon-borne Limb-Emission Sounder at 650-GHz band for Stratospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Ochiai, Satoshi

    We have developed a Balloon-borne Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (BSMILES) to observe stratospheric minor constituents like ozone, HCl etc. BSMILES carries a 300mm-diameter offset parabolic antenna, a 650-GHz heterodyne superconducting (SIS) low-noise receiver, and an acousto-optical spectrometer (AOS) with the bandwidth of 1GHz and the resolution of 1MHz. Gondola size is 1.35 m x 1.35 m x 1.26 m. Total weight is about 500 kg. Limb observations are made by scanning the antenna beam of about 0.12 degrees (FWHM) in vertical direction. A calibrated hot load (CHL) and elevation angle of 50 degrees are ob-served after each scan for calibration. The DSB system noise temperature of the SIS receiver is less than 460 K at 624-639 GHz with a best value of 330 K that is 11 times as large as the quantum limit. Data acquisition and antenna control are made by on-board PCs. Observed data are recorded to PC card with 2 GB capacity to collect after the observations from the sea, and HK data are transmitted to the ground. Gondola attitude is measured by three-axis fiber-optical gyroscope with accuracy less than 0.01 degrees, three-axis accelerometer, and a two-axis geoaspect sensor. Electric power is supplied by lithium batteries. Total power con-sumption is about 150W. Almost all systems are put in pressurized vessels for waterproofing, heat dissipation, and noise shield, etc. BSMILES was launched from Sanriku Balloon Center of Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), at the east coast of Japan, in the summer of 2003, 2004, and 2006. The gondola was carried to an altitude of 35 km by a balloon of 100,000 m3 in volume and the observations were made for 1.5 hours in 2004. All systems operated normally by keeping their temperature within the limit of operation by keeping gondola warm with styrene foam. After the observations, the gondola was dropped and splashed on the Pacific Ocean by a parachute and

  7. PoGOLite A high sensitivity balloon-borne soft gamma-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Andersson, Viktor; Arimoto, Makoto; Axelsson, Magnus; Marini Bettolo, Cecilia; Björnsson, Claes-Ingvar; Bogaert, Gilles; Carlson, Per; Craig, William; Ekeberg, Tomas; Engdegård, Olle; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gunji, Shuichi; Hjalmarsdotter, Linnea; Iwan, Bianca; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kataoka, Jun; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kazejev, Jaroslav; Kiss, Mózsi; Klamra, Wlodzimierz; Larsson, Stefan; Madejski, Grzegorz; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Ng, Johnny; Pearce, Mark; Ryde, Felix; Suhonen, Markus; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takuya; Thurston, Timothy; Ueno, Masaru; Varner, Gary; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Yamashita, Yuichiro; Ylinen, Tomi; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2008-09-01

    We describe a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGOLite) capable of detecting 10% polarisation from 200 mCrab point-like sources between 25 and 80 keV in one 6-h flight. Polarisation measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are expected to provide a powerful probe into high energy emission mechanisms as well as the distribution of magnetic fields, radiation fields and interstellar matter. Synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering and propagation through high magnetic fields are likely to produce high degrees of polarisation in the energy band of the instrument. We demonstrate, through tests at accelerators, with radioactive sources and through computer simulations, that PoGOLite will be able to detect degrees of polarisation as predicted by models for several classes of high energy sources. At present, only exploratory polarisation measurements have been carried out in the soft gamma-ray band. Reduction of the large background produced by cosmic-ray particles while securing a large effective area has been the greatest challenge. PoGOLite uses Compton scattering and photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells made of plastic and BGO scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence shield and a thick polyethylene neutron shield. The narrow field of view (FWHM = 1.25 msr, 2.0 deg × 2.0 deg) obtained with detector cells and the use of thick background shields warrant a large effective area for polarisation measurements (˜228 cm 2 at E = 40 keV) without sacrificing the signal-to-noise ratio. Simulation studies for an atmospheric overburden of 3-4 g/cm 2 indicate that neutrons and gamma-rays entering the PDC assembly through the shields are dominant backgrounds. Off-line event selection based on recorded phototube waveforms and Compton kinematics reduce the background to that expected for a ˜100 mCrab source between 25 and 50 keV. A 6-h observation of the Crab pulsar will differentiate between the Polar Cap/Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and

  8. Stratospheric temperature profile from balloon-borne measurements of the 10.4-micron band of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F.J.; Murcray, D. G.; Smith, M. A. H.; Seals, R. K., Jr.; Larsen, J. C.; Rinsland, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of nonlinear least squares spectral curve fitting has been used to derive the stratospheric vertical temperature profile from balloon-borne measurements of the 10.4 micron band of CO2. The spectral data were obtained at sunset with the approximately 0.02 per cm resolution University of Denver interferometer system from a float altitude of 33.5 km near Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 23 March 1981. The r.m.s. deviation between the retrieved temperature profile and correlative radiosonde measurements is 2.2 K.

  9. A Model-Based Study of On-Board Data Processing Architecture for Balloon-Borne Aurora Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Chester

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an application of ISAAC design methodology to a balloon-borne payload electronic system for aurora observation. The methodology is composed of two phases, high level design and low level implementation, the focus of this paper is on the high level design. This paper puts the system architecture in the context of a balloon based application but it can be generalized to any airborne/space-borne application. The system architecture includes a front-end detector, its corresponding data processing unit, and a controller. VisualSim has been used to perform modeling and simulations to explore the entire design space, finding optimal solutions that meet system requirements.

  10. Model reference adaptive control for the azimuth-pointing system of a balloon-borne stabilized platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Philip M.; Tomizuka, Masayoshi; Chingcuanco, Alfredo O.; Meinhold, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A balloon-born stabilized platform has been developed for the remotely operated altitude-azimuth pointing of a millimeter wave telescope system. This paper presents a development and implementation of model reference adaptive control (MRAC) for the azimuth-pointing system of the stabilized platform. The primary goal of the controller is to achieve pointing rms better than 0.1 deg. Simulation results indicate that MRAC can achieve pointing rms better than 0.1 deg. Ground test results show pointing rms better than 0.03 deg. Data from the first flight at the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) Palestine, Texas show pointing rms better than 0.02 deg.

  11. Daytime wave characteristics in the mesosphere lower thermosphere region: Results from the Balloon-borne Investigations of Regional-atmospheric Dynamics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallamraju, Duggirala; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Singh, Ravindra P.; Laskar, Fazlul I.; Mendillo, Christopher; Cook, Timothy; Lockwood, Sean; Narayanan, R.; Pant, Tarun K.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2014-03-01

    Results obtained from a joint INDO-US experiment on the investigations of mesosphere/lower thermosphere wave dynamics using balloon-borne optical dayglow measurements in combination with ground-based optical, radio, and magnetometer data are presented. Ultraviolet OI 297.2 nm dayglow emissions that originate at ~ 120 km were measured from low-magnetic latitudes from onboard a balloon on 8 March 2010. This paper describes the details of a new spectrograph that is capable of making high spectral resolution (0.2 nm at 297.2 nm) and large (80°) field of view ultraviolet dayglow emission measurements and presents the first results obtained from its operation onboard a high-altitude balloon. Waves of scale sizes ranging from 40 to 80 km in the zonal direction were observed in OI 297.2 nm emissions. Meridional scale sizes of similar waves were found to be 200 km as observed in the OI 557.7 nm emissions that originate from ~ 100 km. Periodicities were also derived from the variations of equatorial electrojet strength and ionospheric height on that day. Common periodicities of waves (in optical, magnetic, and radio measurements) were in the range of 16 to 30 min, which result in intrinsic horizontal wave speeds in the range of 21 to 77 m s-1. It is argued that gravity waves of such scale sizes and speeds at these heights are capable of propagating well into the thermosphere because the background wind directions were favorable. These waves were potentially capable of forming the seeds for the generation of equatorial plasma irregularities which did occur on that night.

  12. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol): Instrument and 2010 Science Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandilo, Natalie; BLAST-Pol Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol) is a 1.8-m telescope that observes polarized dust emission with a resolution of 1'. BLAST-Pol images the sky onto a focal plane that consists of 270 feed-horn coupled bolometers at 250, 350, and 500 microns. In January 2011, BLAST-Pol completed a successful 9.5-day flight over Antarctica. Eight science targets were observed, and a second flight is planned for December 2012. I will give an overview of the instrument performance during the first science campaign and present preliminary maps. BLAST-Pol maps will provide an excellent dataset for studying the role of magnetic fields in star formation.

  13. Use of a Fourier transform spectrometer on a balloon-borne telescope and at the multiple mirror telescope (MMT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.; Chance, K. V.; Brasunas, J. C.; Vrtilek, J. M.; Carleton, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    The design and use of an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer which has been used for observations of laboratory, stratospheric, and astronomical spectra are described. The spectrometer has a spectral resolution of 0.032/cm and has operated in the mid-infrared (12 to 13 microns) as well as the far-infrared (40 to 140 microns), using both bolometer and photoconductor cryogenic detectors. The spectrometer is optically sized to accept an f/9 beam from the multi-mirror telescope (MMT). The optical and electronic design are discussed, including remote operation of the spectrometer on a balloon-borne 102-cm telescope. The performance of the laser-controlled, screw-driven moving cat's-eye mirror is discussed. Segments of typical far-infrared balloon flight spectra, lab spectra, and mid-infrared MMT spectra are presented. Data reduction, interferogram processing, artifact removal, wavelength calibration, and intensity calibration methods are discussed. Future use of the spectrometer is outlined.

  14. New spectral features of stratospheric trace gases identified from high-resolution infrared balloon-borne and laboratory spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    A new Michelson-type interferometer system operating in the infrared at very high resolution has been used to record numerous balloon-borne solar absorption spectra of the stratosphere, ground-based solar absorption spectra, and laboratory spectra of molecules of atmospheric interest. In the present work results obtained for several important stratospheric trace gases, HNO3, CIONO2, HO2NO2, NO2, and COF2, in the 8- to 12-micron spectral region are reported. Many new features of these gases have been identified in the stratospheric spectra. Comparison of the new spectra with line-by-line simulations shows that previous spectral line parameters are often inadequate and that new analysis of high-resolution laboratory and atmospheric spectra and improved theoretical calculations will be required for many bands. Preliminary versions of several sets of improved line parameters under development are discussed.

  15. Balloon-borne ozonesonde and rocket temperature and wind data gathered during the July 1977 intertropical convergence zone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Kloos, G.

    1979-01-01

    In middle latitudes, it is possible for large concentrations of stratospheric air to be brought down to the tropopause through folds or breaks in the tropopause. The exchange of air from the tropopause into higher altitudes is not well understood. Thus, the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone) experiment, conducted from July 16 through July 31, 1977, included a series of balloon-borne ozone soundings. The results of these soundings are presented and explain in the vertical exchange of air and provide information on the short vertical scales-of-motion. Rocketsonde data was also gathered in the ITCZ experiment in support of a stratospheric scales-of-motion study. The investigation was to determine whether rocketsonde and satellite information currently used yield information on the stratospheric horizontal wave spectrum and its importance with respect to tropospheric and mesospheric interaction and transport.

  16. The Ultraviolet Filter Imager (SuFI) onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory: Instrument description and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandorfer, Achim; Barthol, Peter; Feller, Alex; Grauf, Bianca; Hirzberger, Johann; Riethmueller, Tino; Solanki, Sami K.; Berkefeld, Thomas; Knoelker, Michael; Martinez Pillet, Valentin; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Title, Alan

    We describe the design of the near UV filter imager SuFi onboard Sunrise, which was successfully flown in the stratosphere in June 2009. During its five days flight SuFI captured the highest contrast images of solar granulation ever. SuFI is a diffraction limited filter imager with an effective focal length of 121m, working in 5 distinct wavelength bands between 210nm and 397nm. It is based on a two mirror modified Schwarzschild microscope, which is integral part of the central Image stabilization and light Distribution unit (ISLiD) of Sunrise, which acts as the reimaging optics between the 1m telescope and the science instruments. The key technical features of the instrument are presented under the view of the specific demands of balloon-borne optical systems. First results obtained with the instrument are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  17. Balloon-borne observations of the development and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Harder, J. W.; Rolf, S. R.; Rosen, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The vertical distribution of ozone measured at McMurdo Station, Antarctica using balloon-borne sensors on 33 occasions during November 6, 1986 - August 25, 1986 is described. These observations suggest a highly structured cavity confined to the 12-20 km altitude region. In the 17-19 km altitude range, the ozone volume mixing ratio declined from about 2 ppm at the end of August to about 0.5 ppm by mid-October. The average decay in this region can be described as exponential with a half life of about 25 days. While total ozone, as obtained from profile integration, declined only about 35 percent, the integrated ozone between 14 and 18 km declined more than 70 percent. Vertical ozone profiles in the vortex revealed unusual structure with major features from 1 to 5 km thick which had suffered ozone depletions as great as 90 percent.

  18. Constraints on JN2O5 from balloon-borne limb scanning measurements of NO2 in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, Lena; Butz, Andre; Deutschmann, Tim; Dorf, Marcel; Kreycy, Sebastian; Prados-Roman, Cristina; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    The NOx ozone cycle (NOx = NO + NO2) is of great importance for the budget of stratospheric ozone and in future may even become more important due to increasing stratospheric N2O concentrations (Ravishankara et al., 2009). A regulating process for the amount of stratospheric NOx and thus for the efficiency of the NOx mediated ozone loss cycle is photolytic release of N2O5 at daytime since N2O5 acts as a nighttime reservoir gas for stratospheric NOx radicals. Observations of UV/vis scattered skylight by balloon-borne limb scanning spectrometry support the detection of time dependent trace gas and radical profiles, in particular of NO2. Here we present balloon borne measurements of time dependent NO2 profiles from the tropical stratosphere - taken at north-eastern Brazil (5° S, 43° W) in June 2005 - where excess stratospheric ozone is produced and transported to higher latitudes by the Brewer-Dobson circulation. The photolysis rate of N2O5 - uncertain by a factor of 2 (JPL-2006) - is constrained from the comparison of the measured and modelled diurnal variation of NO2. For the photochemical model initial conditions are based on our own observations of O3 and NO2, MIPAS-B measurements and on output of the 3-D SLIMCAT model. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters and absorption cross-sections are taken from the JPL-2006 compilation (Sander et. al, 2006). Overall it is found that, the observed rate of diurnal NO2 increase requires a N2O5 photolysis frequency at the upper limit of values possible according to the uncertainty range given by the JPL-2006 compilation. In conclusion it suggested that the NOx mediated ozone loss in the tropical stratosphere is probably larger than assumed by many photochemical models, and in future may even relatively become more important.

  19. Analysis of Atmospheric Trace Constituents from High Resolution Infrared Balloon-Borne and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Recent results and ongoing studies of high resolution solar absorption spectra will be presented. The analysis of these spectra is aimed at the identification and quantification of trace constituents important in atmospheric chemistry of the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Analysis of balloon-borne and ground-based spectra obtained at 0.0025/ cm covering the 700-2200/ cm interval will be presented. Results from ground-based 0.02/ cm solar spectra, from several locations such as Denver, South Pole, M. Loa, and New Zealand will also be shown. The 0.0025/ cm spectra show many new spectroscopic features. The analysis of these spectra, along with corresponding laboratory spectra, improves the spectral line parameters, and thus the accuracy of trace constituents quantification. The combination of the recent balloon flights, with earlier flights data since 1978 at 0.02/ cm resolution, provides trends analysis of several stratospheric trace species. Results for COF2, F22, SF6, and other species will be presented. Analysis of several ground-based solar spectra provides trends for HCl, HF and other species. The retrieval methods used for total column density and altitude distribution for both ground-based and balloon-borne spectra will be presented. These are extended for the analysis of the ground-based spectra to be obtained by the high resolution interferometers of the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC). Progress or the University of Denver studies for the NDSC will be presented. This will include intercomparison of solar spectra and trace gases retrievals obtained from simultaneous scans by the high resolution (0.0025/ cm) interferometers of BRUKER and BOMEM.

  20. The Filter Imager SuFI and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution System ISLiD of the Sunrise Balloon-Borne Observatory: Instrument Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandorfer, A.; Grauf, B.; Barthol, P.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Chares, B.; Deutsch, W.; Ebert, S.; Feller, A.; Germerott, D.; Heerlein, K.; Heinrichs, J.; Hirche, D.; Hirzberger, J.; Kolleck, M.; Meller, R.; Müller, R.; Schäfer, R.; Tomasch, G.; Knölker, M.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T.; Feger, B.; Heidecke, F.; Soltau, D.; Tischenberg, A.; Fischer, A.; Title, A.; Anwand, H.; Schmidt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution (ISLiD) unit onboard the Sunrise balloon borne solar observatory. This contribution provides the necessary information which is relevant to understand the instruments' working principles, the relevant technical data, and the necessary information about calibration issues directly related to the science data.

  1. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  2. New limits on the ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrino flux from the ANITA experiment.

    PubMed

    Gorham, P W; Allison, P; Barwick, S W; Beatty, J J; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, C; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Goodhue, A; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B C; Miki, C; Miocinović, P; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R J; Palladino, K; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Ruckman, L; Saltzberg, D; Seckel, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wang, Y; Wu, F

    2009-07-31

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E(nu) approximately 3 x 10(18) eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers. PMID:19792479

  3. Intercomparison of remote and balloon-borne sensors operated at JAPE-91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okrasinski, Richard J.; Cook, Greg J.; Olsen, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased availability of different types of remote sensors for measuring atmospheric parameters. With the introduction of remote sensors into field operation, questions have arisen as to their accuracy and precision. An attempt was made to address this issue by analyzing and intercomparing sets of wind and temperature data obtained during the Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE-9l) conducted at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, in Jul. and Aug. 1991. The remote sensing systems that were deployed included a 924 MHz wind profiler, two Doppler acoustic sodars, and a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). In situ measurements of wind, temperature, and humidity were also obtained from radiosondes. Individual system characteristics and the results of intercomparing the derived wind and temperature data from each of the systems are presented.

  4. The design and flight performance of the PoGOLite Pathfinder balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, M.; Florén, H.-G.; Jackson, M.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Olofsson, G.; Rydström, S.; Takahashi, H.; Lind, J.; Strömberg, J.-E.; Welin, O.; Iyudin, A.; Shifrin, D.; Pearce, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of X-ray astronomy there have been many scientific advances due to the development of new experimental techniques for detecting and characterising X-rays. Observations of X-ray polarisation have, however, not undergone a similar development. This is a shortcoming since a plethora of open questions related to the nature of X-ray sources could be resolved through measurements of the linear polarisation of emitted X-rays. The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-240 keV energy band from a stabilised observation platform. Polarisation is determined using coincident energy deposits in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013. A near-circumpolar flight was achieved with a duration of approximately two weeks. The flight performance of the Pathfinder design is discussed for the three Crab observations conducted. The signal-to-background ratio for the observations is shown to be 0.25 ±0.03 and the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (99 % C.L.) is (28.4 ±2.2) %. A strategy for the continuation of the PoGOLite programme is outlined based on experience gained during the 2013 maiden flight.

  5. Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Soler, Juan Diego; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  6. A Balloon-Borne Platform for Measuring Vertically-Resolved Concentrations of Black Carbon in the Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchstetter, T.; Wilson, D.; Hadley, O. L.; Corrigan, C.; Blair, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sunlight-absorbing black carbon (BC) particles emitted during combustion of fossil and biomass fuels contribute to climate change. Modeling studies agree that the climate impacts of BC depend on its vertical distribution in the atmosphere. Since vertically-resolved BC concentrations have scarcely been measured, this project is developing a balloon-borne platform for inexpensive routine vertical profiling. Our current platform, which includes an improved micro-Aethalometer and a small optical particle counter integrated with a data acquisition and tracking system, weighs less than six pounds and is therefore unrestricted by the Federal Aviation Administration. Compared to its predecessor, the improved micro-Aethalometer has been redesigned to increase stability and sensitivity during high altitude operation. In addition to aerosol data, temperature, pressure, humidity and location are recorded. At a predetermined altitude, the onboard computer releases the instrument payload from the balloon, a parachute deploys, and the payload descends back to the Earth's surface. Transmitters incorporated into the instrument package relay the location of the payload to a ground operator's laptop throughout the flight allowing the payload to be recovered after each mission. Video and data from completed test flights will be shown during the presentation.

  7. Constraints on JN2O5 from balloon-borne limb scanning measurements of NO2 in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, L. K.; Dorf, M.; Butz, A.; Kreycy, S.; Prados-Roman, C.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2009-12-01

    A recent study [Ravishankara et al., 2009] revealed the growing importance of N2O and the related partitioning of NOx/NOy for stratospheric ozone in the coming decades. Evidently, the related NOx/NOy photochemistry is most important in the tropical mid-stratosphere where most ozone is formed. We report on measurements of the diurnal variation of NO2 in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, observed during stratospheric balloon flights at north eastern Brazil (5°S, 43°W) in June 2005. The diurnal variation of stratospheric NO2 profiles is inferred from limb scanning balloon-borne spectroscopic measurements in the UV/visible range. Furthermore, photochemical modelling indicates that the observed increase of stratospheric NO2 in the tropical stratosphere is primarily due to the photolysis of N2O5 at daytime. Accordingly our NO2 data is interpreted with respect to the photolysis rate of N2O5 (JN2O5). Together with calculated actinic fluxes, conclusions on the magnitude of the N2O5 absorption cross-section and its uncertainty can be drawn as e.g. compiled in the JPL-2006 data base. Diurnal variation of NO2 measured by limb scattered skylight observations on June 30, 2005.

  8. The high energy replicated optics to explore the sun mission: a hard x-ray balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert; Rodriguez, Marcello; Cramer, Alex; Gregory, Kyle; Edgerton, Melissa; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Apple, Jeff; Stevenson Chavis, Katherine; Jackson, Amanda; Smith, Leigh; Dietz, Kurt; O'Connor, Brian; Sobey, Alex; Koehler, Heather; Ramsey, Brian

    2013-09-01

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HEROES gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. The overall payload will be discussed as well as the new solar aspect system. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  9. A mercuric iodide detector system for X-ray astronomy. II - Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, described by Ricker et al., an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, TX. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 + or - 0.7 x 10 to the -5th counts/s sq cm keV over the energy range of 40-80 keV. This measurement was within 50 percent of the predicted value. The measured rate is about 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range.

  10. Balloon-borne radiometer measurement of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude stratospheric HNO3 profiles spanning 12 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, M.; Quine, B. M.; Strong, K.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Jonsson, A. I.; McElroy, C. T.; Walker, K. A.; Wunch, D.

    2007-08-01

    Low-resolution atmospheric thermal emission spectra collected by balloon-borne radiometers over the time span of 1990-2002 are used to retrieve vertical profiles of HNO3, CFC-11 and CFC-12 volume mixing ratios between approximately 10 and 35 km altitude. All of the data analyzed have been collected from launches from a Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude site, during late summer, when stratospheric dynamic variability is at a minimum. The retrieval technique incorporates detailed forward modeling of the instrument and the radiative properties of the atmosphere, and obtains a best fit between modeled and measured spectra through a combination of onion-peeling and global optimization steps. The retrieved HNO3 profiles are consistent over the 12-year period, and are consistent with recent measurements by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer satellite instrument. This suggests that, to within the errors of the 1990 measurements, there has been no significant change in the HNO3 summer mid-latitude profile.

  11. Balloon-borne radiometer measurements of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude stratospheric HNO3 profiles spanning 12 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, M.; Quine, B. M.; Strong, K.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Jonsson, A. I.; McElroy, C. T.; Walker, K. A.; Wunch, D.

    2007-12-01

    Low-resolution atmospheric thermal emission spectra collected by balloon-borne radiometers over the time span of 1990-2002 are used to retrieve vertical profiles of HNO3, CFC-11 and CFC-12 volume mixing ratios between approximately 10 and 35 km altitude. All of the data analyzed have been collected from launches from a Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude site, during late summer, when stratospheric dynamic variability is at a minimum. The retrieval technique incorporates detailed forward modeling of the instrument and the radiative properties of the atmosphere, and obtains a best fit between modeled and measured spectra through a combination of onion-peeling and optimization steps. The retrieved HNO3 profiles are consistent over the 12-year period, and are consistent with recent measurements by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer satellite instrument. We therefore find no evidence of long-term changes in the HNO3 summer mid-latitude profile, although the uncertainty of our measurements precludes a conclusive trend analysis.

  12. First implementation of TES bolometer arrays with SQUID-based multiplexed readout on a balloon-borne platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, François; Aboobaker, Asad M.; Ade, Peter; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bao, Chaoyun; Borrill, Julian; Cantalupo, Christopher; Chapman, Daniel; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Grainger, Will; Hanany, Shaul; Hubmayr, Johannes; Hyland, Peter; Hillbrand, Seth; Jaffe, Andrew; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Terry; Kisner, Theodore; Klein, Jeff; Korotkov, Andrei; Leach, Sam; Lee, Adrian; Limon, Michele; MacDermid, Kevin; Matsumura, Tomotake; Meng, Xiaofan; Miller, Amber; Milligan, Michael; Polsgrove, Daniel; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Raach, Kate; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Britt; Sagiv, Ilan; Smecher, Graeme; Tran, Huan; Tucker, Gregory S.; Vinokurov, Yury; Yadav, Amit; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zilic, Kyle

    2010-07-01

    EBEX (the E and B EXperiment) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to measure the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background radiation. During a two week long duration science flight over Antarctica, EBEX will operate 768, 384 and 280 spider-web transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers at 150, 250 and 410 GHz, respectively. The 10-hour EBEX engineering flight in June 2009 over New Mexico and Arizona provided the first usage of both a large array of TES bolometers and a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) based multiplexed readout in a space-like environment. This successful demonstration increases the technology readiness level of these bolometers and the associated readout system for future space missions. A total of 82, 49 and 82 TES detectors were operated during the engineering flight at 150, 250 and 410 GHz. The sensors were read out with a new SQUID-based digital frequency domain multiplexed readout system that was designed to meet the low power consumption and robust autonomous operation requirements presented by a balloon experiment. Here we describe the system and the remote, automated tuning of the bolometers and SQUIDs. We compare results from tuning at float to ground, and discuss bolometer performance during flight.

  13. Crest - A Balloon-borne Instrument To Measure Cosmic-ray Electrons Above TeV Energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnell, Michael; Anderson, T.; Bower, C.; Coutu, S.; Geske, M.; Müller, D.; Musser, J.; Nutter, S.; Park, N.; Tarlé, G.; Wakely, S.; Yagi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The observation of high energy (E > 1 TeV) electrons in the cosmic radiation provides important information on the distribution and energetics of local cosmic-ray sources. Galactic cosmic-ray electrons are thought to be shock accelerated in supernova remnants as evident from observations of non-thermal X-rays and TeV gamma rays. Their locally observed energy spectrum above 1 TeV is expected to reflect the distribution and abundance of nearby acceleration sites. However, the rates at these energies are low and the direct detection would require unfeasibly large balloons or satellite born detectors. CREST, a balloon-borne detector array of 1024 BaF2 crystals, overcomes this hurdle: it will measure the intensity and spectrum of multi-TeV electrons by detecting synchrotron photons emitted from electrons passing through the earth's magnetic field. Thus CREST's acceptance is several times its geometric area providing sensitivity up to about 50 TeV. Following an engineering flight in spring of 2009, CREST will be flown in a circumpolar orbit on an upcoming Antarctic long-duration balloon flight. This work is supported by NASA and CSBF.

  14. A mercuric detector system for X-ray astronomy. 2. Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, Texas. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 O.7 x 10-5 counts/sec cm keV over the energy range of 40 to 80 keV. This measurement was within 50% of the predicted value. The measured rate is approx 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range. The prediction was based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the detector assembly in the radiation environment at float altitude.

  15. Intersstellar absorption lines between 2000 and 3000 A in nearby stars observed with BUSS. [Balloon Borne Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Boer, K. S.; Lenhart, H.; Van Der Hucht, K. A.; Kamperman, T. M.; Kondo, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Spectra obtained between 2000 and 3000 A with the Balloon Borne Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (BUSS) payload were examined for interstellar absorption lines. In bright stars, with spectral types between O9V and F5V, such lines were measured of Mg I, Mg II, Cr II, Mn II, Fe II and Zn II, with Cr II and Zn II data of especially high quality. Column densities were derived and interstellar abundances were determined for the above species. It was found that metal depletion increases with increasing E(B-V); Fe was most affected and Zn showed a small depletion for E(B-V) greater than 0.3 towards Sco-Oph. The metal column densities, derived for Alpha-And, Kappa-Dra, Alpha-Com, Alpha-Aql, and 29 Cyg were used to infer N(H I). It was shown that the ratio of Mg I to Na I is instrumental in determining the ionization structure along each line of sight. The spectra of Aql stars confirms the presence of large gas densities near Alpha-Oph. Moreover, data indicated that the Rho-Oph N(H I) value needs to be altered to 35 x 10 to the 20th/sq cm, based on observed ion ratios and analysis of the Copernicus L-alpha profile.

  16. LUPUS I observations from the 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  17. Validation of GOMOS-Envisat vertical profiles of O3, NO2, NO3, and aerosol extinction using balloon-borne instruments and analysis of the retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Brogniez, Colette; Catoire, Valery; Fussen, Didier; Goutail, Florence; Oelhaf, Hermann; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Roscoe, Howard K.; Wetzel, Gerald; Chartier, Michel; Robert, Claude; Balois, Jean-Yves; Verwaerde, Christian; Auriol, Frédérique; François, Philippe; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Wursteisen, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The UV-visible Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument onboard Envisat performs nighttime measurements of ozone, NO2, NO3 and of the aerosol extinction, using the stellar occultation method. We have conducted a validation exercise using various balloon-borne instruments in different geophysical conditions from 2002 to 2006, using GOMOS measurements performed with stars of different magnitudes. GOMOS and balloon-borne vertical columns in the middle stratosphere are in excellent agreement for ozone and NO2. Some discrepancies can appear between GOMOS and balloon-borne vertical profiles for the altitude and the amplitude of the concentration maximum. These discrepancies are randomly distributed, and no bias is detected. The accuracy of individual profiles in the middle stratosphere is 10 % for ozone and 25 % for NO2. On the other hand, the GOMOS NO3 retrieval is difficult and no direct validation can be conducted. The GOMOS aerosol content is also well estimated, but the wavelength dependence can be better estimated if the aerosol retrieval is performed only in the visible domain. We can conclude that the GOMOS operational retrieval algorithm works well and that GOMOS has fully respected its primary objective for the study of the trends of species in the middle stratosphere, using the profiles in a statistical manner. Some individual profiles can be partly inaccurate, in particular in the lower stratosphere. Improvements could be obtained by reprocessing some GOMOS transmissions in case of specific studies in the middle and lower stratosphere when using the individual profiles.

  18. The Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) for the Sunrise Balloon-Borne Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Pillet, V.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Álvarez-Herrero, A.; Domingo, V.; Bonet, J. A.; González Fernández, L.; López Jiménez, A.; Pastor, C.; Gasent Blesa, J. L.; Mellado, P.; Piqueras, J.; Aparicio, B.; Balaguer, M.; Ballesteros, E.; Belenguer, T.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados, M.; Deutsch, W.; Feller, A.; Girela, F.; Grauf, B.; Heredero, R. L.; Herranz, M.; Jerónimo, J. M.; Laguna, H.; Meller, R.; Menéndez, M.; Morales, R.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Ramos, G.; Reina, M.; Ramos, J. L.; Rodríguez, P.; Sánchez, A.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Knoelker, M.; Schmidt, W.; Solanki, S. K.; Vargas Domínguez, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) is a spectropolarimeter built by four institutions in Spain that flew on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory in June 2009 for almost six days over the Arctic Circle. As a polarimeter, IMaX uses fast polarization modulation (based on the use of two liquid crystal retarders), real-time image accumulation, and dual-beam polarimetry to reach polarization sensitivities of 0.1%. As a spectrograph, the instrument uses a LiNbO3 etalon in double pass and a narrow band pre-filter to achieve a spectral resolution of 85 mÅ. IMaX uses the high-Zeeman-sensitive line of Fe i at 5250.2 Å and observes all four Stokes parameters at various points inside the spectral line. This allows vector magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and intensity frames to be produced that, after reconstruction, reach spatial resolutions in the 0.15 - 0.18 arcsec range over a 50×50 arcsec field of view. Time cadences vary between 10 and 33 s, although the shortest one only includes longitudinal polarimetry. The spectral line is sampled in various ways depending on the applied observing mode, from just two points inside the line to 11 of them. All observing modes include one extra wavelength point in the nearby continuum. Gauss equivalent sensitivities are 4 G for longitudinal fields and 80 G for transverse fields per wavelength sample. The line-of-sight velocities are estimated with statistical errors of the order of 5 - 40 m s-1. The design, calibration, and integration phases of the instrument, together with the implemented data reduction scheme, are described in some detail.

  19. Pollination biology of basal angiosperms (ANITA grade).

    PubMed

    Thien, Leonard B; Bernhardt, Peter; Devall, Margaret S; Chen, Zhi-Duan; Luo, Yi-Bo; Fan, Jian-Hua; Yuan, Liang-Chen; Williams, Joseph H

    2009-01-01

    The first three branches of the angiosperm phylogenetic tree consist of eight families with ∼201 species of plants (the ANITA grade). The oldest flower fossil for the group is dated to the Early Cretaceous (115-125 Mya) and identified to the Nymphaeales. The flowers of extant plants in the ANITA grade are small, and pollen is the edible reward (rarely nectar or starch bodies). Unlike many gymnosperms that secrete "pollination drops," ANITA-grade members examined thus far have a dry-type stigma. Copious secretions of stigmatic fluid are restricted to the Nymphaeales, but this is not nectar. Floral odors, floral thermogenesis (a resource), and colored tepals attract insects in deceit-based pollination syndromes throughout the first three branches of the phylogenetic tree. Self-incompatibility and an extragynoecial compitum occur in some species in the Austrobaileyales. Flies are primary pollinators in six families (10 genera). Beetles are pollinators in five families varying in importance as primary (exclusive) to secondary vectors of pollen. Bees are major pollinators only in the Nymphaeaceae. It is hypothesized that large flowers in Nymphaeaceae are the result of the interaction of heat, floral odors, and colored tepals to trap insects to increase fitness. PMID:21628182

  20. Energy and flux measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays observed during the first ANITA flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoorlemmer, H.; Belov, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; García-Fernández, D.; Bugaev, V.; Wissel, S. A.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Carvalho, W. R., Jr.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; DuVernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D.; Gorham, P. W.; Hast, C.; Huege, T.; Heber, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kowalski, J.; Lam, J.; Learned, J. G.; Link, J. T.; Lusczek, E.; Matsuno, S.; Mercurio, B. C.; Miki, C.; Miočinović, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C. J.; Ng, J.; Nichol, R. J.; Palladino, K.; Rauch, B. F.; Roberts, J.; Reil, K.; Rotter, B.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Saltzberg, D.; Seckel, D.; Urdaneta, D.; Varner, G. S.; Vieregg, A. G.; Walz, D.; Wu, F.; Zas, E.

    2016-04-01

    The first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment recorded 16 radio signals that were emitted by cosmic-ray induced air showers. The dominant contribution to the radiation comes from the deflection of positrons and electrons in the geomagnetic field, which is beamed in the direction of motion of the air shower. For 14 of these events, this radiation is reflected from the ice and subsequently detected by the ANITA experiment at a flight altitude of ∼36 km. In this paper, we estimate the energy of the 14 individual events and find that the mean energy of the cosmic-ray sample is 2.9 × 1018 eV, which is significantly lower than the previous estimate. By simulating the ANITA flight, we calculate its exposure for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We estimate for the first time the cosmic-ray flux derived only from radio observations and find agreement with measurements performed at other observatories. In addition, we find that the ANITA data set is consistent with Monte Carlo simulations for the total number of observed events and with the properties of those events.

  1. Analysis of charge transport during lightning using balloon-borne electric field sensors and Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, William W.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Aslan, Beyza Caliskan; Lu, Gaopeng; Winn, William P.; Boeck, William L.

    2007-09-01

    Recently, wide band measurements of the electric field near a lightning flash have been obtained by a balloon-borne electric field sonde or Esonde. This paper develops new techniques for analyzing lightning-associated charge transport in a thundercloud by using both the Esonde data and simultaneous Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) measurements of VHF pulses emitted during lightning breakdown processes. Innovations in this paper include the following: (1) A filtering procedure is developed to separate the background field associated with instrument rotation and cloud charging processes from the lightning-induced electric field change. Because of the abrupt change in the signal caused by lightning, standard filtering techniques do not apply. A new mathematical procedure is developed to estimate the background electric field that would have existed if the lightning had not occurred. The estimated background field is subtracted from the measured field to obtain the lightning-induced field change. (2) Techniques are developed to estimate the charge transport due to lightning. At any instant of time during a cloud-to-ground (CG) flash, we estimate the charge transport by a monopole. During an intracloud (IC) flash, we estimate the charge transport by a dipole. Since the location of the monopole and dipole changes with time, they are referred to as a dynamic monopole and a dynamic dipole. The following physical constraints are used to achieve a unique fit: charge conservation during an IC flash, separation (distance between the CG monopole charge center and the ground and separation between IC dipole charge centers both exceed a minimum threshold), location (charge is placed on lightning channel), and likelihood (after a statistical analysis based on instrument uncertainty, highly unlikely charge locations are excluded). To implement the constraint that the charge is located on the lightning channel, we develop a mathematical object called the "pulse graph." Vertices in the

  2. ProtoEXIST: balloon-borne technology development for wide-field hard X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We report on the development of the ProtoEXIST balloon-borne experiment for development of wide-field coded aperture imaging with high spatial resolution imaging Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) arrays in close-tiled, large area configurations. ProtoEXIST1 will incorporate two coded aperture telescopes, each with 16 x 16cm close-tiled imaging CZT with 2.5mm pixels that maintain registration across the full detector. The detector plane incorporates new-technology low powered ASIC readout on each 20 x 20 x 5mm CZT crystal. A 2 x 4 array of such crystals are closetiled on a single board (DCA) with vertical integration to a controlling and readout-enabling FPGA. Detector readout modes can be commanded through the FPGA and selected in flight: from simple peak pixel, to peak plus neighbor pixels to larger pixel-selected modes, which will improve spatial/spectral resolution as well as allow for future tests of Compton imaging. The full readout consists of a 2 x 4 array of DCAs for each of the two telescopes. The detector plane is shielded from below by an active shield (2cm CsI) on one telescope vs. an equivalent graded-passive shield on the other to enable direct imaging comparisons of background rejection in a balloon environment. Both telescopes incorporate otherwise identical graded-passive side shields and laminated coded aperture masks (5mm pixels, laser-cut in W sheet). The telescopes each have 20o x 20o fields of view (FWHM), with 21arcmin resolution across the field. The ProtoEXIST gondola is derived from the old Harvard EXITE gondola but now with new pointing system and daytime star camera as developed at MSFC for the HERO balloon payload. A first flight is planned for September/October, 2008. Tests will include not only the first tests of this multipixel, controllable ASIC-readout system but also tests of the scanning coded aperture imaging as planned for the proposed EXIST mission. Followup flight(s) will test the higher-spatial resolution CZT imager (0.6mm pixels) now planned

  3. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Ruka; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    Measuring precisely the faint polarization of the Far-Infrared and sub-millimetre sky is one of the next observational challenges of modern astronomy and cosmology. In particular, detection of the B-mode polarization from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may reveal the inflationary periods in the very early universe. Such measurements will require very high sensitivity and very low instrumental systematic effects. As for measurements of the CMB intensity, sensitive measurements of the CMB polarization will be made difficult by the presence of foreground emission from our own Milky Way, which is orders of magnitude stronger than the faint polarized cosmological signal. Such foreground emission will have to be understood very accurately and removed from cosmological measurements. This polarized emission is also interesting in itself, since it brings information relevant to the process of star formation, about the orientation of the magnetic field in our Galaxy through the alignment of dust grains. I will first summarize our current knowledge in this field, on the basis of extinction and emission measurements from the ground and airborne experiments and in the context of the recent measurements with the Planck satellite. I will then describe the concept and science goals of the PILOT balloon-borne experiment project (http://pilot.irap.omp.eu). This project is funded by the French space agency (CNES: “Centre National des Etudes Spatiales”) and currently under final assembly and tests. The experiment is dedicated to measuring precisely the linear polarization of the faint interstellar diffuse dust emission in the Far-Infrared in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies. It is composed of a 0.83 m diameter telescope and a Helium 4 deware accommodating the rest of the optics and 2 focal plane arrays with a total of 2048 individual bolometers cooled to 300 mK, developed for the PACS instruments on board the Hershel satellite. It will be operating in two broad photometric

  4. Stratospheric N2O mixing ratio profile from high-resolution balloon-borne solar absorption spectra and laboratory spectra near 1880/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Smith, M. A. H.; Seals, R. K., Jr.; Larsen, J. C.; Rinsland, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A nonlinear least-squares fitting procedure is used to derive the stratospheric N2O mixing ratio profile from balloon-borne solar absorption spectra and laboratory spectra near 1880/cm. The atmospheric spectra analyzed here were recorded during sunset from a float altitude of 33 km with the University of Denver's 0.02/cm resolution interferometer near Alamogordo, N.M. (33 deg N) on Oct. 10, 1979. The laboratory data are used to determine the N2O line intensities. The measurements suggest an N2O mixing ratio of 264 ppbv near 15 km, decreasing to 155 ppbv near 28 km.

  5. A 16 channel frequency-domain-modulation readout system with custom superconducting LC filters for the SWIPE instrument of the balloon-borne LSPE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorelli, G.; Baldini, A. M.; Bemporad, C.; Biasotti, M.; Cei, F.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; Fontanelli, F.; Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Gatti, F.; Incagli, M.; Grassi, M.; Nicolò, D.; Spinella, F.; Vaccaro, D.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design, implementation and first tests of the superconducting LC filters for the frequency domain readout of spiderweb TES bolometers of the SWIPE experiment on the balloon-borne LSPE mission which aims at measuring the linear polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background at large angular scales to find the imprint of inflation on the B-mode CMB polarization. LC filters are designed, produced and tested at the INFN sections of Pisa and Genoa where thin film deposition and cryogenic test facilities are present, and where also the TES spiderweb bolometers are being produced.

  6. A Multi-Band Far-Infrared Survey with a Balloon-Borne Telescope. Final Report, 20 Nov. 1972 - 19 Feb. 1978. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, M. R.; Harwit, M.; Frederick, C.; Ward, D. B.; Melnick, G.; Stasavage, G.

    1978-01-01

    Nine additional radiation sources, above a 3-sigma confidence level of 1300 Jy, were identified at 100 microns by far infrared photometry of the galactic plane using a 0.4 meter aperture, liquid helium cooled, multichannel far infrared balloon-borne telescope. The instrument is described, including its electronics, pointing and suspension systems, and ground support equipment. Testing procedures and flight staging are discussed along with the reduction and analysis of the data acquired. The history of infrared astronomy is reviewed. General infrared techniques and the concerns of balloon astronomers are explored.

  7. Development of a Peltier-based chilled-mirror hygrometer and cloud particle counter for balloon-borne TTL observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugidachi, T.; Arai, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Shimizu, K.; Ibata, K.; Kanai, Y.; Okumura, S.; Sagara, K.; Hayashi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dehydration processes in the TTL determines the amount of water vapor entering the stratosphere. 'In-situ' measurements of water vapor and cloud particles in the TTL are still a technical challenge, and the observational evidence of dehydration is still limited. Accumulation of the observational data is thus necessary to improve the understanding of the TTL dehydration and transport processes. In this study, we have developed a hygrometer and cloud particle counter for balloon-born TTL observations. A Peltier-based digitally-controlled chilled-mirror hygrometer has been developed to measure atmospheric water vapor accurately. The developed sensor is environmentally-friendly and ease-to-handle in nature because this sensor does not use a cryogenic material to cool the mirror. In January of 2012 and 2013, we have conducted some flight tests at Biak, Indonesia (1.18°S, 136.11°E) under the Soundings of Ozone and Water in the Equatorial Region (SOWER) project to evaluate the performances of this sensor. The results of simultaneous measurements with the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer (CFH) showed that the frost point temperature from the developed sensor is consistent with that from CFH within ~0.5 K in the whole troposphere. In the stratosphere, however, it was found that the controller, which keeps the frost layer on the mirror constant, needs to be further improved. A cloud particle counter has also been developed to measure cloud-particle number density, size distribution, and the particle phase (i.e. liquid water or ice). It is a low-cost and light-weighted (~200 g) particle counter based on a pollen sensor to be used in an air purifier. This sensor consists of a light-emitting part (linearly-polarized light by laser diode) and two light-receiving parts (one detects scattering light directly, while the other detects scattering lights through a polarization plate to estimate the degree of polarization by particles). It is considered that the counts, magnitude of

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Sold by Anita Pacheco last ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Sold by Anita Pacheco last owner of Pacheco Estate 8 years ago. Now owned by Pentecost Church Society. YEAR BUILT: 1830 - Salvio Pancheco Adobe, 2030 Adobe Street, Concord, Contra Costa County, CA

  9. Balloon-borne cryogenic frost-point hygrometer observations of water vapour in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over India: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunilkumar, S. V.; Muhsin, M.; Emmanuel, Maria; Ramkumar, Geetha; Rajeev, K.; Sijikumar, S.

    2016-03-01

    Balloon-borne cryogenic frost-point hygrometer (CFH) observations of water vapour in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region carried out over India, from Trivandrum [8.5°N, 76.9°E] and Hyderabad [17.5°N, 78.6°E], were compared with that obtained from quasi-collocated Aura-Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) satellite observations. Comparisons show a small dry bias for MLS in the stratosphere. Saturated or super-saturation layers observed near the base of tropical tropopause layer (TTL) are consistent with the quasi-collocated space-based observations of tropical cirrus from KALPANA-1 and CALIPSO. Disturbance of large scale waves in the upper troposphere appears to modulate the water vapour and cirrus distribution.

  10. Balloon-borne in situ measurements of ClO and ozone - Implications for heterogeneous chemistry and mid-latitude ozone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; Brune, W. H.; Salawitch, R. J.; Dessler, A. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorine oxide (ClO) obtained on 31 March 1991 with a new balloon-borne instrument are compared to results from a photochemical model which incorporates hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols. With the addition of this process, there is better agreement between calculation and measurement over most of the profile, except below 20 km where observed ClO is greater by as much as a factor of four. In a model which is constrained to reproduce the observed ClO below 20 km, ozone loss by catalytic cycles involving halogen oxides becomes larger than that from NO(x), which would dominate under gas-phase or standard heterogeneous conditions.

  11. In situ stratospheric measurements of HNO3 and HCl near 30 km using the balloon-borne laser in situ sensor tunable diode laser spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Webster, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    In situ stratospheric measurements of the concentrations of the reservoir species HNO3 and HCl made during two flights of the high-resolution (0.0005/cm) balloon-borne laser in situ sensor instrument from Palestine, Texas, are reported. A measured HNO3 volume mixing ratio of 4.3 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at 31 km altitude is about 1 ppbv larger than previously reported measurements at 32 deg N. An HCl mixing ratio of 1.6 ppbv at 29 km is in agreement with values obtained from earlier remote sensing techniques within the experimental uncertainties. Upper limits at 31 km of 0.4 ppbv for H2O2 and 0.2 ppbv for HOCl are also derived from analyses of spectra recorded near 1252/cm.

  12. Rotating-unbalanced-mass Devices for Scanning Balloon-borne Experiments, Free-flying Spacecraft, and Space Shuttle/space Station Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E.

    1990-01-01

    A new method is presented for scanning balloon-borne experiments, free-flying spacecraft, and gimballed experiments mounted to the space shuttle or the space station. It uses rotating-unbalanced-mass (RUM) devices for generating circular, line, or raster scan patterns and an auxiliary control system for target acquisition, keeping the scan centered on the target, and producing complementary motion for raster scanning. It is ideal for applications where the only possible way to accomplish the required scan is to physically scan the entire experiment or spacecraft as in x ray and gamma ray experiments. In such cases, this new method should have advantages over prior methods in terms of either power, weight, cost, performance, stability, or a combination of these.

  13. Development of balloon-borne CO2 sonde: CO2 vertical profile (0-10km) observations and comparison with the air craft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, M.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration has drastically increased since the Industrial Revolution due to the mass consumption of fossil fuels and natural gas by human activities. CO2 is considered to be a major factor of global warming; therefore it is important to measure CO2 correctly. CO2 vertical profile measurement is the key to estimate CO2 sources and sinks in high precision. However, current CO2 monitoring sites are limited and there are few CO2 vertical profile measurements. We have been developing a balloon-borne instrument that can measure the vertical distribution of CO2 in any place in the world under any kind of weather conditions (CO2 sonde). The target specifications of altitude range is from surface to 10 km. Time resolution is 1min. The CO2 sensor, originally developed for upper air sounding by our team, is based on the non-dispersed infrared absorption spectroscopy technique (NDIR) at the wavelengths of 4.0 and 4.3 micrometer. The data of the optical infrared absorption are transmitted through a GPS sonde with temperature, humidity and GPS data every second. In this study, we will show simultaneous measurement campaigns of the balloon-borne instruments and in-situ aircraft measurements in January and February 2011 in the Tokyo metropolitan area in Japan. We will present the comparisons between the results of CO2 sonde (5 flights) and two types of aircraft measurements. One is observed by the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner) and the other is chartered flight measurements operated by NIES/JAXA.

  14. Optimising a balloon-borne polarimeter in the hard X-ray domain: From the PoGOLite Pathfinder to PoGO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, M.; Jackson, M.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Takahashi, H.; Pearce, M.

    2016-09-01

    PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter dedicated to the study of point sources. Compton scattered events are registered using an array of plastic scintillator units to determine the polarisation of incident X-rays in the energy range 20-240 keV. In 2013, a near circumpolar balloon flight of 14 days duration was completed after launch from Esrange, Sweden, resulting in a measurement of the linear polarisation of the Crab emission. Building on the experience gained from this Pathfinder flight, the polarimeter is being modified to improve performance for a second flight in 2016. Such optimisations, based on Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, take into account the source characteristics, the instrument response and the background environment which is dominated by atmospheric neutrons. This paper describes the optimisation of the polarimeter and details the associated increase in performance. The resulting design, PoGO+, is expected to improve the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (MDP) for the Crab from 19.8% to 11.1% for a 5 day flight. Assuming the same Crab polarisation fraction as measured during the 2013 flight, this improvement in MDP will allow a 5σ constrained result. It will also allow the study of the nebula emission only (Crab off-pulse) and Cygnus X-1 if in the hard state.

  15. Intercomparison of in situ water vapor balloon-borne measurements from Pico-SDLA H2O and FLASH-B in the tropical UTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghysels, Mélanie; Riviere, Emmanuel D.; Khaykin, Sergey; Stoeffler, Clara; Amarouche, Nadir; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Held, Gerhard; Durry, Georges

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we compare water vapor mixing ratio measurements from two quasi-parallel flights of the Pico-SDLA H2O and FLASH-B hygrometers. The measurements were made on 10 February 2013 and 13 March 2012, respectively, in the tropics near Bauru, São Paulo state, Brazil during an intense convective period. Both flights were performed as part of a French scientific project, TRO-Pico, to study the impact of the deep-convection overshoot on the water budget. Only a few instruments that permit the frequent sounding of stratospheric water vapor can be flown within small-volume weather balloons. Technical difficulties preclude the accurate measurement of stratospheric water vapor with conventional in situ techniques. The instruments described here are simple and lightweight, which permits their low-cost deployment by non-specialists aboard a small weather balloon. We obtain mixing ratio retrievals which agree above the cold-point tropopause to within 1.9 and 0.5 % for the first and second flights, respectively. This level of agreement for balloon-borne measured stratospheric water mixing ratio constitutes one of the best agreement reported in the literature. Because both instruments show similar profiles within their combined uncertainties, we conclude that the Pico-SDLA H2O and FLASH-B data sets are mutually consistent.

  16. Simultaneous balloon-borne measurements of the key inorganic bromine species BrO and BrONO2 in the stratosphere: DOAS and MIPAS-B evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarski, Sebastian; Maucher, Guido; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Butz, André; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Höpfner, Michael; Kleinert, Anne; Nordmeyer, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Wetzel, Gerald; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Inorganic bromine contributes to a loss of stratospheric ozone of about 25 - 30%. Past studies have demonstrated several uncertainties in the photochemistry of stratospheric bromine, especially by considering the three body reaction (kBrONO2) BrO + NO2 + M → BrONO2 + M, and the photolysis frequencies of BrONO2 (jBrONO2). Hence, an improved knowledge of the ratio jBrONO2/kBrONO2 is crucial to better assess the bromine-related loss of ozone as well as the total amount of bromine in the stratosphere. Here, we report on the first simultaneous balloon-borne measurements of NO2, BrO, and BrONO2 in the stratosphere, performed over Timmins (Ontario, 49 °N, Canada) on Sept., 7th and 8th, 2014. During the flight the targeted species were monitored by remote sensing in the UV, visible and mid-IR spectral ranges by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B), respectively. The analysis and interpretation of the measurements involves radiative transfer as well as photochemical modelling. Major features of the applied techniques are reported and first results of the DOAS as well as MIPAS-B evaluation are discussed. Further investigations address inter-comparisons of the retrieved NO2, BrO, and O3 concentrations and volume mixing ratios, to demonstrate validations of both evaluation methods.

  17. SPECIES: a versatile spectrometer based on optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption for in situ balloon-borne and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Patrick; Catoire, Valery; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Huret, Nathalie; Desbois, Thibault; Marocco, Nicola; Kassi, Samir; Kerstel, Eric; Romanini, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Over the last twenty years, thanks to significant technological advances in measurement techniques, our understanding of the chemistry and dynamics of the upper troposphere and stratosphere has progressed significantly. However some key questions remain unsolved, and new ones arise in the changing climate context. The full recovery of the ozone layer and the delay of recovery, the impact of the climate change on the stratosphere and the role of this one as a feedback are almost unknown. To address these challenges, one needs instruments able to measure a wide variety of trace gas species simultaneously with a wide vertical range. In this context, LPC2E and LIPHY are developing a new balloon-borne and airborne instrument: SPECIES (SPECtromètre Infrarouge à lasErs in Situ, i.e. in-Situ Infrared lasEr SPECtrometer). Based on the Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy technique, combined with mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, this instrument will offer unprecedented performances in terms of the vertical extent of the measurements, from ground to the middle stratosphere, and the number of molecular species simultaneously measured with sub-ppb detection limits (among others: NO, N2O, HNO3, H2O2, HCl, HOCl, CH3Cl, COF2, HCHO, HCOOH, O3, NH3 NO2, H2O, OCS, SO2). Due to high frequency measurement (>0.5 Hz) it shall offer very high spatial resolution (a few meters).

  18. Bright Points in the Quiet Sun as Observed in the Visible and Near-UV by the Balloon-borne Observatory SUNRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Bonet, J. A.; Bello González, N.; Franz, M.; Schüssler, M.; Barthol, P.; Berkefeld, T.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.; Gandorfer, A.; Knölker, M.; Schmidt, W.

    2010-11-01

    Bright points (BPs) are manifestations of small magnetic elements in the solar photosphere. Their brightness contrast not only gives insight into the thermal state of the photosphere (and chromosphere) in magnetic elements, but also plays an important role in modulating the solar total and spectral irradiance. Here, we report on simultaneous high-resolution imaging and spectropolarimetric observations of BPs using SUNRISE balloon-borne observatory data of the quiet Sun at the disk center. BP contrasts have been measured between 214 nm and 525 nm, including the first measurements at wavelengths below 388 nm. The histograms of the BP peak brightness show a clear trend toward broader contrast distributions and higher mean contrasts at shorter wavelengths. At 214 nm, we observe a peak brightness of up to five times the mean quiet-Sun value, the highest BP contrast so far observed. All BPs are associated with a magnetic signal, although in a number of cases it is surprisingly weak. Most of the BPs show only weak downflows, the mean value being 240 m s-1, but some display strong down- or upflows reaching a few km s-1.

  19. Planetary Science with Balloon-Borne Telescopes: A Summary of the BOPPS Mission and the Planetary Science that may be Possible Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremic, T.; Cheng, A.; Hibbitts, K.; Young, E. F.

    2015-09-01

    well as some of the residual motion from the gondola that was not addressed by the gondola's coarse pointing systems. The mission met its primary science and engineering objectives. The results of the BOPPS mission will feed into the body of science knowledge, but also feed into future planning for more science from balloon-borne platforms. A notional platform called Gondola for High-Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) has been explored, and this concept platform can address a number of important decadal questions. This paper provides a summary of the assessment of potential balloon borne observations for planetary science purposes including where potential science contributions can be expected, the necessary performance/characteristics of the platform, and other features required or desired. The BOPPS mission is summarized including descriptions of the main elements and key science and engineering results. The paper then briefly describes GHAPS, and the salient features that can make it a valuable tool for future planetary observations.

  20. Abundance of the Radioactive Be-10 in the Cosmic Radiation up to 2 GeVnucleon-l with the Balloon-borne Instrument ISOMAX1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hams, T.; Barbier, L. M.; Bremerich, M.; Christian, E. R.; deNolfo, G. A.; Geier, S.; Goebel, H.; Gupta, S. K.; Hof, M.; Menn, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Isotope Magnet Experiment (ISOMAX) a balloon-borne superconducting magnet spectrometer was designed to measure the isotopic composition of the light isotopes (3 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 8) of the cosmic radiation up to 4 GeV nucleon (exp -1) with a mass resolution of better than 0.25 amu by using the velocity vs. rigidity technique. To achieve this stringent mass resolution ISOMAX was comprised of three major detector systems, a magnetic rigidity spectrometer with a precision drift chamber tracker in conjunction with a three-layer time-of-flight system and two silica-aerogel Cherenkov counters for the velocity determination. A special emphasis of the ISOMAX program was the accurate measurement of radioactive Be-10 with respect to its stable neighbor isotope Be-9, which provides important constraints on the age of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. ISOMAX had its first balloon flight on August 4-5, 1998, from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada. Thirteen hours of data were recorded during this flight at a residual atmosphere of less than 5 g per square centimeter. The isotopic ratio at the top of the atmosphere for Be-10/Be-9 was measured to be 0.195 plus or minus 0.036 (statistical) plus or minus 0.039 (systematic) between 0.26 - 1.03GeV nucleon (exp -1) and 0.317 plus or minus 0.109 (statistical) plus or minus 0.042 (systematic) between 1.13 - 2.03GeV nucleon(exp -1). This is the first measurement of its kind above 1 GeV nucleon (exp -1). ISOMAX results tend to be higher than predictions from current propagation models.

  1. Constraints for the photolysis rate and the equilibrium constant of ClO-dimer from airborne and balloon-borne measurements of chlorine compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinböhl, Armin; Khosravi, Maryam; Urban, Joachim; Canty, Timothy; Salawitch, Ross J.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Küllmann, Harry; Notholt, Justus

    2014-06-01

    We analyze measurements of ClO across the terminator taken by the Airborne Submillimeter Radiometer (ASUR) in the activated vortices of the Arctic winters of 1995/1996, 1996/1997, and 1999/2000 to evaluate the plausibility of various determinations of the ClO-dimer photolysis cross section and the rate constant controlling the thermal equilibrium between ClO-dimer and ClO. We use measured ClO during sunlit conditions to estimate total active chlorine (ClOx). As the measurements suggest nearly full chlorine activation in winter 1999/2000, we compare ClOx estimates based on various photolysis frequencies of ClO-dimer with total available inorganic chlorine (Cly), estimated from an N2O-Cly correlation established by a balloon-borne MkIV interferometer measurement. Only ClO-dimer cross sections leading to the fastest photolysis frequencies in the literature (including the latest evaluation by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) give ClOx mixing ratios that overlap with the estimated range of available Cly. Slower photolysis rates lead to ClOx values that are higher than available Cly. We use the ClOx calculated from sunlit ClO measurements to estimate ClO in darkness based on different equilibrium constants, and compare it with ASUR ClO measurements before sunrise at high solar zenith angles. Calculations with equilibrium constants published in recent evaluations of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory give good agreement with observed ClO mixing ratios. Equilibrium constants leading to a higher ClO/ClOx ratio in darkness yield ClO values that tend to exceed observed abundances. Perturbing the rates for the ClO + BrO reaction in a manner that increases OClO formation and decreases BrCl formation leads to lower ClO values calculated for twilight conditions after sunset, resulting in better agreement with ASUR measurements.

  2. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2016-06-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 μm. In this initial paper, we show our 500 μm data smoothed to a resolution of 2.‧5 (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p \\propto {{\\boldsymbol{N}}}-0.45 {{\\boldsymbol{S}}}-0.60, where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high column density sightlines. Alternatively, the intrinsic polarization efficiency of the dust grain population might be lower for material along higher density sightlines. We find no significant correlation between N and S. Comparison of observed submillimeter polarization maps with synthetic polarization maps derived from numerical simulations provides a promising method for testing star formation theories. Realistic simulations should allow for the possibility of variable intrinsic polarization efficiency. The measured levels of correlation among p, N, and S provide points of comparison between observations and simulations.

  3. Balloon-Borne Gamma-Ray Polarimeter (PoGO) to Study Black Holes, Pulsars, and AGN Jets: Design and Calibration(SULI)

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Zachary; /Hampshire Coll. /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    Polarization measurements at X-ray and gamma-ray energies can provide crucial information on the emission region around massive compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars. The Polarized Gamma-ray Observer (PoGO) is a new balloon-borne instrument designed to measure polarization from such astrophysical objects in the 30-100 keV range, under development by an international collaboration with members from United States, Japan, Sweden and France. The PoGO instrument has been designed by the collaboration and several versions of prototype models have been built at SLAC. The purpose of this experiment is to test the latest prototype model with a radioactive gamma-ray source. For this, we have to polarize gamma-rays in a laboratory environment. Unpolarized gamma-rays from Am241 (59.5 keV) were Compton scattered at around 90 degrees for this purpose. Computer simulation of the scattering process in the setup predicts a 86% polarization. The polarized beam was then used to irradiate the prototype PoGO detector. The data taken in this experiment showed a clear polarization signal, with a measured azimuthal modulation factor of 0.35 {+-} 0.02. The measured modulation is in very close agreement with the value expected from a previous beam test study of a polarized gamma-ray beam at the Argonne National Laboratories Advanced Photon Source. This experiment has demonstrated that the PoGO instrument (or any other polarimeter in the energy range) can be tested in a libratory with a simple setup to a similar accuracy.

  4. Detection in the summer polar stratosphere of air plume pollution from East Asia by balloon-borne in situ CO measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huret, N.; Krysztofiak, G.; Thiéblemont, R.; Catoire, V.; Payan, S.; Té, Y. V.; Jegou, F.; Drouin, M.; Robert, C.

    2011-12-01

    The SPIRALE (french acronym for infrared absorption spectroscopy by tunable laser diodes) and SWIR-balloon (shortwave infrared Fourier transform spectrometer in nadir-looking) balloon-borne instruments have been launched in the Arctic polar region (Kiruna, Sweden, 67.9°N - 21.1°E) during summer on 7 and 24 August 2009 and on 14 August 2009, respectively. SPIRALE instrument performed in situ measurements of several trace gases including CO and O3 between 10 and 34 km height, with very high vertical resolution (~5 m) and SWIR-balloon instrument measured total column of several species including CO. The balloon CO measurements for the 3 dates are compared with the satellite data from IASI instrument and show a good agreement. However, the stratospheric profile from SPIRALE on 7 August 2009 presents specific structures associated with a tropical intrusion in the low levels (320-380K potential temperature corresponding to 10-14 km altitude) with respect to the 24 august measurements, which is confirmed by the 15-20% increase of the total column of IASI. Their interpretation is made with the help of results from several modelling tools (MIMOSA, FLEXTRA, REPROBUS and GIRAFE) and from satellite data (MODIS on board TERRA/AQUA, IASI instrument on board MetOp-A and GEOS). The results suggest the impact of East Asia urban pollution on the chemistry of polar stratosphere in summer. The SPIRALE O3 vertical profile was also used in correlation with CO to calculate the proportion of recent air in polar stratosphere. SPIRALE and SWIR-balloon flights were part of the balloon campaign conducted by CNES within the frame of the StraPolÉté project funded by French agencies ANR, CNES and IPEV, contributing to the International Polar Year.

  5. Seasonal to Decadal Variations of Water Vapor in the Tropical Lower Stratosphere Observed with Balloon-Borne Cryogenic Frost Point Hygrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Voemel, H.; Hasebe, F.; Shiotani, M.; Ogino, S.-Y.; Iwasaki, S.; Nishi, N.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, K.; Nishimoto, E.; ValverdeCanossa, J. M.; Selkirk, H. B.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated water vapor variations in the tropical lower stratosphere on seasonal, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), and decadal time scales using balloon-borne cryogenic frost point hygrometer data taken between 1993 and 2009 during various campaigns including the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (March 1993), campaigns once or twice annually during the Soundings of Ozone and Water in the Equatorial Region (SOWER) project in the eastern Pacific (1998-2003) and in the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (2001-2009), and the Ticosonde campaigns and regular sounding at Costa Rica (2005-2009). Quasi-regular sounding data taken at Costa Rica clearly show the tape recorder signal. The observed ascent rates agree well with the ones from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite sensor. Average profiles from the recent five SOWER campaigns in the equatorial western, Pacific in northern winter and from the three Ticosonde campaigns at Costa Rica (10degN) in northern summer clearly show two effects of the QBO. One is the vertical displacement of water vapor profiles associated with the QBO meridional circulation anomalies, and the other is the concentration variations associated with the QBO tropopause temperature variations. Time series of cryogenic frost point hygrometer data averaged in a lower stratospheric layer together with HALOE and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder data show the existence of decadal variations: The mixing ratios were higher and increasing in the 1990s, lower in the early 2000s, and probably slightly higher again or recovering after 2004. Thus linear trend analysis is not appropriate to investigate the behavior of the tropical lower stratospheric water vapor.

  6. Seasonal to decadal variations of water vapor in the tropical lower stratosphere observed with balloon-borne cryogenic frost point hygrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M.; VöMel, H.; Hasebe, F.; Shiotani, M.; Ogino, S.-Y.; Iwasaki, S.; Nishi, N.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, K.; Nishimoto, E.; Valverde Canossa, J. M.; Selkirk, H. B.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2010-09-01

    We investigated water vapor variations in the tropical lower stratosphere on seasonal, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), and decadal time scales using balloon-borne cryogenic frost point hygrometer data taken between 1993 and 2009 during various campaigns including the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (March 1993), campaigns once or twice annually during the Soundings of Ozone and Water in the Equatorial Region (SOWER) project in the eastern Pacific (1998-2003) and in the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (2001-2009), and the Ticosonde campaigns and regular sounding at Costa Rica (2005-2009). Quasi-regular sounding data taken at Costa Rica clearly show the tape recorder signal. The observed ascent rates agree well with the ones from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite sensor. Average profiles from the recent five SOWER campaigns in the equatorial western Pacific in northern winter and from the three Ticosonde campaigns at Costa Rica (10°N) in northern summer clearly show two effects of the QBO. One is the vertical displacement of water vapor profiles associated with the QBO meridional circulation anomalies, and the other is the concentration variations associated with the QBO tropopause temperature variations. Time series of cryogenic frost point hygrometer data averaged in a lower stratospheric layer together with HALOE and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder data show the existence of decadal variations: The mixing ratios were higher and increasing in the 1990s, lower in the early 2000s, and probably slightly higher again or recovering after 2004. Thus linear trend analysis is not appropriate to investigate the behavior of the tropical lower stratospheric water vapor.

  7. [Anita: a Maya peasant woman on the rise].

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, M

    1980-01-01

    Chan Kom, a village of 623 inhabitants in the Yucatan peninsula whose population lives primarily by slash-and-burn maize agriculture, has been well studied by social scientists for over 50 years. The roles of women during that time have been interpreted by men, and it is the object of this article to examine the needs and desires of women and the ways in which they seek to improve life for themselves and their families. Anita at 38 has 7 living children from 10 pregnancies. Her husband is a subsistence farmer who works part time at a variety of jobs. The oldest daughter married at 17. A 16-year-old son Emiliano attended an agricultural vocational school to which his family sent him after great sacrifice. After completing school Emiliano became a promoter for the National Indigenist Institute. A daughter finishiing primary school wished to continue studying but her father objected that she would probably get married and her mother worried about her safety if she left home to study. She and a sister were sent to live with the daughter of her mother's comadre in a nearby city in the hope that she would learn office work. A 12-year-old son at home, who is not such a good student, helps the father in farming. 2 little girls are the only other children still at home. Anita's last 2 deliveries were difficult and dangerous, and for 3 years she and her husband have been attempting to avoid another pregnancy, using a combination of withdrawal and rhythm. She and her husband discussed vasectomy with a Maya-speaking North American doctor, but came to no decision. Anita states that many Maya women do not menstruate between pregnancies, or do so only once or twice. Anita has had 2 miscarriages and 2 daughters since deciding that she wanted no more children. She accepted a prescription for pills but was afraid to take them. Fear of disturbing the "tipte," a regulating organ believed by Maya women to lie behind the navel, prevented her from choosing sterilization. PMID:12264283

  8. Overview of balloon-borne aerosol measurements with the aerosol counter LOAC, with focus on the ChArMEx 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulac, François; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of 250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles: the first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.2-100 mm; the second angle, at 60°, is used to discriminate between different types of particles dominating different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with measurements from other sensors at the surface are shown. We shall give a quick review of balloon-borne experiences since 2011 with LOAC under all kinds of balloons including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric, and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLBP) from CNES. Observation domains include the atmospheric surface layer, the boundary layer, the free troposphere and the lower stratosphere up to more than 35 km in altitude. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Results from the various campaigns will be illustrated including the study of fog events, urban aerosols, Saharan dust transport over France, stratospheric soot... Emphasis will be put on the ChArMEx campaign (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) performed in summer 2013 in the Mediterranean basin: 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France) in late July and early August. Most of the flights were coupled with ozone concentration measurements (see presentation by F. Gheusi et al.). LOAC balloons were especially, but not

  9. Balloon Borne Soundings of Water Vapor, Ozone and Temperature in the Upper Tropospheric and Lower Stratosphere as Part of the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voemel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of our work was to provide in situ water vapor and ozone profiles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere as reference measurements for the validation of SAGE III water vapor and ozone retrievals. We used the NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer and ECC ozone sondes on small research balloons to provide continuous profiles between the surface and the mid stratosphere. The NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer is currently the only lightweight balloon borne instrument capable of measuring water vapor between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere. The validation measurements were based in the arctic region of Scandinavia for northern hemisphere observations and in New Zealand for southern hemisphere observations and timed to coincide with overpasses of the SAGE III instrument. In addition to SAGE III validation we also tried to coordinate launches with other instruments and studied dehydration and transport processes in the Arctic stratospheric vortex.

  10. ANITA Air Monitoring on the International Space Station: Results Compared to Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honne, A.; Schumann-Olsen, H.; Kaspersen, K.; Limero, T.; Macatangay, A.; Mosebach, H.; Kampf, D.; Mudgett, P. D.; James, J. T.; Tan, G.; Supper, W.

    2009-01-01

    ANITA (Analysing Interferometer for Ambient Air) is a flight experiment precursor for a permanent continuous air quality monitoring system on the ISS (International Space Station). For the safety of the crew, ANITA can detect and quantify quasi-online and simultaneously 33 gas compounds in the air with ppm or sub-ppm detection limits. The autonomous measurement system is based on FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy). The system represents a versatile air quality monitor, allowing for the first time the detection and monitoring of trace gas dynamics in a spacecraft atmosphere. ANITA operated on the ISS from September 2007 to August 2008. This paper summarizes the results of ANITA s air analyses with emphasis on comparisons to other measurements. The main basis of comparison is NASA s set of grab samples taken onboard the ISS and analysed on ground applying various GC-based (Gas Chromatography) systems.

  11. CO2 and O3 vertical distributions over the Showa Station, Antarctica before and during the ozone hole formation in 2014, measured by balloon-borne CO2 and O3 instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Ouchi, M.; Imasu, R.; Kawasaki, M.

    2015-12-01

    The vertical and horizontal distributions of CO2 mixing ratio in the troposphere and stratosphere are considered to include the information on the source and sink of CO2, as well as transport of air masses in the atmosphere. However, only a limited number of vertical profiles for CO2 mixing ratio, which were typically obtained based on aircraft-based observations, are available. We have originally developed a new balloon-born instrument (CO2 sonde) to measure CO2 vertical profile from surface up to about 10 km in altitude. The ozone hole formation is typically observed in the early spring over Antarctica. To our knowledge, no study focusing on the change in the CO2 vertical profile before and after the ozone hole formation has been reported. In the present study, we launched four CO2 sondes at Syowa Station, Antarctica between June and October in 2014 to obtain CO2 vertical distributions before and during the ozone hole formation. Observations of ozone vertical distributions using traditional ozone sondes were also conducted on the same days. In the presentation, we will report the relationships between the vertical distributions of CO2 and ozone.

  12. High-Altitude Aircraft and Balloon-Borne Observations of OH, HO2, ClO, BrO, NO2, ClONO2, ClOOCl, H2O, and O3 in Earth's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    1999-01-01

    Using observations from balloon-borne instruments and aircraft-borne instruments the investigation arrived at the following developments.: (1) Determination of the dominant catalytic cycles that destroy ozone in the lower stratosphere; (2) The partial derivatives of the rate limiting steps are observables in the lower stratosphere; (3) Recognition that the "Low NOx" condition is the regime that holds the greatest potential for misjudgement of Ozone loss rates; (4) Mapping of the Bromine radical contribution to the ozone destruction rate in the lower stratosphere; (5) Observation of OH, HO2 and ClO in the plume of the Concorde SST in the stratosphere; (6) Determination of the diurnal behavior of OH in the lower stratosphere; (7) Observed OH and H02 in the Troposphere and the interrelationship between Ozone and OH, HO2, CO and NO; (8) Analysis of the Catalytic Production of Ozone and Reactions that Couple OH and H02 in the Troposphere; (9) The continuing development of the understanding of the Tropopause temperatures, water vapor mixing ratios, and vertical advection and the mixing in of mid-latitude air; (10) Performed Multiple Tracer Analyses as a diagnostic of water vapor intrusion into the "Middle World" (i.e., the lowermost stratsophere); (11) Flight testing of a new instrument for the In Situ detection of ClON02 from the ER-2; (12) Laser induced fluorescence detection of NO2. There is included an in depth discussion of each of these developments and observations.

  13. Measurement of the Abundance of Radioactive Be-10 and Other Light Isotopes in Cosmic Radiation Up to 2 GeV /Nucleon with the Balloon-Borne Instrument Isomax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hams, T.; Barbier, L. M.; Bremerich, M.; Christian, E. R.; deNolfo, G. A.; Geier, S.; Goebel, H.; Gupta, S. K.; Hof, M.; Menn, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Isotope Magnet Experiment (ISOMAX), a balloon-borne superconducting magnet spectrometer, was designed to measure the isotopic composition of the light isotopes (3 les than or = Z less than or = 8) of cosmic radiation up to 4 GeV/nucleon with a mass resolution of better than 0.25 amu by using the velocity versus rigidity technique. To achieve this stringent mass resolution, ISOMAX was composed of three major detector systems: a magnetic rigidity spectrometer with a precision drift chamber tracker in conjunction with a three-layer time-of-flight system, and two silica-aerogel Cerenkov counters for velocity determination. A special emphasis of the ISOMAX program was the accurate measurement of radioactive Be-10 with respect to its stable neighbor isotope Be-9, which provides important constraints on the age of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. ISOMAX had its first balloon flight on 1998 August 4-5 from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada. Thirteen hours of data were recorded during this flight at a residual atmosphere of less than 5 g/sq cm. The isotopic ratio at the top of the atmosphere for Be-10/Be-9 was measured to be 0.195 +/- 0.036 (statistical) +/- 0.039 (systematic) between 0.26 and 1.03 GeV/nucleon and 0.317 +/- 0.109(statistical) +/- 0.042(systematic) between 1.13 and 2.03 GeV/nucleon. This is the first measurement of its kind above l GeV/nucleon. ISOMAX results tend to be higher than predictions from current propagation models. In addition to the beryllium results, we report the isotopic ratios of neighboring lithium and boron in the energy range of the time-of-flight system (up to approx. 1 GeV/nucleon). The lithium and boron ratios agree well with existing data and model predictions at similar energies.

  14. Balloon-borne In-Situ Measurements of ClO and ClONO2 in the late 2010/2011 Arctic Polar Vortex: Instrument Calibration and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, F.; Heinecke, F.; Afchine, A.; Barthel, J.; Engel, A.; Grooß, J.; von Hobe, M.; Richter, A.; Schönfeld, A.; Suminska, O.; Tan, V.

    2011-12-01

    Since 1995 we have carried out balloon-borne in-situ measurements of ClO and BrO. Lately we have designed an upgraded balloon instrument to additionally measure the ClO dimer and the reservoir species ClONO2. The halogen oxide measurements are carried out employing the chemical conversion resonance fluorescence technique (Brune et al., 1989) in a fast flow through two parallel ducts generated by modified roots blowers. The inlet of one duct is equipped with a dedicated heating element enabling controlled air temperatures in excess of 550K at pressures lower than 50 hPa. This causes the ClO dimer to thermolyze forming two ClO molecules at around 380K as well as additional thermolysis of ClONO2 to ClO and NO2 at around 540K. The ClO generated within the thermolysis is then detected on top of the ambient ClO. Temperature cycling and intercomparisons with the first unheated duct allow the differentiation of the chlorine species. Details of the instrumental setup, instrument calibration, and performance will be discussed. Profiles for ClO and ClONO2 from a flight carried out from ESRANGE near Kiruna, Sweden, on April-01-2011 in the edge region of the degrading arctic vortex will be presented marking the first ClONO2 in-situ measurements above research aircraft altitudes (20km). Brune, W. H., et al., Insitu Observations Of ClO In The Antarctic - Er-2 Aircraft Results From 54-Degrees-S To 72-Degrees-S Latitude, Journal Of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 94, 16649-16663, 1989.

  15. Vertical distribution of non-volatile species of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol observed by balloon-borne optical particle counter above Ny-Aalesund, Norway in the winter of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, K.; Hayashi, M.; Shibata, T.; Neuber, R.; Ruhe, W.

    2015-12-01

    The polar lower stratosphere is the sink area of stratospheric global circulation. The composition, concentration and size distribution of aerosol in the polar stratosphere are considered to be strongly influenced by the transportations from mid-latitude to polar region and exchange of stratosphere to troposphere. In order to study the aerosol composition and size distribution in the Arctic stratosphere and the relationship between their aerosol microphysical properties and transport process, we carried out balloon-borne measurement of aerosol volatility above Ny-Aalesund, Norway in the winter of 2015. In our observation, two optical particle counters and a thermo denuder were suspended by one rubber balloon. A particle counter measured the heated aerosol size distribution (after heating at the temperature of 300 degree by the thermo denuder) and the other measured the ambient aerosol size distribution during the observation. The observation was carried out on 15 January, 2015. Balloon arrived at the height of 30km and detailed information of aerosol size distributions in upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for both heated aerosol and ambient aerosol were obtained. As a Result, the number ratio of non-volatile particles to ambient aerosol particles in lower stratosphere (11-15km) showed different feature in particle size range of fine mode (0.3

  16. Balloon-borne radiometer profiler: Field observations

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Hubbe, J.M.; Scott, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    This project involves the development of the capability of making routine soundings of broadband radiative fluxes and radiative flux divergences to heights of 1500m AGL. Described in this document are radiometers carried on a stabilized platform in a harness inserted in the tetherline of a tethered balloon meteriological sounding system. Field test results are given.

  17. Radio astronomy from space; Proceedings of the Workshop, Green Bank, WV, Sept. 30-Oct. 2, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    The scientific aims and technological implementation of planned and proposed space radio observatories are examined in reviews and reports. Observations at mm and submm, cm, dkm, and hm wavelengths are considered, and particular attention is given to astrophysical problems requiring space-based observations; radio astronomy from the moon; coordination of ground, airborne, balloon-borne, and space-based mm and submm astronomy; microwave-background observations at 15-90 GHz, the Large Deployable Reflector, the Space Station mm-wave facility, the use of TDRSS as an orbiting VLBI observatory, and interstellar scattering and resolution limitations. Also discussed are Quasat, Astro-Array, VLBA, solar-system radio astronomy at low frequencies, radio emission from coronal and interplanetary shocks, and Tasmanian LF Galactic background surveys.

  18. Original sounding and drifting balloon-borne measurements in the western Mediterranean with the aerosol counter/sizer LOAC during summer ChArMEx campaigns, with a focus on desert dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Chazette, Patrick; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Totems, Julien; Durand, Pierre; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corinne; Mallet, Marc; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2015-04-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles (12° and 60°), allowing the determination of the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 µm and some identification of the nature of particles dominating different size classes. Following laboratory calibration, the sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with other in situ sensors at the surface and with remote sensing measurements on the vertical were performed to give confidence in measurements. The instrument has been operated at the surface, under all kinds of balloons up to more than 35 km in altitude, including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLPB) from CNES, and was tested on board a small UAV. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Presented results are focused on the LOAC balloon-borne measurements performed in the western Mediterranean basin during MISTRALS/ChArMEx campaigns (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-hjome.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), with a focus on African dust events. Two test flights with a first version of LOAC under sounding balloons were first successfully performed in late June 2012 near Marseille during an intense dust event. In 2013, 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France

  19. Original sounding and drifting balloon-borne measurements in the western Mediterranean with the aerosol counter/sizer LOAC during summer ChArMEx campaigns, with a focus on desert dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Chazette, Patrick; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Totems, Julien; Durand, Pierre; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corinne; Mallet, Marc; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2015-04-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles (12° and 60°), allowing the determination of the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 µm and some identification of the nature of particles dominating different size classes. Following laboratory calibration, the sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with other in situ sensors at the surface and with remote sensing measurements on the vertical were performed to give confidence in measurements. The instrument has been operated at the surface, under all kinds of balloons up to more than 35 km in altitude, including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLPB) from CNES, and was tested on board a small UAV. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Presented results are focused on the LOAC balloon-borne measurements performed in the western Mediterranean basin during MISTRALS/ChArMEx campaigns (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-hjome.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), with a focus on African dust events. Two test flights with a first version of LOAC under sounding balloons were first successfully performed in late June 2012 near Marseille during an intense dust event. In 2013, 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France

  20. Past Cultural Restrictions in Anita Rau Badami's "Can You Hear the Night Bird Call?" and "'Tamarind Mem"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johny, S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the thesis is to bring out the trauma of the immigrants who are stuck up by the nostalgic and glorious past in their alien world. The cultural and social restrictions faced by the characters who live in their separate but intertwined worlds are brought in a detailed manner. Anita Rau Badami, one of the newest writers in the field…

  1. Comparative study of MC-50 and ANITA neutron beams by using 55 nm SRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeg, Sanghyeon; Lee, Soonyoung; Bak, Geun Yong; Jeong, Hyunsoo; Jeon, Sang Hoon

    2012-09-01

    Single event upset (SEU) is mainly caused by neutrons in the terrestrial environment. In addition, SEU effects become more and more problematic as technology scales. It is, therefore, important to understand the SEU behaviors of semiconductor devices under neutron reactions. ANITA (atmospheric-like neutrons from thick target) in TSL (The Svedberg Laboratory), Sweden, resembles the neutron energy and flux spectrum to neutrons at the terrestrial level and are typically used to estimate the soft error rate (SER). On the other hand, the neutron energy and flux spectrum from the MC-50 cyclotron at KIRAMS (Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences) differs greatly from the atmospheric environment. The main objective of this work is finding the efficacy of the neutron beam at KIRAMS for a SEU analysis by using a comparative analysis; 55 nm SRAM is used to determine SEU difference under the beams at two different locations. Since MCU (multi-cell upset) is the dominant effect in emerging technologies with smaller critical charges, the MCU cross sections from the two different beam tests are compared.

  2. Concept and Analysis of a Satellite for Space-Based Radio Detection of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Gorham, P.; Booth, J.; Chen, P.; Duren, R. M.; Liewer, K.; Nam, J.; Saltzberg, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Wissel, S.; Zairfian, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a concept for on-orbit radio detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) that has the potential to provide collection rates of ~100 events per year for energies above 10^20 eV. The synoptic wideband orbiting radio detector (SWORD) mission's high event statistics at these energies combined with the pointing capabilities of a space-borne antenna array could enable charged particle astronomy. The detector concept is based on ANITA's successful detection UHECRs where the geosynchrotron radio signal produced by the extended air shower is reflected off the Earth's surface and detected in flight.

  3. ANITA-2000 activation code package - updating of the decay data libraries and validation on the experimental data of the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    ANITA-2000 is a code package for the activation characterization of materials exposed to neutron irradiation released by ENEA to OECD-NEADB and ORNL-RSICC. The main component of the package is the activation code ANITA-4M that computes the radioactive inventory of a material exposed to neutron irradiation. The code requires the decay data library (file fl1) containing the quantities describing the decay properties of the unstable nuclides and the library (file fl2) containing the gamma ray spectra emitted by the radioactive nuclei. The fl1 and fl2 files of the ANITA-2000 code package, originally based on the evaluated nuclear data library FENDL/D-2.0, were recently updated on the basis of the JEFF-3.1.1 Radioactive Decay Data Library. This paper presents the results of the validation of the new fl1 decay data library through the comparison of the ANITA-4M calculated values with the measured electron and photon decay heats and activities of fusion material samples irradiated at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) of the NEA-Frascati Research Centre. Twelve material samples were considered, namely: Mo, Cu, Hf, Mg, Ni, Cd, Sn, Re, Ti, W, Ag and Al. The ratios between calculated and experimental values (C/E) are shown and discussed in this paper.

  4. Balloon-borne match measurements of midlatitude cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, A.; Luo, B. P.; Engel, I.; Wienhold, F. G.; Sprenger, M.; Krieger, U. K.; Weers, U.; Romanens, G.; Levrat, G.; Jeannet, P.; Ruffieux, D.; Philipona, R.; Calpini, B.; Spichtinger, P.; Peter, T.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of high supersaturations with respect to ice inside cirrus clouds with high ice water content (> 0.01 g kg-1) and high crystal number densities (> 1 cm-3) are challenging our understanding of cloud microphysics and of climate feedback processes in the upper troposphere. However, single measurements of a cloudy air mass provide only a snapshot from which the persistence of ice supersaturation cannot be judged. We introduce here the "cirrus match technique" to obtain information about the evolution of clouds and their saturation ratio. The aim of these coordinated balloon soundings is to analyze the same air mass twice. To this end the standard radiosonde equipment is complemented by a frost point hygrometer, "SnowWhite", and a particle backscatter detector, "COBALD" (Compact Optical Backscatter AerosoL Detector). Extensive trajectory calculations based on regional weather model COSMO (Consortium for Small-Scale Modeling) forecasts are performed for flight planning, and COSMO analyses are used as a basis for comprehensive microphysical box modeling (with grid scale of 2 and 7 km, respectively). Here we present the results of matching a cirrus cloud to within 2-15 km, realized on 8 June 2010 over Payerne, Switzerland, and a location 120 km downstream close to Zurich. A thick cirrus cloud was detected over both measurement sites. We show that in order to quantitatively reproduce the measured particle backscatter ratios, the small-scale temperature fluctuations not resolved by COSMO must be superimposed on the trajectories. The stochastic nature of the fluctuations is captured by ensemble calculations. Possibilities for further improvements in the agreement with the measured backscatter data are investigated by assuming a very slow mass accommodation of water on ice, the presence of heterogeneous ice nuclei, or a wide span of (spheroidal) particle shapes. However, the resulting improvements from these microphysical refinements are moderate and comparable in magnitude with changes caused by assuming different regimes of temperature fluctuations for clear-sky or cloudy-sky conditions, highlighting the importance of proper treatment of subscale fluctuations. The model yields good agreement with the measured backscatter over both sites and reproduces the measured saturation ratios with respect to ice over Payerne. Conversely, the 30% in-cloud supersaturation measured in a massive 4 km thick cloud layer over Zurich cannot be reproduced, irrespective of the choice of meteorological or microphysical model parameters. The measured supersaturation can only be explained by either resorting to an unknown physical process, which prevents the ice particles from consuming the excess humidity, or - much more likely - by a measurement error, such as a contamination of the sensor housing of the SnowWhite hygrometer by a precipitation drop from a mixed-phase cloud just below the cirrus layer or from some very slight rain in the boundary layer. This uncertainty calls for in-flight checks or calibrations of hygrometers under the special humidity conditions in the upper troposphere.

  5. A Low Cost Weather Balloon Borne Solar Cell Calibration Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David B.; Wolford, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Calibration of standard sets of solar cell sub-cells is an important step to laboratory verification of on-orbit performance of new solar cell technologies. This paper, looks at the potential capabilities of a lightweight weather balloon payload for solar cell calibration. A 1500 gr latex weather balloon can lift a 2.7 kg payload to over 100,000 ft altitude, above 99% of the atmosphere. Data taken between atmospheric pressures of about 30 to 15 mbar may be extrapolated via the Langley Plot method to 0 mbar, i.e. AMO. This extrapolation, in principle, can have better than 0.1 % error. The launch costs of such a payload arc significantly less than the much larger, higher altitude balloons, or the manned flight facility. The low cost enables a risk tolerant approach to payload development. Demonstration of 1% standard deviation flight-to-flight variation is the goal of this project. This paper describes the initial concept of solar cell calibration payload, and reports initial test flight results. .

  6. GRAPE: a balloon-borne gamma-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark L.; Bancroft, Christopher; Bloser, Peter F.; Connor, Taylor; Legere, Jason; Ryan, James M.

    2009-08-01

    The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a concept for an astronomical hard X-ray Compton polarimeter operating in the 50 - 500 keV energy band. The instrument has been optimized for wide-field polarization measurements of transient outbursts from energetic astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts and solar flares. The GRAPE instrument is composed of identical modules, each of which consists of an array of scintillator elements read out by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). Incident photons Compton scatter in plastic scintillator elements and are subsequently absorbed in inorganic scintillator elements; a net polarization signal is revealed by a characteristic asymmetry in the azimuthal scattering angles. We have constructed a prototype GRAPE module that has been calibrated at a polarized hard X-ray beam and flown on an engineering balloon test flight. A full-scale scientific balloon payload, consisting of up to 36 modules, is currently under development. The first flight, a one-day flight scheduled for 2011, will verify the expected scientific performance with a pointed observation of the Crab Nebula. We will then propose long-duration balloon flights to observe gamma-ray bursts and solar flares.

  7. Proliferation kinetics of paramecium tetraurelia in balloon-borne experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Rousseille, R.; Planel, H.

    1982-06-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effect of cosmic radiation, at a balloon-flight ceiling of about 36,500 m (120,000 ft) on single-cell organism proliferation. Paramecium tetraurelia were placed in air-tight containers and maintained at 25 degrees +/- 0.1 degrees C. Cellular growth was determined by cell count, either after recovery or during the flight, by means of an automatic fixation device. Dosimetry was performed by a tissue equivalent proportional counter and was of about 0.5 mrad/h. Flight ceiling duration ranged from 48 min - 22 h. A secondary stimulating effect of growth rate, preceded by a temporary decrease, was observed after recovery. Because of the high bacterial concentration in the trans-Mediterranean flight culture medium, the temporary drop of the growth rate, due to the radiolysis products, disappears. Researchers consider that the stimulating effect can be the result of enzymatic intracellular scavenging of radiolysis products generated in the cell.

  8. Astrophysical Observations with the HEROES Balloon-borne Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, C.; Gaskin, J.; Christe, S.; Shih, A. Y.; Swartz, D. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Ramsey, B.

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) payload flew on a balloon from Ft. Sumner, NM, September 21-22, 2013. HEROES is sensitive from about 20-75 keV and comprises 8 optics modules, each consisting of 13-14 nickel replicated optics shells and 8 Xenon-filled positionsensitive proportional counter detectors. HEROES is unique in that it is the first hard X-ray telescope that will observe the Sun and astrophysical targets in the same balloon flight. Our astrophysics targets include the Crab nebula and pulsar and the black hole binary GRS 1915+105. In this presentation, I will describe the HEROES mission, the data analysis pipeline and calibrations, and preliminary astrophysics results.

  9. The HEROES Balloon-Borne Hard X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, C.; Gaskin, J.; Christe, S.; Shih, A. Y.; Swartz, D. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) payload flew on a balloon from Ft. Sumner, NM, September 21-22, 2013. HEROES is sensitive from about 20-75 keV and comprises 8 optics modules (HPD approximately 33" as flown), each consisting of 13-14 nickel replicated optics shells and 8 matching Xenon-filled position-sensitive proportional counter detectors (dE/E=0.05 @ 60 keV). Our targets included the Sun, the Crab Nebula and pulsar and the black hole binary GRS 1915+105. HEROES was pointed using a day/night star camera system for astrophysical observations and a newly developed Solar Aspect System for solar observations (with a shutter protecting the star camera.) We have successfully detected the Crab Nebula. Analyses for GRS 1915+105 and the Sun are ongoing. In this presentation, I will describe the HEROES mission, the data analysis pipeline and calibrations, preliminary results, and plans for follow-on missions.

  10. Thermal Control of the Balloon-Borne HEROES Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) telescope is scheduled to fly on a high altitude balloon from Fort Sumner, New Mexico in the Fall of 2013. Once it reaches an altitude of 40km it will observe the Sun, Crab Nebula, and other astrophysical objects in the hard X-Ray spectrum (20-75keV) for around 28 hours. The HEROES project is a joint effort between Marshall and Goddard Space Flight Centers (MSFC and GSFC), and will utilize the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope, which last flew in 2011 in Australia. The addition of new systems will allow the telescope to view the Sun, and monitor the mechanical alignment of the structure during flight. This paper will give an overview of the telescope, and then provide a description of the thermal control method used on HEROES. The thermal control is done through a passive cold-bias design. Detailed thermal analyses were performed in order to prove the design. This will be discussed along with the results of the analyses. HEROES is funded by the NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE) Training Opportunity. The HOPE opportunity provides early career employees within NASA hands on experience with a yearlong flight project. HOPE was awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer, and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  11. BALLOON-BORNE PARTICULATE SAMPLING FOR MONITORING POWER PLANT EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a lightweight remote-controlled sampler, carried aloft by a tethered balloon, that has been developed to collect particulates from the plumes of fossil-fueled power plants at various downwind distances. The airborne sampler is controlled from the ground by a ...

  12. The HEROES Balloon-borne Hard X-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Gaskin, Jessica; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Ramsey, Brian; Kilaru, Kiranmayee

    2014-08-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) payload flew on a balloon from Ft. Sumner, NM, September 21-22, 2013. HEROES is sensitive from about 20-75 keV and comprises 8 optics modules (HP 33"), each consisting of 13-14 nickel replicated optics shells and 8 matching Xenon-filled position-sensitive proportional counter detectors (dE/E=0.05 @ 60 keV). Our targets included the Sun, the Crab Nebula and pulsar and the black hole binary GRS 1915+105. HEROES was pointed using a day/night star camera system for astrophysical observations and a newly developed Solar Aspect System for solar observations (with a shutter protecting the star camera.) We have successfully imaged the Crab Nebula. Analyses for GRS 1915+105 and the Sun are ongoing. In this presentation, I will describe the HEROES mission, the data analysis pipeline and calibrations, preliminary results, and plans for follow-on missions.

  13. Astrophysical Observations with the HEROES Balloon-borne Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Colleen; Gaskin, J.; Christe, S.; Shih, A. Y.; Swartz, D. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Ramsey, B.

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) payload flew on a balloon from Ft. Sumner, NM, September 21-22, 2013. HEROES is sensitive from about 20-75 keV and comprises 8 optics modules, each consisting of 13-14 nickel replicated optics shells and 8 Xenon-filled position-sensitive proportional counter detectors. HEROES is unique in that it is the first hard X-ray telescope that will observe the Sun and astrophysical targets in the same balloon flight. Our astrophysics targets include the Crab nebula and pulsar and the black hole binary GRS 1915+105. In this presentation, I will describe the HEROES mission, the data analysis pipeline and calibrations, and preliminary astrophysics results.

  14. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  15. Educational Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arafeh, Sousan

    1999-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of the radio in education and the crucial role of the radio in distance education in first half of the 20th century; dramatic social changes in the 1960s that led to a review of educational institutions and of educational media; and the radio today as a neglected but inexpensive medium of communication that should be…

  16. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  17. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations. PMID:12286181

  18. Radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankov, V. N.; Barulin, L. G.; Zhodzishskii, M. I.; Malyshev, I. V.; Petrusinskii, V. V.

    The book is concerned with the design of microelectronic radio receivers and their components based on semiconductor and hybrid integrated circuits. Topics discussed include the hierarchical structure of radio receivers, the synthesis of structural schemes, the design of the principal functional units, and the design of radio receiver systems with digital signal processing. The discussion also covers the integrated circuits of multifunctional amplifiers, analog multipliers, charge-transfer devices, frequency filters, piezoelectronic devices, and microwave amplifiers, filters, and mixers.

  19. Educational Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report summarizes information about the history, technology, and operation of educational radio in the U.S. Also presented are the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) rules and regulations concerning the licensing and channel assignment of educational radio, and its auxiliary special broadcast services. Included are the application…

  20. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  1. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  2. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Gulkis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio astronomy operations during the first quarter of 1981 are reported. Results of the use of a low noise maser are presented, as well as updates in DSN support of experiments sanctioned by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel.

  3. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Niell, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the DSN in support of Radio and Radar Astronomy Operations during September through December 1980 are described. Emphasis is on a report of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel: that of VLBI observations of the energetic galactic object SS-433.

  4. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  5. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  6. A technique for detection of PeV neutrinos using a phased radio array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, A. G.; Bechtol, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.

    2016-02-01

    The detection of high energy neutrinos (1015-1020 eV) is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators and would enable tests of fundamental physics at energy scales that cannot easily be achieved on Earth. In this energy range, there are two expected populations of neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube at lower energies (~1 PeV) and the predicted cosmogenic flux at higher energies (~1018 eV) . Radio detector arrays such as RICE, ANITA, ARA, and ARIANNA exploit the Askaryan effect and the radio transparency of glacial ice, which together enable enormous volumes of ice to be monitored with sparse instrumentation. We describe here the design for a phased radio array that would lower the energy threshold of radio techniques to the PeV scale, allowing measurement of the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube over an extended energy range. Meaningful energy overlap with optical Cherenkov telescopes could be used for energy calibration. The phased radio array design would also provide more efficient coverage of the large effective volume required to discover cosmogenic neutrinos.

  7. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  8. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  9. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  10. Impact of Postoperative Radiation Therapy on Survival in Patients With Complete Resection and Stage I, II, or IIIA Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: The Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Douillard, Jean-Yves Rosell, Rafael; De Lena, Mario; Riggi, Marcello; Hurteloup, Patrick; Mahe, Marc-Andre

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) on survival in the Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) randomized study of adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: ANITA is a randomized trial of adjuvant cisplatin and vinorelbine chemotherapy vs. observation in completely resected non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) Stages IB to IIIA. Use of PORT was recommended for pN+ disease but was not randomized or mandatory. Each center decided whether to use PORT before initiation of the study. We describe here the survival of patients with and without PORT within each treatment group of ANITA. No statistical comparison of survival was performed because this was an unplanned subgroup analysis. Results: Overall, 232 of 840 patients received PORT (33.3% in the observation arm and 21.6% in the chemotherapy arm). In univariate analysis, PORT had a deleterious effect on the overall population survival. Patients with pN1 disease had an improved survival from PORT in the observation arm (median survival [MS] 25.9 vs. 50.2 months), whereas PORT had a detrimental effect in the chemotherapy group (MS 93.6 months and 46.6 months). In contrast, survival was improved in patients with pN2 disease who received PORT, both in the chemotherapy (MS 23.8 vs. 47.4 months) and observation arm (median 12.7 vs. 22.7 months). Conclusion: This retrospective evaluation suggests a positive effect of PORT in pN2 disease and a negative effect on pN1 disease when patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The results support further evaluation of PORT in prospectively randomized studies in completely resected pN2 NSCLC.

  11. The Asian Tropopause Aerosol layer through satellite and balloon-borne measurements combined with modelling approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernier, J. P.; Fairlie, T. D.; Natarajan, M.; Crawford, J. H.; Baker, N. C.; Wegner, T.; Deshler, T.; Gadhavi, H. S.; Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Jayaraman, A.; Raj, A.; Alladi, H.; Ratnam, M. V.; Pandit, A.; Vignelles, D.; Wienhold, F.; Liu, H.; Kumar, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Asian tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) is a seasonal aerosol feature occurring in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) above Asia during the Summer Asian Monsoon. Vertically resolved aerosol backscatter profiles from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission and extinction profiles from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) have been used to infer the spatial and temporal distributions of the ATAL since the late 90's. We found that aerosol optical thickness between 13-18km have increased by a factor of 2-3 over the past 16 years likely related to raising pollution levels in South East Asia occuring during the same period. Modelling studies of the ATAL using WACCAM 3 and GEOS-Chem have provided conflicting information on its origin and a better representation of in-cloud SO2 and aerosol lifetime in GOES-Chem seems to be key to obtain consistent results with the few SO2 measurements available in the UTLS during the Asian Monsoon. In situ measurements of aerosol and trace gases in the UTLS from several balloon campaigns which took place in summer 2014 and 2015 in Asia will be presented and discussed with combined satellite and modelling analysis.

  12. B-MINE: The Balloon-Borne Microcalorimeter Nuclear Line Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, E.; Schnopper, H.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Bandler, S.; Murray, S.; Romaine, S.; Slane, P.; Grindlay, J.; Madden, N.

    2001-01-01

    B-MINE is a concept for a balloon mission designed to probe the deepest regions of a supernova explosion by detecting 44Ti emission at 68 keV with spatial and spectral resolutions that are sufficient to determine the extent and velocity distribution of the 44Ti emitting region. The payload introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band. This combination provides a reduced background, an energy resolution of 50 eV and a 3 sigma sensitivity in 10 (exp 6) s of 3.3 x 10(exp -7) ph cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) at 68 keV. During the course of a long duration balloon flight, B-MINE could carry out a detailed study of the 44Ti emission line centroid and width in CAS A.

  13. Evaluation of SAGE II and Balloon-Borne Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Under funding from this proposal we evaluated measurements of stratospheric sulfate aerosols from three platforms. Two were satellite platforms providing solar extinction measurements, the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II using wavelengths from 0.386 - 1.02 microns, and the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) using wavelengths from 2.45 to 5.26 microns. The third set of measurements was from in situ sampling by balloonborne optical particle counters (OPCs). The goal was to determine the consistency among these data sets. This was accomplished through analysis of the existing measurement records, and through additional balloonborne OPC flights coinciding with new SAGE II observations over Laramie, Wyoming. All analyses used the SAGE II v 6.0 data. This project supported two balloon flights per year over Laramie dedicated to SAGE II coincidence. Because logistical factors, such as poor surface weather or unfavorable payload impact location, can make it difficult to routinely obtain close coincidences with SAGE II, we attempt to conduct nearly every Laramie flight (roughly one per month) in conjunction with a SAGE II overpass. The Laramie flight frequency has varied over the years depending on field commitments and funding sources. Current support for the Laramie measurements is from the National Science Foundation in addition to support from this NASA grant. We have also completed a variety of comparisons using aerosol measurements from SAGE II, OPCs, and HALOE. The instruments were compared for their various estimates of aerosol extinction at the SAGE II wavelengths and for aerosol surface area. Additional results, such as illustrated here, can be found in a recently accepted manuscript describing comparisons between SAGE II, HALOE, and OPCs for the period 1982 - 2000. While overall, the impression from these results is encouraging, the agreement of the measurements changes with latitude, altitude, time, and parameter. In the broadest sense, these comparisons fall into two categories: high aerosol loading (volcanic periods) and low aerosol loading (background periods and altitudes above 25 km). When the aerosol amount is low SAGE II and HALOE extinctions are higher than the OPC estimates, while the SAGE II surface areas are lower than HALOE and the OPCS. Under high loading conditions, all three instruments mutually agree to within 50%.

  14. Observation of nuclear reactors on satellites with a balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Terrence J.; Kerrick, Alan D.; Ait-Ouamer, Farid; Tumer, O. Tumay; Zych, Allen D.

    1989-01-01

    Four Soviet nuclear-powered satellites flying over a double Compton gamma-ray telescope resulted in the detection of gamma rays with 0.3-8.0 MeV energies on April 15, 1988, as the balloonborne telescope searched, from a 35-km altitude, for celestial gamma-ray sources. The satellites included Cosmos 1900 and 1932. The USSR is the only nation currently employing moderated nuclear reactors for satellite power; reactors in space may cause significant problems for gamma-ray astronomy by increasing backgrounds, especially in the case of gamma-ray bursts.

  15. The balloon-borne experiment with a superconducting spectrometer (BESS) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, John; Hams, Thomas; Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kumazawa, T.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Moiseev, A. A.; Myers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    In eleven balloon flights since 1993, nine over the northern hemisphere and two over Antarctica, the BESS collaboration has precisely measured the spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons and light nuclei and conducted sensitive searches for antihelium and antideuterons. BESS antiproton measurements constrain candidate models for dark matter and, together with the measured elemental and isotopic spectra of H and He, probe cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy and Solar System. The BESS antihelium search investigates the symmetry of matter and antimatter in the Universe. Using superconducting magnetic-rigidity spectrometers with time-of-flight and aerogel Cherenkov detectors, BESS instruments fully identify incident particles by charge, charge sign, mass, and energy. The long-duration BESS-Polar I instrument flew over Antarctica for 8.5 days in 2004, recording 900 million events. BESS-Polar II, with extended magnet lifetime, improved detector and electronic performance, and greater data storage capacity, flew in 2007-2008, recording 4.7 billion events, more than double the combined data from all previous BESS flights, in 24.5 days. This flight took place near Solar minimum when the sensitivity of the antiproton measurements to a low-energy primary component is greatest. The BESS-Polar II recorded 10-20 times more antiprotons than the combined BESS 95-97 dataset at the previous Solar minimum and will provide a definitive test of the possible primary source suggested by those data. BESS-Polar II landed about 1800 km from McMurdo Station and recovery was successfully accomplished in January 2010. We will review the BESS program, focusing on the flight and recovery of BESS-Polar II. Details of the BESS-Polar II instrument and its in-flight performance are reported in other papers at this conference.

  16. SUNRISE: a balloon-borne telescope for high resolution solar observations in the visible and UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Sami K.; Gandorfer, Achim M.; Schuessler, Manfred; Curdt, W.; Lites, Bruce W.; Martinez-Pillet, Valentin; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Title, Alan M.

    2003-02-01

    Sunrise is a light-weight solar telescope with a 1 m aperture for spectro-polarimetric observations of the solar atmosphere. The telescope is planned to be operated during a series of long-duration balloon flights in order to obtain time series of spectra and images at the diffraction-limit and to study the UV spectral region down to ~200 nm, which is not accessible from the ground. The central aim of Sunrise is to understand the structure and dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. Through its interaction with the convective flow field, the magnetic field in the solar photosphere develops intense field concentrations on scales below 100 km, which are crucial for the dynamics and energetics of the whole solar atmosphere. In addition, Sunrise aims to provide information on the structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere and on the physics of solar irradiance changes. Sunrise is a joint project of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie (MPAe), Katlenburg-Lindau, with the Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik (KIS), Freiburg, the High-Altitude Observatory (HAO), Boulder, the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab. (LMSAL), Palo Alto, and the Instituto de Astrofi sica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife. In addition, there are close contacts with associated scientists from a variety of institutes.

  17. Balloon-borne measurements of aurorally generated X-rays, electric fields and infrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamanig, H.; Friedrich, M.

    1981-12-01

    The block diagram of an integrated ballon payload for measuring X-rays, electric fields and rapid temperature variations is presented. Bremsstrahlung X-rays are measured by an uncollimated scintillation counter whose crystal is optically connected to a photomultiplier. Almost 100% efficiency up to 200 keV is achieved. The electric field probes are 20 cm dia aluminum spheres mounted on four booms. Horizontal field is derived from the voltage difference between the upper pair; orthogonal field is calculated from the lower pair. Temperatures are derived by measuring the phase of a continously radiating acoustic transmitter, using two microphones placed 30 and 120 cm from it. A photometer with a spectral response peak at 400 + or - 20 nm detects optical auroras. An electronic card determines pressure, payload temperature, battery voltage and balloon location. A slow PCM telemetry system is used.

  18. Measurement of trace stratospheric constituents with a balloon borne laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Mcgee, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research was to measure the concentration of the stratospheric hydroxyl radical and related chemical species as a function of altitude, season, and time of day. Although hydroxyl plays a very important role in the chemistry controlling stratospheric ozone, little is known about its behavior because it has been a difficult species to measure. The instrument employed in this program was a laser radar, employing the technique of remote laser induced fluorescence. This instrument offers a number of attractive features including extreme specificity and sensitivity, a straightforward relationship between observed quantity and the desired concentration, and immunity to self-contamination.

  19. Searching for Extra-solar Planets with a Diffraction-Limited Balloon Borne Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. C.; Petro, L. D.; Allen, R.; Bely, P.; Burrows, C. J.; Krist, J.; Rafal, M.; White, R. L.; Jaffe, W.; Le Poole, R.; Crocker, J.; Dopita, M. A.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1998-12-01

    Our goal is to fly a diffraction limited 2.5-m optical telescope and coronagraph on long duration balloon flights at an altitudes of 35 km above 99.99% of the Earth's atmosphere to search for Jupiter-like planets around nearby stars. Analysis of radiosonde data from Mauna Kea and the South Pole suggests that at optical wavelengths and altitudes above 20 km r0 will be much greater than 6 meters anywhere in the world. A telescope equipped with an ultra smooth mirror and/or adaptive optics and coronagraph would provide three orders of magnitude improvement over the coronagraph in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (to be installed in Hubble in May 2000), four orders of magnitude improvement over the HST WFPC-2 camera, and five orders of magnitude improvement over ground based telescopes. A 2.5-m telescope could detect Jupiters and Saturns around the brightest stars within 10 parsecs of the Earth. No present or planned HST instruments will have this capability. Before we can design, build, and fly high resolution telescopes, we must first understand the high altitude balloon environment in detail. We need to know the spatial and temporal spectrum of wavefront errors, and the differential wind forces that will act on the telescope. We must understand the balloon environment sufficiently well to be able to discharge waste heat without spoiling the local thermal environment. We will discuss the major issues for high altitude "site testing" and subsequent high-resolution observations.

  20. Space-quality data from balloon-borne telescopes: The High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Jason; Dobke, Benjamin; Booth, Jeffrey; Massey, Richard; Liewer, Kurt; Smith, Roger; Amara, Adam; Aldrich, Jack; Berge, Joel; Bezawada, Naidu; Brugarolas, Paul; Clark, Paul; Dubbeldam, Cornelis M.; Ellis, Richard; Frenk, Carlos; Gallie, Angus; Heavens, Alan; Henry, David; Jullo, Eric; Kitching, Thomas; Lanzi, James; Lilly, Simon; Lunney, David; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morris, David; Paine, Christopher; Peacock, John; Pellegrino, Sergio; Pittock, Roger; Pool, Peter; Refregier, Alexandre; Seiffert, Michael; Sharples, Ray; Smith, Alexandra; Stuchlik, David; Taylor, Andy; Teplitz, Harry; Ali Vanderveld, R.; Wu, James

    2012-10-01

    We present a method for attaining sub-arcsecond pointing stability during sub-orbital balloon flights, as designed for in the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO) concept. The pointing method presented here has the potential to perform near-space quality optical astronomical imaging at ˜1-2% of the cost of space-based missions. We also discuss an architecture that can achieve sufficient thermo-mechanical stability to match the pointing stability. This concept is motivated by advances in the development and testing of Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights which promise to allow observation campaigns lasting more than three months. The design incorporates a multi-stage pointing architecture comprising: a gondola coarse azimuth control system, a multi-axis nested gimbal frame structure with arcsecond stability, a telescope de-rotator to eliminate field rotation, and a fine guidance stage consisting of both a telescope mounted angular rate sensor and guide CCDs in the focal plane to drive a Fast-Steering Mirror. We discuss the results of pointing tests together with a preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis required for sub-arcsecond pointing at high altitude. Possible future applications in the areas of wide-field surveys and exoplanet searches are also discussed.

  1. A long duration balloon-borne telescope for solar gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Alan; Chupp, Edward L.; Dunphy, Philip P.

    1989-01-01

    A new solar gamma-ray telescope is described which is intended to take advantage of current long-duration ballon facilities such as the RACOON system. The primary scientific objective is to detect and measure gamma-ray lines from solar flares, along with the associated low-energy continuum. The proposed instrument is centered on a multiheaded Ge system and is designed to operate over the energy range 50 keV to 200 200 MeV. In the nuclear transition energy region, the average energy resolution of the primary detectors is over 20 times better than that achieved with the gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite.

  2. HERO: A Balloon-Borne Hard-X-Ray Focusing Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2008-01-01

    HERO, for High Energy Replicated Optics, is an evolutionary balloon payload featuring hard-x-ray grazing-incidence nickel optics. The HERO payload is designed to perform high-sensitivity, fine spatial resolution observations of galactic and extragalactic sources in an energy range that is as yet unexplored with grazing-incidence optics. A proof-of-concept flight with just 6 x-ray mirrors was completed in 2001 and captured the first focused hard-x-ray images galactic sources. Since that time, the payload has been greatly expanded and now features 100, in-house-fabricated mirror shells with an attendant large increase in sensitivity. In its current form, HERO was flown in 2007, from Fort Sumner, NM, and is schedules to fly again in September 2009, from Alice Springs, NT. Full details of the HERO payload will be provided in this presentation together with a discussion of the challenges of flying moderate resolution x-ray optics from a balloon platform.

  3. HERO: A Hard-X-Ray Balloon-Borne Focusing Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    HERO, for High Energy Replicated Optics, is an evolutionary balloon payload featuring hard-X-ray grazing-incidence nickel optics. The payload provides a scientific instrument capable of high-sensitivity observations in an energy regime that is relatively unexplored at fine spatial scales, and also serves as a demonstration vehicle for in-house fabricated optics and focal plane detectors. After a proof-of-concept flight in 2001, which captured the first focused hard-X-ray images galactic sources, HERO has been significantly expanded from just 6, 3-m-focal length mirror shells to its current complement of nearly 100, 6-m-focal length mirrors. HERO was flown in 2007, from Fort Sumner, NM, and is scheduled to fly again in September 2009, from Alice Springs, NT. Full details of the payload will be provided along with preliminary data from the previous flight and science targets for the next flight, where the galactic center region will be imaged.

  4. Low energy gamma ray observations with the MPI-Compton telescope. [balloon-borne detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graml, F.; Penningsfeld, F. P.; Schoenfelder, V.

    1978-01-01

    Although the evaluation of data from the first balloon-flight of a large area Compton telescope is incomplete, two preliminary results are discussed. From the measured background spectrum at float altitude, the sensitivity of the telescope for the detection of cosmic gamma ray lines is estimated. The energy spectra is determined for an enhanced gamma ray flux observed from the direction of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. A schematic drawing of the telescope is presented and discussed.

  5. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  6. Note: A balloon-borne accelerometer technique for measuring atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlton, Graeme J.; Giles Harrison, R.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Williams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    A weather balloon and its suspended instrument package behave like a pendulum with a moving pivot. This dynamical system is exploited here for the detection of atmospheric turbulence. By adding an accelerometer to the instrument package, the size of the swings induced by atmospheric turbulence can be measured. In test flights, strong turbulence has induced accelerations greater than 5g, where g = 9.81 m s-2. Calibration of the accelerometer data with a vertically orientated lidar has allowed eddy dissipation rate values of between 10-3 and 10-2 m2 s-3 to be derived from the accelerometer data. The novel use of a whole weather balloon and its adapted instrument package can be used as a new instrument to make standardized in situ measurements of turbulence.

  7. SMILE-II: Balloon-Borne Telescope for Background-Suppressed Soft Gamma-Ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawano, T.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Parker, J. D.; Mizumoto, T.; Sonoda, S.; Mizumura, Y.; Tomono, D.; Nakamura, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Komura, S.; Sato, Y.; Nakamura, S.; Miuchi, K.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.; Iwaki, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ikeno, M.; Uchida, T.

    We have developed an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) for an all-sky survey at the MeV gamma-ray band. The ETCC consists of a gaseous tracker and a position sensitive scintillation camera to measure the momentum of the Compton-recoil electron and the scattering gamma ray so that we can reconstruct the energy and momentum of the incident gamma ray photon by photon. Also the ETCC has strong background rejection methods using tracking information such as the dE/dx particle identification and theCompton kinematics test. To confirm feasibility of observing celestial objects in space, we performed a balloon experiment to successfully observe the diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays, which confirmed the effectiveness of the background rejection capability. Based on the first balloon experiment result, we are developing a large ETCC and plan to launch it for the test of the imaging property. The performance of the SMILE-II ETCC is simulated and then it will obtain an effective area of 1.1 cm2 for 200 keV by improving the electron track reconstruction efficiency by a factor of about 10, which results in the detection of Crab nebula at >5σ level for several-hour observation in the middle latitude with an altitude of 40 km.

  8. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, P.; Lenoble, J. ); Ovarlez, J. ); Chu, W.P. )

    1993-03-20

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes ([approximately]45[degrees]N) and tropical latitudes (12[degrees]S-25[degrees]S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At [plus minus]0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more). 17 refs., 4 figs.

  9. The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer Through Satellite and Balloon-Borne Measurements Combined With Modeling Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, J.-P.; Fairlie, T. D.; Natarajan, M.; Wegner, T.; Baker, N.; Crawford, J.; Moore, J.; Deshler, T.; Gadhavi, H.; Jayaraman, A.; Pandit, A.; Raj, A.; Kumar, H.; Kumar, S.; Singh, A.; Vignelles, D.; Stenchikov, G.; Wiehold, F.; Bian, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer-ATAL is a confined area of enhanced aerosol associated Summer Asia Monsoon spanning from the E. Med Sea to W. China. It essentially extends from top of convective outflow over much of SE Asia Existence recognize through CALIPSO observations.

  10. Interference of sulphur dioxide to balloon-borne ECC ozone sensors over the Valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, I.; Basaldud, R.; Horikoshi, N.; Okazaki, Y.; Benítez Garcia, S. E.; Ortínez, A.; Ramos Benítez, V. R.; Cárdenas, B.; Wakamatsu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal decrease in the ozonesonde sensor signal occurred during air-pollution study campaigns in November 2011 and March 2012 in Mexico City. Sharp drops around 5 km a.s.l. and above were observed in November 2011, and a broad deficit in the convective boundary layer in March 2012. Various circumstantial evidence indicates that the decrease was due to interference of SO2 gas to Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) ozone sensors. The sharp drops in November 2011 are considered to be caused by the SO2 plume from the Popocatépetl volcano to the south-east of Mexico City. Response experiments of the ECC sensor to representative atmospheric trace gases showed that only SO2 could generate the observed abrupt drops. The vertical structure of the plume reproduced by a Lagrangian particle diffusion simulation also supported this assumption. The near-ground deficit in March 2012 is considered to be generated by the SO2 plume from the Tula industrial complex to the north-west of Mexico City. Sporadic large SO2 emission is known to occur from this region, and before and at the ozonesonde launching time, large intermittent peaks of SO2 concentration were recorded at the ground-level monitoring stations. The difference between the O3 concentration obtained by ozonesonde and that by UV-based O3 monitor was consistent with the SO2 concentration measured by a UV-based monitor on the ground. The plume vertical profiles estimated by the Lagrangian particle diffusion simulation agreed fairly well with the observed profile. Statistical analysis of the wind field in Mexico City revealed that the Popocatépetl effect is most likely to occur from June to October, and the Tula effect all the year.

  11. A general-purpose balloon-borne pointing system for solar scientific instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    A general purpose balloonborne pointing system for accommodating a wide variety of solar scientific instruments is described. It is designed for precise pointing, low cost, and quick launch. It offers the option of three-axis control, pitch-yaw-roll, or two-axis control, pitch-yaw, depending on the needs of the solar instrument. Simulation results are presented that indicate good pointing capability at Sun elevation angles ranging from 10 to 80 deg.

  12. The survival of micro-organisms in space. Further rocket and balloon-borne exposure experiments.

    PubMed

    Hotchin, J; Lorenz, P; Markusen, A; Hemenway, C

    1967-01-01

    This report describes the results of survival studies of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed directly to the space environment on two balloons and in two rocket flights. The work is part of a program to develop techniques for the collection of micro-organisms in the size range of micrometeorite particles in space or non-terrestrial atmospheres, and their return to earth in a viable state for further study. Previous survival studies were reported (J. Hotchin, P. Lorenz and C. Hemenway, Nature 206 (1965) 442) in which a few relatively large area samples of micro-organisms were exposed on millipore filter cemented to aluminum plates. In the present series of experiments, newly developed techniques have resulted in a 25-fold miniaturization resulting in a corresponding increase in the number of experiments performed. This has enabled a statistical evaluation of the results to be made. A total of 756 separate exposure units (each approximately 5 x 5 mm in size) were flown in four experiments, and organisms used were coliphage T1, penicillium roqueforti (THOM) mold spores, poliovirus type I (Pfizer attenuated Sabin vaccine strain), and bacillus subtilis spores. The organisms were deposited either by spraying directly upon the vinyl-coated metal units, or by droplet seeding into shallow depressions in the millipore filter membrane-coated units. Groups of units were prepared comprising fully exposed, inverted (screened by 2 mm of Al), and filter-protected organisms. All of these were included in the flight set, the back up set, and a laboratory control set. The altitude of the exposures varied from 35 km in the balloon experiments to 150 km in the rocket experiments. Times of exposures at altitude were approximately 6 hours for the balloon flights and about 3 minutes for the rocket experiments. PMID:11973839

  13. Stratospheric minor species vertical distributions during polar winter by balloon borne UV-Vis spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pommereau, J. P.; Piquard, J.

    1994-01-01

    A light, relatively cheap and easy to operate balloonborne UV-visible spectrometer was designed for investigating ozone photochemistry in the Arctic winter. The instrument was flown 11 times during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in winter 1991-92 in Northern Scandinavia. The first simultaneous measurements of vertical distributions of aerosols, PSC's, O3, NO2 and OClO inside the vortex during flight no. 6 on 16 January, in cold conditions are reported, which show that nitrogen oxides were almost absent (lower than 100 ppt) in the stratosphere below 22 km, while a layer of relatively large OClO concentration (15 ppt) was present at the altitude of the minimum temperature.

  14. Twenty years of balloon-borne tropospheric aerosol measurements at Laramie, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper examines the tropospheric aerosol record obtained over the period 1971 to 1990, during which high-altitude balloons with optical particle counters were launched at Laramie, Wyoming, in a long-term study of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer. All aerosol particle size ranges display pronounced seasonal variations, with the condensation nuclei concentration and the optically active component showing a summer maximum throughout the troposphere. Mass estimates, assuming spherical sulfate particles, indicate an average column mass between altitudes of 2.5 and 10 km of about 4 and 16 mg/sq m in winter and summer, respectively. Calculated optical depths vary between 0.01 and 0.04 from winter to summer; the estimated mass scattering cross section is about 3 sq m/g throughout the troposphere. There is evidence for a decreasing trend of 1.6-1.8 percent/yr in the optically active tropospheric aerosol over the past 20 yr, which may be related to a similar reduction in SO2 emission in the U.S. over this period.

  15. Balloon-borne measurements of the ultraviolet flux in the Arctic stratosphere during winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Cornelius; Mueller, Martin; Klein, Erich; Schmidt, Ulrich; Roeth, Ernst-Peter

    1994-01-01

    Filter radiometers sensitive from 280 to 320 nm and from 280 to 400 nm, respectively, were used for measurements of the actinic flux in the stratosphere. Since the instruments are calibrated for absolute spectral sensitivity the data can be compared with model calculations of the actinic flux. Data were obtained during seven balloon flights during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE).

  16. Hard X-ray imaging of Cyg X-1 using balloon borne Fresnel Zone plates imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.

    Imaging in hard X-rays above 20 keV is a well known technological challenge. Coded aperture mask have been used in the past, but these require position sensitive detectors. However, the scintillation counters which form the bulk of hard X-ray detectors as these offer high detection efficiency, do not have intrinsic position sensitivity. Pixilated solid state detectors CZT and CdTe are being developed as the detectors for imaging telescope with coded mask. Alternatively, a combination of Fresnel Zone Plates (FZP) can also be used for imaging in the hard X-ray band. We have developed a new imaging telescope using a pair of tungsten FZP and tiny hard X-ray imager, made with thin NaI(Tl) viewed by a position sensitive photomultiplier. The instrument was launched as a piggyback on the Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment (LASE) in a balloon flight conducted on April 25, 2008 and reached a ceiling altitude 2.8 mb. Cyg X-1, was observed during the flight to study the imaging efficacy of FZP imager. This paper describes the details of the experiment, digital reconstruction of the imaged data.

  17. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes (~45°N) and tropical latitudes (12°S-25°S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique. At +/-0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  18. Balloon-borne 3-meter telescope for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, G. G.

    1986-01-01

    The gimbal design was studied and revised to eliminate the alignment and limited rotation problems inherent in the flex-pivot design. A new design using ball-bearings to replace the flex-pivot was defined and its performance analyzed. An error analysis for the entire gondola pointing system was also prepared. Mirror development and the test program using mirror test blanks from Dornier were continued.

  19. Identification of isolated NO lines in balloon-borne infrared solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, F. J.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Cook, G. R.; Van Allen, J. W.; Blatherwick, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Ballon-borne infrared solar spectra at about 0.02/cm resolution show a number of atmospheric NO lines isolated from other atmospheric and solar lines in the 1830-1930/cm region. Typical spectra are presented and NO total column values are derived.

  20. HERO: A Balloon-Borne Hard-X-Ray Focusing Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Brian

    HERO, for High Energy Replicated Optics, is an evolutionary balloon payload featuring hard-xray grazing-incidence nickel optics. The HERO payload is designed to perform high-sensitivity, fine spatial resolution observations of galactic and extragalactic sources in an energy range that is as yer unexplored with grazing-incidence optics. A proof-of-concept flight with just 6 x-ray mirrors was completed in 2001 and captured the first focused hard-x-ray images galactic sources. Since that time, the payload has been greatly expanded and now features 100, in-house-fabricated mirror shells with an attendant large increase in sensitivity. In its current form, HERO was flown in 2007, from Fort Sumner, NM, and is schedules to fly again in September 2009, from Alice Springs, NT. Full details of the HERO payload will be provided in this presentation together with a discussion of the challenges of flying moderate resolution x-ray optics from a balloon platform.

  1. Balloon-borne, high altitude gravimetry: The flight of DUCKY 1a (11 October 1983)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarewicz, A. R.; Schilinski, B. J.; Cowie, R. J.; Rice, C. L.; Moss, P.; Carter, L. N.

    1985-12-01

    Gravity measurements from a high-altitude balloon were made in late September to verify global and upward-continued gravity models. The first flight was intended to provide balloon motion and environment data with a preliminary estimate of the quality of measured gravity values. A balloon operates in a dynamic, largely unpredictable environment; thus, the gravimeter senses accelerations due to balloon motions as well as gravitational acceleration. Independent measurements of balloon motions from an intertial navigation package (three accelerometers, three rate gyros, three-axis magnetometer and two tiltmeters) combined with ground tracking (X, Y and Z position and velocity) will allow for separation of balloon-induced accelerations from gravitational acceleration to 1 mGal, using tracking data to an accuracy of about 5 cm/sec in velocity for Eotvos corrections, and position to 1 m. This first engineering flight was planned to coincide with the lowest seasonal wind velocities over Holloman AFB, where AFGL has its permanent balloon launch facility. Mild wind velocities are desired to provide the most benign environment possible during the testing phase, and to keep the balloon within tracking range. The experiment design, launch, and flight operations, and a first look at the data are presented.

  2. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  3. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  4. RADIO ALTIMETERS

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A radio ranging device is described which utilizes a superregenerative oscillator having alternate sending and receiving phases with an intervening ranging interval between said phases, means for varying said ranging interval, means responsive to an on-range noise reduction condition for stopping said means for varying the ranging interval and indicating means coupled to the ranging interval varying means and calibrated in accordance with one-half the product of the ranging interval times the velocity of light whereby the range is indicated.

  5. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  6. Radio tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, J. C.; Komarek, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The principles and techniques of deep space radio tracking are described along with the uses of tracking data in navigation and radio science. Emphasis is placed on the measurement functions of radio tracking.

  7. Soviet radio telescopes and solar radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. A.; Gel'Freikh, Georgii B.; Zaitsev, Valerii V.; Iliasov, Iurii P.; Kaidanovskii, N. L.

    Soviet radio telescopes of different type and purpose are described, with particular emphasis on very long baseline interferometry. Soviet radio-astronomy studies of solar radio emission and the interplanetary medium are also discussed, with particular attention given to the investigation of the sun's supercorona and the interplanetary plasma.

  8. The Radio Amateur's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Douglas, Ed.

    The objectives of this basic reference work for the radio amateur are to present radio theory and practice in terms of application and to reflect both the fundamentals and the rapidly-advancing technology of radio communications so that the radio amateur will have a guide to what is practical, meaningful, proven, and useful. Twenty-three chapters…

  9. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  10. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  11. Correlation of Windspeed and Antarctic Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockham, Mark; Anita Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    When electromagnetic waves interact with a media interface the transmitted and reflected portions of the incoming wave depend on the incident angle of the wave and wavelength (as well as the material properties of the media). The roughness of the surface of Antarctica affects the radio frequency signals received by airborne experiments, such as the balloon-borne experiment ANITA (ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna) which observes the reflected radio waves from cosmic ray-induced extensive air showers (EAS). Roughness of a given scale can cause decoherence of the reflected signal and is an important effect to understand when estimating the amplitude of the incoming wave based on the reflected wave. It is challenging to get a survey of surface roughness over many of the areas that these experiments are likely to pass over. Correlating historical wind speed records with statistical roughness as observed by the backscatter of satellite [Rémy F, Parouty S. Remote Sensing. 2009] and airborne experiments operating at different frequencies can possibly be used to predict time-dependent surface roughness with surface wind speed as the input. These correlations will be presented for a variety of areas on the Antarctic ice shelf. NASA Grant NNX11AC47G.

  12. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  13. Triggered Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    Certain Jovian radio emissions seem to be triggered from outside, by much weaker radio waves from the sun. Recently found in the Voyager observations near Jupiter, such triggering occurs at hectometric wavelengths during the arrival of solar radio bursts, with the triggered emissions lasting sometimes more than an hour as they slowly drifted toward higher frequencies. Like the previous discovery of similar triggered emissions at the earth, this suggests that Jupiter's emissions might also originate from natural radio lasers.

  14. Commercial Radio as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenbuhler, Eric W.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the day-to-day work routines of commercial radio with the principles of a theoretical communication model. Illuminates peculiarities of the conduct of communication by commercial radio. Discusses the application of theoretical models to the evaluation of practicing institutions. Offers assessments of commercial radio deriving from…

  15. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  16. Stellar radio emission (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelezniakov, V. V.

    The current understanding of the radio-emission characteristics of 'ordinary' main sequence stars as well as giants and supergiants is examined. Particular consideration is given to radio emission from supergiants, Young T Tauri stars, magnetic Ap stars, flare stars of UV Ceti type, Alpha Sco, and RS CVn objects. It is noted that the study of stellar radio emission is in its initial stage. Further progress in this area depends on successes in finding new radio sources, associated, for example, with magnetic stars, and on an intensified investigation of the frequency spectra and polarization of already-discovered radio stars. It is also noted that, although the current knowledge of solar physics can help in understanding stellar radio emission, models and ideas developed for solar conditions should not be mechanically transferred to other stars by a simple change in scale.

  17. STEM on the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  18. Radio data transmission for SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Enron has used such wireless systems as meteor burst radio, 952 MHz multiple address radio, VSAT and L-band satellite, cellular radio and ACSB radio. The company's experience with meteor burst radio communications is discussed in this paper. It indicates good system reliability and consequently all back-up telephone lines have been removed from sites using this system.

  19. Radio Frequency Interference and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sierra

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy have been closely linked since the emergence of radio astronomy as a scientific discipline in the 1930s. Even before the official establishment of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, protection against contemporary and future radio noise levels was seen as crucial to ensure success of any new observatory. My talk will examine the various local, regional, national, and international efforts enacted to protect NRAO and other American radio astronomy sites from RFI.

  20. Broadcast Management: Radio; Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaal, Ward L.; Martin, Leo A.

    After outlining the qualities necessary in a good radio or television manager, the book describes his duties which fall in three major areas: programming, engineering, and sales. It discusses the relationship between the station and its audience in detail. Sections on radio and television programming describe the way most stations operate and…

  1. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958 are…

  2. Amateur Radio Satellite Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, David P.

    The Amateur Radio Satellite Communications project had, as its goal, the assembly of an amateur radio satellite station in a high school physics classroom. Specific objectives were to provide: (1) a special source of interest as a motivator for attracting students and building public relations; (2) a center of interest as a motivator for the study…

  3. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  4. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  5. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  6. Optical and radio rangefinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostetskaia, Iaromira Mikhailovna

    This handbook expounds the theory of optical and radio rangefinders and radiogeodesic systems. Particular attention is given to instrument design, investigations using geodesic phase rangefinders, ranging errors, and the effect of meteorological factors in the atmospheric surface layer. Applications of optical and radio rangefinders are considered, including the establishment of geodetic networks and the assessment of the accuracy of triangulation networks.

  7. Planetary radio lasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1988-01-01

    Both the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) and Jupiter's decametric radio S-bursts are attributed to natural radio lasing. Presumably consisting of self-excited, closed-loop wave feedback oscillations between local irregularities of the source plasma density, this radio lasing is comparable to that which occurs in man-made optical lasers, although at radio, rather than optical wavelengths. As a result, it should produce a multiple discrete emission spectrum and intense, coherent beams. Recent observations of the AKR's discreteness and coherence have clearly ruled out the previous open-loop amplifier model for such emissions, and recent observations of the Jovian S-bursts have shown the expected, regularly-spaced, longitudinal laser modes. These new observations thus confirm the proposed planetary cyclotron radio lasing at both planets.

  8. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  9. Inorganic Iodine and Bromine in the Tropical Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere Derived From Balloon Borne Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, M.; Butz, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M.; Kreycy, S.; Kritten, L.; Prados-Roman, C.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2008-12-01

    Due to the ozone destroying capabilities of bromine and iodine bearing compounds, the stratospheric budget of inorganic bromine and iodine is of major interest for modeling ozone depletion and assessing the future evolution of the ozone layer. In particular the contribution of very short lived substances (VSLS) to the bromine budget has recently been shown to enhance ozone depletion in mid-latitudes and polar regions. So far, iodine species have not been unambiguously detected in the stratosphere with upper limits for total inorganic iodine (Iy) of about 0.1 ppt. However, observations are sparse and mainly restricted to mid- and high-latitudes. Here, we assess the budget of iodine and bromine in the tropical Upper Troposphere/ Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS) where the halogen source gases enter the stratosphere and supply the stratosphere with halogen species. We report on two stratospheric balloon flights of the LPMA/DOAS (Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere/Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer) payload from a tropical station in northern Brazil (5°S, 43°W) in June 2005 and June 2008. There, the LPMA/DOAS payload conducted spectroscopic direct sun measurements in the UV/visible and infrared spectral range during balloon ascent and in solar occultation geometry. The LPMA/DOAS observations allow for the retrieval of IO and OIO from their absorption features in the visible spectral range. Neither species could be detected unambiguously with detection limits ranging between 0.01 and 0.2 ppt in the UT/LS. Constraining a stratospheric chemistry model by the inferred detection limits for IO and OIO, yields an upper limit for Iy of 0.1 to 0.3 ppt. Implications for stratospheric ozone are discussed on the basis of model studies. BrO is inferred from absorption bands in the UV spectral range yielding the first BrO vertical profile in the tropical UT/LS. For the balloon flight in June 2005, total inorganic bromine (Bry) is estimated to (21.5 ± 2.5) ppt in 4.5-year-old air using a stratospheric model constrained by measured BrO. We derive a total contribution of (5.2 ± 2.5) ppt from brominated VSLS and inorganic product gases to Bry. Tropospheric BrO was found to be < 1 ppt. Our results are compared to 3-D CTM SLIMCAT model runs.

  10. The Liege-balloon program. [balloon-borne instruments for high-spectral resolution observations of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.

    1974-01-01

    The Liege-balloon program is intended to make high-spectral resolution observations of the sun in the near- and intermediate infrared regions not accessible from the ground. A description of the equipment, followed by a summary of the data obtained till now is presented. Except for ozone whose maximum of concentration lies near 25 Km altitude, the residual mass distribution of the other mentioned molecules decreases with altitude. This is a self-explanatory argument for carrying out spectroscopic observations from platforms transcending the densest layers of the earth's atmosphere. The Liege balloon equipment is primarily intended for very high-resolution solar observations from about 27-30 Km altitude, in all spectral regions between 1.5 and 15.0 microns, not accessible from the ground.

  11. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Penacchioni, A. V. Braga, J. Castro, M. A. Sacahui, J. R. D’Amico, F.

    2015-12-17

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modelled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre (CG) region during balloon flights in Brazil (∼ −23° of latitude and an altitude of ∼40 km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the GC: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  12. Identification of the V3 vibration-rotation band of CF4 in balloon-borne infrared solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Cook, G. R.; Van Allen, J. W.; Bonomo, F. S.; Blatherwick, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared solar spectra in the 850 to 1350/cm region, at 0.02/cm resolution, were obtained during a balloon flight made on 27 October 1978 from Alamogordo, New Mexico. Analysis of the 1275-1290/cm region indicates that the atmospheric absorption lines of CH4, N2O, H2O, HNO3 and CO2 near 1283/cm are super-imposed on a broader absorption feature which we interpret as due to the V3 band of CF4. Fine structure of CF4 is also identified. Preliminary estimates from the sunset spectra show approximately 75 pptv CF4 near 25 km.

  13. High resolution, balloon-borne emission spectroscopy of trace species in the lower stratosphere - N2O5, HNO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Herman, J.; Kunde, V.; Maguire, W.; Herath, L.; Shaffer, W.; Abbas, M.; Massie, S.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid-nitrogen cooled Fourier transform spectrometer (SIRIS) measures thermal limb-emission of the stratosphere from a balloon platform at a nominal altitude of 40 km, under night and day conditions, with a 3 km vertical resolution. N2O5 and HNO3 mixing ratios inferred from emission spectra are compared with previous measurements and with the predictions from a one-dimensional photochemical model.

  14. Balloon-borne scanning spectrometer system for atmospheric extinction studies in the 350-1100 nm spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. A.; Pepin, T. J.; Lane, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A scanning spectrometer system which is capable of being flown in high-altitude balloon studies of the earth's atmosphere is presented. The instrument is small, has a large operative wavelength range of 350-1100 nm, high data density, and real-time data telemetry to ground. A computer software package is used to provide a real-time monitor of balloon gondola and instrument performance, with the software reliability enhanced by proof of correctness techniques and exhibiting the high degree of reliability necessary for the monitoring system.

  15. A balloon-borne high-resolution spectrometer for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Starr, R.; Stottlemyre, A. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    The design, development, and balloon-flight verification of a payload for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares are reported. The payload incorporates a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector, standard NIM and CAMAC electronics modules, a thermally stabilized pressure housing, and regulated battery power supplies. The flight system is supported on the ground with interactive data-handling equipment comprised of similar electronics hardware. The modularity and flexibility of the payload, together with the resolution and stability obtained throughout a 30-hour flight, make it readily adaptable for high-sensitivity, long-duration balloon fight applications.

  16. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS): A new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A. F.; Maccallum, C. J.; Stang, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload, a balloon program was initiated to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments.

  17. A Balloon-Borne observation in the Atmosphere of secondary X-rays during the August 7, 1972 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcarate, I. N.

    2002-05-01

    An observation carried out with a ballon-borne detector of additional secondary X-rays flux(E less than 40 keV) at large depths into the atmosphere is described. The hypothesis is put forward that this additional flux was caused by the emission of very hard X-rays during the solar flare of August 7, 1972. The propagation of the secondary photons resulting from their electromagnetic interactions in the atmosphere is computed, by means of a statistical simulation of the physical processes ( Monte Carlo method). The results of the computation agree with the observed excess flux therefore supporting the hypothesis mentioned above. This research was partially supported by Grant PIP 0430/98, from CONICET, Argentina.

  18. Balloon-Borne Measurements of Total Reactive Nitrogen, Nitric Acid, and Aerosol in the Cold Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Murcray, D. G.; Hofmann, D. J.; Johnston, P. V.; Iwasaka, Y.; Iwata, A.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Total reactive nitrogen (NO(Y)) between 15 and 29 km was measured for the first time on board a balloon within the Arctic cold vortex. Observations of HNO3, aerosol, and ozone were made by instruments on the same balloon gondola which was launched from Esrange, Sweden (68 deg N, 20 deg E) on January 23, 1989. The NO(y) mixing ratio was observed to increase very rapidly from 6 ppbv at 18 km altitude to a maximum of 21 ppbv at 21 km, forming a sharp layer with a thickness of about 2 km. A minimum in the NO(y) mixing ratio of 5 ppbv was found at 27 km. The measured HNO3 profile shows broad similarities to that of NO(y). This observation, together with the observed very low column amount of NO2, shows that NO(x) had been almost totally converted to HNO3, and that NO(y) was composed mainly of HNO3. The enhanced aerosol concentration between 19 and 22 km suggests that the maximum abundance of HNO3 trapped in the form of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was about 6 ppbv at 21 km. The sampled air parcels were highly supersaturated with respect to NAT. Although extensive denitrification throughout the stratosphere did not prevail, an indication of denitrification was found at altitudes of 27 and 22 km, and between 18 and 15 km.

  19. Development of a balloon-borne stabilized platform for measuring radiative flux profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Shaw, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A stabilized platform has been developed to carry broadband short-wave and long-wave radiometric sensors on the tether line of a small tethered balloon that ascends through atmospheric depths of up to 1.5 km to obtain vertical profiles of radiative flux and flux divergence for evaluating atmospheric radiative transfer models. The Sky Platform was designed to keep the radiometers level despite unpredictable movements of the balloon and tether line occasioned by turbulence and wind shear. The automatic control loop drives motors, gears, and pulleys located on two of the vertices of the triangular frame to climb the harness lines to keep the platform level. Radiometric sensors, an electronic compass, and an on-board data acquisition system make up the remainder of the Sky Platform. Because knowledge of the dynamic response of the tether line-platform system is essential to properly close the automatic control loop on the Sky Platform, a Motion Sensing Platform (MSP) was developed to fly in place of the Sky Platform on the tether line to characterize the Sky Platform`s operating environment. This unstabilized platform uses an array of nine solid-state linear accelerometers to measure the lateral and angular accelerations, velocities, and displacements that the Sky Platform will experience. This paper presents field performance tests of the Sky and Motion Sensing Platforms, as conducted at Richland, Washington, on February 17, 1993. The tests were performed primarily to characterize the stabilization system on the Sky Platform. Test flights were performed on this cold winter day from 1400 to 1800 Pacific Standard Time (PST). During this period, temperature profiles were near the dry adiabatic lapse rate. Flights were made through a jet wind speed profile having peak wind speeds of 7 m/s at a height of 100 m AGL. Wind directions were from the northwest. All flights were performed as continuous ascents, rather than ascending in discrete steps with halts at set altitudes.

  20. Development of a balloon-borne stabilized platform for measuring radiative flux profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Shaw, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A stabilized platform has been developed to carry broadband short-wave and long-wave radiometric sensors on the tether line of a small tethered balloon that ascends through atmospheric depths of up to 1.5 km to obtain vertical profiles of radiative flux and flux divergence for evaluating atmospheric radiative transfer models. The Sky Platform was designed to keep the radiometers level despite unpredictable movements of the balloon and tether line occasioned by turbulence and wind shear. The automatic control loop drives motors, gears, and pulleys located on two of the vertices of the triangular frame to climb the harness lines to keep the platform level. Radiometric sensors, an electronic compass, and an on-board data acquisition system make up the remainder of the Sky Platform. Because knowledge of the dynamic response of the tether line-platform system is essential to properly close the automatic control loop on the Sky Platform, a Motion Sensing Platform (MSP) was developed to fly in place of the Sky Platform on the tether line to characterize the Sky Platform's operating environment. This unstabilized platform uses an array of nine solid-state linear accelerometers to measure the lateral and angular accelerations, velocities, and displacements that the Sky Platform will experience. This paper presents field performance tests of the Sky and Motion Sensing Platforms, as conducted at Richland, Washington, on February 17, 1993. The tests were performed primarily to characterize the stabilization system on the Sky Platform. Test flights were performed on this cold winter day from 1400 to 1800 Pacific Standard Time (PST). During this period, temperature profiles were near the dry adiabatic lapse rate. Flights were made through a jet wind speed profile having peak wind speeds of 7 m/s at a height of 100 m AGL. Wind directions were from the northwest. All flights were performed as continuous ascents, rather than ascending in discrete steps with halts at set altitudes.

  1. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, J.-Ph.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Bautista, L.; Bray, N.; Bernardis, P. de; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P.; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Longval, Y.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Mot, B.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-08-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project, which aims at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarized continuum emission by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment also constitutes a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. This paper presents the instrument and its expected performances. Performance measured during ground calibrations of the instrument and in flight will be described in a forthcoming paper.

  2. Upper limits for stratospheric H2O2 and HOCl from high resolution balloon-borne infrared solar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Solar absorption spectra from two stratospheric balloon flights have been analyzed for the presence of H2O2 and HOCl absorption in the 1230.0 to 1255.0 per cm region. The data were recorded at 0.02 per cm resolution during sunset with the University of Denver interferometer system on October 27, 1978 and March 23, 1981. Selected spectral regions were analyzed with the technique of nonlinear least squares spectral curve fitting. Upper limits of 0.33 ppbv for H2O2 and 0.36 ppbv for HOCl near 28 km are derived from the 1978 flight data while upper limits of 0.44 ppbv for H2O2 and 0.43 ppbv for HOCl at 29.5 km are obtained from the 1981 flight data.

  3. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro Avila, M. A.; Amico, F. D.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modelled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre (GC) region during balloon flights in Brazil (∽ -23° of latitude and ∽ 40 km of altitude) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the GC region: IE 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  4. A Distributed, Real-Time Data Monitoring System as Ground Support Equipment for Balloon-Borne Astronomy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. M. H.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cook, W. R.; Davis, A. J.; Harrison, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    We present a real-time data-monitoring software suite that we developed for the High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT). HEFT was one of the first projects to develop focusing mirrors and detectors for hard X-ray astronomy. We deployed these new technologies on the scientific ballooning platform. During a balloon flight, this so-called ‘ground support equipment’ (GSE) allows us to monitor the physical condition of the payload, and to inspect preliminary science data in real time, through displays of tables of frequently updated quantities and their averages, time-series plots, histograms, spectra, and images. Unique from previous implementations of GSE s for other experiments, our system is a server-client network that utilises TCP/IP unicast and UDP multicast to enable multiple, concurrent and independent display clients. Most of the code is in Java, and thus platform-independent. We verified that the software suite works on Linux, Mac OS/X and Windows XP, deployed it in two flight campaigns for use during on-site calibration, pre-launch practice drills, and an observation flight of 24 hours. This system, and individual ideas of its implementation, can be adapted for use in future experiments requiring sophisticated real-time monitoring and data display.

  5. A pulse shape discriminator and an online system for the balloon-borne hard X-ray/gamma-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Kamae, T.; Tanaka, M.; Gunji, S.; Miyazuki, S.; Tamura, T.; Sekimoto, Y.; Yamaoka, N.; Nishimura, J.; Yajima, N.

    Attention is given to a new kind of phoswich counters (the well-type phoswich counter) that will be capable of detecting very low flux hard X-rays/gamma-rays (40-1000 keV) from astronomical objects. A specially designed pulse-shape discriminator (PSD) selects hard X-rays/gamma-rays that has deposited energy only in the detection part. Sixty-four such counters are assembled into an array where each phoswich element acts as an active shield to the neighboring elements too. The ADCs, the TDCs, the hit-pattern latches, and the precision clock are read out by a VME-based online system, stored on an 8-mm video tape, and transmitted to the ground station. The design and performance of the pulse shape discriminator and the online system are described.

  6. Diurnal variation of turbulence in troposphere and lower stratosphere using balloon borne radiosonde observations over two tropical stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed, Muhsin; Sunilkumar, S. V.; Parameswaran, Krishnaswamy; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2016-07-01

    A study on the diurnal variabilities of atmospheric stability and occurrence and strength of turbulence in the troposphere and lower stratosphere at two tropical stations, Trivandrum (8.5N, 76.9E) and Gadanki (13.5N, 79.2E), situated in the Indian peninsula is carried out using three years of GPS-radiosonde observations obtained as a part of the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics (TTD) Experiment under the CAWSES-India program. Thorpe method is adopted to estimate the turbulent parameters from radiosonde observations. This study showed that in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), both stability and turbulence parameters depict a clear diurnal variation. Over Trivandrum, the occurrence of turbulence as well as its strength peaks during night time and falls off during the day, while at. Gadanki it peaks during the day and falls off during night Above ABL, in the 3-10 km region, the occurrence of turbulence is high with significant strength during night at both the stations. At both the stations, turbulence strength in 10-15 km region does not show any significant diurnal variation when compared to the lower region. But the occurrence frequency of turbulence shows a clear diurnal pattern (high during the day) especially over Trivandrum. This study showed that in the middle troposphere while the occurrence of convective instability is fairly the same at both the stations, wind shear is significantly large at Trivandrum compared to Gadanki and is high during night compared to the day. Thus, below 15 km, while convective instability is mainly responsible for the generation of turbulence at Gadanki, wind shear induced dynamic instability is also responsible for the generation of turbulence at Trivandrum at least during night. In the upper troposphere above 15 km, turbulence at both the stations does not show significant diurnal variability, where wind shear driven instability leads the convective instability in the generation of turbulence. In the Lower Stratosphere (LS) region, diurnal variation of turbulence is insignificant and wind shear is the only driving force for the generation of turbulence.

  7. A balloon-borne ionization spectrometer with very large aperture for the detection of high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atallah, K.; Modlinger, A.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A balloon experiment which was used to determine the chemical composition of very high-energy cosmic rays up to and beyond 100 GeV/nucleon is described. The detector had a geometric factor of 1 sq m sr and a total weight on the balloon of 2100 kg. The apparatus consisted of an ionization spectrometer, spark chambers, and plastic scintillation and Cherenkov counters. It was calibrated at CERN up to 24 GeV/c protons and at DESY up to 7 GeV/c electrons. In October 1972 it was flown successfully on a stratospheric balloon.

  8. Observations of a gamma-ray burst and other sources with a large-area, balloon-borne detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of a weak cosmic gamma ray burst of integrated intensity 2 x 10 to the -6th erg/sq cm, two solar flare events, and pulsed emission profiles of A0535+26 and NP0532 are reported for several energy intervals in the energy range from 45 to 520 keV. The measurements were made with a NaI(Tl) detector array flown on a balloon to 4 g/sq cm residual atmosphere from Palestine, Texas, on October 6-8, 1980, for 28 hours. The detector is a prototype of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) to be flown on the Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO).

  9. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; Sacahui, J. R.; D'Amico, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modelled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre (CG) region during balloon flights in Brazil (˜ -23° of latitude and an altitude of ˜40 km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the GC: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  10. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modeled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre region during balloon flights in Brazil (∼ - 23 ° of latitude and an altitude of ∼ 40km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the Galactic Centre region: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  11. Limiting sensitivities of coded-aperture telescopes for gamma-ray astronomy: Balloon-Borne fixed-mask systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan

    1990-07-01

    The limiting sensitivities of coded-aperture imaging telescopes employing fixed masks are derived for continuum and line emission from cosmic point sources. The sensitivities are calculated for a single-source observation and do not take into consideration the many advantages offered by a multiplex system; for instance, low susceptibility to secular background changes and the ability to observe more than one source during an observation period. For the nuclear transition energy region, it is shown that the utilization of a coded-aperture mask by a particular detection system does not significantly degrade its performance relative to conventional, sequential scanning instruments. It is further shown that for short source observation times (e.g., typical of those obtained from stratospheric balloons), the coded-aperture imaging technique can be particularly advantageous. The effects of a non-uniform instrumental background on the imaging process are discussed and a correction procedure suggested. It is found that by careful planning of the observing program coupled with a stable instrument design, image degradation due to background non-uniformities can be made arbitrarily small and the resulting performance made to approach that predicted for an equivalent mask-antimask system. Present address: Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics, Code 661, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA.

  12. X-ray observations of MeV electron precipitation with a balloon-borne germanium spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, Robyn Margaret

    The MAXIS (MeV Auroral X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy) balloon payload was launched on a long duration balloon from McMurdo, Antarctica on Jan. 12, 2000. The high spectral resolution germanium spectrometer aboard MAXIS detected nine X-ray bursts with significant flux extending above 0.5 MeV during the 18 day flight. The X-rays are bremsstrahlung produced by precipitating electrons and the events are characterized by an extremely flat X-ray spectrum (˜E-2) similar to the first MeV event discovered in 1996, indicating relativistic parent electrons. The bursts were detected between magnetic latitudes 58°--68° (IGRF L-values of 3.8--6.7) with durations varying from several minutes to several hours and occurred only in the late afternoon/dusk sectors (14:30--00:00 MLT) while softer precipitation was detected at all magnetic local times. In addition, the MeV events were associated with substorm activity and several events showed Ultra Low Frequency (mHz) modulation of the X-ray count rate. Spacecraft and ground-based observations indicate the presence of ULF wave activity near the time and location of the events which may be causing the modulation by some mechanism that is not understood. The MeV events are well modeled by a very flat exponential precipitating electron distribution and the average flux of precipitating electrons with E ≥ 0.5 MeV is estimated to be ˜360 cm-2 s-1. This corresponds to about 5 x 1025 precipitated electrons in this latitude range during the eight day observing interval compared to ˜2 x 10 25 trapped 0.5--3.6 MeV electrons estimated using GPS electron measurements. The MAXIS observations indicate that these electron precipitation events are common and may be the primary loss mechanism for outer zone relativistic electrons. Individual events were also compared with measurements of the trapped electrons from which it is estimated that only a few percent of the loss cone is being filled by the mechanism acting to precipitate the particles. This indicates that if the mechanism is wave-particle interaction, it is not in the strong diffusion regime. Looking towards the future, a Compton telescope for imaging MeV X-ray bursts at high energies is also investigated. Such an instrument may also be used to measure polarization and thus may provide a method for inferring the precipitating electron pitch angle distribution.

  13. X-ray observations of MeV electron precipitation with a balloon-borne germanium spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, R. M.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; Lorentzen, K. R.; McCarthy, M. P.

    2002-12-01

    The high-resolution germanium detector aboard the MAXIS (MeV Auroral X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy) balloon payload detected nine X-ray bursts with significant flux extending above 0.5 MeV during an 18 day flight over Antarctica. These minutes-to-hours-long events are characterized by an extremely flat spectrum (~E-2) similar to the first MeV event discovered in 1996, indicating that the bulk of parent precipitating electrons is at relativistic energies. The MeV bursts were detected between magnetic latitudes 58°-68° (L-values of 3.8-6.7) but only in the late afternoon/dusk sectors (14:30-00:00 MLT), suggesting scattering by EMIC (electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves as a precipitation mechanism. We estimate the average flux of precipitating E >= 0.5 MeV electrons to be ~360 cm-2s-1, corresponding to about 5 × 1025 such electrons precipitated during the eight days at L = 3.8-6.7, compared to ~2 × 1025 trapped 0.5-3.6 MeV electrons estimated from dosimeter measurements on a GPS spacecraft. These observations show that MeV electron precipitation events are a primary loss mechanism for outer zone relativistic electrons.

  14. HERO: Program Status and Fist Images from a Balloon-Borne Focusing Hard-X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Alexander, C. D.; Apple, J. A.; Benson, C. M.; Dietz, K. L.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt. D. E.; Ghosh, K. K.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    HERO is a balloon payload featuring shallow-graze angle replicated optics for hard-x-ray imaging. When completed, the instrument will offer unprecedented sensitivity in the hard-x-ray region, giving thousands of sources to choose from for detailed study on long flights. A recent proof-of-concept flight captured the first hard-x-ray focused images of the Crab Nebula, Cygnus X-1 and GRS 1915+105. Full details of the HERO program are presented, including the design and performance of the optics, the detectors and the gondola. Results from the recent proving flight are discussed together with expected future performance when the full science payload is completed.

  15. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  16. Packet Radio for Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This tutorial on packet radio (communication system using radio and digital packet-switching technology) highlights radio transmission of data, brief history, special considerations in applying packet radio to library online catalogs, technology, defining protocol at physical and network levels, security, geographic coverage, and components. (A…

  17. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  18. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    2012-04-01

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North America, and the development of new facilities such as LOFAR, ALMA, FAST, and Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes in Australia and South Africa. These developments are driven by advances in radio-frequency, digital and information technologies that tremendously enhance the capabilities in radio astronomy. These new developments foreshadow major scientific advances driven by radio observations in the next triennium. We highlight these facility developments in section 3 of this report. A selection of science highlight from this triennium are summarized in section 2.

  19. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  20. Conceptual Background to Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsonby, J. E. B.

    2004-06-01

    The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) conceives the radio spectrum as primarily a resource for telecommunications. Indeed most applications of radio are for communications and other radio services, particularly the Radio Astronomy Service, are deemed to be `pretend'communication serviceas for spectrum amnagement purposes. The language of Radio Spectrum Management is permeated by the terminology ofcommunications, some derived from the physics of radio and some from aspects of information theory. This contribution touches on all the essential concepts of radiocommunications which the author thinks should be the common mental equipment of the Spectrum Manager. The fundamental capacity of a communication channel is discussed in terms of the degrees of freedom and bandwidth of a signal, and the signal to noise ratio. It is emphasized that an information bearing signal is inherently unpredictable, and must, at some level, be discontinuous. This has important consequences for the form of its power spectrum. The effect of inserting filters is discussed particularly with regard to constant amplitude signals and, in the context of non-linear power amplifiers, the phenomenon of`sideband recovery'. All the common generic forms of modulation are discussed including the very different case of `no-modulation' which applies in all forms of passive remote sensing. Whilst all are agreed that the radio spectrum should be used `efficiently', there is no quantitative measure of spectral efficiency which embraces all relevant aspects of spectral usage. These various aspects are dicussed. Finally a brief outline of some aspects of antennae are reviewed. It is pointed out that the recent introduction of so-called `active antennnae', which have properties unlike traditional passive antennae, has confused the interpretation of those ITU Radio Regulations which refer to antennae.

  1. Astrometry of southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Graeme L.; Jauncey, David L.; Harvey, Bruce R.; Savage, Ann; Gulkis, Samuel; Preston, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogs. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarcsecond radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way.

  2. Radio emission from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Panagia, N.; Sramek, R. A.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Stockdale, C. J.; Williams, C. L.

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 30 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85 - 110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements. 2) At a time ˜3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+beta ) beta ˜ -0.7 to beta ˜ -2.7 without change in the spectral index (nu +alpha ; alpha ˜ -0.81). This decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay with an e-folding time of ˜ 1100 days. 3) The best overall fit to all of the data is a model including both non-thermal synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and a thermal free-free absorbing (FFA) components at early times, evolving to a constant spectral index, optically thin decline rate, until a break in that decline rate at day ˜3100, as mentioned above.

  3. Educational Radio. Information Bulletin 21-B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The term "Educational Radio" includes all radio stations licensed for noncommercial operation. A history of educational radio begins with the first domestic law for control of radio in general, The Radio Act of 1912. Federal Communication Commission (FCC) regulations pertaining to educational radio or "public radio" deal with channel assignments,…

  4. Double Radio Sources: Two Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, M. J.; Heinämäki, P.

    2000-02-01

    The theory of double radio sources is considered from two different points of view: the so called unified models and the slingshot model. First, observations and theory are discussed in 11 areas: (1) the dependence or independence of small-scale and large-scale jets from each other; (2) stability and existence of large-scale jets; (3) radio hot spots inside the lobes of double radio sources; (4) the relation of double-lobed quasars to radio galaxies; (5) polarization and other asymmetries between the two lobes and correlations among them; (6) the speeds of advance of radio lobes; (7) giant radio sources; (8) one-sided double radio sources; (9) multiple-sided double radio sources; (10) the origin of the Fanaroff-Riley classes of radio morphology; and (11) the origin of distance asymmetries of the radio lobes. Then five steps in building up a double radio source theory are discussed: (1) theory of galaxy mergers; (2) theory of black hole mergers; (3) theory of black hole interactions and ejections; (4) theory of radio lobe formation and evolution; and (5) radio jet theory. Finally, recent X-ray observations by ROSAT are discussed from the point of view of double radio source theory.

  5. The Smiley Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R. M.; Castelaz, M. W.; Daugherty, J.; Owen, L.

    2004-12-01

    More than ever modern astronomy is based upon a multi-wavelength approach combining data-sets from optical, infrared, radio, X-ray and gamma ray observatories to provide improved understanding of astrophysical phenomena. In the field of astronomy education however, until recently most teaching resources available to high schools have been limited to small optical telescopes, with little coverage of other branches of observational astronomy. To fill in this resource gap, PARI has developed the School of Galactic Radio Astronomy and the Smiley 4.6 m Radio Telescope to provide high schools access to a state-of-the-art, internet accessable radio observatory for class projects and activities. We describe here the development of the Smiley radio telescope, its control systems and give examples of several class activities which have been developed for use by high school students. We describe the future development of Smiley and plans to upgrade its performance. The SGRA has been supported by grants from Progress Energy, Z. Smith Reynolds, STScI IDEAS, and the AAS Small Research Grant Program which is supported by NASA.

  6. Giant radio pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratiev, Vladislav

    Rotation-powered radio pulsars exhibit a remarkably diverse spectrum of variability with characteristic time scales from days and even years (intermittent pulsars) to minutes-seconds (nulling) and (sub-)microseconds. The latter time scales are associated with the phenomenon of giant pulses (GPs) and micropulses. The story of GPs started in 1968, when Staelin and Reifenstein discovered the Crab pulsar through its spectacularly bright radio pulses. To date, only seven pulsars out of more than 2200 are known to show GP emission, namely the pulsars B0531+21, B1937+21, B0540-69, B1821-24, B1957+20, J0218+4232, and B1820-30A. Giant pulses are characterized by large energies (more than ten times of the energy of the average pulse), short durations, power-law energy distribution, specific rotational phase of occurrence, high degree of polarization, and accompanying high-energy radiation. Large energies of GPs and coincidence of their phase of occurrence with peaks of high-energy profiles hint at the same mechanism of radio GP and high-energy emission. The correlation of Crab pulsar GPs with optical, X-ray and gamma-ray photons was studied for the past 20 years, with only radio/optical link confirmed so far. In my talk I will present the summary of the observational evidence of radio GPs and give an overview of theoretical advances on giant-pulse emission mechanism.

  7. Galileo radio science investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, H. T.; Eshleman, V. R.; Hinson, D. P.; Kliore, A. J.; Lindal, G. F.; Woo, R.; Bird, M. K.; Volland, H.; Edenhoffer, P.; Paetzold, M.

    1992-01-01

    Galileo radio-propagation experiments are based on measurements of absolute and differential propagation time delay, differential phase delay, Doppler shift, signal strength, and polarization. These measurements can be used to study: the atmospheric and ionospheric structure, constituents, and dynamics of Jupiter; the magnetic field of Jupiter; the diameter of Io, its ionospheric structure, and the distribution of plasma in the Io torus; the diameters of the other Galilean satellites, certain properties of their surfaces, and possibly their atmospheres and ionospheres; and the plasma dynamics and magnetic field of the solar corona. The spacecraft system provides linear rather than circular polarization on the S-band downlink signal, the capability to receive X-band uplink signals, and a differential downlink ranging mode. A highly-stable, dual-frequency, spacecraft radio system is developed that is suitable for simultaneous measurements of all the parameters normally attributed to radio waves.

  8. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  9. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2007-10-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85-110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements rather well. 2) At mid-cm wavelengths there is often deviation from the fitted radio light curves, particularly near the peak flux density, and considerable shorter term deviations in the declining portion when the emission has become optically thin. 3) At a time ~3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+β)β~-0.7 to β~-2.7 without change in the spectral index (ν+αα~-0.81). However, this decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay starting at day ~3100 with an e-folding time of ~1100 days. 4) The best overall fit to all of the data is

  10. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  11. Radio astronomy with microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic constellation of microspacecraft in lunar orbit can carry out valuable radio astronomy investigations in the frequency range of 30kHz--30MHz, a range that is difficult to explore from Earth. In contrast to the radio astronomy ivestigations that have flown on individual spacecraft, the four microspacecraft together with a carrier spacecraft, which transported them to lunar orbit, form an interferometer with far superior angular resolution. Use of microspacecraft allows the entire constellation to be launched with a Taurus-class vehicle. Also distinguishing this approach is that the Moon is used as needed to shield the constellation from RF interference from the Earth and Sun.

  12. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  13. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  14. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Order 1. On March 17, 2005, the Commission adopted the Cognitive Radio Report and Order, 70 FR 23032... Memorandum Opinion and Order (MO&O), 72 FR 31190, June 6, 2007, which responded to two petitions filed in... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios AGENCY:...

  15. Talk Radio as Interpersonal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Cameron B.; Rubin, Alan M.

    1989-01-01

    Examines whether talk radio serves different purposes for listeners who phone in, compared to those who do not. Finds that talk radio provides callers with an accessible and nonthreatening alternative to interpersonal communication. (MS)

  16. Prism beamswitch for radio telescopes.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Ulich, B L

    1978-12-01

    A dielectric prism and switching mechanism have been constructed for beamswitching a Cassegrain radio telescope. Spatially extended radio sources may be mapped without significant confusion utilizing the sensitivity and stability inherent in the conventional Dicke radiometer. PMID:18699031

  17. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  18. Albanian: Basic Radio Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This volume has been designed as a supplement to a course in Albanian developed by the Defense Language Institute. The emphasis in this text is placed on radio communications instruction. The volume is divided into five exercises, each of which contains a vocabulary, dictation, and an air-to-ground communications procedure conducted in Albanian…

  19. A Radio Station Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geva, Edna

    2002-01-01

    Describes a radio program in an English-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom in Israel. Classrooms of English students listen carefully to daily broadcasts, waiting to solve the brain teaser. Personal messages and catchy music follow the program. The project has encouraged students to use English actively and purposefully. Evaluation of the broadcasts…

  20. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  1. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  2. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  3. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  4. Educational Broadcasting--Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahamed, Uvais; Grimmett, George

    This manual is intended for those who must conduct educational radio broadcasting training courses in Asia-Pacific countries without the resources of experienced personnel, as well as for individuals to use in self-learning situations. The selection of material has been influenced by the need to use broadcasting resources effectively in programs…

  5. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  6. Radio Is an Educational Medium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duby, Aliza

    This report summarizes information found in a survey of the literature on radio as an educational medium which covered the published literature from many areas of the world. Comments on the literature reviewed are provided throughout the text, which is organized under seven major headings: (1) Radio, Mass Medium; (2) Radio, the Medium (broadening…

  7. Radio as a Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Peggy

    1980-01-01

    National Public Radio's educational staff is experimenting with radio in the classroom by dramatizing the issues of the Afghan crisis in an audiodisc presentation mailed to teachers around the country. The article includes samples of dialogue from the tape, student opinions, and why radio is the medium used. (CT)

  8. Radio: Your Publics Are Listening!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Gary

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide school board members, administrators, teachers, and others interested in education with an understanding of radio, how it works, and how school systems can take advantage of the communications possibilities offered by radio. After providing background information on radio as a mass communications medium…

  9. Ham Radio is Mir Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students communicated with U.S. and Russian astronauts via ham radio while they were in orbit on the space station Mir. Gives suggestions for other ham radio classroom activities as well as names of organizations, publications, and grant programs that teachers can access to help in bring ham radio into their…

  10. The LOFAR radio environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; van Diepen, G.; Martinez-Ruby, O.; Labropoulos, P.; Brentjens, M. A.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Jelić, V.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mellema, G.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R. F.; Schaye, J.; Vedantham, H.; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H.; Conway, J.; de Vos, M.; Dettmar, R. J.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Frieswijk, W.; Gerbers, M.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Koopman, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J. D.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.; Norden, M.; Paas, H.; Pandey, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Schoenmakers, A. P.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; van Ardenne, A.; van Cappellen, W.; van Duin, A. P.; van Haarlem, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Weeren, R. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: This paper discusses the spectral occupancy for performing radio astronomy with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), with a focus on imaging observations. Methods: We have analysed the radio-frequency interference (RFI) situation in two 24-h surveys with Dutch LOFAR stations, covering 30-78 MHz with low-band antennas and 115-163 MHz with high-band antennas. This is a subset of the full frequency range of LOFAR. The surveys have been observed with a 0.76 kHz/1 s resolution. Results: We measured the RFI occupancy in the low and high frequency sets to be 1.8% and 3.2% respectively. These values are found to be representative values for the LOFAR radio environment. Between day and night, there is no significant difference in the radio environment. We find that lowering the current observational time and frequency resolutions of LOFAR results in a slight loss of flagging accuracy. At LOFAR's nominal resolution of 0.76 kHz and 1 s, the false-positives rate is about 0.5%. This rate increases approximately linearly when decreasing the data frequency resolution. Conclusions: Currently, by using an automated RFI detection strategy, the LOFAR radio environment poses no perceivable problems for sensitive observing. It remains to be seen if this is still true for very deep observations that integrate over tens of nights, but the situation looks promising. Reasons for the low impact of RFI are the high spectral and time resolution of LOFAR; accurate detection methods; strong filters and high receiver linearity; and the proximity of the antennas to the ground. We discuss some strategies that can be used once low-level RFI starts to become apparent. It is important that the frequency range of LOFAR remains free of broadband interference, such as DAB stations and windmills.

  11. Collaborative Beamfocusing Radio (COBRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Jeremy P.; Hsu, Mark J.; Smith, David; Husain, Anis

    2013-05-01

    A Ziva team has recently demonstrated a novel technique called Collaborative Beamfocusing Radios (COBRA) which enables an ad-hoc collection of distributed commercial off-the-shelf software defined radios to coherently align and beamform to a remote radio. COBRA promises to operate even in high multipath and non-line-of-sight environments as well as mobile applications without resorting to computationally expensive closed loop techniques that are currently unable to operate with significant movement. COBRA exploits two key technologies to achieve coherent beamforming. The first is Time Reversal (TR) which compensates for multipath and automatically discovers the optimal spatio-temporal matched filter to enable peak signal gains (up to 20 dB) and diffraction-limited focusing at the intended receiver in NLOS and severe multipath environments. The second is time-aligned buffering which enables TR to synchronize distributed transmitters into a collaborative array. This time alignment algorithm avoids causality violations through the use of reciprocal buffering. Preserving spatio-temporal reciprocity through the TR capture and retransmission process achieves coherent alignment across multiple radios at ~GHz carriers using only standard quartz-oscillators. COBRA has been demonstrated in the lab, aligning two off-the-shelf software defined radios over-the-air to an accuracy of better than 2 degrees of carrier alignment at 450 MHz. The COBRA algorithms are lightweight, with computation in 5 ms on a smartphone class microprocessor. COBRA also has low start-up latency, achieving high accuracy from a cold-start in 30 ms. The COBRA technique opens up a large number of new capabilities in communications, and electronic warfare including selective spatial jamming, geolocation and anti-geolocation.

  12. X-ray and radio core emission in radio quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kembhavi, A.; Feigelson, E. D.; Singh, K. P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate the physical relationship between X-ray and radio core emission in radio-selected quasars, 35 radio quasars have been observed with the VLA at 6 and 20 cm. The sample was chosen from a list of radio quasars with known X-ray luminosity but poorly known radio properties. Including data gathered from the literature, radio core detections or upper limits at 6 cm have been obtained for 127 radio quasars which have published Einstein X-ray data. A statistical association is sought between radio core luminosity and X-ray luminosity, and it is found that there is a strong correlation. The slope of the relation of L(x) to L(Gamma)-alpha is alpha = 0.71 + or - 0.07 for unresolved quasars with flat radio spectra. The slope decreases as quasars with extended radio regions are considered. This is traced to the presence of radio emission which is unrelated to the X-ray emission, in the presently unresolved cores of quasars.

  13. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  14. Radio tomography of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitsyn, V.E.; Tereshchenko, E.D. RAN, Poliarnyi Geofizicheskii Inst., Murmansk )

    1992-10-01

    This paper provides on overview of tomographic approaches to ionospheric remote sensing in the radio-wave range. The ionosphere has a very complicated structure. Thus, it is reasonable to divide tomographic methods into deterministic and statistical ones. The deterministic tomography problems can be subdivided into ray radio tomography and diffraction radio tomography. The statistical radio tomography approach is used when it is necessary to reconstruct the statistical structure of a great number of inhomogeneities, on the basis of measurements of field statistics (instead of one realization of the reconstruction of an inhomogeneity). The methods of solving radio-tomography problems, and their connection with inverse-scattering problems, are considered. The results of some first experiments are described, which show the possibilities of the radio tomography approaches. In conclusion, we discuss perspectives, directions of the development of radio tomography, and problems which appear. 30 refs.

  15. Compact radio cores in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Giovannini, G.; Spitler, L. R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The mechanism of radio emission in radio-quiet (RQ) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is still debated and might arise from the central AGN, from star formation activity in the host, or from either of these sources. A direct detection of compact and bright radio cores embedded in sources that are classified as RQ can unambiguously determine whether a central AGN significantly contributes to the radio emission. Aims: We search for compact, high-surface-brightness radio cores in RQ AGNs that are caused unambiguously by AGN activity. Methods: We used the Australian Long Baseline Array to search for compact radio cores in four RQ AGNs located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). We also targeted four radio-loud (RL) AGNs as a control sample. Results: We detected compact and bright radio cores in two AGNs that are classified as RQ and in one that is classified as RL. Two RL AGNs were not imaged because the quality of the observations was too poor. Conclusions: We report on a first direct evidence of radio cores in RQ AGNs at cosmological redshifts. Our detections show that some of the sources that are classified as RQ contain an active AGN that can contribute significantly (~50% or more) to the total radio emission.

  16. High stability radio links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, E. Robert

    1989-01-01

    Radio telecommunication links are used for communication with deep space probes. These links consist of sinusoidal carrier signals at radio frequencies (RF) modulated with information sent between the spacecraft and the earth. This carrier signal is a very pure and stable sinusoid, typically derived from an atomic frequency standard whose frequency and phase are used to measure the radial velocity of the probe and from this and other data types derive its trajectory. This same observable can be used to search for space-time distortions cased by low frequency (0.1 to 100 MHz) gravitation radiation. How such a system works, what its sensitivity limitations are, and what potential future improvements can be made are discussed.

  17. Stellar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the various radiation mechanisms believed to play a role in stellar radio emission. The radio emission from most stars is nonthermal and is generally due to mildly relativistic electrons with energies from a few keV to over 10 MeV. Magnetic fields play a crucial role both in accelerating the electrons to the requisite energies and in mediating the emission mechanism. They also play a fundamental role in creating the velocity anisotropies that are necessary for the operation of some of the coherent emission mechanisms. Coherent emission is seen most commonly on the M dwarfs, rarely on the RS CVns, and has yet to be detected for any other class of star. These coherent processes are best studied by means of their dynamic spectra; such studies are now just getting underway.

  18. [Radio-guided parathyroidectomy].

    PubMed

    Calbo, L; Gorgone, S; Palmieri, R; Lazzara, S; Sciglitano, P; Catalfamo, A; Calbo, E; Campennì, A; Ruggeri, M; Vermiglio, F; Baldari, S

    2009-01-01

    The Authors, after a careful review of literature about the instrumental diagnostic techniques (with particular attention to the nuclear-medical ones) and the surgical therapy of parathyroid diseases, report their experience on the use of the radio-guided mininvasive surgery with MIBI and gamma-probe for intraoperative localization of pathological glands. Once exposed their experience, the Authors conclude asserting that this technique is fast, slightly invasive and expensive, and certainly useful for the detection of pathological or ectopic glands. It can be widely employed because, in comparison to its numerous advantages, such as the reduction of the operating time and of the hospital-stay, the greater radicality and the possibility to use mininvasive techniques, it does not present significant technical limitations and/or radio-protectionistic problems. PMID:20109383

  19. Mobile radio - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucar, Andy D.

    1991-11-01

    Following a brief prologue and historical overview, such technical issues as the repertoire of systems and services, management of the airwaves, the operating environment, service quality, network issues and cell size, channel coding and modulation, speech coding, diversity, multiplex, and multiple access (FDMA, TDMA, CDMA) are discussed. Also addressed are the potential economic and sociological impacts of mobile radio communications in the wake of the redistribution of airwaves at the World Administrative Radio Conference WARC '92. Performance dependence on multipath delay (related to the cell size and terrain configuration), Doppler frequency (related to the carrier frequency, data rate, and the speed of vehicles), and message length (can dictate the choice of multiple access) is briefly discussed.

  20. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patzold, M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Wennmacher, A.; Aksnes, K.; Anderson, J. D.; Asmar, S. W.; Tinto, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Yeomans, D. K.; Barriot, J. -P.; Bird, M. K.; Boehnhardt, H.; Gill, E.; Montenbruck, O.; Grun, E.; Hausler, B.; Ip, W. H.; Thomas, N.; Marouf, E. A.; Rickman, H.; Wallis, M. K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    The Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment was selected by the European Space Agency to be included in the International Rosetta Mission to comet P/Wirtanen (launch in 2003, arrival and operational phase at the comet 2011-2013). The RSI science objectives address fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, the gravity field, non-gravitational forces, the size and shape, the internal structure, the composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains and the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux on the orbiter. RSI will make use of the radio system of the Rosetta spacecraft.

  1. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  2. Radio quiet, please! - protecting radio astronomy from interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, W.

    2011-06-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite and increasingly precious resource for astronomical research, as well as for other spectrum users. Keeping the frequency bands used for radio astronomy as free as possible of unwanted Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is crucial. The aim of spectrum management, one of the tools used towards achieving this goal, includes setting regulatory limits on RFI levels emitted by other spectrum users into the radio astronomy frequency bands. This involves discussions with regulatory bodies and other spectrum users at several levels - national, regional and worldwide. The global framework for spectrum management is set by the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union, which has defined that interference is detrimental to radio astronomy if it increases the uncertainty of a measurement by 10%. The Radio Regulations are revised every three to four years, a process in which four organisations representing the interests of the radio astronomical community in matters of spectrum management (IUCAF, CORF, CRAF and RAFCAP) participate actively. The current interests and activities of these four organisations range from preserving what has been achieved through regulatory measures, to looking far into the future of high frequency use and giant radio telescope use.

  3. Radio jets in NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, K. J.; Elvis, M.; Kjer, D.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between the radio and optical emissions from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 is investigated by mapping the radio radiation from this source at wavelengths of 20 and 6 cm using the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Results show that the radio emission at wavelengths from 20 to 6 cm extend 10'' (950 pc) along a position angle of 72-84 degrees. This nonthermal emission is found to consist of at least six components and is similar to jets observed in other compact extragalactic radio sources. These radio jets appear to be coincident with the optical line emission region in NGC 4151 and are aligned with the position angle of the linearly polarized optical continuum emission.

  4. Locating Radio Noise from Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Watson, R.; Gaffet, S.; Astin, I.; Evans, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into exponentially growing streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010). The acceleration of the electrons to a few eV results in the radiation of a small amount of electromagnetic energy. The incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the low frequency radio noise from sprites near ~40 km height (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this theoretically predicted radiation was recently confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). To locate the radio noise from sprites in the sky, an interferometric network of low frequency radio receivers was developed (Mezentsev and Fullekrug, JGR, 2013). The key parameter for the interferometric signal processing is the frequency dependent wave propagation velocity of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere. This wave propagation velocity is determined by the wave number vector which needs to be inferred from the measurements. Here we adapt and subsequently apply array analyses which have been developed for seismic and infrasound arrays to determine the horizontal wave number vectors of ~20-24 kHz radio waves measured with an array of ten radio receivers distributed over an area of ~1 km × 1 km. It is found that the horizontal slowness of ~20-24 kHz radio waves ranges from ~2.7 ns/m to ~4.1 ns/m depending on the arrival azimuth of the radio wave. For comparison, an electromagnetic wave in vacuum has a slowness of ~3.34 ns/m. A larger slowness indicates an apparent velocity which is smaller than the speed of light and a smaller slowness indicates that the radio wave arrives at the array from an elevation angle. The observed variability of the observed slowness almost certainly results from the distance dependent superposition of the transverse electric and magnetic TEn and TMn radio wave propagation modes.

  5. Decimetric radio dot emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.; Sawant, H. S.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We study a rare type of solar radio bursts called decimetric dot emissions. Aims: In the period 1999-2001, 20 events of decimetric dot emissions observed by the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS) in the frequency range 950-2640 MHz are investigated statistically and compared with radio fine structures of zebras and fibers. Methods: For the study of the spectral characteristics of the dot emissions we use specially developed Interactive Data Language (IDL) software called BSSView and basic statistical methods. Results: We have found that the dm dot emissions, contrary to the fine structures of the type IV bursts (i.e. zebras, fibers, lace bursts, spikes), are not superimposed on any background burst emission. In the radio spectrum, in most cases the dot emissions form chains that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. Because some zebras and fibers, especially those observed with high time and high spectral resolutions, also show emission dots (but superimposed on the background burst emission), we compared the spectral parameters of the dot emissions with the dots being the fine structure of zebras and fibers. For both these dots, similar spectral characteristics were found. Some similarities of the dot emissions can be found also with the lace bursts and spikes. For some events the dot emissions show structural evolution from patterns resembling fibers to patterns resembling zebras and vice versa, or they evolve into fully chaotic patterns. Conclusions: For the first time, we present decimetric dot emissions that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. We propose that these emissions are generated by the plasma emission mechanism at the locations in the solar atmosphere where the double resonance condition is fulfilled.

  6. Internet Resources for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    A subjective overview of Internet resources for radio-astronomical information is presented. Basic observing techniques and their implications for the interpretation of publicly available radio data are described, followed by a discussion of existing radio surveys, their level of optical identification, and nomenclature of radio sources. Various collections of source catalogues and databases for integrated radio source parameters are reviewed and compared, as well as the web interfaces to interrogate the current and ongoing large-area surveys. Links to radio observatories with archives of raw (uv-) data are presented, as well as services providing images, both of individual objects or extracts (``cutouts'') from large-scale surveys. While the emphasis is on radio continuum data, a brief list of sites providing spectral line data, and atomic or molecular information is included. The major radio telescopes and surveys under construction or planning are outlined. A summary is given of a search for previously unknown optically bright radio sources, as performed by the students as an exercise, using Internet resources only. Over 200 different links are mentioned and were verified, but despite the attempt to make this report up-to-date, it can only provide a snapshot of the situation as of mid-1998.

  7. Observations of Solar Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Giorla

    2011-05-01

    A low frequency radio telescope has been recently been constructed on the campus of the The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) and has begun conducting observations at 20MHz as part of NASA'a Radio Jove program. This instrument is capable of observations of solar radio emission including strong prompt radio emission associated with solar burst events. We will discuss solar observations conducted with this instrument as well as an effort to conduct coincident observations with the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  8. Circumstellar radio molecular lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NGUYEN-QUANG-RIEU

    1987-01-01

    Radio molecular lines appear to be useful probes into the stellar environment. Silicon oxide masers provide information on the physical conditions in the immediate vicinity of the stellar photosphere. Valuable information on the physics operating in the envelope of IRC + 10216 was recently obtained by high sensitivity observations and detailed theoretical analyses. Infrared speckle interferometry in the molecular lines and in the continuum is helpful in the investigation of the inner region of the envelope. These techniques are discussed in terms of late-type star mass loss.

  9. Solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Smith, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Active areas of both observational and theoretical research in which rapid progress is being made are discussed. These include: (1) the dynamic spectrum or frequency versus time plot; (2) physical mechanisms in the development of various types of bursts; (3) microwave type 1, 2, 3, and moving type 4 bursts; (4) bursts caused by trapped electrons; (5) physics of type 3bursts; (6) the physics of type 2 bursts and their related shocks; (7) the physics of both stationary and moving traps and associated type 1 and moving type 4 bursts; and (8) the status of the field of solar radio emission.

  10. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  11. Educational Radio: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grise, Philip J., Jr.; And Others

    Radio has been used for educational purposes since its beginning in the early 1920's; the application of radio to the educational problems of the developing nations is not a new concept by any means. Among the uses of educational radio are foreign radio schools, classroom radio uses, "Accion Cultural Popular" (ACPO), and correspondence radio…

  12. The Extragalactic Radio Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of an isotropic component of the high-latitude radio sky has been recognized for nearly fifty years, but has typically been assumed to be Galactic in origin. We use recent radio observations to test whether the observed high-latitude component could originate within either an extended Galactic halo or a more local "bubble" structure. The lack of significant polarization from the isotropic component, combined with the lack of significant correlation with the Galactic far-infrared emission, rule out an origin within the Galaxy. We conclude that an extragalactic origin is the only viable alternative for the bulk of the isotropic high-latitude emission. The extragalactic component is 2-3 times brighter than local (Galactic) emission towards the Galactic poles and is consistent with a power law in frequency with amplitude T(sub r) = 24.1 plus or minus 2.1 K and spectral index beta = -2.599 plus or minus 0.036 evaluated at reference frequency 310 MHz.

  13. Angular momentum radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thidé, B.; Tamburini, F.; Then, H.; Someda, C. G.; Mari, Elletra; Parisi, G.; Spinello, F.; Romanato, Fra

    2014-02-01

    Wireless communication amounts to encoding information onto physical observables carried by electromagnetic (EM) fields, radiating them into surrounding space, and detecting them remotely by an appropriate sensor connected to an informationdecoding receiver. Each observable is second order in the fields and fulfills a conservation law. In present-day radio only the EM linear momentum observable is fully exploited. A fundamental physical limitation of this observable, which represents the translational degrees of freedom of the charges (typically an oscillating current along a linear antenna) and the fields, is that it is single-mode. This means that a linear-momentum radio communication link comprising one transmitting and one receiving antenna, known as a single-input-single-output (SISO) link, can provide only one transmission channel per frequency (and polarization). In contrast, angular momentum, which represents the rotational degrees of freedom, is multi-mode, allowing an angular-momentum SISO link to accommodate an arbitrary number of independent transmission channels on one and the same frequency (and polarization). We describe the physical properties of EM angular momentum and how they can be exploited, discuss real-world experiments, and outline how the capacity of angular momentum links may be further enhanced by employing multi-port techniques, i.e., the angular momentum counterpart of linear-momentum multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO).

  14. Looking for radio waves with a simple radio wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto (Stray Cats), Norihiro

    2011-11-01

    I created a simple device that can detect radio waves in a classroom. In physics classes I tell students that we live in a sea of radio waves. They come from TV, radio, and cell phone signals as well as other sources. Students don't realize this because those electromagnetic waves are invisible. So, I wondered if I could come up with a way to detect the waves and help students to understand them better. Electromagnetic wave meters, which measure intensity of radio waves quantitatively, are commercially available. However, to students most of these are black boxes, and at the introductory level it is more effective to detect radio waves in a simpler way. This paper describes my device and how I have used it in my classes.

  15. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  16. SETI radio spectrum surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, B.; Lokshin, A.; Marina, M.; Ching, L.

    1985-01-01

    The SETI Radio Spectrum Surveillance System (SRSSS) will provide a data base for assessing the radio frequency interference (RFI) environment for SETI and minimizing RFI disruptions during the search. The system's hardware and software are described and the sensitivity of the system is discussed.

  17. The future for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

    2013-12-01

    THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

  18. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  19. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  20. Audiences for Contemporary Radio Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James T.; And Others

    A radio audience survey of 110 sample geographic clusters in the Santa Barbara, California, area served a twofold purpose: the construction of a demographic profile of audience types according to radio format choices, and the identification and analysis of various audience subgroups. A skip interval technique of these geographic clusters resulted…

  1. Radio outburst of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bach, U.

    2013-04-01

    We report on extremely high radio flux of BL Lacertae at 43 and 8 GHz. Observations at 43 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Noto (Italy) revealed a flux density of 10.5 +/- 0.2 Jy on 2013 April 10.65, while observations at 8 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Medicina (Italy) detected a flux density of 8.2 +/- 0.7 Jy on April 12.22. These extremely high radio fluxes show that the radio activity likely correlated to the strong optical, near-infrared, and gamma-ray activity of 2011-2012 (see ATels #4028, #4031, #4155, #4271, #4277, #4349, #4565, #4600), and X-ray activity of late 2012 (ATels #4557, #4627), is far to be exhausted.

  2. Planetary radio astronomy from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of radio astronomy makes it possible for a remote observer to detect the presence of magnetic fields and plasmas in planetary environments. Prior to the flights of the Voyager spacecraft, radio astronomical studies of Jupiter from earth and from earth orbit had correctly predicted the strength and orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field and trapped radiation belts. The Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy investigations have now provided measurements of the complete spectrum of low frequency radio emissions from both planets. Each Voyager instrument consists of a pair of orthogonal, 10-m, electric monopole antennas which are connected to a step-tuned, superheterodyne receiver operating over the frequency range from 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. The Voyager trajectory provided observations from above both the sunlit and nightside hemispheres of Jupiter. Saturn's nonthermal radio emission has been observed at frequencies as low as 3 kHz and as high as 1.2 MHz.

  3. CONSTRAINING RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Dib, R.; Champion, D. J.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2012-01-10

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U 0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits of L{sub 1950} {approx}< 1.60 mJy kpc{sup 2} for periodic emission and L{sub 1950,single} {approx}< 7.6 Jy kpc{sup 2} for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.

  4. Radio-Optical Alignments in a Low Radio Luminosity Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Mark; Ridgway, Susan E.; Wold, Margrethe; Lilje, Per B.; Rawlings, Steve

    1999-01-01

    We present an optically-based study of the alignment between the radio axes and the optical major axes of eight z approximately 0.7 radio galaxies in a 7C sample. The radio galaxies in this sample are approximately 20-times less radio luminous than 3C galaxies at the same redshift, and are significantly less radio-luminous than any other well-defined samples studied to date. Using Nordic Optical Telescope images taken in good seeing conditions at rest-frame wavelengths just longward of the 4000A break, we find a statistically significant alignment effect in the 7C sample. Furthermore, in two cases where the aligned components are well separated from the host we have been able to confirm spectroscopically that they are indeed at the same redshift as the radio galaxy. However, a quantitative analysis of the alignment in this sample and in a corresponding 3C sample from HST (Hubble Space Telescope) archival data indicates that the percentage of aligned flux may be lower and of smaller spatial scale in the 7C sample. Our study suggests that alignments on the 50-kpc scale are probably closely related to the radio luminosity, whereas those on the 15 kpc scale are not. We discuss these results in the context of popular models for the alignment effect.

  5. On the origin of radio emission in radio quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laor, Ari; Behar, Ehud

    The radio emission in radio loud quasars (RLQs) originates in a jet carrying relativistic electrons. In radio quiet quasars (RQQs) the radio emission is ˜ 103 times weaker, relative to other bands. Its origin is not clearly established yet, but it is often speculated to arise from a weak jet. Here we show that there is a tight relation between L_R and L_X for RQQs, with L_R/L_X˜ 10-5, based on the optically selected Palomar-Green (PG) quasars, with nearly complete X-ray and radio detections (avoiding biases and selection effects). Coronally active stars also show a tight relation between L_R and L_X with L_R/L_X˜ 10-5 (the Güdel & Benz relation), which together with correlated variability indicates that stellar coronae are magnetically heated. The X-ray emission of quasars most likely originates from a hot accretion disk corona, and since RQQs follow the Güdel & Benz relation, it is natural to associate their radio emission with coronal emission as well. The tight relation between L_R and L_X may simply reflect the equality of accretion disk coronal heating by magnetically generated relativistic electrons (producing L_R), and coronal cooling by Compton scattering (producing L_X). This suggestion can be tested by looking for correlated X-ray and radio variability patterns, such as the Neupert effect, displayed by stellar coronae.

  6. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  7. Division X: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Taylor, Russ; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Chapman, Jessica; Dubner, Gloria; Garrett, Michael; Goss, W. Miller; Torrelles, Jose M.; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Carilli, Chris; Hills, Richard; Shastri, Prajval

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division X in the IAU 2009GA took place in three sessions during the day of August 6, 2009. The meeting, being well attended, started with the approval for the meeting agenda. Then the triennium reports were made in the first session by the president of Division X, Ren-Dong Nan, and by the chairs of three working groups: “Historic Radio Astronomy WG” by Wayne Orchiston, “Astrophysically Important Lines WG” by Masatoshi Ohishi, and “Global VLBI WG” by Tasso Tzioumis (proxy chair appointed by Steven Tingay). Afterwards, a dozen reports from observatories and worldwide significant projects have been presented in the second session. Business meeting of “Interference Mitigation WG” was located in the third session.

  8. Extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The standard model for extragalactic variable radio sources comprises an isotropically expanding plasmoid with frozen magnetic flux and an electron distribution which evolves adiabatically. This model leads to the following relaton between the peak luminosity L (sub nu, m) and the relevant frequency nu(sub m) which are functions of time: L(sub nu,m) is proportional to nu(sub m)(n) where N = (7n + 5)/(4n + 5). In this expression, n is the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum, where L (sub nu) is proportional to nu (-n). For n in the range 0.5 to 1.5, the standard model yields N in the range 1.2 to 1.4. By contrast, analysis of observational data yields estimates of N in a small range about the mean value 0.4, in clear contradiction with the standard model.

  9. Radio Seeing Monitor Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiriart, David; Valdez, Jorge; Zaca, Placido; Medina, José L.

    2002-10-01

    A two-element interferometer for monitoring atmospheric phase fluctuations (radio seeing) is presented; this uses the unmodulated beacon signal at 11.715 GHz from a geostationary satellite. The system measures phase differences on the signal received by two small antennas separated by 50 m. The system incorporates the best features from previous designs: a heterodyne phase-lock receiver and an IQ demodulator system. Phase fluctuations measured at this frequency may be extrapolated to millimetric and submillimetric wavelengths since the atmosphere is not dispersive at these frequencies. The instrument has been tested at the Observatory San Pedro Martir (Mexico) at 2800 m above sea level. The final destination of the instrument is Cerro la Negra (Mexico), where the Large Millimeter Telescope is under construction, at an altitude of 4600 m.

  10. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  11. Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, I. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) comprises a network of ground-based high-frequency vertical sounding sensors, ionosondes, with instrument installations in 27 countries and a central Lowell GIRO Data Center (LGDC) for data acquisition and assimilation, including 46 real-time data streams as of August 2014. The LGDC implemented a suite of technologies for post-processing, modeling, analysis, and dissemination of the acquired and derived data products, including: (1) IRI-based Real-time Assimilative Model, "IRTAM", that builds and publishes every 15-minutes an updated "global weather" map of the peak density and height in the ionosphere, as well as a map of deviations from the classic IRI climate; (2) Global Assimilative Model of Bottomside Ionosphere Timelines (GAMBIT) Database and Explorer holding 15 years worth of IRTAM computed maps at 15 minute cadence;. (3) 17+ million ionograms and matching ionogram-derived records of URSI-standard ionospheric characteristics and vertical profiles of electron density; (4) 10+ million records of the Doppler Skymaps showing spatial distributions over the GIRO locations and plasma drifts; (5) Data and software for Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (TID) diagnostics; and (6) HR2006 ray tracing software mated to the "realistic" IRTAM ionosphere. In cooperation with the URSI Ionosonde Network Advisory Group (INAG), the LGDC promotes cooperative agreements with the ionosonde observatories of the world to accept and process real-time data of HF radio monitoring of the ionosphere, and to promote a variety of investigations that benefit from the global-scale, prompt, detailed, and accurate descriptions of the ionospheric variability.

  12. Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

  13. Quasar emission lines, radio structures and radio unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal; Browne, I. W. A.

    2013-02-01

    Unified schemes of radio sources, which account for different types of radio active galactic nucleus in terms of anisotropic radio and optical emission, together with different orientations of the ejection axis to the line of sight, have been invoked for many years. Recently, large samples of optical quasars, mainly from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), together with large radio samples, such as Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST), have become available. These hold the promise of providing more stringent tests of unified schemes but, compared to previous samples, lack high-resolution radio maps. Nevertheless, they have been used to investigate unified schemes, in some cases yielding results which appear inconsistent with such theories. Here we investigate using simulations how the selection effects to which such investigations are subject can influence the conclusions drawn. In particular, we find that the effects of limited resolution do not allow core-dominated radio sources to be fully represented in the samples, that the effects of limited sensitivity systematically exclude some classes of sources and the lack of deep radio data make it difficult to decide to what extent closely separated radio sources are associated. Nevertheless, we conclude that relativistic unified schemes are entirely compatible with the current observational data. For a sample selected from SDSS and FIRST which includes weak-cored triples we find that the equivalent width of the [O III] emission line decreases as core dominance increases, as expected, and also that core-dominated quasars are optically brighter than weak-cored quasars.

  14. Radio Astronomy Explorer /RAE/. I - Observations of terrestrial radio noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.; Stone, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) I data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial radio noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 dB and more above cosmic noise background, on frequencies above the F-layer critical frequency.

  15. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)–BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  16. Recurrent Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jamrozy, Marek; Konar, Chiranjib; Machalski, Jerzy; Mack, Karl-Heinz; Saikia, Dhruba; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U.

    2007-10-15

    One of the outstanding issues concerning extragalactic radio sources is the total duration of their active phase and the possible existence of duty cycles of their nuclear activity. A duty cycle can be recognized if there is a mechanism which preserves the information of past activity for a sufficiently long time after a new activity has started up. If a new cycle starts before the radio lobes created during a former activity period have faded, we can recognize this by the observations of a young radio source embedded in an old relic structure.

  17. Dying radio galaxies in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Parma, P.; Mack, K.-H.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Fanti, R.; Govoni, F.; Tarchi, A.; Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We present a study of five "dying" nearby (z ≤ 0.2) radio galaxies belonging to both the WENSS minisurvey and the B2 bright catalogs WNB1734+6407, WNB1829+6911, WNB1851+5707, B2 0120+33, and B2 1610+29. Methods: These sources have been selected on the basis of their extremely steep broad-band radio spectra, which strongly indicates that either these objects belong to the rare class of dying radio galaxies or we are observing "fossil" radio plasma remaining from a previous instance of nuclear activity. We derive the relative duration of the dying phase from the fit of a synchrotron radiative model to the radio spectra of the sources. Results: The modeling of the integrated spectra and the deep spectral index images obtained with the VLA confirmed that in these sources the central engine has ceased to be active for a significant fraction of their lifetime, although their extended lobes have not yet completely faded away. We found that WNB1851+5707 is in reality composed of two distinct dying galaxies, which appear blended together as a single source in the WENSS. In the cases of WNB1829+6911 and B2 0120+33, the fossil radio lobes are seen in conjunction with a currently active core. A very faint core is also detected in a MERLIN image of WNB1851+5707a, one of the two dying sources composing WNB1851+5707. We found that all sources in our sample are located (at least in projection) at the center of an X-ray emitting cluster. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the duration of the dying phase for a radio source in a cluster can be significantly higher than that of a radio galaxy in the field, although no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the small number statistics involved. The simplest interpretation of the tendency for dying galaxies to be found in clusters is that the low-frequency radio emission from the fading radio lobes lasts longer if their expansion is somewhat reduced or even stopped. Another possibility is that the occurrence of dying

  18. The Helios radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S.; Stone, R.

    1984-01-01

    Radio bursts traveling between the Sun and the Earth were tracked by radio astronomy experiments on Helios 1 and 2. A relatively short dipole antenna with a well-defined toroidal reception pattern was flown. The antenna spins in the ecliptic at 60.3 rpm and 2 frequencies are measured in each revolution. The signal analysis determines the strength of the signal, the direction of the source in the ecliptic, and the degree of modulation, and estimates source size. The experiments provide three-dimensional direction finding in space. They extend the radio frequency window beyond what is observable on Earth, and offer a long triangulation baseline.

  19. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  20. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  1. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  2. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  3. EVA Radio DRATS 2011 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.; Bakula, Casey J.

    2012-01-01

    In the Fall of 2011, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) participated in the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field experiments held near Flagstaff, Arizona. The objective of the DRATS outing is to provide analog mission testing of candidate technologies for space exploration, especially those technologies applicable to human exploration of extra- terrestrial rocky bodies. These activities are performed at locations with similarities to extra-terrestrial conditions. This report describes the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Dual-Band Radio Communication System which was demonstrated during the 2011 outing. The EVA radio system is designed to transport both voice and telemetry data through a mobile ad hoc wireless network and employs a dual-band radio configuration. Some key characteristics of this system include: 1. Dual-band radio configuration. 2. Intelligent switching between two different capability wireless networks. 3. Self-healing network. 4. Simultaneous data and voice communication.

  4. Ganymede: A New Radio Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Roux, A.; Bolton, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    Observations by the Galileo plasma wave receiver during the first two flybys of Ganymede revealed that this Jovian moon is the source of narrowband electromagnetic radio waves, making it the only satellite in the solar system known to generate non-thermal radio emissions. The emissions are the result of mode-coupling from electrostatic electron cyclotron emissions mu the upper hybrid resonance frequency, similar to non-thermal continuum radiation found at the known magnetized planets.

  5. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  6. Radio astronomy. [principles and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J.; Clark, T.

    1974-01-01

    The origins, generation, detection, and interpretation of radio signals are discussed for signals with an assumed random polarization. After defining the basic parameters, the discussion moves to such topics as synchrotron radiation, plasma effects, changes in the electron energy spectrum in the radiating regions, energy loss to ionization, bremsstrahlung, radio astronomical observations of high-energy particles, emission by energetic particles, observation of supernova remnants and pulsars, galactic background continuum radiation, and others.

  7. Radio Telescope Gets Star Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-11-01

    Actress Jodie Foster, who played a scientist in search of extraterrestrial life in the 1997 film Contact, narrates a new promotional film to reintroduce the public to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) renovated Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The 24-minute film, Beyond the Visible, which will air in the VLA Visitor Center, focuses on the operation of the telescope and scientific achievements associated with it.

  8. Populations of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, J. V.

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, radio sky surveys were the center of an intense and public debate -- Big-Bang versus Steady-State cosmology -- the arguments revolving about source counts and statistical interpretations in the face of instrumental complications. The 1965 discovery of the microwave background took the fire from the debate, but left the momentum in place for large-area radio surveys at different frequencies, and for extensive identification/redshift-measurement programs. By the 1970s the data enabled us to start disentangling the different populations of extragalactic radio sources. We could refine our taxonomy, and we could view the possibility of delineating individual cosmic histories and evolutions. We could at least describe a goal to elucidate the birth-life-death cycles of the objects involved 1quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) and radio galaxies: together the 'active galactic nuclei' (AGNs)1 whose unaccountably prodigious energies somehow produce the beautifully aligned radio structures with which we are now familiar. One part of John Bolton's vision was to see how distorted a view of the AGN universe the original long-wavelength surveys provided. One legacy is thus the 'short-wavelength survey' for extragalactic radio sources, which has done so much to balance our picture of the radio sky. And indeed the legacy continues in the form of the immense sky surveys at present under way, complete with their sub-industries of radio-positioning and identification. From these, yet further results are emerging on spatial distribution and the skeleton structure of the universe. It is the purpose of this paper to outline something of this current view of the populations, their differences, similarities and unifying concepts.

  9. A zero-power radio receiver.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-09-01

    This report describes both a general methodology and some specific examples of passive radio receivers. A passive radio receiver uses no direct electrical power but makes sole use of the power available in the radio spectrum. These radio receivers are suitable as low data-rate receivers or passive alerting devices for standard, high power radio receivers. Some zero-power radio architectures exhibit significant improvements in range with the addition of very low power amplifiers or signal processing electronics. These ultra-low power radios are also discussed and compared to the purely zero-power approaches.

  10. Radio transients: an antediluvian review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, R. P.; Bell, M. E.

    2011-09-01

    We are at the dawn of a new golden age for radio astronomy, with a new generation of facilities under construction and the global community focused on the Square Kilometre Array as its goal for the next decade. These new facilities offer orders of magnitude improvements in survey speed compared to existing radio telescopes and arrays. Furthermore, the study of transient and variable radio sources, and what they can tell us about the extremes of astrophysics as well as the state of the diffuse intervening media, have been embraced as key science projects for these new facilities. In this paper we review the studies of the populations of radio transients made to date, largely based upon archival surveys. Many of these radio transients and variables have been found in the image plane, and their astrophysical origin remains unclear. We take this population and combine it with sensitivity estimates for the next generation arrays to demonstrate that in the coming decade we may find ourselves detecting 10^5 image plane radio transients per year, providing a vast and rich field of research and an almost limitless set of targets for multi-wavelength follow up.

  11. Radio galaxies and their environment

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.

    1993-02-24

    The relationships between radio galaxies and their environment are varied, complex, and evolve with cosmic epoch. Basic questions are what role the environment plays in triggering and fuelling (radio) galaxy activity what the effects of this activity are on its environment, and how radio galaxies and environment evolve. Clearly, this could be the topic of a workshop all in itself and the scope of this review will necessarily be limited. A review of the connections between environment and galaxy activity in general has been given by Heckman. First, I will briefly summarize the relationships between parent galaxy and cluster environments, and radio galaxies. A more detailed discussion of various aspects of this will be given elsewhere by F. Owen, J.0. Burns and R. Perley. I will then discuss the current status of investigations of extended emission-line regions in radio galaxies, again referring elsewhere in this volume for more detailed discussions of some particular aspects (kinematics and ionization mechanisms by K. Meisenheimer; polarization and spectral index lobe asymmetries by G. Pooley). I will conclude with a brief discussion of the current status of observations of high redshift radio galaxies.

  12. Natural radio lasing at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.; Leblanc, Y.; Ellis, G. R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Like the comparable AKR radio emissions from earth's magnetosphere, the well-known decametric radio S-bursts from Jupiter, observed in France and Australia at frequencies from 10 to 26 MHz, have been found to exhibit equally spaced discrete spectral components which can be attributed to the adjacent longitudinal oscillation modes of natural radio lasers. Implying sizes of only a few kilometers for the individual radio lasers producing the S-bursts, the frequency spacing of these modes was roughly constant with frequency and about 30 to 50 kHz. Their corresponding temporal spacings, however, varied inversely proportional to the observing frequency, suggesting that the radio lasers producing the S-bursts were expanding uniformly at a rate of about 4 km/s. Presumably caused by the projected motion of Io with respect to the planet, this expansion of the S-burst radio lasers would account for the downward frequency drifts of the S-bursts without the energetic electron bunches which have heretofore always been assumed necessary to account for such behavior.

  13. Mechanism for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.; del Valle, M. V.; Vieyro, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarized and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The time scale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of the order of 1 0-3 s . The mechanism we present here can explain the main features of fast radio bursts and is plausible in different astrophysical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts and some active galactic nuclei.

  14. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  15. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  16. Radio Stars or Radio Nebulae? - The Uncertainties of 1953

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. T., III

    1997-12-01

    By the early 1950s radio astronomers in England and Australia had assembled a handful of catalogues giving flux densities (at 100 MHz) and positions for a total of about 200 radio sources. But only a half dozen of these sources had suggested optical identifications and there raged a debate as to whether the radio sources as a whole were galactic or extragalactic. Furthermore, what was the relationship between these discrete radio sources and the strong galactic background radiation? Could a consistent model be constructed in which the background was the integrated radiation from the weaker members of the detected population? This paper aims to convey the uncertainty of astronomers in 1953. The primary data emanated from the surveys of Ryle, Smith and Elsmore (1950), Bolton, Stanley and Slee (1950), Mills (1952), and Hanbury Brown and Hazard (1953). Quoted position uncertainties were typically 0.5 to 2 degrees; even more discouraging, in overlapping regions the surveys seldom agreed. Optical identifications were rare and of varying degrees of acceptance, and in any case were about evenly split between galaxies (e.g., M31, Cyg A, Vir A) and galactic objects (e.g., Tau A = the Crab nebula, Cas A). And why were so many bright galaxies and gaseous nebulae not detected in the radio? Were there two classes of source, as suggested by Bernard Mills? If the bulk of the sources were extragalactic, what was their source of prodigious radio luminosity and why was it so much larger than the Milky Way's? If the background consisted of radio stars with a Population II distribution, was there also an isotropic extragalactic background component, as modelled by Jan Oort and Gart Westerhout (1950)? What in fact was the radiation mechanism for the sources and the background - free-free (but of what optical thickness?), synchrotron (but did the cosmic ray electrons exist?), or something else?

  17. Performance of radar wind profilers, radiosondes, and surface flux stations at the SGP CART site

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.; Lesht, B.M.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Holdridge, D.J.; Martin, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of several routinely operating observational systems at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site has been evaluated. The results of a few specific investigations are shown here for Radar Wind Profilers (RWPs) and Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASSs), Balloon-Borne Sounding Systems (BBSSs), and Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) stations.

  18. IA-Regional-Radio - Social Network for Radio Recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziczkowski, Grzegorz; Bougueroua, Lamine; Wegrzyn-Wolska, Katarzyna

    This chapter describes the functions of a system proposed for the music hit recommendation from social network data base. This system carries out the automatic collection, evaluation and rating of music reviewers and the possibility for listeners to rate musical hits and recommendations deduced from auditor's profiles in the form of regional Internet radio. First, the system searches and retrieves probable music reviews from the Internet. Subsequently, the system carries out an evaluation and rating of those reviews. From this list of music hits, the system directly allows notation from our application. Finally, the system automatically creates the record list diffused each day depending on the region, the year season, the day hours and the age of listeners. Our system uses linguistics and statistic methods for classifying music opinions and data mining techniques for recommendation part needed for recorded list creation. The principal task is the creation of popular intelligent radio adaptive on auditor's age and region - IA-Regional-Radio.

  19. RADIO VARIABILITY IN SEYFERT NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mundell, C. G.; Ferruit, P.; Nagar, N.; Wilson, A. S.

    2009-09-20

    Comparison of 8.4 GHz radio images of a sample of eleven, early-type Seyfert galaxies with previous observations reveals possible variation in the nuclear radio flux density in five of them over a seven year period. Four Seyferts (NGC 2110, NGC 3081, MCG -6-30-15, and NGC 5273) show a decline in their 8.4 GHz nuclear flux density between 1992 and 1999, while one (NGC 4117) shows an increase; the flux densities of the remaining six Seyferts (Mrk 607, NGC 1386, Mrk 620, NGC 3516, NGC 4968, and NGC 7465) have remained constant over this period. New images of MCG -5-23-16 are also presented. We find no correlation between radio variability and nuclear radio luminosity or Seyfert nuclear type, although the sample is small and dominated by type 2 Seyferts. Instead, a possible correlation between the presence of nuclear radio variability and the absence of hundred parsec-scale radio emission is seen, with four out of five marginally resolved or unresolved nuclei showing a change in nuclear flux density, while five out of six extended sources show no nuclear variability despite having unresolved nuclear sources. NGC 2110 is the only source in our sample with significant extended radio structure and strong nuclear variability ({approx}38% decline in nuclear flux density over seven years). The observed nuclear flux variability indicates significant changes are likely to have occurred in the structure of the nucleus on scales smaller than the VLA beam size (i.e., within the central {approx}0.''1 (15 pc)), between the two epochs, possibly due to the appearance and fading of new components or shocks in the jet, consistent with previous detection of subparsec-scale nuclear structure in this Seyfert. Our results suggest that all Seyferts may exhibit variation in their nuclear radio flux density at 8.4 GHz, but that variability is more easily recognized in compact sources in which emission from the variable nucleus is not diluted by unresolved, constant flux density radio jet

  20. Radio continuum polarimetric imaging of high redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Owen, F. N.; Harris, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Multifrequency images of total and polarized radio continuum emission from the two high redshift radio galaxies 0902+343 (z = 3.40) and 0647+415 (4C 41.17, z = 3.80) are presented. These images represent the most sensitive polarimetric study of high redshift ratio galaxies to date. The emission from both galaxies is substantially polarized, up to 30% in some regions, and both sources sit behind deep 'Faraday screens,' producing large rotation measures, over 10(exp 3) rad/sq. m in magnitude, and large rotation measure gradients across the sources. Such large rotation measures provide further evidence that high redshift radio galaxies are situated in very dense environments. Drawing the analogy to a class of low redshift powerful radio galaxies with similarly large rotation measures, we suggest that 0902+343 and 0647+415 are situated at the centers of dense, x-ray 'colling flow' clusters, and that the cluster gas is substantially magnetized. The remarkable similarity between the optical and radio morphologies of 0647+415 on scales as small as 0.1 sec is presented. We consider, and reject, both synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation as possible sources of the optical emission. We also consider both scattering of light out of a 'cone' of radiation from an obscured nucleus, and jet-induced star formation, and find that both models encounter difficulties in explaining this remarkably close radio-optical alignment. High resolution spectral index images reveal compact, flat spectrum components in both sources. We suggest that these components are the active nuclei of the galaxies. Lastly, high resolution images of 0902+343 show that the southernmost component forms a 'ring' of 0.2 sec radius. We discuss the possibility that this ring is the result of gravitational lensing, along the lines proposed by Kochanek & Lawrence (1990).

  1. Industrial interference and radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessner, A.

    2013-07-01

    The interferer - victim scenario is described for the case of industrial interference affecting radio astronomical observatories. The sensitivity of radio astronomical receivers and their interference limits are outlined. EMC above 30 MHz is a serious problem for Radio Astronomy. Interferer (CISPR) and victim (ITU-R RA 769) standards are not harmonised. The emissions from the interferer and their spectral characteristics are not defined sufficiently well by CISPR standards. The required minimum coupling losses (MCL) between an industrial device and radio astronomical antenna depends on device properties but is shown to exceed 140 dB in most cases. Spatial separation of a few km is insufficient on its own, the terrain must shield > 30-40 dB, additional mitigations such as extra shielding or suppression of high frequency emissions may be necessary. A case by case compatibility analysis and tailored EMC measures are required for individual installations. Aggregation of many weak rfi emitters can become serious problem. If deployment densities are high enough, the emission constraints can even exceed those for a single interferer at a short distance from the radio observatory. Compatibility studies must account not only for the single interferer but also for many widely distributed interference sources.

  2. Radio-Optical Imaging of ATLBS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorat, Kshitij

    2011-12-01

    We present the radio-optical imaging of ATLBS, a sensitive radio survey (Subrahmanyan et al. 2010). The primary aim of the ATLBS survey is to image low-power radio sources which form the bulk of the radio source population to moderately high red-shifts ( z ˜ 1.0). The accompanying multiband optical and near infra-red observations provide information about the hosts and environments of the radio sources. We give here details of the imaging of the radio data and optical data for the ATLBS survey.

  3. Phenomenology of magnetospheric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, T. D.; Desch, M. D.; Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Jupiter has now been observed over 24 octaves of the radio spectrum, from about 0.01 MHz to 300,000 MHz. Its radio emissions fill the entire spectral region where interplanetary electromagnetic propagation is possible at wavelengths longer than infrared. Three distinct types of radiation are responsible for this radio spectrum. Thermal emission from the atmosphere accounts for virtually all the radiation at the high frequency end. Synchrotron emission from the trapped high-energy particle belt deep within the inner magnetosphere is the dominant spectral component from about 4000 to 40 MHz. The third class of radiation consists of several distinct components of sporadic low frequency emission below 40 MHz. The decimeter wavelength emission is considered, taking into account the discovery of synchrotron emission, radiation by high-energy electrons in a magnetic field, and the present status of Jovian synchrotron phenomenology. Attention is also given to the decameter and hectometer wavelength emission, and emissions at kilometric wavelengths.

  4. Photoelectric spectrophotometry of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. K. C.; Oke, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The absolute energy distributions from 3200 to 10,000 A of 26 3CR radio galaxies are determined on the basis of spectrophotometric observations with the multichannel spectrometer of the Hale 5-m telescope. It is found that there is a continuous range of emission-line characteristics and UV excess in the sample and that a strong correlation exists between the nonthermal component luminosity and hydrogen emission, which favors the hypothesis that direct photoionization by the nuclear radiation is responsible for the emission lines observed. Calculations are performed which show that in almost all cases the power-law component model provides sufficient UV photons to produce the observed H-beta line. Indications are obtained that the optical nuclear component is related to the radio emission in some complex manner and that strong radio galaxies tend to be accompanied by UV excess and emission lines.

  5. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  6. Radio Relays Improve Wireless Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Signal Hill, California-based XCOM Wireless Inc. developed radio frequency micromachine (RF MEMS) relays with a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract through NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In order to improve satellite communication systems, XCOM produced wireless RF MEMS relays and tunable capacitors that use metal-to-metal contact and have the potential to outperform most semiconductor technologies while using less power. These relays are used in high-frequency test equipment and instrumentation, where increased speed can mean significant cost savings. Applications now also include mainstream wireless applications and greatly improved tactical radios.

  7. Blazars at Low Radio Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trüstedt, J.; Kadler, M.; Brüggen, M.; Falcke, H.; Heald, G.; McKean, J.; Mueller, C.; Ros, E.; Schulz, R.; Wilms, J.

    We explore the low radio-frequency properties of the MOJAVE 1 blazar sample using the LOFAR Multi-Frequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS). We find the characteristically flat blazar spectrum to extend down to the LOFAR bands, demonstrating that the emission at these low radio frequencies is still dominated by relativistically beamed emission. As most sources remain unresolved at the MSSS angular resolution, we are reimaging these data using LOFAR baselines beyond the standard MSSS uv-range resulting in an angular resolution of ~24 arcsec. We present first LOFAR images of MOJAVE sources from this project.

  8. Mobile radio interferometric geodetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Niell, A. E.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.; Morabito, D. D.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (ARIES) in a proof of concept mode is discussed. Accuracy demonstrations over a short baseline, a 180 km baseline, and a 380 km baseline are documented. Use of ARIES in the Sea Slope Experiment of the National Geodetic Survey to study the apparent differences between oceanographic and geodetic leveling determinations of the sea surface along the Pacific Coast is described. Intergration of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System and a concept called SERIES (Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) is briefly reviewed.

  9. Radio Galaxies in Abell Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    We have defined a complete sample of radio galaxies chosen from Abell's northern catalog consisting of all clusters with measured redshifts < 0.09. This sample consists of nearly 300 clusters. A multiwavelength survey including optical CCD R-Band imaging, optical spectroscopy, and VLA 20 cm radio maps has been compiled. I have used this database to study the optical/radio properties of radio galaxies in the cluster environment. In particular, optical properties have been compared to a radio-quiet selected sample to look for optical signatures which may distinguish radio galaxies from normal radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations between radio morphology and galaxy type, the optical dependence of the FR I/II break, and the univariate and bivariate luminosity functions have been examined for this sample. This study is aimed at understanding radio galaxies as a population and examining their status in the AGN heirarchy. The results of this work will be applied to models of radio source evolution. The results from the optical data analysis suggest that radio galaxies, as a class, cannot be distinguished from non-radio selected elliptical galaxies. The magnitude/size relationship, the surface-brightness profiles, the fundamental plane, and the intrinsic shape of the radio galaxies are consistent between our radio galaxy and control sample. The radio galaxies also trace the elliptical galaxy optical luminosity function in clusters very well; with many more L(*) galaxies than brightest cluster members. Combined with the results of the spectroscopy, the data are consistent with the idea that all elliptical galaxies may at some point in their lifetimes become radio sources. In conclusion, I present a new observational picture for radio galaxies and discuss the important properties which may determine the evolution of individual sources.

  10. Cosmic ray primary composition in the energy range 10-1000 TeV obtained by passive balloon-borne detector: Reanalysis of the RUNJOB experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kopenkin, V.; Sinzi, T.

    2009-04-01

    We search for a consistent view on the RUNJOB experiment and present an alternative analysis based on explicitly reported and published numerical data. Here we show that there is more than one interpretation to the reported observational data. It is demonstrated that, contrary to the wide-spread opinion, the RUNJOB data are not inconsistent with an increase of the average mass near the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum. Considering very low statistics and systematic uncertainties, especially in the high energy region, we suggest that peculiarities of the methodical origin were the most likely source of those RUNJOB conclusions which contradicted previous observations reported by other groups.

  11. Balloon-borne and ground-based aerosol measurements with the aerosol counter LOAC during the ChArMEx 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Durand, Pierre; Mallet, Marc; Totems, Julien; Chazette, Patrick; Sciare, Jean; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corrine; Verdier, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams that can fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles: the first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 micrometers. The second angle is at 60°, is used to discriminate between the different types of particles dominating the different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust and carbon particles. 30 flights of LOAC have been conducted during the ChAMEx campaign (Chemistry Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) on summer 2013, from Minorca Island (Spain) and Ile du Levant (south of France): 19 flights under meteorological balloons and 12 flights under low altitude drifting balloons. Most of the flights were also coupled with ozone concentration measurements. LOAC balloons were especially, but not only, dedicated to study the various Saharan dust events that occurred during the campaign. In particular, flights were conducted every 12 hours during the 15-19 June dust event. Turbid air masses from North America were also sampled in late June over Minorca. The flights allow us to determine the vertical extent of the dust plume and various aerosol layers, and to follow the particle size distribution and the concentration evolution along the vertical. The low altitude drifting balloons, which stayed at constant altitude (between 0.4 and 3 km) for several hours, allow us to study the time-evolution of the aerosol concentrations in the same air mass. Under both balloon types, LOAC has detected larges particles up to ~30 micrometers in diameter. The flights drifting within dust layers indicate that there is a relatively stable particle size distribution during transport over the sea, with no clear sedimentation loss of large particles. LOAC is used to tentatively identify the various kinds of particles (marine salt close to the sea, pure sand or more heterogeneous layers). Continuous surface measurements have also been conducted on Minorca Island with a LOAC. The LOAC number concentration measurements are converted to mass concentrations, in order to evaluate the effect of the mid-June dust event on the ambient air quality. Coincident ground-based remote sensing (lidar, sun-photometer) and in situ measurements (aethalometer, TEOM…) performed on Minorca Island and occasionally close airborne data are also used for comparison with balloon data.

  12. Balloon-Borne Observations of the Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave'Background on Angular Scales of 0.2 to 40 Degrees'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During this final period, BOOMERANG was deployed to McMurdo Mtn., Antarctica in late 1998 and successfully flew a 10.5 day long duration flight. The experiment returned excellent data, and produced the first resolved images of the early universe. These results, as well as those produced during a test flight over North America in August, 1997, are given in the references below. Analysis of the data from the 1998 flight is continuing. In parallel, we have begun to prepare the payload for a long-duration flight from McMurdo in December 2001. For this flight, the focal plane is being outfitted with polarization sensitive detectors, with the goal of detecting the polarization of the CMB that is predicted to exist at degree angular scales.

  13. Tropical upper troposphere and tropopause layer in situ measurement of H2O by the micro- SDLA balloon borne diode laser spectrometer: modelling interpretation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durry, G.; Huret, N.; Freitas, S.; Hauchecorne, A.; Longo, K.

    2006-12-01

    During the HIBISCUS European campaign in Bauru (Brazil, 22°S) in 2004, the micro-SDLA diode laser sensor was flown twice on February the 13th (SF2 flight) and the 24th (SF4 flight) from small size open stratospheric balloons operated by the CNES. In situ measurements of H2O, CH4 at high spatial resolution (a few meters) were obtained in the UT and in the TTL. Both flights took place in convective conditions. Layering in the TTL water vapour content is observed with values from 3 ppmv (typical of TTL) to high values of 6 ppmv. To investigate such layering we have used a combination of 3D trajectory calculations (Freitas et al., JGR, 2000) using the mesoscale model BRAMS outputs and Potential vorticity map obtained from the high- resolution PV-advection model MIMOSA (Hauchecorne et al., JGR, 2001). The mesoscale model BRAMS allows us to study processes associated with convective systems, whereas isentropic transport at global scale is investigated with MIMOSA. Backward 3D trajectories have been calculated every km for the two flights. It appears that a very strong uplifting from the ground to 16.5 km has occurred 80 hours before the SF4 flight. This uplifting is associated with a 3 ppmv water vapor layer whereas just above twice more water vapour is observed. This layer with high water vapor is associated with trajectories that skim over the top of the convective region. This leads us to discuss on the ability of convective system to inject water vapour in the TTL. For both flights we investigate also the impact of isentropic transport from extratropical region on TTL water vapour content. It appears that for the SF2 and SF4 flight using the PV maps from MIMOSA model we report filamentation in the TTL and in the UT respectively. This filamentation is associated in the UT with strong dehydration observed at 8-10 km for the SF4 flight and with high water vapour content in the TTL typical of mid- latitude region during SF2 flight.

  14. Balloon-borne measurements of aerosol, condensation nuclei, and cloud particles in the stratosphere at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the spring of 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Harder, J. W.; Hereford, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the vertical profile of particles with condensation nuclei counters and eight channel aerosol detectors at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, in 1987 verified observations made in 1986 concerning the absence of upwelling in the polar vortex and the presence of a condensation nuclei layer in conjunction with the ozone hole region. New observations of a bimodal aerosol size distribution, consisting of a large-particle mode mixed in with the small-particle sulfate mode, at temperatures below -79 C are consistent with the presence of nitric acid-water particles at low concentrations. Higher concentrations of large particles were observed in association with nacreous clouds. An unusual particle layer which contained enhanced concentrations of both the small-particle (sulfate) mode and the large-particle (nitric acid) mode was detected at temperatures below -85 C, suggesting simultaneous nucleation and growth phenomena. The vortex condensation nuclei layer was observed to form at the same time as the ozone hole, indicating that formation of the layer is triggered by photochemical processes and may be important in controlling ozone depletion above 22 km.

  15. Intercomparison of in situ water vapor balloon-borne measurements from Pico-SDLA H2O and FLASH-B in the tropical UTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghysels, M.; Riviere, E. D.; Khaykin, S.; Stoeffler, C.; Amarouche, N.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Held, G.; Durry, G.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we compare water vapor mixing ratio measurements from two quasi-parallel flights of the Pico-SDLA H2O and FLASH-B hygrometers. The measurements were made on 10 February 2013 and 13 March 2012, respectively, in the tropics near Bauru, Sao Paulo St., Brazil during an intense convective period. Both flights were performed as part of a French scientific project, TRO-Pico, to study the impact of the deep-convection overshoot on the water budget. Only a few instruments that permit the frequent sounding of stratospheric water vapor can be flown within a small volume weather balloons. Technical difficulties preclude the accurate measurement of stratospheric water vapor with conventional in situ techniques. The instruments described here are simple and lightweight, which permits their low-cost deployment by non-specialists aboard a small weather balloon. We obtain mixing ratio retrievals which agree above the cold-point tropopause to within 1.9 and 0.5 % for the first and second flights, respectively. This level of agreement for measured stratospheric water mixing ratio is among the best ever reported in the literature. Because both instruments show similar profiles within their combined uncertainties, we conclude that the Pico-SDLA H2O and FLASH-B datasets are mutually consistent.

  16. A balloon-borne instrument for high-resolution astrophysical spectroscopy in the 20-8000 keV energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Baker, R.; Boclet, D.; Brown, S.; Cline, T.; Costlow, H.; Durouchoux, P.; Ehrmann, C.; Gehrels, N.; Hameury, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Low Energy Gamma ray Spectrometer (LEGS) is designed to perform fine energy resolution measurements of astrophysical sources. The instrument is configured for a particular balloon flight with either of two sets of high purity germanium detectors. In one configuration, the instrument uses an array of three coaxial detectors (effective volume equal to or approximately 230 cubic cm) inside an NaI (T1) shield and collimator (field of view equal to or approximately 16 deg FWHM) and operates in the 80 to 8000 keV energy range. In the other configuration, three planar detectors (effective area equal to or approximately square cm) surrounded by a combination of passive Fe and active NaI for shielding and collimation (field of view equal to or approximately 5 deg x 10 deg FWHM) are optimized for the 20 to 200 keV energy range. In a typical one day balloon flight, LEGS sensitivity limit (3 sigma) for narrow line features is less than or approximately .0008 ph/cm/s square (coaxial array: 80 to 2000 keV) and less than or approximately .0003 ph/square cm/s (planar array: 50 to 150 keV).

  17. Evaluation of SAGE II and Balloon-Borne Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements: Evaluation of Aerosol Measurements from SAGE II, HALOE, and Balloonborne Optical Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark; Deshler, Terry; Moddrea, G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol measurements from the University of Wyoming balloonborne optical particle counters (OPCs), the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, and the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) were compared in the period 1982-2000, when measurements were available. The OPCs measure aerosol size distributions, and HALOE multiwavelength (2.45-5.26 micrometers) extinction measurements can be used to retrieve aerosol size distributions. Aerosol extinctions at the SAGE II wavelengths (0.386-1.02 micrometers) were computed from these size distributions and compared to SAGE II measurements. In addition, surface areas derived from all three experiments were compared. While the overall impression from these results is encouraging, the agreement can change with latitude, altitude, time, and parameter. In the broadest sense, these comparisons fall into two categories: high aerosol loading (volcanic periods) and low aerosol loading (background periods and altitudes above 25 km). When the aerosol amount was low, SAGE II and HALOE extinctions were higher than the OPC estimates, while the SAGE II surface areas were lower than HALOE and the OPCS. Under high loading conditions all three instruments mutually agree to within 50%.

  18. Evaluating the Use of MODIS AOD for Air Quality Determination by Comparison with the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Light Scattering Coefficient Obtained with a Balloon-Borne Nephelometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumlin, B.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The MODIS instruments aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites provide aerosol optical depth information for the entire Earth on a daily basis. Ideally, satellite measurements should correlate with ground-based measurements in order to be useful for air quality applications. Reno, Nevada, USA is a high desert city situated in the Great Basin. Its unique geography and proximity to urban and biomass burning aerosol sources make it an ideal candidate for aerosol research. In August 2011, the Reno Aerosol Characterization Experiment measured atmospheric aerosols with a ground-based Cimel CE-318 sun-photometer and in situ photoacoustic instrumentation to quantify aerosol concentrations at the surface and in the column. However, the results of these measurements indicated the existence of a more complex system of aerosol mixing above the atmospheric boundary layer than previously thought. In order to validate these measurements, an autonomous suite of instrumentation has been developed. This device is carried aloft by a weather balloon and utilizes a reciprocal nephelometer to obtain a high-resolution profile of the vertical distribution of aerosol light scattering coefficient, as well as instrumentation to record atmospheric variables such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and dew point. Position, course, speed, and altitude are logged with an onboard GPS module and correlated with atmospheric and aerosol measurements. Presented is the design and development of this new instrument, its comparison with proven laboratory instruments, data gathered from flights during August-November 2012, and its comparison to ground-based measurements and satellite data from the MODIS instruments.

  19. Balloon-borne direct search for ionizing massive particles as a component of the galactic halo dark matter (The Arizona-IMAX Collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, P. C.; Bowen, T.; Barker, D. L.; Halverson, P. G.; Kendall, K. R.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Norton, R. S.; Pifer, A. E.; Barbier, L. M.; Christian, E. R.; Krombel, K. E.; Mitchell, J. W.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Davis, A. J.; Labrador, A. W.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Schindler, S. M.; Golden, R. L.; Stochaj, S. J.; Webber, W. R.; Arizona-IMAX Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    A dark matter (DM) search experiment was flown on the IMAX balloon payload to search for a possible minor component of the dark matter in the Galactic halo: ionizing massive particles (IMPs) (mx>~104 GeV/c2) that cannot penetrate the atmosphere due to their low-velocities and high energy-loss. The DM search experiment consisted of a delayed coincidence between four large plastic scintillation detectors arranged in a vertical stack. In order to search for ultra-slow particles which do not slow down in the IMAX telescope, the experiment contained TDCs which measured the time-delay Ti,i+1∈(0.3, 14.0) μs between hits in successive counters to ~2% precision. We present IMP flux limits for non-slowing IMPs and also for IMPs which slow down significantly within the IMAX telescope. This experiment effectively closes much of a previously unconstrained ``window'' in the mass/cross-section joint parameter spaces for massive particles as the dominant halo DM.

  20. Low-background balloon-borne direct search for ionizing massive particles as a component of the dark galactic halo matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Patrick Charles

    A dark matter (DM) search experiment was flown on the IMAX balloon payload, which tested the hypothesis that a minor component of the dark matter in the Galactic halo is composed of ionizing (dE/dx greater than 1 MeV/g/cm2 or sigma greater than 2 x 10-20 sq cm supermassive particles (mx is an element of (104, 1012)GeV/c2 that cannot penetrate the atmosphere due to their low velocities (beta belongs to (0.0003, 0.00025)). The DM search experiment consisted of a delayed coincidence between four approximately 2400 cm2 plastic scintillation detectors, with a total acceptance of approximately 100 cm2 sr. In order to search for ultra-slow particles which do not slow down in the IMAX telescope, the experiment contained TDCs which measured the time-delays Ti,i+1is an element of (0.3, 14.0)microseconds between hits in a successive counters to approximately 1 percent precision. Using the first 5 hours of data at float altitude (5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere), we observed approximately 5 candidate non-slowing dark matter events, consistent with the background from accidental coincidences of 4 events. This implies that the DM flux is less than 6.5 x 10-6 cm-2s-1sr-1 (95 percent C.L.). Similar results were also obtained for particles which slow down in the counter telescope. This experiment effectively closes much of a previously unconstrained 'window' in the mass/cross-section joint parameter space for massive particles as the dominant halo DM, and implies that for certain regions of this parameter space massive particles cannot be more than one part in 105 by mass of all the DM. These results can also directly constrain 'light' magnetic monopoles and neutra CHAMPs in a previously unconstrained mass region mx belongs to (106, 109) GeV.

  1. A 380 GHz SIS receiver using Nb/AlO(x)/Nb junctions for a radioastronomical balloon-borne experiment: PRONAOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Febvre, P.; Feautrier, P.; Robert, C.; Pernot, J. C.; Germont, A.; Hanus, M.; Maoli, R.; Gheudin, M.; Beaudin, G.; Encrenaz, P.

    1992-01-01

    The superheterodyne detection technique used for the spectrometer instrument of the PRONAOS project will provide a very high spectral resolution (delta nu/nu = 10(exp -6)). The most critical components are those located at the front-end of the receiver: their contribution dominates the total noise of the receiver. Therefore, it is important to perform accurate studies for specific components, such as mixers and multipliers working in the submillimeter wave range. Difficulties in generating enough local oscillator (LO) power at high frequencies make SIS mixers very desirable for operation above 300 GHz. The low LO power requirements and the low noise temperature of these mixers are the primary reason for building an SIS receiver. This paper reports the successful fabrication of small (less than or equal to 1 sq micron) Nb/Al-O(x)/Nb junctions and arrays with excellent I-V characteristics and very good reliability, resulting in a low noise receiver performance measured in the 368/380 GHz frequency range.

  2. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  3. Radio frequency power load and associated method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus includes a container and a fluid having an ion source therein, the fluid being contained in the container. Two conductors are immersed in the fluid. A radio frequency transmission system includes a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus includes a fluid having an ion source therein, and two conductors immersed in the fluid. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system includes the steps of: immersing two conductors of a radio frequency power load apparatus in a fluid having an ion source therein; and connecting the apparatus to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  4. Observational aspects of stellar radio flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.

    1991-01-01

    The study of stellar flares in the radio regime provides a nearly unique observational perspective, as the emission generally arises from the particle acceleration region. Continuum and spectral studies of radio burst emission for several classes of stars are reviewed, and some preliminary connections with the quiescent radio emission from flare stars are made. Further, the radio observations are placed in a broader observational context provided by X-ray, UV, and optical observations.

  5. New vistas in planetary radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress in planetary radio astronomy is reviewed, where the most significant advances have come from spacecraft observations. The low-frequency radio spectra of the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn are compared, and the striking similarity in shapes is noted. New radio data are examined which provide a way to compare the magnetic field strengths of the planets. More detailed information on the radio structures of Jupiter and Saturn, and possibly on Uranus, is expected from the 1977 Mariner Jupiter-Saturn mission.

  6. RadioActive101 Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brites, Maria José; Ravenscroft, Andrew; Dellow, James; Rainey, Colin; Jorge, Ana; Santos, Sílvio Correia; Rees, Angela; Auwärter, Andreas; Catalão, Daniel; Balica, Magda; Camilleri, Anthony F.

    2014-01-01

    In keeping with the overarching RadioActive101 (RA101) spirit and ethos, this report is the product of collaborative and joined-up thinking from within the European consortium spread across five countries. As such, it is not simply a single voice reporting on the experiences and knowledge gained during the project. Rather it is a range of…

  7. The Sources of Radio News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, D. Charles

    To examine the production of programing material in a radio newsroom, a study was undertaken of the sources presented to the newsroom, of sources within the sources, of sources actively sought by the news staff, of degrees of processing of news items, and of the sources comprising the news output. Information in each of these areas was collected…

  8. Meteors by radio: Getting started

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonc, William

    1999-02-01

    A system for detecting meteors by radio is described which is simple and reliable, and thought to be suitable as a science fair project. There is a relatively detailed discussion of the various factors involved in such a project, along with some typical results to indicate the kind of data that is possible.

  9. Radio's role in popular education.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, M

    1988-01-01

    Many theorists in the 1950's and 1960's thought that mass communications media would be a major factor in integrating and modernizing developing countries. International organizations and Western governments supported educational programs on sanitation and agriculture technology for developing countries. However, Western technology did not suit the rural areas of the developing world. The programs often did not reach the people who needed them the most, but only the educated few. The Catholic church has developed a radio network in Colombia that combines commercial and cultural or religious programs. In addition, 42 church organizations are producing radio programs in Latin America. Most of these programs have not been successful in formal education in history, health care, and agriculture technology. This indicates that radio may not be a good medium for scientific information; audiences don't listen often enough and concentrate adequately to gain from this kind of teaching. It can, however, be effective in spreading cultural information and voicing opinions and views. Educational radio programming is useful when the subject matter is closely linked to specific problems in the community. It must be expressed in the terms of the local audience, as in the rural areas of Latin America. Presentations should not be in the teacher format but in forums, dramas, and documentary reports, and delivered in the local language. PMID:12282828

  10. Bolivia: instruction through interactive radio.

    PubMed

    Teas, M M; Tilson, T

    1989-01-01

    The Education Development Center in Bolivia is developing and testing a new application for interactive radio instruction (IRI) to teach health in primary schools. The project is funded by USAID and has been undertaken to help the Bolivian government include health education in primary schools as part of a strategy to reduce child mortality. Each radio health program will be broadcast weekly for school children in twenty-minute segments. The broadcasts and complementary post-broadcast activities will give special emphasis to child survival topics such as oral rehydration therapy and nutrition. Special features include IRI scripts which simulate interaction between the radio teacher and the students, new topics introduced in a systematic way engaging students in problem-solving activities, and extensive oral and written student participation. Complementary IRI program materials will include take-home exercises designed to involve family participation, and teachers' guides to provide teachers with practical hands-on activities to strengthen children's understanding of basic health concepts. Short, in-service training sessions will prepare teachers to facilitate radio classes and carry out post-broadcast activities with students. The potential of IRI to improve student and teacher understanding of health and nutrition is only beginning to be recognized. PMID:12346418

  11. Workplace Training at SBS Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Lynette

    2001-01-01

    Notes that at Australia's Special Broadcasting Services Radio, workplace training is an essential requirement for on-air staff but a degree in journalism or communications is an enormous advantage. Describes several in-house accredited competency-based modules in journalism and broadcasting. (RS)

  12. International Radio Broadcasting: Who Listens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Donald R.

    It is difficult to obtain reliable data on the nature of the audience for international broadcast programs in Asia (e.g., those beamed by the Voice of America or Radio Japan). However, analysis of listener mail and some survey research have provided a fairly clear profile of the audience: young (ages 15-34), well educated, urban, male (but with a…

  13. Digital Audio Radio Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

  14. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F [London, TN; Dress, William B [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  15. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  16. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF RADIO PASTEURIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency energy was investigated as a nonthermal alternative to thermal pasteurization. Two RF power supply systems were assembled and provided frequencies in the range of 20 kHz to 27 MHz. Electric field strengths of 14 to 30 kV/cm were applied to suspensions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae i...

  17. Dictionary of Radio and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannett, W. E.

    This dictionary presents definitions of both the well-established terms and many new ones that have come into use with the advances that have taken place in the fields of radio and television. In many cases extended definitions are given in order to describe briefly elementary principles and circuits, while newer and more complex devices and…

  18. Counselor Effectiveness Through Radio Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This study determined the effectiveness of the use of radio as a means of providing immediate feedback on student counselors in a practicum setting. Using a non-equivalent group experimental design, 10 experimental subjects were compared to 10 control subjects with respect to counselor effectiveness. The experimental subjects were given immediate…

  19. Radio Days in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuchat, Dan

    2005-01-01

    What social studies project challenges students with interdisciplinary learning, engages their various abilities and learning styles, offers them the opportunity for collaborative work-and encourages them to speak in strange voices? The answer is an eighth grade radio drama project. For most of the month of March 2004, the entire eighth grade at…

  20. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  1. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  2. Kashima 34-m Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Kawai, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The Kashima 34-m radio telescope has been continuously operated and maintained by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) as a facility of the Kashima Space Technology Center (KSTC) in Japan. This brief report summarizes the status of this telescope, the staff, and activities during 2012.

  3. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  4. The Auger Engineering Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    High and ultra-high energy cosmic rays hitting the Earth's atmosphere cause extensive air showers (EAS). In recent years, these cosmic rays have been extensively studied at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. The EAS mainly consist of charged particles, especially electrons and positrons, which cause electro-magnetic emission in the MHz range by interaction with the Earth's magnetic field. To measure this radio emission, AERA, the Auger Engineering Radio Array, was deployed in October 2010 and commenced regular data acquisition in April 2011. AERA was designed as an engineering array for technology and methodology development towards future large-scale radio arrays. It will allow studies on the radio emission mechanism and the physics capabilities of the detection technique. AERA's unique site within the surface detector array (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides the possibility of coincident hybrid and super-hybrid EAS detection especially in overlap with the fluorescence telescopes Coihueco and HEAT. Besides a description of the setup, we present an overview of analyses of commissioning data taken between November 2010 and April 2011. Also, we show the first hybrid and self-triggered events detected with AERA in April 2011.

  5. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  6. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  7. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  8. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  9. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  10. Sprite Luminosity and Radio Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Evans, A.; Mezentsev, A.; van der Velde, O.; Soula, S.

    2013-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010) with diameters 50-100 m at 60-80 km height (Kanmae et al., 2012). The sprite luminosity coincides in time and space with extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation <3 kHz in excellent agreement with theory (Cummer and Fullekrug, 2001). This theory is based on current flowing in the body of sprites at 70-80 km height associated with large streamer densities (Pasko et al., 1998). A more detailed study shows specifically that the exponential growth and splitting of streamers at 70-80 km height results in an electron multiplication associated with the acceleration of electrons to a few eV. The accelerated electrons radiate a small amount of electromagnetic energy and the incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the observed electromagnetic radiation (Qin et al., 2012). It has been predicted that this newly recognized physical mechanism might also result in low frequency ( 30-300 kHz) electromagnetic radiation emanating from sprite streamers near 40 km height in the stratosphere, albeit with very small magnetic fields 10^{-17}-10^{-12} T from a single streamer (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this predicted radiation was promptly confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). Specifically, it was found that the sprite luminosity coincides with sudden enhancements of the radio noise. These initial observations are extended here with a more detailed analysis to study the spatial coherence of the radio noise recorded with a novel network of sensitive radio receivers deployed during field work in the summer 2013. This network of radio receivers is used to study the relationship between the radio noise and the sprite luminosity observed with video cameras. The sprite luminosity is inferred from video recordings by use of sophisticated image

  11. Politics and Radio in the 1924 Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkman, Dave

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the relation between radio broadcasting and politics in the 1924 presidential campaign, focusing on newspaper and magazine coverage. Notes radio's influence on candidate image, the aspect of censorship, and the use of radio during the campaign and after the election. (MM)

  12. Metsaehovi Radio Observatory Annual Report 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpo, S.; Mujunen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Contents include the following: Introduction; Research Activities; Radio Astronomical Instrumentation; Extragalactic Radio Sources; Observations with Other Facilities; VLBI Research; Solar Research; HRDL for Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS); Radio Spectroscopy; Publications; Visits to Foreign Institutes; Visiting Scientists; Teaching; Other Activities; Personnel in 1998; and List of Figures.

  13. International Radio Regulations Resulting from WARC 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrada, Abderrazak

    The main features of international regulations on radio communications of the International Telecommunication Union are summarized and the possible effects on these regulations of the World Administrative Radio Conference of 1979 (WARC-79) are discussed in this paper. It is noted that while the international radio regulations are regarded as…

  14. Packet Radio: An Alternative Way to Connect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Larry W.

    1995-01-01

    Explains packet radio as a form of telecomputing in which digital data is transported via radio waves instead of telephone lines or other cabling, and describes how it can be used by students to access the Internet. Highlights include packet bulletin board systems and equipment needed for a packet radio station. (LRW)

  15. Making Waves: Pirate Radio and Popular Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steve

    The history of pirate radio--radio broadcasts offered by unlicensed broadcasters as alternatives to licensed, commercial radio programming--is difficult to trace, both in America and the United Kingdom (UK) since mention of pirate broadcasts of a less-then-thrilling nature are rarely found. Also, until 1927, the U.S. government did not formally…

  16. New trends in meteor radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses in low cost—but performing—SDR (software defined radio) technology presents a major breakthrough in the domain of meteor radio observations. Their performances are now good enough for meteor work and should therefore encourage newcomers to join the meteor radio community.

  17. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  18. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  19. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  20. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  1. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  2. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  3. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  4. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  5. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  6. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  7. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  8. 46 CFR 169.715 - Radio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio. 169.715 Section 169.715 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.715 Radio. (a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are... Regulations, part 83. (b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is...

  9. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  10. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  11. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Commission requirements as found in 47 CFR part 13 and 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the...

  12. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  13. 46 CFR 169.715 - Radio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio. 169.715 Section 169.715 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.715 Radio. (a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are... Regulations, part 83. (b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is...

  14. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  15. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  16. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  17. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  18. 62. The Return of Educational Radio?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Sally D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines one of the traditional technologies of distance education, radio, and presents examples of educational and community radio usage in Asia and Africa. Instead of merely transposing western approaches to distance education in developing countries, it is suggested that the developed world can learn from uses of radio in developing…

  19. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  20. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...