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Sample records for ankle joint fractures

  1. Inverse Dynamics Model for the Ankle Joint with Applications in Tibia Malleolus Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budescu, E.; Merticaru, E.; Chirazi, M.

    The paper presents a biomechanical model of the ankle joint, in order to determine the force and the torque of reaction into the articulation, through inverse dynamic analysis, in various stages of the gait. Thus, knowing the acceleration of the foot and the reaction force between foot and ground during the gait, determined by experimental measurement, there was calculated, for five different positions of the foot, the joint reaction forces, on the basis of dynamic balance equations. The values numerically determined were compared with the admissible forces appearing in the technical systems of osteosynthesis of tibia malleolus fracture, in order to emphasize the motion restrictions during bone healing.

  2. Ankle Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks is covered with cartilage. Cartilage is the smooth surface that lines a joint. If the broken piece ... the surface of the joint will not be smooth. This uneven surface typically leads to increased and uneven pressure on ...

  3. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed Long-term Complications Result from Poor Recovery Mistaking an ankle fracture for an ankle sprain has serious consequences ...

  4. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000548.htm Ankle fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... Sit with your foot elevated higher than your knee at least 4 times a day Apply an ...

  5. Effectiveness of joint mobilisation after cast immobilisation for ankle fracture: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial [ACTRN012605000143628

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C Christine; Moseley, Anne M; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Haas, Marion; Herbert, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Background Passive joint mobilisation is a technique frequently used by physiotherapists to reduce pain, improve joint movement and facilitate a return to activities after injury, but its use after ankle fracture is currently based on limited evidence. The primary aim of this trial is to determine if adding joint mobilisation to a standard exercise programme is effective and cost-effective after cast immobilisation for ankle fracture in adults. Methods/Design Ninety participants will be recruited from the physiotherapy departments of three teaching hospitals and randomly allocated to treatment or control groups using a concealed procedure. All participants will perform an exercise programme. Participants in the treatment group will also receive joint mobilisation twice a week for four weeks. Blinded follow-up assessments will be conducted four, 12 and 24 weeks after randomisation. The primary outcome measures will be the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and the Assessment of Quality of Life. Secondary outcomes will include measures of impairments, activity limitation and participation. Data on the use of physiotherapy services and participants' out-of-pocket costs will be collected for the cost-effective and cost-utility analyses. To test the effects of treatment, between-group differences will be examined with analysis of covariance using a regression approach. The primary conclusions will be based on the four-week follow-up data. Discussion This trial incorporates features known to minimise bias. It uses a pragmatic design to reflect clinical practice and maximise generalisability. Results from this trial will contribute to an evidence-based approach for rehabilitation after ankle fracture. PMID:16729880

  6. Expedited patient-specific assessment of contact stress exposure in the ankle joint following definitive articular fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Kern, Andrew M; Anderson, Donald D

    2015-09-18

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85 ± 0.64 MPa and 22.5 ± 11.5mm(2). As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture. PMID:26105660

  7. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  8. Diagnosing syndesmotic instability in ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    van den Bekerom, Michel PJ

    2011-01-01

    The precise diagnosis of distal tibiofibular syndesmotic ligament injury is challenging and a distinction should be made between syndesmotic ligament disruption and real syndesmotic instability. This article summarizes the available evidence in the light of the author’s opinion. Pre-operative radiographic assessment, standard radiographs, computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging are of limited value in detecting syndesmotic instability in acute ankle fractures but can be helpful in planning. Intra-operative stress testing, in the sagittal, coronal or exorotation direction, is more reliable in the diagnosis of syndesmotic instability of rotational ankle fractures. The Hook or Cotton test is more reliable than the exorotation stress test. The lateral view is more reliable than the AP mortise view because of the larger displacement in this direction. When the Hook test is used the force should be applied in the sagittal direction. A force of 100 N applied to the fibula seems to be appropriate. In the case of an unstable joint requiring syndesmotic stabilisation, the tibiofibular clear space would exceed 5 mm on the lateral stress test. When the surgeon is able to perform an ankle arthroscopy this technique is useful to detect syndesmotic injury and can guide anatomic reduction of the syndesmosis. Many guidelines formulated in this article are based on biomechanical and cadaveric studies and clinical correlation has to be established. PMID:22474636

  9. Fatigue characteristics following ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Behm, D G; St-Pierre, D M

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of surgical and nonsurgical treatment of previously immobilized ankle fractures on voluntary and evoked contractile properties before and following fatigue. Twelve control and 12 previously immobilized (4-14 wk postfracture) internally fixated and nonfixated ankles were investigated before and following an isometric, intermittent, submaximal, fatigue protocol of the plantar flexors. Before fatigue, fracture groups had significantly lower force output (42.7 vs 78.8 Nm) and muscle activation (78.3 vs 98.7%) than controls. Decreased activation may be attributed to the inhibitory effects of injured muscle and swelling. All groups had similar force and muscle activation decreases (7-10%) following fatigue; however, the internally fixated group performed significantly fewer contractions during the fatigue test (19) than the nonfixated (71) and controls (61). In contrast to the other groups, internally fixated subjects experienced increased (13%) rather than decreased EMG activity (controls: 10.9%, nonfixated: 21.1%). M-waves and twitch torques potentiated to a similar extent in the fracture groups (4.5 and 5.7%) but decreased significantly in the control group (24.2 and 9.8%). The similar fatigue durations of non-fixated subjects compared with controls may be attributed to a lack of impairment in nonfixated neuromuscular propagation and contractile kinetics, while the increased fatigability of fixated subjects with a similar lack of evoked contractile property impairments suggested a greater intrinsic fatigability. PMID:9309620

  10. Which ankle fractures require syndesmotic stabilization?

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Lamme, Bas; Hogervorst, Mike; Bolhuis, Hugo W

    2007-01-01

    Syndesmotic ruptures associated with ankle fractures are most commonly caused by external rotation of the foot, eversion of the talus within the ankle mortise, and excessive dorsiflexion. The distal tibiofibular syndesmosis consists of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and interosseous ligament, and it is essential for stability of the ankle mortise. Despite the numerous biomechanical and clinical studies pertaining to ankle fractures, there are no uniform recommendations regarding the use of the syndesmotic screw for specific injury patterns and fracture types. The objective of this review was to formulate recommendations for clinical practice related to the use of syndesmotic screw placement. PMID:17980843

  11. Beware the Emergency Ankle Fracture Referral: An Unusual Case of Lateral Subtalar Joint Dislocation Secondary to Calcaneal Fracture with associated Lateral Malleolus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Colegate-Stone, TJ; James, SE; Koka, SR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The referral of a lateral malleolus fracture is one of the commonest orthopaedic trauma presentations. Failure to fully assess the patient and radiography can lead to missing associated injuries in the hindfoot. Case Report: We describe an unusual hindfoot injury with an atypical combination of lateral subtalar dislocation and calcaneal fracture with associated lateral malleolus fracture that was initially not appreciated by the referring emergency department. This case is of particular interest as subtalar dislocation is a rare injury and lateral subtalar dislocation is even rarer. Conclusion: Failure to fully assess such injuries and manage non-operatively leads to early degenerative tibia-talar, hindfoot and midfoot changes and a difficult situation for the surgeon to salvage. We advocate early CT scan and open reduction with fixation for such cases. PMID:27299009

  12. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the ankle. This condition often... Barefoot Running Barefoot running is running while barefoot, without wearing any shoes on the feet. Running in thin-soled, flexible shoes is related but ...

  13. Ankle dislocation without accompanying malleolar fracture. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Masahito; Kotajima, Satoshi; Smith, Richard A; Kokubun, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Dislocation of the tibiotalar joint without associated fracture is rare. We present here a 21-year-old man who sustained open posteromedial dislocation of the left ankle without malleolar facture when he jumped and sprained his right ankle while playing basketball. The most likely mechanism is forced flexion applied to the ankle joint leading to a rupture of the anterior capsule and lateral structures of the ankle followed by an accelerating inversion stress leading to a posteromedial dislocation of the talus from the tibial condyle. Transient paresthesia was noted in the area of the superficial peroneal nerve. At surgery, the anterior part of the tibiotalar joint capsule and anterior talofibular ligament were detached from their original sites. The calcaneofibular ligament was also detached with its associated periosteum and a tiny avulsed bony fragment. The articular facets of the tibia and talus were intact. The treatment consisted of wound irrigation, debridement, reduction and capsular suture followed by immobilization with a short leg cast. About 10 degrees of loss in the range of dorsiflexion was observed. The patient achieved good long-term functional results. PMID:16961183

  14. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  15. [Unexpected revision procedures treating ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Pommer, A; Breuer, R; Hullmann, S; Heyde, D V; Dávid, A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the risk factors associated with unexpected second procedures and strategies of revision surgery. Within a 5 year period 647 patients with closed ankle fractures AO type 44 were identified of which 77 (11.9%) needed revision surgery. Complications were addressed to 4 main groups: deep infections (IG) were seen in 29 patients (4.5%), problems with primary wound closure (WG) in 22 patients (3.4%), insufficient reduction (KG) in 22 patients (3.4%) and other causes (RG) included 4 patients (0.6%). Significant predictive factors for soft tissue complications were higher age, comorbidities with peripheral arteriosclerosis, high American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score and diabetes mellitus. AO 44 type B2 and B3 fractures were often associated with soft tissue problems. The more complex fracture types AO 44 C1-C3 and A2-A3 were significantly associated with problems of insufficient congruency post-surgery. The distribution of the mean revision rate was significantly different (p<0.01) for all groups: IG 4.59, WG 3.5, KG 1.55, RG 1.25. In summary, we strongly recommend immediate reduction of displaced fractures and to consider a more detailed fracture classification. To reduce the amount of unexpected ankle procedures individual risk factors should be weighed against the advantages of optimal open reduction and internal fixation. PMID:21165587

  16. Primary Retrograde Tibiotalocalcaneal Nailing For Fragility Ankle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin C.; Hansen, Dane C.; Harrison, Ryan; Lucas, Douglas E; Degenova, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Ankle fragility fractures are difficult to treat due to poor bone quality and soft tissues as well as the near ubiquitous presence of comorbidities including diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Conventional open reduction and internal fixation in this population has been shown to lead to a significant rate of complications. Given the high rate of complications with contemporary fixation methods, the present study aims to critically evaluate the use of acute hindfoot nailing as a percutaneous fixation technique for high-risk ankle fragility fractures. Methods In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 31 patients treated with primary retrograde tibiotalocalcaneal nail without joint preparation for a mean of 13.6 months postoperatively from an urban Level I trauma center during the years 2006-2012. Results Overall, there were two superficial infections (6.5%) and three deep infections (9.7%) in the series. There were 28 (90.3%) patients that went on to radiographic union at a mean of 22.2 weeks with maintenance of foot and ankle alignment. There were three cases of asymptomatic screw breakage observed at a mean of 18.3 months postoperatively, which were all treated conservatively.. Conclusions This study shows that retrograde hindfoot nailing is an acceptable treatment option for treatment of ankle fragility fractures. Hindfoot nailing allows early weightbearing, limited soft tissue injury, and a relatively low rate of complications, all of which are advantages to conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques. Given these findings, larger prospective randomized trials comparing this treatment with conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques are warranted. PMID:27528840

  17. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. PMID:24365326

  18. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  19. Open Reduction Internal Fixation of a Bimalleolar Ankle Fracture With Syndesmotic Injury.

    PubMed

    Ostrum, Robert F; Avery, Matthew C

    2016-08-01

    Rotational ankle fractures are incredibly common, resulting in a wide spectrum of bony and ligamentous injury patterns. After open reduction of an ankle fracture, the treating surgeon must always evaluate syndesmotic stability. If the syndesmosis is determined to be unstable, a reduction of the distal tibiofibular joint should be performed. Failure to adequately identify and treat injuries to the syndesmosis may result in continued ankle instability and poor patient outcomes. Lateral fluoroscopic images are necessary to assess a closed reduction of the syndesmosis before stabilization, although the accuracy of this tool has been questioned in several studies. Significant controversy surrounds many aspects of this injury and its treatment, including methods of diagnosis, ideal reduction clamp positioning, diameter and number of syndesmotic screws, and number of tibial cortices to be engaged. In the accompanying video, we describe our approach for the treatment of a bimalleolar ankle fracture with syndesmotic injury, using a posterior fibular plate and single tricortical syndesmotic screw. PMID:27441940

  20. State-of-the-Art in Ankle Fracture Management in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Cristián A; Wagner, Pablo; Wagner, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The ankle represents the most commonly injured weightbearing joint in the human body. They are typically the result of low-energy, rotational injury mechanisms. However, ankle fractures represent a spectrum of injury patterns from simple to very complex, with varying incidence of posttraumatic arthritis. Stable injury patterns can be treated nonoperatively; unstable injury patterns are typically treated operatively given that they could lead to severe arthritis if not properly addressed. PMID:27261811

  1. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint. PMID:26072625

  2. Ankle fracture: radiographic approach according to the Lauge-Hansen classification.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Reginelli, A; Zappia, M; Rossi, C; Fabozzi, G; Fabozzi, O; Cerrato, M; Macarini, L; Coppolino, F

    2013-08-01

    Ankle fractures account for 9 % of fractures (Clare in Foot Ankle Clin 13(4):593-610, 1) representing a significant portion of the trauma workload; proximal femoral fractures are the only lower limb fracture to present more frequently. Ankle fractures have a bimodal age distribution with peaks in younger males and older females (Arimoto and Forrester in AJR Am J Roentgenol 135(5):1057-1063, 2). There has been threefold increase in the incidence among elderly females over the past three decades (Haraguchi and Armiger in J Bone Joint Surg Am 91(4):821-829, 3). In 1950, Lauge-Hansen devised a classification of ankle fractures based on the position of the foot and the deforming force at the time of injury. This has been widely accepted by orthopedists, but is not in general use by radiologists. Identification of the fractures and classification of the type of injury allows diagnosis of the otherwise occult ligamentous injuries. Three radiographic views of the ankle (anteroposterior, mortise, and lateral) are necessary to classify an injury with the Lauge-Hansen system. Two additional criteria are also necessary: the position of the foot at the time of injury and the direction of the deforming force. PMID:23949937

  3. [Ankle fractures in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Crevoisier, Xavier; Baalbaki, Rayan; Dos Santos, Tiago; Assal, Mathieu

    2014-12-17

    Ankle fractures in adults are usually managed by open reduction internal fixation. In elderly patients the surgical dilemma relates to bone quality. Osteoporosis is the enemy of internal fixation, and secure purchase of screws in osteopenic bone may be difficult to achieve. Insufficient screw purchase may lead to loss of reduction, wound breakdown, and infection. Postoperative management after osteosynthesis usually requires an extended period of restricted weight bearing. However, this is not feasible in older patients as a result of their lack of strength in the upper extremities and frequent comorbidities. Therefore, augmen- ted methods of internal fixation and specific surgical techniques have been developed using metal and bone cement. This permits this fragile population to begin early full weight bearing in a removable brace. PMID:25752013

  4. Ankle motion after external fixation of tibial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G J; Allum, R L

    1988-01-01

    Loss of ankle movement is a complication of severe tibial fractures. This can be exacerbated if the foot is allowed to drop into equinus, particularly when an external fixator is employed. The range of ankle motion following external fixation of tibial fractures as compared to the opposite normal ankle was studied in 40 of 55 patients treated over a ten-year period. Nine were excluded due to other causes of ankle stiffness, leaving 31 cases for analysis. The mean follow up was 2 years 7 months (range 1 year to 8 years 3 months), and union had occurred by a mean of 35 weeks (range 9-100 weeks). The mean loss of ankle movement was 8 degrees of plantar-flexion and 12 degrees of dorsiflexion (overall loss 20 degrees), the difference between the two being highly significant (P greater than 0.001, t test). Loss of ankle motion closely paralleled the degree of soft tissue trauma, being 6 degrees for closed fractures and 22 degrees for open fractures (0.05 greater than P greater than 0.02). Ankle function is therefore at risk when a severe tibial fracture is treated by external fixation, and appropriate measures should be taken to preserve movement and prevent an equinus contracture. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:3343667

  5. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  9. Mechanical Joint Laxity Associated With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Mitchell L.; Sefton, JoEllen M.; Hubbard, Tricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Lateral ankle sprains can manifest into chronic mechanical joint laxity when not treated effectively. Joint laxity is often measured through the use of manual stress tests, stress radiography, and instrumented ankle arthrometers. Purpose: To systematically review the literature to establish the influence of chronic ankle instability (CAI) on sagittal and frontal plane mechanical joint laxity. Data Sources: Articles were searched with MEDLINE (1966 to October 2008), CINAHL (1982 to October 2008), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (to October 2008) using the key words chronic ankle instability and joint laxity, functional ankle instability and joint laxity, and lateral ankle sprains and joint laxity. Study Selection: To be included, studies had to employ a case control design; mechanical joint laxity had to be measured via a stress roentogram, an instrumented ankle arthrometer, or ankle/foot stress-testing device; anteroposterior inversion or eversion ankle-subtalar joint complex laxity had to be measured; and means and standard deviations of CAI and control groups had to be provided. Data Extraction: One investigator assessed each study based on the criteria to ensure its suitability for analysis. The initial search yielded 1378 potentially relevant articles, from which 8 were used in the final analysis. Once the study was accepted for inclusion, its quality was assessed with the PEDro scale. Data Synthesis: Twenty-one standardized effect sizes and their 95% confidence intervals were computed for each group and dependent variable. CAI produced the largest effect on inversion joint laxity; 45% of the effects ranged from 0.84 to 2.61. Anterior joint laxity measures were influenced second most by CAI (effects, 0.32 to 1.82). CAI had similar but less influence on posterior joint laxity (effects, −0.06 to 0.68) and eversion joint laxity (effects, 0.03 to 0.69). Conclusion: CAI has the largest effect with the most variability on anterior and

  10. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles. PMID:26077988

  11. Epidemiologic study of ankle fractures in a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; Matsumura, Bruno Akio Rodrigues; Dotta, Thiago De Angelis Guerra; Pontin, Pedro Augusto; dos Santos, Alexandre Leme Godoy; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the epidemiology of ankle fractures surgically treated at the Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: Medical records of patients admitted with foot and ankle fractures between 2006 and 2011 were revised. Seventy three ankle fractures that underwent surgical treatment were identified. The parameters analyzed included age, gender, injured side, AO and Gustilo & Anderson classification, associated injuries, exposure, need to urgent treatment, time to definitive treatment and early post-operative complications. Study design: retrospective epidemiological study. RESULTS: Male gender was predominant among subjects and the mean age was 27.5 years old. Thirty nine fractures resulted from traffic accidents and type B fracture according to AO classification was the most common. Twenty one were open fractures and 22 patients had associated injuries. The average time to definitive treatment was 6.5 days. Early post-operative complications were found in 21.3% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Ankle fractures treated in a tertiary hospital of a large city in Brazil affect young people victims of high-energy accidents and present significant rates of associated injuries and post-operative complications. Level of Evidence IV, Cases Series. PMID:24868187

  12. An in Silico Analysis of Ankle Joint Loads in Secondary Ankle Osteoarthritis. Case Study.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Mrzygłód, Mirosław W; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Secondary, post-traumatic, degenerative lesions of the ankle joint remain a serious clinical challenge. This paper presents the case of a 66-year-old patient with secondary, post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis and subchondral cysts. The use of rapid computer modelling FEM 2D enabled optimization of surgical treatment. A FEM 2D model of biomechanical changes in bones may help in streamlining treatment as well as improve our understanding of the pathomechanism of osteoarthritis. PMID:26248632

  13. Small joint arthroscopy in foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Yuen, Chi Pan

    2015-03-01

    The clinical application of small joint arthroscopies (metatarsophalangeal joint, Lisfranc joint, Chopart joint, and interphlangeal joint) in the foot has seen significant advancements in the past decades. This article reviews the clinical indications, technical details, outcomes, and potential complications of small joint arthroscopies of the foot. PMID:25726488

  14. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  15. Open ankle fractures: who gets them and why?

    PubMed

    Bugler, Kate E; Clement, Nicholas D; Duckworth, Andrew D; White, Timothy O; McQueen, Margaret M; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2015-03-01

    Open ankle fractures present a significant clinical challenge. The management and outcome of these injuries has been extensively reported, but there have been no reports of the epidemiology and how this has changed over time. We report 178 adult patients with open ankle fractures presenting to our unit over a twenty-three year period. The study centre is the only hospital receiving adult orthopaedic trauma in the region and has a defined population. The incidence of open ankle fractures was 1.5/10(5)/year, representing 1.5 % of all ankle fractures. The mean age was 55 years (range 16-96), with the highest incidence occurring in women over the age of 90. The most common mechanism was a simple fall with only 26 % of cases due to a motor vehicle collision (MVC). 82 % of cases were isolated injuries. Social deprivation had no significant influence on the incidence, but there was a difference in the mechanism with the majority of injuries in the most deprived quintile caused by MVCs and significantly fewer due to simple falls (p = 0.047). Over the twenty-three years, there was a significant increase in the mean age from 44 to 64 years (p = 0.03). The overall incidence remained constant over the two decades. In common with many traumatic injuries, open ankle fractures are increasingly low-energy insufficiency fractures affecting elderly patients, particularly older women. This has implications for service planning and training as well as the surgical intervention in these patients. PMID:25596941

  16. Ankle Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one ... muscles and tendons move it. The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is ...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3120 Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3120 Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3120 Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  5. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  6. Ankle Joint Fusion With an Anatomically Preshaped Anterior Locking Plate.

    PubMed

    Wiewiorski, Martin; Barg, Alexej; Schlemmer, Thomas; Valderrabano, Victor

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel fixation plate for primary ankle joint fusion. A single anatomically preshaped angular stable plate was used with an anterior approach. An excellent result with good bone consolidation was present at the 1-year follow-up examination. PMID:25998475

  7. Tibiotalar joint arthrodesis for the treatment of severe ankle joint degeneration secondary to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caron, M; Kron, E; Saltrick, K R

    1999-04-01

    The technical aspects of fusion of the rheumatoid ankle do not deviate from those in the post-traumatic or osteoarthritic ankle. Screw fixation can usually be achieved, and rarely is fixation failure a problem in rheumatoid ankle arthrodesis. If fixation is difficult because of deformity or bone quality, external fixation or locking intramedullary nails should be used. The placement of cannulated screws and adequacy of screw fixation has not been a problem (Fig. 13). Screw fixation provides compression and prevents rotation. The surgeon, however, needs to be assured that no screws invade the subtalar joint and that all threads are beyond the arthrodesis site. A washer may be necessary for further stability if this screw is not inserted at too great an angle. The authors have found that troughing out of the cortical surface of the tibia with a power bur aids in screw insertion. Not only does the trough act as a countersink, but it also provides a path for screw insertion and prevents palpable screw irritation. Malalignment is unforgiving. The foot must be placed neutral to dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Equinus positioning places added stress on the tibia and a back-knee gait occurs. Approximately 5 degrees of valgus is recommended, and varus positioning is unforgiving. Internal and external rotation is determined by the position of the contralateral extremity. Nonunion does not seem to be a problem with rigid internal fixation to any greater degree in patients with RA. Despite this, patients may continue to have pain despite solid fusion, which can be caused by incomplete correction of deformity, painful internal fixation, or adjacent joint pathology. Additionally, patients may experience supramalleolar pain above the fusion site consistent with tibial stress fracture, which is more common if the subtalar or midtarsal joint is rigid or if the patient is obese. A rocker sole shoe with impact-absorbing soles used after brief periods of guarded mobilization in a

  8. [Fractures of the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Nowak, T E; Dietz, S O; Burkhart, K J; Müller, L P; Rommens, P M

    2012-02-01

    Fractures around the elbow joint comprise fractures of the distal humerus, the radial head, the olecranon and the coronoid process. Combined lesions are particularly demanding for the surgeon. Accurate knowledge of the anatomy and of the biomechanics is an essential requirement for a specific diagnosis and therapy. A stable and painless movable elbow joint is essential for most of the activities of daily living. Risk factors for the development of posttraumatic elbow joint arthrosis are non-anatomically reconstructed joint surfaces, axial malalignment of the joint axis and untreated concomitant injuries. Modern angular stable and anatomically preshaped implants facilitate a biomechanically adequate osteosynthesis and avoid or decrease functional impairment. In consideration of an increasing number of osteoporotic elbow joint fractures, endoprosthetic replacement has gained significance. PMID:22271056

  9. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. PMID:27599433

  10. Quantitative biomechanical comparison of ankle fracture casting methods.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Alastair; Alsousou, Joseph; Keene, David J; Dyson, Igor N; Lamb, Sarah E; Willett, Keith M; Thompson, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of ankle fractures is increasing rapidly due to the ageing demographic. In older patients with compromised distal circulation, conservative treatment of fractures may be indicated. High rates of malunion and complications due to skin fragility motivate the design of novel casting systems, but biomechanical stability requirements are poorly defined. This article presents the first quantitative study of ankle cast stability and hypothesises that a newly proposed close contact cast (CCC) system provides similar biomechanical stability to standard casts (SC). Two adult mannequin legs transected at the malleoli, one incorporating an inflatable model of tissue swelling, were stabilised with casts applied by an experienced surgeon. They were cyclically loaded in torsion, measuring applied rotation angle and resulting torque. CCC stiffness was equal to or greater than that of SC in two measures of ankle cast resistance to torsion. The effect of swelling reduction at the ankle site was significantly greater on CCC than on SC. The data support the hypothesis that CCC provides similar biomechanical stability to SC and therefore also the clinical use of CCC. They suggest that more frequent re-application of CCC is likely required to maintain stability following resolution of swelling at the injury site. PMID:25719278

  11. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  12. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques.

    PubMed

    Runge, C F; Shupert, C L; Horak, F B; Zajac, F E

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  13. Are low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly the new geriatric hip fracture?

    PubMed

    Toole, William P; Elliott, Mark; Hankins, David; Rosenbaum, Corey; Harris, Anthony; Perkins, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As the geriatric population in the United States continues to increase, ankle fractures in the elderly are predicted to exponentially increase in the future. As such, these injuries will become a common injury seen by physicians in various fields. Currently, no studies discussing low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly and/or the mortality rate associated with these devastating injuries have been published. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively review the morality rate associated with low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly. We retrospectively identified 11 patients >60 years old who had sustained low-energy open ankle fractures and been treated at our institution. The patient demographics, mechanism of injury, wound size, medical comorbidities, treatment, follow-up data, and outcomes were recorded. Low-energy falls were defined as ground level falls from sitting or standing. The mean age of the patients was 70.72 years, with a mean body mass index of 35.93 ± 10.24. Of the 11 patients, 9 (81.81%) had ≥3 comorbidities (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The mean size of the medially based ankle wound was 14.18 ± 4.12 cm; 10 (90.90%) were Gustilo and Anderson grade IIIA open ankle fractures. In our study, low-energy open ankle fractures in the elderly, very similar to hip fractures, were associated with a high mortality incidence (27.27%) at a mean of 2.67 ± 2.02 months, and 81.81% of our patients had ≥3 medical comorbidities. PMID:25488597

  14. Unusual ankle fracture: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Bensaad, Soufiane; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the talus are uncommon, and talar body fractures in the sagittal plane are still rarer. The aim of its treatment is urgent anatomic reduction to restore congruency of the ankle and to reduce the risk of avascular necrosis by preserving any remaining blood supply. We report the case of a body talar fracture in sagittal plane associated with fracture of the medial malleolus in a young adult; the mechanism of the fracture was plantar hyperflexion, internal rotation and axial compression. We perform an open reduction and stabilization with two screws for the talus and screw the medial malleolus. At 14 months following the injury patient had good range of movement with little pain. The mechanism is discussed along with a literature review. PMID:25983480

  15. Fractures and Soft Tissue Injuries of the Feet and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    English, Edward

    1985-01-01

    An accurate clinical diagnosis of foot and ankle pain can be made by a history, physical examination and routine X-rays of the affected part. Each problem has a specific treatment; however, fractures and dislocations around the foot and ankle can be thought of in an organized fashion by proper physical examination and then the appropriate treatment. Fractures and soft tissue injuries can be treated rationally by understanding the mechanism of injury and the possibility of subsequent deformity. This article classifies specific injuries as a group and indicates a treatment program for each problem. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7aFig. 7bFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:21274230

  16. Clinical audit of ankle fracture management in the elderly☆

    PubMed Central

    Kurar, Langhit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ankle fractures in the osteoporotic patient are challenging injuries to manage, due to a combination of poor soft tissue, peripheral vascular disease and increased bone fragility, often resulting in more complex fracture patterns. I aim to audit current practice and introduce change by producing recommendations to help improve longer-term functional outcomes. Patients and methods A retrospective 3-week audit was conducted reviewing results of ankle fracture management in 50 patients aged between 50 and 80 years. Patients admitted for either manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA)/application of cast or open-reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) were considered. Medical notes, including discharge summaries, were used for data extraction. Results From the 50 patients included within the cohort, forty-two patients (84%) underwent surgical intervention, with eight patients (16%) managed non-operatively. Malunion (63%) and failed fracture fixation (25%) were more commonly reported in patients managed non-operatively. Surgery performed by trainee surgeons was unlikely to prolong theatre time with no statistical significance observed with the consultant led cohort (p = 0.380). However, incidence of fracture malunion and failed fixation were significantly higher following surgery without consultant supervision in the junior trainee group (p = 0.043). Conclusions Poor bone quality and associated co-morbidity can present technical difficulties when managing patients surgically. However, our results have shown considerably improved anatomical reduction rates following internal fixation in eligible patients, irrespective of age or gender. PMID:26981239

  17. Biomechanical characteristics of human ankle-joint muscles.

    PubMed

    Aruin, A S; Zatsiorsky, V M

    1984-01-01

    Equivalent biomechanical characteristics of human ankle-joint muscles have been determined by impact and vibration tests. The estimate of the stiffness and damping coefficients has yielded, respectively, (2.67 +/- 0.48) X 10(4) N X m-1 and (811.58 +/- 201.3) N X s X m-1 by impact actions, n = 126; (1.49 +/- 0.35) X 10(4) N X m-1 and (430.1 +/- 36.1) N X s X m-1 -by vibration actions, n = 7. The characteristics of the ankle-joint muscles of subjects representing different kinds of sports have proved to be different. PMID:6540667

  18. Biomechanics of the natural, arthritic, and replaced human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The human ankle joint complex plays a fundamental role in gait and other activities of daily living. At the same time, it is a very complicated anatomical system but the large literature of experimental and modelling studies has not fully described the coupled joint motion, position and orientation of the joint axis of rotation, stress and strain in the ligaments and their role in guiding and stabilizing joint motion, conformity and congruence of the articular surfaces, patterns of contact at the articular surfaces, patterns of rolling and sliding at the joint surfaces, and muscle lever arm lengths. The present review article addresses these issues as described in the literature, reporting the most recent relevant findings. PMID:24499639

  19. Safety profile of sural nerve in posterolateral approach to the ankle joint: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Husami, Yaya; McLeod, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The posterolateral approach to ankle joint is well suited for ORIF of posterior malleolar fractures. There are no major neurovascular structures endangering this approach other than the sural nerve. The sural nerve is often used as an autologous peripheral nerve graft and provides sensation to the lateral aspect of the foot. The aim of this paper is to measure the precise distance of the sural nerve from surrounding soft tissue structures so as to enable safe placement of skin incision in posterolateral approach. This is a retrospective image review study involving 64 MRI scans. All measurements were made from Axial T1 slices. The key findings of the paper is the safety window for the sural nerve from the lateral border of tendoachilles (TA) is 7 mm, 1.3 cm and 2 cm at 3 cm above ankle joint, at the ankle joint and at the distal tip of fibula respectively. Our study demonstrates the close relationship of the nerve in relation to TA and fibula in terms of exact measurements. The safety margins established in this study should enable the surgeon in preventing endangerment of the sural nerve encountered in this approach. PMID:24158742

  20. Biomechanical changes at the ankle joint after stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Thilmann, A F; Fellows, S J; Ross, H F

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the relaxed ankle to slow displacement over the joint movement range was measured on both sides of a group of hemiparetic stroke patients, in whom spasticity had been established for at least one year and who showed no clinical signs of contractures. The ankle joints of the age-matched normal subjects were flexible over most of the movement range, showing dramatically increasing stiffness only when the foot was dorsiflexed beyond 70 degrees, with a neutral range between 90-100 degrees, and a less dramatic increase in stiffness during plantarflexion. Hemiparetic patients showed identical curves to the normal subjects on the "healthy" side, ipsilateral to the causative cerebral lesion, but were significantly stiffer in dorsiflexion on the contralateral side, without change in the minimum stiffness range or during plantarflexion. Therefore significant changes in passive biomechanical properties occur at the affected ankle of hemiparetic subjects, predominantly as the result of a loss of compliance in the Achilles tendon, although an increase in the passive stiffness of the triceps surae may also occur. The contribution of these changes to the locomotor disability of hemiparetic patients is discussed. PMID:2019838

  1. The effects of ankle joint taping on gait and balance ability of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of the application of elastic taping over the ankle joints of healthy subjects on their gait, balance ability, and muscle strength. [Subjects] Fifty healthy subjects with no orthopedic history of the ankle joint were selected and elastic taping was applied to their ankle joints. [Methods] Before and after application of the elastic taping, gait and balance ability of the subjects were evaluated. [Results] After the taping application, gait velocity significantly increased and there were significant differences in all variables of balance ability. [Conclusion] Application of elastic taping aimed at improving stability of the ankle joint had a positive effect on gait speed and balance ability. PMID:26504323

  2. Evaluating fracture risk in acute ankle sprains: Any news since the Ottawa Ankle Rules? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jonckheer, Pascale; Willems, Tine; De Ridder, Roel; Paulus, Dominique; Holdt Henningsen, Kirsten; San Miguel, Lorena; De Sutter, An; Roosen, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Background Ankle sprain is frequently encountered, both in primary care and in emergency departments. Since 1992, the Ottawa ankle rules (OAR) can assist clinicians in determining whether an X-ray should be performed to exclude a fracture. Several guidelines recommend the use of OAR based on a systematic review from 2003. Ten years later, one can wonder if this recommendation should be changed. Objective To review systematically the current evidence on the most accurate method to assess the fracture risk after an ankle sprain in adults. Methods A methodical search for systematic reviews, meta-analyses and primary studies was carried out in Medline, Cochrane Database of systematic reviews, Embase, Pedro, CINAHL, Medion and specific guideline search engines. At least two independent researchers performed selection, quality appraisal (with validated checklists) and data extraction. Results One systematic review and 21 primary studies were selected. Sensitivity and specificity of the OAR range from 92-100% and from 16-51%, respectively. To improve the OAR specificity, other tools are proposed such as the Bernese ankle rules. Vibrating tuning fork test and ultrasound could be useful in patient with OAR positive to decrease the need for radiographs. No evidence was found in favour of the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) in the acute phase of ankle sprain. Conclusion The findings confirm the value of the OAR at ruling out fractures after an ankle sprain and propose other or additional tools to decrease the need for X-rays. PMID:26691309

  3. Four Weeks of Balance Training does not Affect Ankle Joint Stiffness in Subjects with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarang Kumar; Wauneka, Clayton N.; Liu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Balance training has been shown to be effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) but the biomechanical pathways underlying the clinical outcomes are still unknown. This study was conducted to determine if a 4-week balance training intervention can alter the mechanical characteristics in ankles with CAI. Methods Twenty-two recreationally active subjects with unilateral CAI were randomized to either a control (n = 11, 35.1 ± 9.3 years) or intervention (n = 11, 33.5 ± 6.6 years) group. Subjects in the intervention group were trained on the affected limb with static and dynamic components using a Biodex balance stability system for 4-weeks. The ankle joint stiffness and neutral zone in inversion and eversion directions on the involved and uninvolved limbs was measured at baseline and post-intervention using a dynamometer. Results At baseline, the mean values of the inversion stiffness (0.69 ± 0.37 Nm/degree) in the involved ankle was significantly lower (p < 0.011, 95% CI [0.563, 0.544]) than that of uninvolved contralateral ankle (0.99 ± 0.41 Nm/degree). With the available sample size, the eversion stiffness, inversion neutral zone, and eversion neutral zone were not found to be significantly different between the involved and uninvolved contralateral ankles. The 4-week balance training intervention failed to show any significant effect on the passive ankle stiffness and neutral zones in inversion and eversion. Conclusion Decreased inversion stiffness in the involved chronic unstable ankle was found that of uninvolved contralateral ankle. The 4-week balance training program intervention was ineffective in altering the mechanical characteristics of ankles with CAI. Level of evidence Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3100 Ankle joint metal/composite...

  5. Hydraulic fracturing of jointed formations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.D.; Fehler, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Measured by volume, North America's largest hydraulic fracturing operations have been conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico to create geothermal energy reservoirs. In the largest operation 21,000 m/sup 3/ of water were injected into jointed granitic rock at a depth of 3.5 km. Microearthquakes induced by this injection were measured with geophones placed in five wells drilled into, or very close, to the reservoir, as well as 11 surface seismometers. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. A coupled rock mechanics/fluid flow model provides much of the explanation. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60 degrees to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. These results are qualitatively similar to the controversial process known as ''Kiel'' fracturing, in which sequential injections and shut-ins are repeated to create dendritic fractures for enhanced oil and gas recovery. However, we believe that the explanation is shear slippage of pre-existing joints and stress redistribution, not proppant bridging and fluid blocking as suggested by Kiel. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Ankle joint complex mobility of children 7 to 14 years old.

    PubMed

    Alanen, J T; Levola, J V; Helenius, H Y; Kvist, M H

    2001-01-01

    The ranges of motions of the ankle have been studied only rarely in children. The authors examined the mobility of the ankle joint complex of 245 healthy children. The mean age was 10.2 years. In healthy children ages 7 to 14 years, the variation of the ankle joint complex range of motion was wide. The largest gender-related difference was recorded for passive plantarflexion, which was greater in girls. Other statistically significant gender differences do exist, but they are small and probably lack clinical meaning. Some of the children had remarkable left-right difference in the range of motions of the ankle joint complex. This means that the "healthy ankle" cannot necessarily be used in clinical practice as a reference when evaluating, for example, treatments of foot and ankle injuries in children. PMID:11675545

  7. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  8. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  9. Understanding risks and complications in the management of ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh Sagar; Rees, Kishan; Cutler, Lucy; Mangwani, Jitendra

    2014-01-01

    Ankle fracture (AF) is a common injury with potentially significant morbidity associated with it. The most common age groups affected are young active patients, sustaining high energy trauma and elderly patients with comorbidities. Both these groups pose unique challenges for appropriate management of these injuries. Young patients are at risk of developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis, with a significant impact on quality of life due to pain and impaired function. Elderly patients, especially with poorly controlled diabetes and osteoporosis are at increased risk of wound complications, infection and failure of fixation. In the most severe cases, this can lead to amputation and mortality. Therefore, individualized approach to the management of AF is vital. This article highlights commonly encountered complications and discusses the measures needed to minimize them when dealing with these injuries. PMID:25298549

  10. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  11. Ankle sprain - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ankle joint connects the foot with the leg. The ankle joint allows the foot to move upward and ... outward motion. Muscles, tendons, and ligaments surround the ankle providing the stability the ankle joint needs for ...

  12. Predictors of Adverse Events for Ankle Fractures: An Analysis of 6800 Patients.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ashley C; Lakomkin, Nikita; Attum, Basem; Bulka, Catherine; Karhade, Aditya V; Douleh, Diana G; Mir, Hassan; Jahangir, A Alex; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2016-01-01

    Ankle fractures are one of the most common injuries seen by orthopedic surgeons. It is therefore essential to understand the risks associated with their treatment. Using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program(®) database from 2006 to 2013, the patient demographics, comorbidities, and 30-day complications were collected for 5 types of ankle fractures. A bivariate analysis was used to compare the patient demographics, comorbidities, and complications across all Common Procedural Terminology codes. A multivariable logistic regression model was then used to assess the odds of minor and major postoperative complications within 30 days after open treatment. A total of 6865 patients were included in the analysis. Of these patients, 2507 (36.5%) had bimalleolar ankle fractures. The overall rate of adverse events for ankle fractures was low. Bimalleolar fractures had the greatest rate of major (2.6%, n = 64), minor (3.8%, n = 94), and total (5.7%, n = 143) complications. When controlling for individual patient characteristics, bimalleolar fractures were associated with 4.92 times the odds (95% confidence interval 1.80 to 13.5; p = .002) of developing a complication compared with those with a medial malleolar fracture. The risk factors driving postoperative complications for all ankle fractures were age >65 years, obesity, diabetes, American Society of Anesthesiologists score >2, and functional status (p < .05). Although the overall rate of adverse events for ankle fractures was low, bimalleolar fractures were associated with 5 times the odds of developing a complication compared with medial malleolar fractures. Orthopedic surgeons must be aware of the risk factors that increase the rate of ankle fracture complications to improve patients' quality of care. PMID:27086177

  13. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  14. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  15. The in vivo kinematics of the tibiotalar joint after lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Adam M.; Lee, Jun Y.; Spritzer, Chuck E.; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous studies have suggested injury to the anterior talofibular ligament may be linked to altered kinematics and the development of osteoarthritis of the ankle joint. However, the effects of ATFL injury on the in vivo kinematics of the ankle joint are unclear. HYPOTHESIS Based on the orientation of the ATFL fibers, we hypothesized that ATFL deficiency would lead to increased anterior translation and increased internal rotation of the talus relative to the tibia. STUDY DESIGN Controlled laboratory study. METHODS The ankles of 9 patients with unilateral ATFL injuries were compared as they stepped onto a level surface. Kinematic measurements were made as a function of increasing load. Using magnetic resonance imaging and orthogonal fluoroscopy, the in vivo kinematics of the tibiotalar joint were measured in the ATFL deficient and intact ankles from the same individuals. RESULTS A statistically significant increase in internal rotation, anterior translation, and superior translation of the talus was measured in ATFL deficient ankles as compared to intact, contralateral controls. For example, at 100% body weight, ATFL deficient ankles demonstrated a statistically significant increase in anterior translation of 0.9 ± 0.5mm (p = 0.008). At 100% body weight, the ATFL deficient ankle was internally rotated relative to the intact ankle by 5.7 ± 3.6° (p = 0.008). There was a slight increase of 0.2 ± 0.2mm in the superior translation of the ATFL deficient ankle compared to the intact ankle at 100% body weight (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS ATFL deficiency increases anterior translation, internal rotation, and superior translation of the talus. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Altered kinematics may contribute to the degenerative changes observed with chronic lateral ankle instability. These findings might help to explain the degenerative changes frequently observed on the medial talus in patients with chronic ATFL insufficiency and provide a baseline for improving ankle ligament

  16. [Condylar fracture and temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    This article summarized the advances in treatment and research of temporomandibular joint surgery in the last 5 years which was presented in "The 2nd Condyle Fracture and Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis Symposium". The content includes 5 parts: non-surgical treatment of children condyle fracture and long-term follow-up, the improvement of operative approach for condyle fracture and key techniques, the importance and the method for the simultanesous reduction of disc in condylar fracture treatment, the development of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis similar to hypertrophic non-union and the improved safety and accuracy by applying digital surgery in joint surgery. PMID:26980648

  17. Effects of focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static balance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Application of cryotherapy over an injured joint has been shown to improve muscle function, yet it is unknown how ankle cryotherapy affects postural control. Our purpose was to determine the effects of a 20-min focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static stance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen young subjects with CAI (9 males, 6 females) and 15 healthy gender-matched controls participated. All subjects underwent two intervention sessions on different days in which they had a 1.5L plastic bag filled with either crushed ice (active treatment) or candy corn (sham) applied to the ankle. Unipedal stance with eyes closed for 10s were assessed with a forceplate before and after each intervention. Center of pressure (COP) data were used to compute 10 specific dependent measures including velocity, area, standard deviation (SD), and percent range of COP excursions, and mean and SD of time-to-boundary (TTB) minima in the anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral directions. For each measure a three-way (Group-Intervention-Time) repeated ANOVAs found no significant interactions and main effects involving intervention (all Ps > 0.05). There were group main effects found for mean velocity (F(1,28) = 6.46, P = .017), area (F(1,28) = 12.83, P = .001), and mean of TTB minima in the AP direction (F(1,28) = 5.19, P = .031) indicating that the CAI group demonstrated greater postural instability compared to the healthy group. Postural control of unipedal stance was not significantly altered following focal ankle joint cooling in groups both with and without CAI. Ankle joint cryotherapy was neither beneficial nor harmful to single leg balance. PMID:25468685

  18. Life impact of ankle fractures: Qualitative analysis of patient and clinician experiences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ankle fractures are one of the more commonly occurring forms of trauma managed by orthopaedic teams worldwide. The impacts of these injuries are not restricted to pain and disability caused at the time of the incident, but may also result in long term physical, psychological, and social consequences. There are currently no ankle fracture specific patient-reported outcome measures with a robust content foundation. This investigation aimed to develop a thematic conceptual framework of life impacts following ankle fracture from the experiences of people who have suffered ankle fractures as well as the health professionals who treat them. Methods A qualitative investigation was undertaken using in-depth semi-structured interviews with people (n=12) who had previously sustained an ankle fracture (patients) and health professionals (n=6) that treat people with ankle fractures. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Each phrase was individually coded and grouped in categories and aligned under emerging themes by two independent researchers. Results Saturation occurred after 10 in-depth patient interviews. Time since injury for patients ranged from 6 weeks to more than 2 years. Experience of health professionals ranged from 1 year to 16 years working with people with ankle fractures. Health professionals included an Orthopaedic surgeon (1), physiotherapists (3), a podiatrist (1) and an occupational therapist (1). The emerging framework derived from patient data included eight themes (Physical, Psychological, Daily Living, Social, Occupational and Domestic, Financial, Aesthetic and Medication Taking). Health professional responses did not reveal any additional themes, but tended to focus on physical and occupational themes. Conclusions The nature of life impact following ankle fractures can extend beyond short term pain and discomfort into many areas of life. The findings from this research have provided an empirically derived framework from which a

  19. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  20. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  1. The Effects of Sex, Joint Angle, and the Gastrocnemius Muscle on Passive Ankle Joint Complex Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    DeMont, Richard G.; Ryu, Keeho; Lephart, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of sex, joint angle, and the gastrocnemius muscle on passive ankle joint complex stiffness (JCS). Design and Setting: A repeated-measures design was employed using sex as a between-subjects factor and joint angle and inclusion of the gastrocnemius muscle as within-subject factors. All testing was conducted in a neuromuscular research laboratory. Subjects: Twelve female and 12 male healthy, physically active subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 years volunteered for participation in this study. The dominant leg was used for testing. No subjects had a history of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury or circulatory or neurologic disorders. Measurements: We determined passive ankle JCS by measuring resistance to passive dorsiflexion (5°·s−1) from 23° plantar flexion (PF) to 13° dorsiflexion (DF). Angular position and torque data were collected from a dynamometer under 2 conditions designed to include or reduce the contribution of the gastrocnemius muscle. Separate fourth-order polynomial equations relating angular position and torque were constructed for each trial. Stiffness values (Nm·degree−1) were calculated at 10° PF, neutral (NE), and 10° DF using the slope of the line at each respective position. Results: Significant condition-by-position and sex-by-position interactions and significant main effects for sex, position, and condition were revealed by a 3-way (sex-by-position, condition-by-position) analysis of variance. Post hoc analyses of the condition-by-position interaction revealed significantly higher stiffness values under the knee-straight condition compared with the knee-bent condition at both ankle NE and 10° DF. Within each condition, stiffness values at each position were significantly higher as the ankle moved into DF. Post hoc analysis of the sex-by-position interaction revealed significantly higher stiffness values at 10° DF in the male subjects. Post hoc analysis of the position main effect revealed

  2. EXACT: EXercise or Advice after ankle fraCTure. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ankle fractures are common. Management of ankle fractures generally involves a period of immobilisation followed by rehabilitation to reduce pain, stiffness, weakness and swelling. The effects of a rehabilitation program are still unclear. However, it has been shown that important components of rehabilitation programs may not confer additional benefits over exercise alone. The primary aim of this trial is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an exercise-based rehabilitation program after ankle fracture, compared to advice alone. Methods/Design A pragmatic randomised trial will be conducted. Participants will be 342 adults with stiff, painful ankles after ankle fracture treated with immobilisation. They will be randomly allocated using a concealed randomisation procedure to either an Advice or Rehabilitation group. Participants in the Advice group will receive verbal and written advice about exercise at the time of removal of immobilisation. Participants in the Rehabilitation group will be provided with a 4-week rehabilitation program that is designed, monitored and progressed by a physiotherapist, in addition to verbal and written advice. Outcomes will be measured by a blinded assessor at 1, 3 and 6 months. The primary outcomes will be activity limitation and quality-adjusted life years. Discussion This pragmatic trial will determine if a rehabilitation program reduces activity limitation and improves quality of life, compared to advice alone, after immobilisation for ankle fracture. PMID:21726463

  3. Intra-Articular Giant Synovial Osteochondroma: Case Reports of the Ankle and Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fornaciari, Paolo; Schai, Pascal A.; Niehaus, Richard; Exner, Ulrich G.

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of giant intra-articular osteochondromas (knee and ankle joint) are reported; pathologically they are rare representations of synovial chondromatosis. A 17-year-old man presented with a tumorous mass which had been localized in his left ankle for many years, increasing in volume during the last months. The lesion was removed by posteromedial ankle arthrotomy. The second case was observed in a 39-year-old woman with a slow-growing mass in her right knee joint. The lesion was removed from the Hoffa fat pad by open anteromedial arthrotomy. PMID:25785214

  4. Intra-articular giant synovial osteochondroma: case reports of the ankle and knee joint.

    PubMed

    Fornaciari, Paolo; Schai, Pascal A; Niehaus, Richard; Exner, Ulrich G

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of giant intra-articular osteochondromas (knee and ankle joint) are reported; pathologically they are rare representations of synovial chondromatosis. A 17-year-old man presented with a tumorous mass which had been localized in his left ankle for many years, increasing in volume during the last months. The lesion was removed by posteromedial ankle arthrotomy. The second case was observed in a 39-year-old woman with a slow-growing mass in her right knee joint. The lesion was removed from the Hoffa fat pad by open anteromedial arthrotomy. PMID:25785214

  5. The Costs of Operative Complications for Ankle Fractures: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; Grantham, W. Jeffrey; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Thakore, Rachel V.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Archer, Kristin R.; Obremskey, William T.; Mir, Hassan R.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2014-01-01

    As our healthcare system moves towards bundling payments, it is vital to understand the potential financial implications associated with treatment of surgical complications. Considering that surgical treatment of ankle fractures is common, there remains minimal data relating costs to postsurgical intervention. We aimed to identify costs associated with ankle fracture complications through case-control analysis. Using retrospective analysis at a level I trauma center, 28 patients with isolated ankle fractures who developed complications (cases) were matched with 28 isolated ankle fracture patients without complications (controls) based on ASA score, age, surgery type, and fracture type. Patient charts were reviewed for demographics and complications leading to readmission/reoperation and costs were obtained from the financial department. Wilcoxon tests measured differences in the costs between the cases and controls. 28 out of 439 patients (6.4%) developed complications. Length of stay and median costs were significantly higher for cases than controls. Specifically, differences in total costs existed for infection and hardware-related pain. This is the first study to highlight the considerable costs associated with the treatment of complications due to isolated ankle fractures. Physicians must therefore emphasize methods to control surgical and nonsurgical factors that may impact postoperative complications, especially under a global payment system. PMID:25525521

  6. Tillaux fracture of the ankle in an adult: a rare injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narinder; Prasad, Manish

    2014-01-01

    The Tillaux fracture of the ankle is an external rotation ankle injury resulting in an avulsion fracture of the anterolateral tibial plafond. This injury is known to occur in adolescents, although it has rarely been reported in adults. We report a case of a Tillaux fracture in an adult. A brief description of the history, mechanism of injury, required imaging, and treatment and other management options are provided in the present report. Anatomic reduction, rigid fixation, and early mobilization are emphasized to obtain a satisfactory functional outcome, shown by the long-term follow-up findings. PMID:25128312

  7. Fatigue Stress Fracture of the Talar Body: An Uncommon Cause of Ankle Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Kim, Jong Pil; Moon, Han Sol

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue stress fractures of the talus are rare and usually involve the head of the talus in military recruits. We report an uncommon cause of ankle pain due to a fatigue stress fracture of the body of the talus in a 32-year-old male social soccer player. Healing was achieved after weightbearing suppression for 6 weeks. Although rare, a stress fracture of the body of the talus should be considered in an athlete with a gradual onset of chronic ankle pain. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scan are useful tools for early diagnosis. PMID:26961416

  8. Diagnostic Ultrasonography of an Ankle Fracture Undetectable by Conventional Radiography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Clinton J.; Welk, Aaron B.; Enix, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present diagnostic ultrasonography assessment of an occult fracture in a case of persistent lateral ankle pain. Clinical Features A 35-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with bruising, swelling, and pain along the distal fibula 3 days following an inversion ankle trauma. Prior radiographic examination at an urgent care facility was negative for fracture. Conservative care over the next week noted improvement in objective findings, but the pain persisted. Intervention and Outcome Diagnostic ultrasonography was ordered to assess her persistent ankle pain and showed a minimally displaced fracture of the fibula 4 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus. The patient was referred to her primary care physician and successfully managed with conservative care. Conclusion In this case, diagnostic ultrasonography was able to identify a Danis-Weber subtype B1 fracture that was missed by plain film radiography. PMID:27069430

  9. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle Joint: Clinical, Radiological, and Intraoperative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Choudry, Q.; Garg, S.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis, also termed synovial osteochondromatosis, is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium of the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most commonly involves large joints, such as the knee, hip, and shoulder, but its presence in smaller joints has also been reported. Nevertheless, ankle involvement is unusual. The diagnosis is commonly made following a thorough history, clinical, physical, and radiographic examination. We report a case of a young patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint and present the clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative findings. PMID:26177002

  10. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle Joint: Clinical, Radiological, and Intraoperative Findings.

    PubMed

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Choudry, Q; Garg, S

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis, also termed synovial osteochondromatosis, is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium of the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most commonly involves large joints, such as the knee, hip, and shoulder, but its presence in smaller joints has also been reported. Nevertheless, ankle involvement is unusual. The diagnosis is commonly made following a thorough history, clinical, physical, and radiographic examination. We report a case of a young patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint and present the clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative findings. PMID:26177002

  11. Design and simulation of a cable-pulley-based transmission for artificial ankle joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaxin; Ceccarelli, Marco; Huang, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a mechanical transmission based on cable pulley is proposed for human-like actuation in the artificial ankle joints of human-scale. The anatomy articular characteristics of the human ankle is discussed for proper biomimetic inspiration in designing an accurate, efficient, and robust motion control of artificial ankle joint devices. The design procedure is presented through the inclusion of conceptual considerations and design details for an interactive solution of the transmission system. A mechanical design is elaborated for the ankle joint angular with pitch motion. A multi-body dynamic simulation model is elaborated accordingly and evaluated numerically in the ADAMS environment. Results of the numerical simulations are discussed to evaluate the dynamic performance of the proposed design solution and to investigate the feasibility of the proposed design in future applications for humanoid robots.

  12. Design and simulation of a cable-pulley-based transmission for artificial ankle joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaxin; Ceccarelli, Marco; Huang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a mechanical transmission based on cable pulley is proposed for human-like actuation in the artificial ankle joints of human-scale. The anatomy articular characteristics of the human ankle is discussed for proper biomimetic inspiration in designing an accurate, efficient, and robust motion control of artificial ankle joint devices. The design procedure is presented through the inclusion of conceptual considerations and design details for an interactive solution of the transmission system. A mechanical design is elaborated for the ankle joint angular with pitch motion. A multi-body dynamic simulation model is elaborated accordingly and evaluated numerically in the ADAMS environment. Results of the numerical simulations are discussed to evaluate the dynamic performance of the proposed design solution and to investigate the feasibility of the proposed design in future applications for humanoid robots.

  13. The effects of axial preload and dorsiflexion on the tolerance of the ankle/subtalar joint to dynamic inversion and eversion.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Srinivasan, Sreebala C M; Crandall, Jeff R; Khaewpong, Nopporn; Eppinger, Rolf H; Jaffredo, Anna S; Potier, Pascal; Petit, Philippe Y

    2002-11-01

    Forced inversion or eversion of the foot is considered a common mechanism of ankle injury in vehicle crashes. The objective of this study was to model empirically the injury tolerance of the human ankle/subtalar joint to dynamic inversion and eversion under three different loading conditions: neutral flexion with no axial preload, neutral flexion with 2 kN axial preload, and 30 degrees of dorsiflexion with 2 kN axial preload. 44 tests were conducted on cadaveric lower limbs, with injury occurring in 30 specimens. Common injuries included malleolar fractures, osteochondral fractures of the talus, fractures of the lateral process of the talus, and collateral ligament tears, depending on the loading configuration. The time of injury was determined either by the peak ankle moment or by a sudden drop in ankle moment that was accompanied by a burst of acoustic emission. Characteristic moment-angle curves to injury were generated for each loading configuration. Neutrally flexed ankles with no applied axial preload sustained injury at 21 +/- 5 Nm and 38 degrees +/- 8 degrees in inversion, and 47 +/- 21 Nm and 28 degrees +/- 4 degrees in eversion. For ankles tested in neutral flexion with 2 kN of axial preload, inversion failure occurred at 77 +/- 27 Nm and 40 degrees +/- 12 degrees , and eversion failure occurred at 142 +/- 100 Nm and 41 degrees +/- 14 degrees . Ankles dorsiflexed 30 degrees and axially preloaded to 2 kN sustained inversion injury at 62 +/- 31 Nm and 33 degrees +/- 4 degrees , and eversion injury at 140 +/- 53 Nm and 40 degrees +/- 6 degrees . Survival analyses were performed to generate injury risk curves in terms of joint moment and rotation angle. PMID:17096228

  14. Online estimation algorithm for a biaxial ankle kinematic model with configuration dependent joint axes.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Y H; Xie, S Q

    2011-02-01

    The kinematics of the human ankle is commonly modeled as a biaxial hinge joint model. However, significant variations in axis orientations have been found between different individuals and also between different foot configurations. For ankle rehabilitation robots, information regarding the ankle kinematic parameters can be used to estimate the ankle and subtalar joint displacements. This can in turn be used as auxiliary variables in adaptive control schemes to allow modification of the robot stiffness and damping parameters to reduce the forces applied at stiffer foot configurations. Due to the large variations observed in the ankle kinematic parameters, an online identification algorithm is required to provide estimates of the model parameters. An online parameter estimation routine based on the recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm was therefore developed in this research. An extension of the conventional biaxial ankle kinematic model, which allows variation in axis orientations with different foot configurations had also been developed and utilized in the estimation algorithm. Simulation results showed that use of the extended model in the online algorithm is effective in capturing the foot orientation of a biaxial ankle model with variable joint axis orientations. Experimental results had also shown that a modified RLS algorithm that penalizes a deviation of model parameters from their nominal values can be used to obtain more realistic parameter estimates while maintaining a level of estimation accuracy comparable to that of the conventional RLS routine. PMID:21280877

  15. Ankle Bracing and the Neuromuscular Factors Influencing Joint Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, Steven M; Granata, Kevin P; Shultz, Sandra J; Gansneder, Bruce M

    2009-01-01

    Context: Health care professionals commonly prescribe external stabilization to decrease the incidence and severity of ankle sprains. The mechanism for this decrease is not clearly understood. Examining the effects of ankle bracing on biomechanical stability and influencing factors may provide important information regarding the neuromuscular effects of bracing. Objective: To study the effects of 2 different ankle braces on the neuromuscular factors influencing ankle stiffness. Design: Mixed-model repeated-measures design. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-eight physically active participants composing 2 groups: 14 with unilateral functional ankle instability (age  =  26.19 ± 6.46 years, height  =  166.07 ± 12.90 cm, mass  =  69.90 ± 13.46 kg) and 14 with bilaterally stable ankles (age  =  23.76 ± 5.82 years, height  =  174.00 ± 11.67 cm, mass  =  68.60 ± 13.12 kg). Intervention(s): Participants were fitted with surface electromyography electrodes over the peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, tibialis anterior, and soleus muscles. Each participant received transient motion oscillations to his or her ankle on a custom-built medial-lateral swaying cradle in each of 3 conditions: no ankle brace (NB), lace-up brace (LU), and semirigid brace (SR). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle stiffness as measured by the cradle and preactivation levels (percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction) of the 4 test muscles. Results: Stiffness levels increased across brace conditions (NB  =  24.79 ± 6.59 Nm/rad, LU  =  28.29 ± 7.05 Nm/rad, SR  =  33.22 ± 8.78 Nm/rad; F2,52  =  66.185, P < .001). No differences were found between groups for rotational stiffness (stable  =  27.36 ± 6.17 Nm/rad, unstable  =  30.18 ± 8.21 Nm/rad; F1,26  =  1.084, P  =  .307). Preactivation levels did not change for any of the tested muscles with the application of an ankle brace (F2,52  =  1.326, P

  16. Arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1A ankle Fractures in Children: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of growth arrest following paediatric ankle fractures type 1 A is very high. Therefore all attempts should be done to anatomically reduce this kind of fracture. The advances in ankle arthroscopy have brought the possibility to reduce these fractures under direct vision, without the need of capsulotomy. The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance of the use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures. Case Report: We describe two cases with SH type IV fractures of the distal medial tibia, one treated with open reduction and percutaneous screw fixation and the other treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation. The first case ended with severe growth disturbance, while the second gave a very good result. Conclusion: The use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures should be considered to ensure anatomical reduction. PMID:27298899

  17. Analysis of minor fractures associated with joints and faulted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Kenneth M.; Zhao, Guozhu; Johnson, Arvid M.

    In this paper, we use fracture mechanics to interpret conditions responsible for secondary cracks that adorn joints and faulted joints in the Entrada Sandstone in Arches National Park, U.S.A. Because the joints in most places accommodated shearing offsets of a few mm to perhaps 1 dm, and thus became faulted joints, some of the minor cracks are due to faulting. However, in a few places where the shearing was zero, one can examine minor cracks due solely to interaction of joint segments at the time they formed. We recognize several types of minor cracks associated with subsequent faulting of the joints. One is the kink, a crack that occurs at the termination of a straight joint and whose trend is abruptly different from that of the joint. Kinks are common and should be studied because they contain a great deal of information about conditions during fracturing. The sense of kinking indicates the sense of shear during faulting: a kink that turns clockwise with respect to the direction of the main joint is a result of right-lateral shear, and a kink that turns counterclockwise is a result of left-lateral shear. Furthermore, the kink angle is related to the ratio of the shear stress responsible for the kinking to the normal stress responsible for the opening of the joint. The amount of opening of a joint at the time it faulted or even at the time the joint itself formed can be estimated by measuring the kink angle and the amount of strike-slip at some point along the faulted joint. Other fractures that form near terminations of pre-existing joints in response to shearing along the joint are horsetail fractures. Similar short fractures can occur anywhere along the length of the joints. The primary value in recognizing these fractures is that they indicate the sense of faulting accommodated by the host fracture and the direction of maximum tension. Even where there has been insignificant regional shearing in the Garden Area, the joints can have ornate terminations. Perhaps

  18. Ibuprofen in the treatment of acute ankle joint injuries. A double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Fredberg, U; Hansen, P A; Skinhøj, A

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-eight patients who presented to the casualty ward with acute ankle joint injuries were studied to examine the effect of ibuprofen on pain and ankle swelling. Thirty-two patients were treated with placebo tablets and 36 with 600 mg ibuprofen tablets taken four times a day for 4 to 6 days. All of the patients were immobilized and requested to keep the foot elevated. The results showed that ibuprofen had no effect on the ankle swelling. The need for additional analgesics was not influenced by treatment with ibuprofen, which means that ibuprofen has no effect on pain. The time elapsed from occurrence of the injury to arrival at the casualty ward was negatively correlated to the reduction of ankle joint swelling during the treatment period. Treatment with ice-sprays, icebags, or cold water during the acute stage of injury did not influence the reduction of swelling during the treatment period. PMID:2675651

  19. Associations between static and functional measures of joint function in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, James S; Connolly, John E; Beach, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians have traditionally assessed range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal and ankle joints in a static position. It is unclear, however, if these measurements accurately reflect functional sagittal plane limitations of these joints during gait. For 50 patients (100 feet), we assessed available dorsiflexion at the first metatarsophalangeal and ankle joints, as well as the presence of pinch callus. We then compared these findings with 11 functional gait parameters, as measured using a pressure sensor system. After adjusting for age, weight, smoking status, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insensitivity to monofilament, we found that patients with pinch callus demonstrated statistically significant compensatory gait patterns in 7 of 11 measures. Hallux limitus and equinus patients demonstrated six and three statistically significant associations, respectively. Pinch callus seems to be as predictive of functional gait alterations as static first metatarsophalangeal joint and ankle dorsiflexion. PMID:15547120

  20. Tendon entrapments and dislocations in ankle and hindfoot fractures: evaluation with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Campbell, Kevin J; Blanton, Lee E; Williams, Jason T; Sangster, Guillermo; Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations associated with ankle and hindfoot fractures in patients studied by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Additionally, we describe particular tendon injuries associated with specific fractures. This was a retrospective review of all individuals with a trauma-protocol CT for suspected ankle and/or hindfoot fractures during a consecutive 41-month time period at a single Level I Trauma Center. Each patient's images were evaluated by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon for tendon entrapment, tendon dislocation, and bone(s) fractured or dislocated. There were 398 patients with ankle and/or hindfoot fractures that showed tendon entrapment or dislocation in 64 (16.1 %) patients. There were 30 (46.9 %) patients with 40 tendon entrapments, 31 (48.4 %) patients with 59 tendon dislocations, and three (4.7 %) patients with both tendon entrapment and dislocation. All patients with tendon entrapments were seen with either pilon fractures and/or a combination of posterior, medial, or lateral malleolar fractures. The most frequently entrapped tendon was the posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) in 27 patients (27/30, 90.0 %). The peroneal tendons were the most frequently dislocated, representing 27 (87.1 %) of patients with tendon dislocation; all resulted from a talar or calcaneal fracture or subluxation. This study demonstrates that tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations are commonly seen in complex fractures of the ankle and hindfoot. Pilon fractures were associated with the majority of tendon entrapments, whereas calcaneus fractures were associated with the majority of tendon dislocations. PMID:27234977

  1. The unexpected with ankle fracture: traumatic tibialis posterior tendon dislocation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Al Khudairy, A; Zafar, M M; Padinjarathala, B A

    2013-12-01

    Traumatic dislocation of tibialis posterior is infrequently reported in the literature. It is rare but potential cause of persistent pain that can be easily missed. Concomitant ankle fracture may obscure the clinical picture and if unsuspected, consequences such as iatrogenic injury to tibialis posterior tendon while fixing the medial malleolus may occur. We report our experience in the management of a tibialis posterior tendon dislocation associated with ankle fracture. A review of all English literature had been carried with a focus on treatment options. PMID:24026087

  2. Ankle Joint Angle and Lower Leg Musculotendinous Unit Responses to Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akehi, Kazuma; Long, Blaine C; Warren, Aric J; Goad, Carla L

    2016-09-01

    Akehi, K, Long, BC, Warren, AJ, and Goad, CL. Ankle joint angle and lower leg musculotendinous unit responses to cryotherapy. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2482-2492, 2016-The use of cold application has been debated for its influence on joint range of motion (ROM) and stiffness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute ice bag application to the plantarflexor muscles or ankle influences passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM and lower leg musculotendinous stiffness (MTS). Thirty-five recreationally active college-aged individuals with no history of lower leg injury 6 months before data collection volunteered. On each testing day, we measured maximum passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM (°) and plantarflexor torque (N·m) on an isokinetic dynamometer to calculate the passive plantarflexor MTS (N·m per degree) at 4 joint angles before, during, and after a treatment. Surface electromyography amplitudes (μV), and skin surface and ambient air temperature (°C) were also measured. Subjects received an ice bag to the posterior lower leg, ankle joint, or nothing for 30 minutes in different days. Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle did not influence passive ROM (F(12,396) = 0.67, p = 0.78). Passive torque increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.21, p = 0.011). Passive MTS at the initial joint angle increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.14, p = 0.014) but not at the other joint angles (p > 0.05). Surface electromyography amplitudes for gastrocnemius and soleus muscles increased after ice application to the lower leg (F(2,66) = 5.61, p = 0.006; F(12,396) = 3.60, p < 0.001). Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle joint does not alter passive dorsiflexion ROM but increases passive ankle plantarflexor torque in addition to passive ankle plantarflexor MTS at the initial joint angle. PMID:26863585

  3. Identification of the contribution of the ankle and hip joints to multi-segmental balance control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human stance involves multiple segments, including the legs and trunk, and requires coordinated actions of both. A novel method was developed that reliably estimates the contribution of the left and right leg (i.e., the ankle and hip joints) to the balance control of individual subjects. Methods The method was evaluated using simulations of a double-inverted pendulum model and the applicability was demonstrated with an experiment with seven healthy and one Parkinsonian participant. Model simulations indicated that two perturbations are required to reliably estimate the dynamics of a double-inverted pendulum balance control system. In the experiment, two multisine perturbation signals were applied simultaneously. The balance control system dynamic behaviour of the participants was estimated by Frequency Response Functions (FRFs), which relate ankle and hip joint angles to joint torques, using a multivariate closed-loop system identification technique. Results In the model simulations, the FRFs were reliably estimated, also in the presence of realistic levels of noise. In the experiment, the participants responded consistently to the perturbations, indicated by low noise-to-signal ratios of the ankle angle (0.24), hip angle (0.28), ankle torque (0.07), and hip torque (0.33). The developed method could detect that the Parkinson patient controlled his balance asymmetrically, that is, the right ankle and hip joints produced more corrective torque. Conclusion The method allows for a reliable estimate of the multisegmental feedback mechanism that stabilizes stance, of individual participants and of separate legs. PMID:23433148

  4. The perils of spinning class: an open ankle fracture following a spinning exercise session.

    PubMed

    Butler, Daniel P; Henry, Francis P; Ghali, Shadi

    2013-12-01

    Spinning is an increasingly popular form of cycle-based exercise. The workouts are often of high-intensity and participants are intermittently encouraged to achieve a high crank-set-cadence rate. We report a unique case of an open ankle fracture requiring free flap coverage, which highlights the potential perils of spinning class. PMID:23773931

  5. Ankle rehabilitation device with two degrees of freedom and compliant joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu (Cazacu, C.-M.; Doroftei, I.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a rehabilitation device that we intend to be low cost and easy to manufacture. The system will ensure functionality but also have a small dimensions and low mass, considering the physiological dimensions of the foot and lower leg. To avoid injure of the ankle joint, this device is equipped with a compliant joint between the motor and mechanical transmission. The torque of this joint is intended to be adjustable, according to the degree of ankle joint damage. To choose the material and the dimensions of this compliant joint, in this paper we perform the first stress simulation. The minimum torque is calculated, while the maximum torque is given by the preliminary chosen actuator.

  6. Estimation of ligament strains and joint moments in the ankle during a supination sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Kai-Ming; Haut, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the ankle ligament strains and ankle joint moments during an accidental injury event diagnosed as a grade I anterior talofibular ligament (ATaFL) sprain. A male athlete accidentally sprained his ankle while performing a cutting motion in a laboratory setting. The kinematic data were input to a three-dimensional rigid-body foot model for simulation analyses. Maximum strains in 20 ligaments were evaluated in simulations that investigated various combinations of the reported ankle joint motions. Temporal strains in the ATaFL and the calcaneofibular ligament (CaFL) were then compared and the three-dimensional ankle joint moments were evaluated from the model. The ATaFL and CaFL were highly strained when the inversion motion was simulated (10% for ATaFL and 12% for CaFL). These ligament strains were increased significantly when either or both plantarflexion and internal rotation motions were added in a temporal fashion (up to 20% for ATaFL and 16% for CaFL). Interestingly, at the time strain peaked in the ATaFL, the plantarflexion angle was not large but apparently important. This computational simulation study suggested that an inversion moment of approximately 23 N m plus an internal rotation moment of approximately 11 N m and a small plantarflexion moment may have generated a strain of 15-20% in the ATaFL to produce a grade I ligament injury in the athlete's ankle. This injury simulation study exhibited the potentially important roles of plantarflexion and internal rotation, when combined with a large inversion motion, to produce a grade I ATaFL injury in the ankle of this athlete. PMID:23654290

  7. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases. PMID:16224109

  8. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c) Weakened... the purpose of rating disability from arthritis, the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle...

  9. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c) Weakened... the purpose of rating disability from arthritis, the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle...

  10. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c) Weakened... the purpose of rating disability from arthritis, the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle...

  11. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c) Weakened... the purpose of rating disability from arthritis, the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle...

  12. Effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, R.I.; Coradini, J.G.; Silva, L.I.; Bertolini, G.R.F.; Brancalhão, R.M.C.; Ribeiro, L.F.C.

    2014-01-01

    A sprained ankle is a common musculoskeletal sports injury and it is often treated by immobilization of the joint. Despite the beneficial effects of this therapeutic measure, the high prevalence of residual symptoms affects the quality of life, and remobilization of the joint can reverse this situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint of Wistar rats. Eighteen male rats had their right hindlimb immobilized for 15 days, and were divided into the following groups: G1, immobilized; G2, remobilized freely for 14 days; and G3, remobilized by swimming and jumping in water for 14 days, performed on alternate days, with progression of time and a series of exercises. The contralateral limb was the control. After the experimental period, the ankle joints were processed for microscopic analysis. Histomorphometry did not show any significant differences between the control and immobilized/remobilized groups and members, in terms of number of chondrocytes and thickness of the articular cartilage of the tibia and talus. Morphological analysis of animals from G1 showed significant degenerative lesions in the talus, such as exposure of the subchondral bone, flocculation, and cracks between the anterior and mid-regions of the articular cartilage and the synovial membrane. Remobilization by therapeutic exercise in water led to recovery in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the ankle joint when compared with free remobilization, and it was shown to be an effective therapeutic measure in the recovery of the ankle joint. PMID:25140815

  13. Effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kunz, R I; Coradini, J G; Silva, L I; Bertolini, G R F; Brancalhão, R M C; Ribeiro, L F C

    2014-10-01

    A sprained ankle is a common musculoskeletal sports injury and it is often treated by immobilization of the joint. Despite the beneficial effects of this therapeutic measure, the high prevalence of residual symptoms affects the quality of life, and remobilization of the joint can reverse this situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint of Wistar rats. Eighteen male rats had their right hindlimb immobilized for 15 days, and were divided into the following groups: G1, immobilized; G2, remobilized freely for 14 days; and G3, remobilized by swimming and jumping in water for 14 days, performed on alternate days, with progression of time and a series of exercises. The contralateral limb was the control. After the experimental period, the ankle joints were processed for microscopic analysis. Histomorphometry did not show any significant differences between the control and immobilized/remobilized groups and members, in terms of number of chondrocytes and thickness of the articular cartilage of the tibia and talus. Morphological analysis of animals from G1 showed significant degenerative lesions in the talus, such as exposure of the subchondral bone, flocculation, and cracks between the anterior and mid-regions of the articular cartilage and the synovial membrane. Remobilization by therapeutic exercise in water led to recovery in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the ankle joint when compared with free remobilization, and it was shown to be an effective therapeutic measure in the recovery of the ankle joint. PMID:25140815

  14. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations. PMID:25442161

  15. Ankle fracture configuration following treatment with and without arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation

    PubMed Central

    Angthong, Chayanin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report ankle fracture configurations and bone quality following arthroscopic-assisted reduction and internal-fixation (ARIF) or open reduction and internal-fixation (ORIF). METHODS: The patients of ARIF (n = 16) or ORIF (n = 29) to treat unstable ankle fracture between 2006 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Baseline data, including age, sex, type of injury, immediate postoperative fracture configuration (assessed on X-rays and graded by widest gap and largest step-off of any intra-articular site), bone quality [assessed with bone mineral density (BMD) testing] and arthritic changes on X-rays following surgical treatments were recorded for each group. RESULTS: Immediate-postoperative fracture configurations did not differ significantly between the ARIF and ORIF groups. There were anatomic alignments as 8 (50%) and 8 (27.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.539) respectively. There were acceptable alignments as 12 (75%) and 17 (58.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.341) respectively. The arthritic changes in follow-up period as at least 16 wk following the surgeries were shown as 6 (75%) and 10 (83.3%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.300) respectively. Significantly more BMD tests were performed in patients aged > 60 years (P < 0.001), ARIF patients (P = 0.021), and female patients (P = 0.029). There was no significant difference in BMD test t scores between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Ankle fracture configurations following surgeries are similar between ARIF and ORIF groups, suggesting that ARIF is not superior to ORIF in treatment of unstable ankle fractures. PMID:27114933

  16. Effects of Strength Training on Strength Development and Joint Position Sense in Functionally Unstable Ankles

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Carrie L.; Moore, Josef H.; Arnold, Brent L.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of ankle-strengthening exercises on joint position sense and strength development in subjects with functionally unstable ankles. Design and Setting: Subjects were randomly assigned to a training or control group. The training group participated in a 6-week strength-training protocol using rubber tubing 3 times a week throughout the training period. The control group did not participate in the strength-training protocol. Subjects: Twenty healthy college students (10 females, 10 males, age = 20.6 ± 2.23 years; ht = 176.40 ± 7.14 cm; wt = 74.18 ± 10.17 kg) with a history of functional ankle instability volunteered to participate in this study. Measurements: We pretested and posttested dorsiflexor and evertor isometric strength with a handheld dynamometer and collected joint position sense (JPS) data at 20° for inversion and plantar flexion and at 10° for eversion and dorsiflexion. Results: Statistical tests for strength and JPS revealed significant group-by-time interactions for dorsiflexion strength, eversion strength, inversion JPS, and plantar flexion JPS. Simple main-effects testing revealed improvements in training group strength and JPS at posttesting. There were no significant effects for eversion JPS, but the group main effect for dorsiflexion JPS was significant, with the experimental group having better scores than the control group. Conclusions: Ankle-strengthening exercises improved strength, inversion JPS, dorsiflexion JPS, and plantar flexion JPS in subjects with functionally unstable ankles. Imagesp311-a PMID:16558526

  17. Quadruple-component superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap: A chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction of an exposed artificial joint after total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Saito, Takafumi; Ishiura, Ryohei; Iida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is becoming popular in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ankle joint degeneration. However, ankle wound complications can occur after TAA, which sometimes requires challenging reconstruction due to anatomical complexity of the ankle. Superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) perforator (SCIP) flap has been reported to be useful for various reconstructions, but no case has been reported regarding a chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction. We report a case of complex ankle defect successfully reconstructed with a free quadruple-component chimeric SCIP flap. A 73-year-old female patient with RA underwent TAA, and suffered from an extensive ankle soft tissue defect (13 × 5 cm) with exposure of the implanted artificial joint and the extensor tendons. A chimeric SCIP flap was raised based on the deep branch and the superficial branch of the SCIA, which included chimeric portions of the sartorius muscle, the deep fascia, the inguinal lymph node (ILN), and the skin/fat. The flap was transferred to the recipient ankle. The sartorius muscle was used to cover the artificial joint, the deep fascia to reconstruct the extensor retinaculum, the ILN to prevent postoperative lymphedema, and the adiposal tissue to put around the extensor tendons for prevention of postoperative adhesion. Postoperatively, the patient could walk by herself without persistent leg edema or bowstringing of the extensor tendons, and was satisfied with the concealable donor scar. Although further studies are required to confirm efficacy, multicomponent chimeric SCIP has a potential to be a useful option for complex defects of the ankle. PMID:27423250

  18. Open Axial and True Vertical Ankle Dislocation Without Malleolar Fractures: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Kapil

    2016-01-01

    Tibiotalar dislocation is rare and usually associated with a high-velocity, high-energy impact or extreme sporting injuries. I describe complete tibiotalar dislocation from an unusual mechanism. A 22-year-old mechanic was sitting under a hydraulic lift when it began to leak, lowering the engine on which he was working onto his right lower thigh. This heavy load, without rotational force or high-velocity impact, was transmitted down his foreleg. Because his foot was fixed to the ground, the talus was proximally and vertically displaced, and the distal tibia was forced to the ground, beside his foot, and was contaminated with sand and grease. The circumferential ligament complexes and capsule were completely transected, but, despite a severely disrupted dorsal and capsular blood supply, talar vasculature remained adequate. In the emergency department, gentle traction restored impaired circulation. No malleolar fractures were seen. The wound was meticulously irrigated with saline and povidone-iodine and debrided. Cefepime, 2 g, was given twice daily. In surgery, the unstable joint was transfixed with two thick Kirschner wires, passed retrograde. Interrupted sutures were placed in the anterior capsule and anterior third of the lateral ligament without additional incisions. The wound healed aseptically. The Kirschner wires were removed at 6 weeks. The joint space was only minimally reduced. He returned to work after 4 months. His ankle-hindfoot score was 90/100 at 18 months, he could jog at 24 months, and he was still asymptomatic at 36 months. The case illustrates the importance of preserving talar circulation and treatment within the "golden hour." PMID:25524434

  19. Irreducible Fracture-Dislocation of the Ankle Associated With Interposition of the Tibialis Posterior Tendon in the Syndesmosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Jean-Simon; Laflamme, Melissa; Penner, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Although ankle fracture-dislocations are common orthopedic injuries, it is very uncommon for them to be irreducible, and such cases require special attention. We report the case of a closed fracture-dislocation of the ankle in a 17-year-old male that required 3 surgeries because of persistent anterior subluxation of the talus on the postoperative radiographs. After advanced radiologic investigations, tibialis posterior tendon interposition in the syndesmosis was identified as the cause of the subluxation. This is a very rare event, reported in only 5 patients in published studies. Once the diagnosis was identified by magnetic resonance imaging, the tendon was relocated to its anatomic position, and the tibiofibular and tibiotalar joints were reduced adequately. The patient was then able to regain a satisfactory level of function many months after the initial trauma. PMID:24846161

  20. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Cairns, Benjamin J; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996-2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2-2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4-5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5-7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites. PMID:22465850

  1. Comparative study of therapies for fibular ligament rupture of the lateral ankle joint in competitive basketball players.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Höher, J; Tiling, T

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study compares the results of different therapies for fibular ligament rupture in a homogenous group of professional athletes. The endpoint "competitive sports" was an outcome consideration. Subjects were examined by means of a standardized questionnaire and a structured interview. One hundred and seventy-nine of the questionnaires were completed and returned for evaluation. All of the basketball players with severe ankle sprain (supination trauma with swelling, pain, and inability to bear stress) were included. Those players with fractures of the foot, pronation trauma, or additional distal fibula or tibia fractures were excluded from this study. Of the 179 basketball players 160 (89%) had suffered severe ankle sprain. The treatment was divided into three groups: primary surgery (N = 35), plaster cast (N = 39), and functional treatment (N = 89). While simple ligament injuries (Grade I and II) were mostly treated functionally, complex ligament injuries (Grade III) were usually operated on. A total of 119 (74%) of the players reported no further pain. For pain reduction surgical and functional treatments showed advantages over plaster treatment. In the surgical group 63% of the players judged their regained stability to be equivalent to that of their healthy leg. Only 50% of the players in the plaster and functional groups believed their ankle joints to have regained the same stability as before their injuries. Despite the achievement of good results through surgery, there were clear differences in the players' assessments of their performance in competitive sports. Most subjects (92%) did not have any problems in everyday life regardless of which kind of therapy had been chosen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8406246

  2. Functional Comparison of Immediate and Late Weight Bearing after Ankle Bimalleolar Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ağır, İsmail; Tunçer, Nejat; Küçükdurmaz, Fatih; Gümüstaş, Seyitali; Akgül, Esra Demirel; Akpinar, Fuat

    2015-01-01

    Aim : The aim of the study is to compare immediate weight bearing with below-knee cast or immobilization with plaster splint in 6 weeks in patients after operative treatment for ankle bimalleolar fractures. Methods : Fifty-three patients with ankle bimalleolar fractures were treated operatively in 2005 to 2010 and then were randomly allocated to two groups. Immediately weight bearing in a below-knee cast (26 patients) and immobilization in a plaster splint for the first six postoperative weeks (27 patients). A mean age 37.9 (min 17; max 72). An average follow-up 26.1 months. (min 14; max 55). All fractures were classified with Lauge-Hansen classification. Functional results of both groups were evaluated with AOFAS for the postoperative one year after surgical treatment. Results : According to the AOFAS scoring system, results were excellent and good in 17 patients in group 1. On the other hand, results were excellent and good in 14 patients in group 2. Conclusion : As a result we think that weight bearing protocol should be advantaged for patients with ankle bimalleolar fractures after surgical treatment immediately. PMID:26069513

  3. Ankle Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... intense you're unable to walk on the ankle? Yes You may have a FRACTURE or a severe SPRAIN. Don't walk on the injured foot. Raise the leg and place ice on the swollen area. See your doctor promptly. No ... but you're still able to walk on the ankle? Yes You may have a SPRAINED ANKLE, or ...

  4. Management of chronic ankle pain using joint mobilization and ASTYM® treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Slaven, Emily J; Mathers, Jessie

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of ankle sprains predominately focuses on the acute management of this condition; less emphasis is placed on the treatment of ankle sprains in the chronic phase of recovery. Manual therapy, in the form of joint mobilization and manipulation, has been shown to be effective in the management of this condition, but the combination of joint mobilization and manipulation in tandem with ASTYM® treatment has not been explored. The purpose of this case report is to chronicle the management of a patient with chronic ankle pain who was treated with manual therapy including manipulation and ASTYM treatment. As a result of a fall down stairs 6 months previously, the patient sustained a severe ankle sprain. The soft tissue damage was accompanied by bony disruptions which warranted the patient spending 3 weeks in a walking boot. At the initial evaluation, the patient reported difficulty with descending stairs reciprocally and not being able to run more than 4 minutes on the treadmill before the pain escalated to the level that she had to stop running. After five sessions of therapy consisting of joint mobilization, manipulation and ASTYM, the patient was able to descend stairs and run 40 minutes without pain. PMID:22547921

  5. Factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Nobumasa; Shoji, Morio; Kitagawa, Takashi; Terada, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Increased plantar pressure during walking is a risk factor for foot ulcers because of reduced range of motion at the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints. However, the range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis has not yet been determined. A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy feet of 35 patients receiving hemodialysis therapy were examined. Measurements included the passive range of motion of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint, and flexion and extension of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. [Results] Hemodialysis duration was not associated with ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Diabetes duration was significantly associated with limited ankle joint mobility. Finally, blood hemoglobin levels, body mass index, and age were associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion. [Conclusion] The present study identified age, diabetes, and decreased physical activity, but not hemodialysis duration, to be risk factors for limited joint mobility of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:27313371

  6. Foot and ankle compression improves joint position sense but not bipedal stance in older people.

    PubMed

    Hijmans, Juha M; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Geertzen, Jan H B; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of foot and ankle compression on joint position sense (JPS) and balance in older people and young adults. 12 independently living healthy older persons (77-93 years) were recruited from a senior accommodation facility. 15 young adults (19-24 years) also participated. Compression was applied at the ankles and feet using medical compression hosiery. The mean velocity of the centre of pressure (CoP) displacements and the root mean square of the CoP velocity in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions, were measured with a foot pressure plate. In older people, ankle compression was associated with an improvement of JPS towards normal values. However, a concurrent deterioration of their balance was found. In young adults compression had no effect on either JPS or balance. PMID:19019679

  7. Examination of knee joint moments on the function of knee-ankle-foot orthoses during walking.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Kooy, John

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate clinically relevant biomechanical conditions relating to the setup and alignment of knee-ankle-foot orthoses and the influence of these conditions on knee extension moments and orthotic stance control during gait. Knee moments were collected using an instrumented gait laboratory and concurrently a load transducer embedded at the knee-ankle-foot orthosis knee joint of four individuals with poliomyelitis. We found that knee extension moments were not typically produced in late stance-phase of gait. Adding a dorsiflexion stop at the orthotic ankle significantly decreased the knee flexion moments in late stance-phase, while slightly flexing the knee in stance-phase had a variable effect. The findings suggest that where users of orthoses have problems initiating swing-phase flexion with stance control orthoses, an ankle dorsiflexion stop may be used to enhance function. Furthermore, the use of stance control knee joints that lock while under flexion may contribute to more inconsistent unlocking of the stance control orthosis during gait. PMID:23182738

  8. Unilateral Adolescent Pes Planus After a Bimalleolar Ankle Fracture: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Staton L; Williams, Daniel; Jeyaseelan, Luckshmana; Bryce, Elaine; Alyas, Faisal; Vemulapalli, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old female who presented with unilateral pes planus 30 months after a bimalleolar ankle fracture dislocation. At surgery, the tibialis posterior tendon was encased in fracture callus within the syndesmosis and required reconstruction using flexor digitorum longus transfer. Dislocation of the tibialis posterior tendon and entrapment within the tibiofibular syndesmosis has been previously reported. To our knowledge, this is the first case report tibialis posterior tendon syndesmotic entrapment presenting with unilateral pes planus. PMID:25648274

  9. Effects of changing speed on knee and ankle joint load during walking and running.

    PubMed

    de David, Ana Cristina; Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Joint moments can be used as an indicator of joint loading and have potential application for sports performance and injury prevention. The effects of changing walking and running speeds on joint moments for the different planes of motion still are debatable. Here, we compared knee and ankle moments during walking and running at different speeds. Data were collected from 11 recreational male runners to determine knee and ankle joint moments during different conditions. Conditions include walking at a comfortable speed (self-selected pacing), fast walking (fastest speed possible), slow running (speed corresponding to 30% slower than running) and running (at 4 m · s(-1) ± 10%). A different joint moment pattern was observed between walking and running. We observed a general increase in joint load for sagittal and frontal planes as speed increased, while the effects of speed were not clear in the transverse plane moments. Although differences tend to be more pronounced when gait changed from walking to running, the peak moments, in general, increased when speed increased from comfortable walking to fast walking and from slow running to running mainly in the sagittal and frontal planes. Knee flexion moment was higher in walking than in running due to larger knee extension. Results suggest caution when recommending walking over running in an attempt to reduce knee joint loading. The different effects of speed increments during walking and running should be considered with regard to the prevention of injuries and for rehabilitation purposes. PMID:25105739

  10. Does ankle joint power reflect type of muscle action of soleus and gastrocnemius during walking in cats and humans?

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J; Prilutsky, Boris I; Lichtwark, Glen A; Maas, Huub

    2013-04-26

    The main objective of this paper is to highlight the difficulties of identifying shortening and lengthening contractions based on analysis of power produced by resultant joint moments. For that purpose, we present net ankle joint powers and muscle fascicle/muscle-tendon unit (MTU) velocities for medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (SO) muscles during walking in species of different size (humans and cats). For the cat, patterns of ankle joint power and MTU velocity of MG and SO during stance were similar: negative power (ankle moment×angular velocity<0), indicating absorption of mechanical energy, was associated with MTU lengthening, and positive power (generation of mechanical energy) was found during MTU shortening. This was also found for the general fascicle velocity pattern in SO. In contrast, substantial differences between ankle joint power and fascicle velocity patterns were observed for MG muscle. In humans, like cats, the patterns of ankle joint power and MTU velocity of SO and MG were similar. Unlike the cat, there were substantial differences between patterns of fascicle velocity and ankle joint power during stance in both muscles. These results indicate that during walking, only a small fraction of mechanical work of the ankle moment is either generated or absorbed by the muscle fascicles, thus confirming the contribution of in-series elastic structures and/or energy transfer via two-joint muscles. We conclude that ankle joint negative power does not necessarily indicate eccentric action of muscle fibers and that positive power cannot be exclusively attributed to muscle concentric action, especially in humans. PMID:23538001

  11. Dynamic Evaluation of the Contact Characteristics and Three-Dimensional Motion for the Ankle Joint with Lateral Ligament Injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Kensaku; Omori, Go; Terashima, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Hara, Toshiaki

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the dynamic changes in contact pressure distribution and three-dimensional ankle joint motion before and after lateral ligament injuries. Five fresh and frozen intact cadaveric ankles were examined. Each ankle was mounted on a specially designed frame that preserved five degrees of freedom motion. The direct linear transformation technique was used to measure the three-dimensional ankle motion, and a pressure-sensitive conductive rubber sensor was inserted into the talocrural joint space to determine the contact pressure distribution. The contact area on the talus for intact ankle moved anteriorly and laterally with increasing dorsiflexion. An area of high pressure was observed in the medial aspect of the articular surface after the ligament was cut. Supination significantly increased after a combined anterior talofibular ligament (ATF) and calcaneofibular ligament (CF) were cut in comparison with after only an ATF was cut, and no significant differences were observed in motional properties under each experimental condition.

  12. Contemporary demographics and complications of patients treated for open ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Madanat, Rami; Honkamaa, Maija; Mäkinen, Tatu J

    2015-08-01

    Open ankle fractures are rare injuries with a high likelihood of wound complications and subsequent infections. There is limited information about the complications and outcomes of these injuries in different age groups. The aim of this study was to assess the contemporary demographics and complications related to this injury. We performed a chart review of all the 3030 patients treated for ankle fractures at a Level 1 trauma centre from 2006 to 2011. 137 (4.5%) patients had an open ankle fracture. The demographic data, injury mechanism, comorbidities, and fracture type were collected. Treatment, complications, length of stay and number of outpatient visits were also recorded. The mean age of the patients was 60 years and 56% were women. Most fractures were Weber type B with a medial sided wound (93%). Only 20% of the fractures were the result of high-energy trauma, and 31% were Gustilo grade III injuries. Immediate internal fixation was performed in 82% of patients, and the wound was primarily closed in most cases (80%). The incidence of postoperative wound necrosis and deep infection was 18% and 17%, respectively. There were more deep infections if pulsatile lavage was used during the wound debridement (p=0.029). About 14 (10%) patients required a flap reconstruction to cover the soft-tissue defect. Every other patient (54%) had a complication, and 21 patients (15%) suffered a long-term disability related to the injury. The number complications did not differ for nighttime and daytime operations (p=0.083). High-energy injuries were more common in younger patients (p<0.001) and these patients also had more lateral sided open wounds than older patients (p=0.002). Interestingly, younger patients also had significantly more complications (p=0.024), suffered more often from chronic pain (p=0.003), and required more flap reconstructions (p=0.026), reoperations (p=0.026), and outpatient clinic visits (p=0.006). Open ankle fractures have a high complication rate and

  13. Differences in Injury Pattern and Prevalence of Cartilage Lesions in Knee and Ankle Joints: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints. PMID:25568732

  14. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-10-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints. PMID:25568732

  15. Modeling and simulating the neuromuscular mechanisms regulating ankle and knee joint stiffness during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Massimo; Maculan, Marco; Pizzolato, Claudio; Reggiani, Monica; Farina, Dario

    2015-10-01

    This work presents an electrophysiologically and dynamically consistent musculoskeletal model to predict stiffness in the human ankle and knee joints as derived from the joints constituent biological tissues (i.e., the spanning musculotendon units). The modeling method we propose uses electromyography (EMG) recordings from 13 muscle groups to drive forward dynamic simulations of the human leg in five healthy subjects during overground walking and running. The EMG-driven musculoskeletal model estimates musculotendon and resulting joint stiffness that is consistent with experimental EMG data as well as with the experimental joint moments. This provides a framework that allows for the first time observing 1) the elastic interplay between the knee and ankle joints, 2) the individual muscle contribution to joint stiffness, and 3) the underlying co-contraction strategies. It provides a theoretical description of how stiffness modulates as a function of muscle activation, fiber contraction, and interacting tendon dynamics. Furthermore, it describes how this differs from currently available stiffness definitions, including quasi-stiffness and short-range stiffness. This work offers a theoretical and computational basis for describing and investigating the neuromuscular mechanisms underlying human locomotion. PMID:26245321

  16. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability. PMID:26957768

  17. Muscular tendinous junction rupture of the posterior tibial tendon after closed bimalleolar ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, Salomon; Rodriguez-Corlay, Ruy Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, we present an acute rupture in the muscular tendinous junction of a posterior tibialis muscle in a bimalleolar closed ankle fracture after a high-energy trauma in a 30-year-old patient with no significant medical history. Fracture was confirmed by simple X-rays, and was treated with an open reduction in which both of the fractures were treated with osteosynthesis material and reparation of the syndesmosis. If left untreated, this uncommon finding can result in a bad postsurgical outcome; we believe this injury is more common but under-reported in the literature. The surgeon should be aware and look specifically for this type of lesion during the procedure. Finding and treating this injury requires special postoperative care, non-weight-bearing instructions and balanced physiotherapy. PMID:26843223

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wenxin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The simulated impact velocities were from 2.0 to 7.0 m/s with 1.0 m/s interval. Results At 5.0 m/s impact velocity, the maximum von Mises stress of the trabecular calcaneus and talus were 3.21MPa and 2.41MPa respectively, while that of the Tresca stress were 3.46MPa and 2.55MPa. About 94% and 84% of the trabecular calcaneus and talus exceeded the shear yielding stress, while 21.7% and 18.3% yielded the compressive stress. The peak stresses were distributed around the talocalcaneal articulation and the calcaneal tuberosity inferiorly, which corresponded to the common fracture sites. Conclusions The prediction in this study showed that axial compressive impact at 5.0 m/s could produce considerable yielding of trabecular bone in both calcaneus and talus, dominantly by shear and compounded with compression that predispose the rearfoot in the risk of fracture. This study suggested the injury pattern and fracture mode of high energy trauma that provides insights in injury prevention and fracture management. PMID:27119740

  19. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint. PMID:26252560

  20. The estimated mechanical advantage of the prosimian ankle joint musculature, and implications for locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Ryosuke; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2013-05-01

    In this study we compared the power arm lengths and mechanical advantages attributed to 12 lower leg muscles across three prosimian species. The origins and insertions of the lower leg muscles in Garnett's galago, the ring-tailed lemur, and the slow loris were quantified and correlated with positional behaviour. The ankle joint of the galago has a speed-oriented mechanical system, in contrast to that of the slow loris, which exhibits more power-oriented mechanics. The lemur ankle joint exhibited intermediate power arm lengths and an intermediate mechanical advantage relative to the other primates. This result suggests that the mechanical differences in the ankle between the galago and the lemur, taxa that exhibit similar locomotory repertoires, reflect a difference in the kinematics and kinetics of leaping (i.e. generalised vs. specialised leapers). In contrast to leaping primates, lorises have developed a more power-oriented mechanical system as a foot adaptation for positional behaviours such as bridging or cantilevering in their arboreal habitat. PMID:23489408

  1. Effects of a training program after surgically treated ankle fracture: a prospective randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Gertrud M; Jonsson, Kjell; Ekdahl, Charlotte S; Eneroth, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite conflicting results after surgically treated ankle fractures few studies have evaluated the effects of different types of training programs performed after plaster removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week standardised but individually suited training program (training group) versus usual care (control group) after plaster removal in adults with surgically treated ankle fractures. Methods In total, 110 men and women, 18-64 years of age, with surgically treated ankle fracture were included and randomised to either a 12-week training program or to a control group. Six and twelve months after the injury the subjects were examined by the same physiotherapist who was blinded to the treatment group. The main outcome measure was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score (OMAS) which rates symptoms and subjectively scored function. Secondary outcome measures were: quality of life (SF-36), timed walking tests, ankle mobility tests, muscle strength tests and radiological status. Results 52 patients were randomised to the training group and 58 to the control group. Five patients dropped out before the six-month follow-up resulting in 50 patients in the training group and 55 in the control group. Nine patients dropped out between the six- and twelve-month follow-up resulting in 48 patients in both groups. When analysing the results in a mixed model analysis on repeated measures including interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training group demonstrated significantly improved results compared to the control group in subjects younger than 40 years of age regarding OMAS (p = 0.028), muscle strength in the plantar flexors (p = 0.029) and dorsiflexors (p = 0.030). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that when adjusting for interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training model employed in this study was superior to usual care in patients under the age of 40. However, as only three out of nine outcome

  2. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury.

    PubMed

    Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; AlJawder, Abdulla; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Almajed, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed. PMID:27313928

  3. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury

    PubMed Central

    AlJawder, Abdulla; Almajed, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed. PMID:27313928

  4. Muscle imbalance and reduced ankle joint motion in people with hammer toe deformity

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, OY; Tuttle, LJ; Johnson, JE; Mueller, MJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple factors may contribute to hammer toe deformity at the metatarsophalangeal joint. The purposes of this study were to (1) compare the ratio of toe extensor/flexor muscle strength in toes 2-4 among groups with and without hammer toe deformity, (2) to determine correlations between the ratio of toe extensor/flexor muscle strength in toes 2-4, and metatarsophalangeal joint deformity (3) to determine if other clinical measures differ between groups and if these measures are correlated with metatarsophalangeal joint angle. Methods 27 feet with visible hammer toe deformity and 31 age matched feet without hammer toe deformity were tested. Toe muscle strength was measured using a dynamometer and the ratio of toe extensor muscle strength to flexor muscle strength was calculated. Metatarsophalangeal joint angle was measured from a computerized tomography image. Ankle and subtalar joint range of motion, and tibial torsion were measured using goniometry. Findings Extensor/flexor toe muscle strength ratio was 2.3-3.0 times higher in the hammer toe group compared to the non-hammer toe group, in toes 2-4. The ratios of extensor/flexor toe muscle strength for toes 2-4 and metatarsophalangeal joint angle were highly correlated (r=0.69-0.80). Ankle dorsiflexion and metatarsophalangeal joint angle were negatively correlated for toes 2-4 (r= -0.38- -0.56) as were eversion and metatarsophalangeal joint angle. Interpretation These results provide insight into potential risk factors for the development of hammer toe deformity. Additional research is needed to determine the causal relationship between hammer toe deformity and the ratio of toe extensor/flexor muscle strength in toes 2-4. PMID:19535185

  5. Impact extractive fracture of jointed steel plates of a bolted joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimaruya, M.; Fujiki, H.; Ambarita, H.

    2012-08-01

    This study is concerned with the development of a fracture criterion for the impact fracture of jointed steel plates of a bolted joint used in a car body. For the accurate prediction of crash characteristics of car bodies by computer-aided engineering (CAE), it is also necessary to examine the behavior and fracture of jointed steel plates subjected to impact loads. Although the actual impact fracture of jointed steel plates of a bolted joint used in cars is complicated, for simplifying the problem it might be classified into the shear fracture and the extractive fracture of jointed steel plates. Attention is given to the extractive fracture of jointed steel plates in this study. The extractive behavior and fracture of three kinds of steel plates used for cars are examined in experiments and numerical simulations. The impact extraction test of steel plates jointed by a bolt is performed using the one-bar method, together with the static test. In order to understand the mechanism of extractive fracture process of jointed steel plates, numerical simulations by a FEM code LS-DYNA are also carried out. The obtained results suggest that a stress-based fracture criterion may be developed for the impact extractive fracture of jointed steel plates of a bolted joint used in a car body.

  6. Transfer of mechanical energy between ankle and knee joints by gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles during cat locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Leonard, T

    1996-04-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to define and estimate the direction and amount of the energy transfer between the knee and ankle through gastrocnemius (GA) and plantaris (PL) muscles during cat locomotion, and (2) to test the assumption that the force and activity patterns of soleus (SO), GA, and PL are mechanically and physiologically advantageous for providing the transfer of energy between these joints. The direction, amount and rate of the energy transfer through a two-joint muscle were defined using a theoretical analysis of movements in two adjacent joints spanned by the two-joint muscle. The energy transferred between the ankle and the knee was calculated using the time integration of the difference between the power developed by the moments of SO, GA, and PL at the ankle joint and the total power of these muscles. The total power of SO, GA, and PL muscles, and the power of their movements about the ankle and knee, were obtained using the experimentally determined muscle forces, the rates of change in muscle length, and the angular velocities at the knee and ankle which were calculated from the kinematics and the geometry of the cat hindlimb. Muscular forces and hindlimb kinematics of the cats were recorded during normal walking and trotting on a treadmill at speeds of 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8 ms-1 using 'E'-shaped tendon transducers and high-speed video, respectively. It was found that during the early phase of support, there was a transfer of mechanical energy from the ankle to the knee through GA and PL. During the late phase of support, mechanical energy was transferred from the knee to the ankle. The amount of energy transferred increased with increasing speeds of locomotion. The energy transferred from the ankle to the knee was 3-60 mJ (7-22% of the negative work done by the moments of SO, GA, and PL at the ankle), and the energy transferred from the knee to the ankle was 10-67 mJ (7-14% of the positive work done by the moments of SO, GA, and

  7. A Novel Ultrasound Technique for Detection of Osteochondral Defects in the Ankle Joint: A Parametric and Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Loeve, Arjo J.; van Dongen, Koen W. A.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; Zadpoor, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    (Osteo)chondral defects (OCDs) in the ankle are currently diagnosed with modalities that are not convenient to use in long-term follow-ups. Ultrasound (US) imaging, which is a cost-effective and non-invasive alternative, has limited ability to discriminate OCDs. We aim to develop a new diagnostic technique based on US wave propagation through the ankle joint. The presence of OCDs is identified when a US signal deviates from a reference signal associated with the healthy joint. The feasibility of the proposed technique is studied using experimentally-validated 2D finite-difference time-domain models of the ankle joint. The normalized maximum cross correlation of experiments and simulation was 0.97. Effects of variables relevant to the ankle joint, US transducers and OCDs were evaluated. Variations in joint space width and transducer orientation made noticeable alterations to the reference signal: normalized root mean square error ranged from 6.29% to 65.25% and from 19.59% to 8064.2%, respectively. The results suggest that the new technique could be used for detection of OCDs, if the effects of other parameters (i.e., parameters related to the ankle joint and US transducers) can be reduced. PMID:25609040

  8. Atypical stress-avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Barry J; Sweeney, Laura A; Moroney, Paul J; Mulhall, Kevin J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic erythematosus have been associated with metatarsal stress fractures. Stress fractures of the Lisfranc joint complex are uncommon injuries but have been reported to occur most frequently in ballet dancers. We present a case of an avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex that occurred spontaneously. We have reviewed the association between systemic conditions and metatarsal fractures and proposed a series of hypothetical pathological events that may have contributed to this unusual injury. PMID:24521754

  9. Acute ankle sprain: an update.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Douglas

    2006-11-15

    Acute ankle injury, a common musculoskeletal injury, can cause ankle sprains. Some evidence suggests that previous injuries or limited joint flexibility may contribute to ankle sprains. The initial assessment of an acute ankle injury should include questions about the timing and mechanism of the injury. The Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules provide clinical guidelines for excluding a fracture in adults and children and determining if radiography is indicated at the time of injury. Reexamination three to five days after injury, when pain and swelling have improved, may help with the diagnosis. Therapy for ankle sprains focuses on controlling pain and swelling. PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) is a well-established protocol for the treatment of ankle injury. There is some evidence that applying ice and using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs improves healing and speeds recovery. Functional rehabilitation (e.g., motion restoration and strengthening exercises) is preferred over immobilization. Superiority of surgical repair versus functional rehabilitation for severe lateral ligament rupture is controversial. Treatment using semirigid supports is superior to using elastic bandages. Support devices provide some protection against future ankle sprains, particularly in persons with a history of recurrent sprains. Ankle disk or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise regimens also may be helpful, although the literature supporting this is limited. PMID:17137000

  10. Numerical simulation of strain-adaptive bone remodelling in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of artificial endoprostheses has become a routine procedure for knee and hip joints while ankle arthritis has traditionally been treated by means of arthrodesis. Due to its advantages, the implantation of endoprostheses is constantly increasing. While finite element analyses (FEA) of strain-adaptive bone remodelling have been carried out for the hip joint in previous studies, to our knowledge there are no investigations that have considered remodelling processes of the ankle joint. In order to evaluate and optimise new generation implants of the ankle joint, as well as to gain additional knowledge regarding the biomechanics, strain-adaptive bone remodelling has been calculated separately for the tibia and the talus after providing them with an implant. Methods FE models of the bone-implant assembly for both the tibia and the talus have been developed. Bone characteristics such as the density distribution have been applied corresponding to CT scans. A force of 5,200 N, which corresponds to the compression force during normal walking of a person with a weight of 100 kg according to Stauffer et al., has been used in the simulation. The bone adaptation law, previously developed by our research team, has been used for the calculation of the remodelling processes. Results A total bone mass loss of 2% in the tibia and 13% in the talus was calculated. The greater decline of density in the talus is due to its smaller size compared to the relatively large implant dimensions causing remodelling processes in the whole bone tissue. In the tibia, bone remodelling processes are only calculated in areas adjacent to the implant. Thus, a smaller bone mass loss than in the talus can be expected. There is a high agreement between the simulation results in the distal tibia and the literature regarding. Conclusions In this study, strain-adaptive bone remodelling processes are simulated using the FE method. The results contribute to a better understanding of the

  11. Effects of balance training by knee joint motions on muscle activity in adult men with functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung-min; Kim, Won-bok; Yun, Chang-kyo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of balance training by applying knee joint movements on muscle activity in male adults with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] 28 adults with functional ankle instability, divided randomly into an experimental group, which performed balance training by applying knee joint movements for 20 minutes and ankle joint exercises for 10 minutes, and a control group, which performed ankle joint exercise for 30 minutes. Exercises were completed three times a week for 8 weeks. Electromyographic values of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and the lateral gastrocnemius muscles were obtained to compare and analyze muscle activity before and after the experiments in each group. [Results] The experimental group had significant increases in muscle activity in the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and lateral gastrocnemius muscles, while muscle activity in the peroneus brevis increased without significance. The control group had significant increases in muscle activity in the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus, while muscle activity in the peroneus brevis and lateral gastrocnemius muscles increased without significance. [Conclusion] In conclusion, balance training by applying knee joint movements can be recommended as a treatment method for patients with functional ankle instability. PMID:27313386

  12. Ligament fibre recruitment at the human ankle joint complex in passive flexion.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Rita; Leardini, Alberto; Ensini, Andrea

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of ligament fibre recruitment at the human ankle joint complex is a fundamental prerequisite for analysing mobility and stability. Previous experimental and modelling studies have shown that ankle motion must be guided by fibres within the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments, which remain approximately isometric during passive flexion. The purpose of this study was to identify these fibres. Three below-knee amputated specimens were analysed during passive flexion with combined radiostereometry for bone pose estimation and 3D digitisation for ligament attachment area identification. A procedure based on singular value decomposition enabled matching bone pose with digitised data and therefore reconstructing position in space of ligament attachment areas in each joint position. Eleven ordered fibres, connecting corresponding points on origin and insertion curves, were modelled for each of the following ligaments: posterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, anterior talofibular, posterior tibiotalar, tibiocalcaneal, and anterior tibiotalar. The measured changes in length for the ligament fibres revealed patterns of tightening and slackening. The most anterior fibre of the calcaneofibular and the medio-anterior fibre of the tibiocalcaneal ligament exhibited the most isometric behaviour, as well as the most posterior fibre of the anterior talofibular ligament. Fibres within the calcaneofibular ligament remain parallel in the transverse plane, while those within the tibiocalcaneal ligament become almost parallel in joint neutral position. For both these ligaments, fibres maintain their relative inclination in the sagittal plane throughout the passive flexion range. The observed significant change in both shape and orientation of the ankle ligaments suggest that this knowledge is fundamental for future mechanical analysis of their response to external forces. PMID:15519590

  13. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: “spasticity” vs. “contracture”). Differentiation between these components is hard to achieve by common manual tests. We applied an assessment instrument to obtain quantitative measures of neural and non-neural contributions to ankle joint stiffness in CP. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with CP and eleven healthy subjects were seated with their foot fixated to an electrically powered single axis footplate. Passive ramp-and-hold rotations were applied over full ankle range of motion (RoM) at low and high velocities. Subject specific tissue stiffness, viscosity and reflexive torque were estimated from ankle angle, torque and triceps surae EMG activity using a neuromuscular model. Results In CP, triceps surae reflexive torque was on average 5.7 times larger (p = .002) and tissue stiffness 2.1 times larger (p = .018) compared to controls. High tissue stiffness was associated with reduced RoM (p < .001). Ratio between neural and non-neural contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Significant associations of SPAT (spasticity test) score with both tissue stiffness and reflexive torque show agreement with clinical phenotype. Conclusions Using an instrumented and model based approach, increased joint stiffness in CP could be mainly attributed to higher reflexive torque compared to control subjects. Ratios between contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Quantitative differentiation of neural and non-neural stiffness contributors in CP allows for assessment of individual patient characteristics and tailoring of therapy. PMID:23880287

  14. IINCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN SOCCER PLAYERS WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Bertolini, Fabricio Melo; Vieira, Tallys Campos; Aguiar, Rodrigo Manso; Pinheiro, Guilherme Baldez; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-three soccer players aged between 14 and 19 years, in the basic category of a professional soccer club in the city of Belo Horizonte, were followed up during the 2009 season. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted, in which these soccer players were divided randomly into two groups. The first consisted of individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), totaling 22 players, and the second was a control group with 61 players without this syndrome, determined through a physical examinati. Results: Both groups were studied with regard to incidence of ankle sprains. At the end of this period, the data were compiled and statistical analysis was performed. A total of 43 cases of ankle injury due to sprains were recorded, of which nine episodes were in players with JHS, thus making p = 0.106. The significance level was 5%. Conclusion: We were able to conclude that in our study there was insufficient evidence to assert that there is an association with increased incidence of ankle sprains among patients with JHS. PMID:27047888

  15. Human ankle joint stiffness over the full range of muscle activation levels.

    PubMed

    Weiss, P L; Hunter, I W; Kearney, R E

    1988-01-01

    System identification techniques have been used to track changes in dynamic stiffness of the human ankle joint over a wide range of muscle contraction levels. Subjects lay supine on an experimental table with their left foot encased in a rigid, low-inertia cast which was fixed to an electro-hydraulic actuator operating as a position servo. Subjects generated tonic plantarflexor or dorsiflexor torques of different magnitudes ranging from rest to maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) during repeated presentations of a stochastic ankle angular position perturbation. Compliance impulse response functions (IRF) were determined from every 2.5 s perturbation sequence. The gain (G), natural frequency (omega n), and damping (zeta) parameters of the second-order model providing the best fit to each IRF were determined and used to compute the corresponding inertial (I), viscous (B) and elastic (K) stiffness parameters. The behaviour of these parameters with mean torque was found to follow two simple rules. First, the elastic parameter (K) increased in proportion to mean ankle torque as it was varied from rest to MVC; these changes were considerable involving increases of more than an order of magnitude. Second, the damping parameter (zeta) remained almost invariant over the entire range of contractions despite the dramatic changes in K. PMID:3410857

  16. Extended indications for foot and ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Gross, Christopher E; Lee, Simon; Carreira, Dominic S

    2014-01-01

    Advances in foot and ankle arthroscopy have allowed surgeons to diagnose and treat a broadening array of disorders that were previously limited to open procedures. Arthroscopy of the posterior ankle, subtalar joint, and first metatarsophalangeal joint and tendoscopy can be used to address common foot and ankle ailments, with the potential benefits of decreased pain, fast recovery, and low complication rates. Posterior ankle and subtalar arthroscopy can be used to manage impingement, arthrofibrosis, synovitis, arthritis, fractures, and osteochondral defects. First metatarsophalangeal joint arthroscopy can address osteophytes, chronic synovitis, osteochondral defects, and degenerative joint disease. Tendoscopy is a minimally invasive alternative for evaluation and débridement of the Achilles, posterior tibial, flexor hallucis longus, and peroneal tendons. PMID:24382875

  17. Motion control of the ankle joint with a multiple contact nerve cuff electrode: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Durand, Dominique M

    2014-08-01

    The flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) has demonstrated significant capability for fascicular and subfascicular stimulation selectivity. However, due to the inherent complexity of the neuromuscular skeletal systems and nerve-electrode interface, a trajectory tracking motion control algorithm of musculoskeletal systems for functional electrical stimulation using a multiple contact nerve cuff electrode such as FINE has not yet been developed. In our previous study, a control system was developed for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) musculoskeletal systems with little prior knowledge of the system. In this study, more realistic computational ankle/subtalar joint model including a finite element model of the sciatic nerve was developed. The control system was tested to control the motion of ankle/subtalar joint angles by modulating the pulse amplitude of each contact of a FINE placed on the sciatic nerve. The simulation results showed that the control strategy based on the separation of steady state and dynamic properties of the system resulted in small output tracking errors for different reference trajectories such as sinusoidal and filtered random signals. The proposed control method also demonstrated robustness against external disturbances and system parameter variations such as muscle fatigue. These simulation results under various circumstances indicate that it is possible to take advantage of multiple contact nerve electrodes with spatial selectivity for the control of limb motion by peripheral nerve stimulation even with limited individual muscle selectivity. This technology could be useful to restore neural function in patients with paralysis. PMID:24939581

  18. An unusual cause of ankle pain: fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition as a differential diagnosis in an acute ankle sprain: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The acute ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries seen in trauma departments. Ankle sprains have an incidence of about one injury per 10 000 people a day. In contrast tarsal coalition is a rare condition occurring in not more than one percent of the population. Case presentation We present the case of a 23 year old male patient with pain and local swelling after an acute ankle sprain. Initial clinical and radiological examination showed no pathologies. Due to prolonged pain, swelling and the inability of the patient to weight bear one week after trauma further diagnostics was performed. Imaging studies (MRI and CT) revealed a fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition. To the knowledge of the authors no fracture of a coalition was reported so far. Conclusion This report highlights the presentation of symptomatic coalitions following trauma and furthermore, it points out the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of a rare entity after a common injury. A diagnostic algorithm has been developed to ensure not to miss a severe injury. PMID:23530869

  19. The Immediate Effects of Different Types of Ankle Support Introduced 6 Weeks After Surgical Internal Fixation for Ankle Fracture on Gait and Pain: A Randomized Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Keene, David J; Willett, Keith; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Randomized 3-treatment, 3-period crossover trial. Background There is variation in clinical practice regarding the type of ankle support used to aid recovery after ankle fracture internal fixation surgery. Objective To determine the immediate effects of different ankle supports commonly issued to patients 6 weeks after surgery. Methods Participants were 18 adults, 6 weeks after internal fixation for transsyndesmotic/infrasyndesmotic fracture, in a major trauma center in the UK. Interventions were a stirrup brace and walker boot compared with Tubigrip. Outcomes were (1) step-length and single-limb support time asymmetry (percentage comparing injured and uninjured limbs), (2) step width, (3) gait velocity, and (4) pain during walking (visual analog scale, 0-100). Results Participants (mean ± SD age, 47 ± 14 years) included 8 women and 10 men, 6 weeks after surgical internal fixation for ankle fracture. Single-limb support time asymmetry reduced by 3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0%, 6%; P = .02) in the stirrup brace and by 5% (95% CI: 2%, 7%; P = .001) in the walker boot compared with Tubigrip. Step width was 1.2 cm (95% CI: 0.6, 1.7; P<.001) wider in the walker boot than in Tubigrip. Self-reported pain was lower in the walker boot (5/100) and in the stirrup brace (13/100) compared to the Tubigrip (18/100, P = .03). No significant differences were found in the effects of the supports on step-length asymmetry between the walker boot or stirrup brace and Tubigrip. Conclusion At 6 weeks after surgical internal fixation for ankle fracture, pain and single-limb support time asymmetry over a short distance and for a short-term walk were immediately reduced with the use of a walker boot use and, to a lesser extent, a stirrup-brace compared to Tubigrip. Step width also widened in a walker boot, which may confer some additional gait stability. These results apply to immediate effects, so studies with longer-term follow-up are now indicated. The trial was

  20. Joint sparing treatments in early ankle osteoarthritis: current procedures and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Castagnini, Francesco; Pellegrini, Camilla; Perazzo, Luca; Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis (AOA) is a severe pathology, mostly affecting a post-traumatic young population. Arthroscopic debridement, arthrodiastasis, osteotomy are the current joint sparing procedures, but, in the available studies, controversial results were achieved, with better outcomes in case of limited degeneration. Only osteotomy in case of malalignment is universally accepted as a joint sparing procedure in case of partial AOA. Recently, the biological mechanism of osteoarthritis has been intensively studied: it is a whole joint pathology, affecting cartilage, bone and synovial membrane. In particular, the first stage is characterized by a reversible catabolic activity with a state of chondropenia. Thus, biological procedures for early AOA were proposed in order to delay or to avoid end stage procedures. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be a good solution to prevent or reverse degeneration, due to their immunomodulatory features (able to control the catabolic joint environment) and their regenerative osteochondral capabilities (able to treat the chondral defects). In fact, MSCs may regulate the cytokine cascade and the metalloproteinases release, restoring the osteochondral tissue as well. After interesting reports of mesenchymal stem cells seeded on scaffold and applied to cartilage defects in non-degenerated joints, bone marrow derived cells transplantation appears to be a promising technique in order to control the degenerative pathway and restore the osteochondral defects. PMID:26915003

  1. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-01-01

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed. PMID:27608626

  2. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body I think my child has sprained her ankle. How can I tell for sure? Sprains are injuries to the ligaments that connect bones ... away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is the most commonly sprained joint, followed by ...

  3. Microneurographically recorded Ia discharge from the tibial nerve mainly transmits the angular velocity of the ankle joint in humans.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, S; Iwase, S; Mano, T; Fukuda, H; Mochida, J

    2004-08-01

    Investigations of the Ia afferent discharge in clarifying problems in disused and malused skeletal muscles have been carried out mainly in muscles of the upper extremities. However, such problems actually occur more frequently in the antigravity muscles of the lower extremities, such as the triceps surae muscle. An analysis of microneurographically recorded Ia discharges from the tibial nerve innervating the triceps surae muscle during dynamic movement of the ankle joint indicated that they mainly transmitted information on the angular velocity of the joint. However, the information on the position sense of the joint was not as well transmitted through Ia discharges. There was no correlation between the joint angle and the static response. However, the dynamic response of a Ia afferent was well correlated to the angular velocity. It is concluded that the human proprioception of the triceps surae muscle was not dependent on the position of the ankle joint, but largely on its movement by the stretching of the muscle. PMID:15631694

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN OSTEOSYNTHESIS IN CONVENTIONAL AND BIOABSORBABLE IMPLANTS IN ANKLE FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Gaiarsa, Guilherme Pelosini; dos Reis, Paulo Roberto; Mattar, Rames; Silva, Jorge dos Santos; Fernandez, Túlio Diniz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the functional results of ankle fractures treated with metallic and absorbable plates. Twenty patients were randomized into two groups (metallic and absorbable implant groups) and followed prospectively. In the immediate postoperative period, patients were immobilized with plaster casts for one week, which was replaced by a removable cast for another four weeks. Partial weight-bearing was allowed after three weeks, and full weight-bearing after six weeks. Functional recovery was similar in both groups. At six months, three patients in the metallic group complained of local pain, and had their implants removed. One patient in the absorbable group exhibited early dehiscence of the suture and underwent debridement and suturing with good evolution. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was similar between the two groups after six and nine months of follow-up. The absorbable implants showed clinical and functional results that were similar to those of metallic implants. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:26981035

  5. Ankle Fracture Surgery on a Pregnant Patient Complicated by Intraoperative Emergency Caesarian Section

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Gross, Steven C.; Coopersmith, Allen; Gidumal, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who sustained an ankle fracture dislocation that could not be adequately closed reduced. After discussions with the patient, her obstetrician, and the anesthesiologists, she was indicated for surgical fixation. A heart tone monitor was used to assess fetal health during the procedure. During surgical incision, the fetus went into distress, and an emergency caesarian section was performed. After delivery of the infant and abdominal closer, surgery was completed. Due to a cohesive team effort, both the patient and her infant had excellent outcomes. There are many important considerations in the surgical management of the pregnant patient with traumatic orthopaedic injuries. Of especial importance to the orthopaedic surgeon is the impact of patient positioning on uteroplacental blood flow. This report discusses factors that should be taken into account by any orthopaedist who plans to operate on a pregnant patient. PMID:23819091

  6. Ankle fracture surgery on a pregnant patient complicated by intraoperative emergency caesarian section.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Gross, Steven C; Coopersmith, Allen; Gidumal, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who sustained an ankle fracture dislocation that could not be adequately closed reduced. After discussions with the patient, her obstetrician, and the anesthesiologists, she was indicated for surgical fixation. A heart tone monitor was used to assess fetal health during the procedure. During surgical incision, the fetus went into distress, and an emergency caesarian section was performed. After delivery of the infant and abdominal closer, surgery was completed. Due to a cohesive team effort, both the patient and her infant had excellent outcomes. There are many important considerations in the surgical management of the pregnant patient with traumatic orthopaedic injuries. Of especial importance to the orthopaedic surgeon is the impact of patient positioning on uteroplacental blood flow. This report discusses factors that should be taken into account by any orthopaedist who plans to operate on a pregnant patient. PMID:23819091

  7. Control of torque direction by spinal pathways at the cat ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R; Lawrence, J H; Bonasera, S J

    1993-01-01

    To study the biomechanics of the calcaneal tendon's complex insertion onto the calcaneus, we measured torque-time trajectories exerted by the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles in eight unanesthetized decerebrate cats using a multi-axis force-moment sensor placed at the ankle joint. The ankle was constrained to an angle of 110 degrees plantarflexion. Muscles were activated using crossed-extension (XER), flexion (FWR), and caudal cutaneous sural nerve (SNR) reflexes. Torque contributions of other muscles activated by these reflexes were eliminated by denervation or tenotomy. In two animals, miniature pressure transducers were implanted among tendon fibers from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle that insert straight into the calcaneus or among tendon fibers from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) that cross over and insert on the lateral aspect of calcaneus. Reflexively evoked torques had the following directions: FWR, dorsiflexion and adduction; SNR, plantarflexion and abduction; and XER, plantarflexion and modest abduction or adduction. The proportion of abduction torque to plantarflexion torque was always greater for SNR than XER; this difference was about 50% of the magnitude of abduction torque generated by tetanic stimulation of the peronei. During SNR, pressures were higher in regions of the calcaneal tendon originating from MG than regions originating from LG. Similarly, pressures within the MG portion of the calcaneal tendon were higher during SNR than during XER, although these two reflexes produced matched ankle plantarflexion forces. Selective tenotomies and electromyographic recordings further demonstrated that MG generated most of the torque in response to SNR, while soleus, LG, and MG all generated torques in response to XER.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8150057

  8. Balance in single-limb stance after surgically treated ankle fractures: a 14-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Gertrud; Ageberg, Eva; Ekdahl, Charlotte; Eneroth, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    Background The maintenance of postural control is fundamental for different types of physical activity. This can be measured by having subjects stand on one leg on a force plate. Many studies assessing standing balance have previously been carried out in patients with ankle ligament injuries but not in patients with ankle fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients operated on because of an ankle fracture had impaired postural control compared to an uninjured age- and gender-matched control group. Methods Fifty-four individuals (patients) operated on because of an ankle fracture were examined 14 months postoperatively. Muscle strength, ankle mobility, and single-limb stance on a force-platform were measured. Average speed of centre of pressure movements and number of movements exceeding 10 mm from the mean value of centre of pressure were registered in the frontal and sagittal planes on a force-platform. Fifty-four age- and gender-matched uninjured individuals (controls) were examined in the single-limb stance test only. The paired Student t-test was used for comparisons between patients' injured and uninjured legs and between side-matched legs within the controls. The independent Student t-test was used for comparisons between patients and controls. The Chi-square test, and when applicable, Fisher's exact test were used for comparisons between groups. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with belonging to the group unable to complete the single-limb stance test on the force-platform. Results Fourteen of the 54 patients (26%) did not manage to complete the single-limb stance test on the force-platform, whereas all controls managed this (p < 0.001). Age over 45 years was the only factor significantly associated with not managing the test. When not adjusted for age, decreased strength in the ankle plantar flexors and dorsiflexors was significantly associated with not managing the test. In the 40 patients who

  9. Effect of Solder Joint Length on Fracture Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Saeed; Nourani, Amir; Spelt, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture tests were conducted on copper-solder-copper joints of various lengths using double-cantilever-beam (DCB) specimens under mode I loading conditions. The thickness and length of the solder joints were large enough to neglect any anisotropy associated with the solder microstructure. It was found that the critical strain energy release rate at crack initiation, G ci, was insensitive to the length of the solder joint; however, for joints shorter than a characteristic length which was a function of the thickness and the mechanical properties of the solder layer and the substrates, the fracture load increased with increasing solder joint length. A sandwich model was developed for the analysis of the stress and strain in solder joints, taking into account the influence of both the bending deformation and the shear deformation of the substrates on the solder joint stresses. Consistent with the experimental results, it was found that solder joints longer than the characteristic length have a maximum peel stress that remains unchanged with joint length, causing the joint strength to become independent of the joint length. A closed-form analytical solution was developed for the characteristic length of DCB specimens under mode I loading. The experimental results were in good agreement with the analytical model and with finite element results. The generality of the G ci failure criterion was demonstrated by comparing the experimental results and the fracture load predictions of mode I DCB solder joints with different lengths.

  10. Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Schon, L C; Easley, M E; Weinfeld, S B

    1998-04-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle by specific sites of involvement (ankle, hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot), modes of presentation, methods of management, and outcome. A summary of treatment and results for 50 ankles, 22 hindfeet, 131 midfeet, and 18 forefeet is presented. Nondisplaced neuropathic ankle fractures typically healed uneventfully with casting and bracing. For displaced ankle fractures, closed reduction and casting generally resulted in loss of reduction and progressive deterioration; better results were obtained with open reduction and internal fixation, using supplemental Kirschner wires and screws. Ankles with Charcot neuroarthropathy and preexisting arthritis typically required arthrodesis. Of the ankles with neuropathic avascular talar necrosis, approximately 1/3 did well with nonoperative intervention and 2/3 required surgery. Chronic, unstable, malaligned Charcot ankles often required arthrodesis. Neuropathic calcaneal fractures were managed successfully nonoperatively. For feet with transverse tarsal joint involvement (Schon Type IV), management was more complex. Nonoperative treatment was successful for less than 1/2. Two thirds of the feet with midtarsus involvement (Schon Types I, II, and III) were managed successfully nonoperatively; 1/3 required surgery for recurrent ulceration, instability, or osteomyelitis. Half of the feet with forefoot neuroarthropathy required surgery for malalignment, ulceration, and/or difficulty with shoewear or braces. This review has established patterns of Charcot involvement of the foot and ankle with corresponding methods of treatment and subsequent responses. From this extensive clinical experience with 221 neuropathic fractures or Charcot joints, recommendations were derived to assist in selecting appropriate management options. PMID:9584374

  11. A Patient-Specific Foot Model for the Estimate of Ankle Joint Forces in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prinold, Joe A I; Mazzà, Claudia; Di Marco, Roberto; Hannah, Iain; Malattia, Clara; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Petrarca, Maurizio; Ronchetti, Anna B; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Wesarg, Stefan; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading cause of childhood disability from a musculoskeletal disorder. It generally affects large joints such as the knee and the ankle, often causing structural damage. Different factors contribute to the damage onset, including altered joint loading and other mechanical factors, associated with pain and inflammation. The prediction of patients' joint loading can hence be a valuable tool in understanding the disease mechanisms involved in structural damage progression. A number of lower-limb musculoskeletal models have been proposed to analyse the hip and knee joints, but juvenile models of the foot are still lacking. This paper presents a modelling pipeline that allows the creation of juvenile patient-specific models starting from lower limb kinematics and foot and ankle MRI data. This pipeline has been applied to data from three children with JIA and the importance of patient-specific parameters and modelling assumptions has been tested in a sensitivity analysis focused on the variation of the joint reaction forces. This analysis highlighted the criticality of patient-specific definition of the ankle joint axes and location of the Achilles tendon insertions. Patient-specific detection of the Tibialis Anterior, Tibialis Posterior, and Peroneus Longus origins and insertions were also shown to be important. PMID:26374518

  12. Manual Stress Ankle Radiography Has Poor Ability to Predict Deep Deltoid Ligament Integrity in a Supination External Rotation Fracture Cohort.

    PubMed

    Schottel, Patrick C; Fabricant, Peter D; Berkes, Marschall B; Garner, Matthew R; Little, Milton T M; Hentel, Keith D; Mintz, Douglas N; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-01-01

    Stress ankle radiographs are routinely performed to determine deep deltoid ligament integrity in supination external rotation (SER) ankle fractures. However, variability is present in the published data regarding what medial clear space (MCS) value constitutes a positive result. The purposes of the present study were to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different MCS cutoff values and determine whether this clinical test could accurately discriminate between patients with and without a deep deltoid ligament disruption. MCS measurements were recorded for stress ankle injury radiographs in an SER ankle fracture cohort. Preoperative ankle magnetic resonance imaging studies, obtained for all patients, were then read independently by 2 musculoskeletal attending radiologists to determine deep deltoid ligament integrity. The MCS measurements were compared with the magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis using receiver operating characteristic analyses to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and optimal data-driven cutoff values. SER II-III patients demonstrated a mean stress MCS distance of 4.3 ± 0.98 mm compared with 5.8 ± 1.76 mm in the SER IV cohort (p < .001). An analysis of differing MCS positive cutoff thresholds revealed that a stress MCS of 5.0 mm maximized the combined sensitivity and specificity of the external rotation test: 65.8% sensitive and 76.5% specific. Using the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of the MCS measurement, the calculated area under the curve was 0.77, indicating inadequate discriminative ability for diagnosing SER pattern fractures with or without a deep deltoid ligament tear. Judicious use of additional diagnostic testing in patients with a stress MCS result between 4.0 mm and 5.5 mm is warranted. PMID:25189335

  13. Is immobilization of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joint effective in suppressing the spread of infection in diabetic foot ulcers?

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Tsuji, Yoriko; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Terashi, Hiroto

    2014-09-01

    Diabetics with foot-related problems might eventually need to undergo major or minor amputation because of infection or cellulites. It has been suggested that immobilization of the ankle and the metatarsophalangeal joint suppresses the spread of infection; however, there is no evidence to support this inference. Here, we demonstrate by histological analysis how the immobilization works. The tendon from the amputated toe is harvested, and a hematoxylin-eosin stained paraffin-embedded section is prepared and analyzed. Necrosis occurred in only a single fiber of the tendon, and intact and necrotic or infected tendon fibers were found intermingled. The reciprocal movements of the tendon and the joint (extension and flexion) may be the pathogenic cause of cellulites and infection, leading to the massage effect and the spread of bacteria along the tendon itself. We suggest that immobilizing the ankle and the metatarsophalangeal joint with a removable contacting cast would suppress the spread of infection in foot ulcers. PMID:25106445

  14. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. PMID:27599442

  15. Metatarsal Shaft Fracture with Associated Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tung, Taranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Metatarsophalangeal joint dislocations of lesser toes are often seen in the setting of severe claw toes. Traumatic irreducible dislocations have been reported in rare cases following both low-energy and high-energy injuries to the forefoot. In this case report, I present a previously unreported association of a metatarsal shaft fracture with metatarsophalangeal joint dislocation of a lesser toe. PMID:27597914

  16. Metatarsal Shaft Fracture with Associated Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metatarsophalangeal joint dislocations of lesser toes are often seen in the setting of severe claw toes. Traumatic irreducible dislocations have been reported in rare cases following both low-energy and high-energy injuries to the forefoot. In this case report, I present a previously unreported association of a metatarsal shaft fracture with metatarsophalangeal joint dislocation of a lesser toe. PMID:27597914

  17. Shear fracture of jointed steel plates of bolted joints under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimaruya, M.; Fujiki, H.; Ambarita, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Shin, H.-S.

    2013-07-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a fracture criterion for the impact fracture of jointed steel plates of bolted joints used in a car body, which contributes to crash simulations by CAE. We focus our attention on the shear fracture of the jointed steel plates of lap-bolted joints in the suspension of a car under impact load. Members of lap-bolted joints are modelled as a pair of steel plates connected by a bolt. One of the plates is a specimen subjected to plastic deformation and fracture and the other is a jig subjected to elastic deformation only. Three kinds of steel plate specimens are examined, i.e., a common steel plate with a tensile strength of 270 MPa and high tensile strength steel plates of 440 and 590 MPa used for cars. The impact shear test was performed using the split Hopkinson bar technique for tension impact, together with the static test using a universal testing machine INSTRON 5586. The behaviour of the shear stress and deformation up to rupture taking place in the joint was discussed. The obtained results suggest that a stress-based fracture criterion may be developed for the impact fracture of jointed steel plates of a lap-bolted joint.

  18. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series To use the sharing features on ... 4 out of 4 Normal anatomy Overview The ankle joint connects the foot with the leg. The ...

  19. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  20. Effect of passive stretching and jogging on the series elastic muscle stiffness and range of motion of the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    McNair, Peter J; Stanley, Stephen N

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of stretching and jogging on the series elastic muscle stiffness of the plantar flexors and on the range of dorsiflexion at the ankle joint. Methods 24 healthy subjects participated in this study. Each subject undertook all of the following protocols, in random order: (1) stretching protocol: five 30 s static stretches with 30 s rest between stretches; (2) aerobic jogging protocol: subjects ran on a treadmill for 10 min at 60% of their maximum age predicted heart rate; (3) combined protocol: subjects ran first and then stretched. A damped oscillation technique was used to measure the series elastic stiffness of the plantar flexors. Dorsiflexion of the ankle was assessed with a weights and pulley system that moved the ankle joint from a neutral position into dorsiflexion passively. Electromyography was used to monitor the activity of the plantar and dorsiflexors during these procedures. The statistical analysis of these data involved an analysis of covariance Results For decreasing series elastic muscle stiffness running was more effective than stretching (P<0.05). In contrast, the results for range of motion showed that the combination protocol and the stretching only protocol were more effective than the running only protocol (P < 0.05) for increasing dorsiflexion range of motion at the ankle. Conclusions Both jogging and static stretching exercises appear to be beneficial to individuals participating in sporting activities. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:9015593

  1. Plantar-flexion of the ankle joint complex in terminal stance is initiated by subtalar plantar-flexion: A bi-planar fluoroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seungbum; Lee, Kyoung Min; Cha, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Gross motion of the ankle joint complex (AJC) is a summation of the ankle and subtalar joints. Although AJC kinematics have been widely used to evaluate the function of the AJC, the coordinated movements of the ankle and subtalar joints are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify the individual kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the intact foot during ground walking by using a bi-planar fluoroscopic system. Bi-planar fluoroscopic images of the foot and ankle during walking and standing were acquired from 10 healthy subjects. The three-dimensional movements of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus were calculated with a three-dimensional/two-dimensional registration method. The skeletal kinematics were quantified from 9% to 86% of the full stance phase because of the limited camera speed of the X-ray system. At the beginning of terminal stance, plantar-flexion of the AJC was initiated in the subtalar joint on average at 75% ranging from 62% to 76% of the stance phase, and plantar-flexion of the ankle joint did not start until 86% of the stance phase. The earlier change to plantar-flexion in the AJC than the ankle joint due to the early plantar-flexion in the subtalar joint was observed in 8 of the 10 subjects. This phenomenon could be explained by the absence of direct muscle insertion on the talus. Preceding subtalar plantar-flexion could contribute to efficient and stable ankle plantar-flexion by locking the midtarsal joint, but this explanation needs further investigation. PMID:26238571

  2. Anterior fracture dislocation of sacroiliac joint: A rare type of crescent fracture

    PubMed Central

    Trikha, Vivek; Singh, Vivek; Kumar, V Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Crescent fractures of the pelvis are usually described as posterior sacro iliac fracture dislocations. Rarely anterior displacement of the fractured iliac fragment along with dislocation has been reported in crescent fractures. Four cases of anterior fracture dislocation of the sacro iliac joint managed in the last two years by a single surgeon are presented. The injury mechanism, radiological diagnosis, management protocol along with functional outcomes of all the four patients have been discussed. CT scan is essential in the diagnosis and preoperative planning of this injury pattern. Early fixation along with proper reduction leads to excellent functional outcome in this subset of lateral compression injuries of the pelvis. PMID:26015619

  3. Joint Stability Characteristics of the Ankle Complex in Female Athletes With Histories of Lateral Ankle Sprain, Part II: Clinical Experience Using Arthrometric Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Hollis, J. M.; Liu, Wei; IV, Albert W. Pearsall

    2014-01-01

    Context: This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. Objective: To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. Intervention(s): All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Results: Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P < .01). Conclusions: Changes in ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles. PMID:24568223

  4. The effects of ankle joint strategy exercises with and without visual feedback on the dynamic balance of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Si-Nae; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of visual feedback training on the balance of stroke patients performing ankle joint strategy exercises. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 26 stroke patients were randomly and equally assigned to a visual feedback group (VFG) and a visual disuse group (VDG). They performed ankle joint strategy exercises for 30 minutes, three times per week for six weeks. The patients’ balance ability was measured before and after the exercises to compare the effects of visual feedback. To assess balance ability, the limits of stability (LOS) and the distance the center of pressure (CoP) moved were measured using a BT4 portable force platform. The Berg balance scale (BBS) and the timed up and go (TUG) test were also used to assess balance before and after the exercises. [Results] Changes in LOS were significant in the anterior, posterior, left, and right directions in each group, and the interactions between the two groups were significant in the posterior, left, and right directions. The changes in TUG and BBS results between pre-test and the post-test were statistically significant in the two groups, and also between the groups. [Conclusion] Visual feedback training had a positive effect on balance when ankle joint strategy exercises were performed by stroke patients to improve balance. PMID:26355721

  5. Fracture Characterization through Multi-Physics Joint Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, S.; Edmiston, J. K.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Natural and man-made fractures tend to significantly impact the behavior of a subsurface system - with both desirable and undesirable consequences. Thus, the description, characterization, and prediction of fractured systems requires careful conceptualization and a defensible modeling approach that is tailored to the objectives of a specific application. We review some of these approaches and the related data needs, and discuss the use of multi-physics joint inversion techniques to identify and characterize the relevant features of the fracture system. In particular, we demonstrate the potential use of a non-isothermal, multiphase flow simulator coupled to a thermo-poro-elastic model for the calculation of observable deformations during injection-production operations. This model is integrated into a joint inversion framework for the estimation of geometrical, hydrogeological, rockmechanical, thermal, and statistical parameters representing the fractured porous medium.

  6. Total ankle replacement. Early experiences with STAR prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Murnaghan, J. M.; Warnock, D. S.; Henderson, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Early designs of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) had a high failure rate. More recent experience with the 3-piece, meniscal bearing, total ankle replacement has been more promising. We report a review of the early results of our first 22 prostheses in 20 patients undergoing Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) in Northern Ireland. There was a mean follow-up time of 26 months. Seventeen patients are pain-free at the ankle joint during normal daily activities. Two of the early cases have required revision surgery due to technical errors. Other complications have included malleolar fractures, poor wound healing and postoperative stiffness. These early results show high levels of patient satisfaction, and we are encouraged to continue with total ankle arthroplasty. There is a steep initial learning curve and use of TAR should be restricted to foot and ankle surgeons. Images Fig 1 Figs 2a and b Figs 2 c and d PMID:16022128

  7. Total ankle replacement. Early experiences with STAR prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Murnaghan, J M; Warnock, D S; Henderson, S A

    2005-05-01

    Early designs of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) had a high failure rate. More recent experience with the 3-piece, meniscal bearing, total ankle replacement has been more promising. We report a review of the early results of our first 22 prostheses in 20 patients undergoing Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) in Northern Ireland. There was a mean follow-up time of 26 months. Seventeen patients are pain-free at the ankle joint during normal daily activities. Two of the early cases have required revision surgery due to technical errors. Other complications have included malleolar fractures, poor wound healing and postoperative stiffness. These early results show high levels of patient satisfaction, and we are encouraged to continue with total ankle arthroplasty. There is a steep initial learning curve and use of TAR should be restricted to foot and ankle surgeons. PMID:16022128

  8. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  9. Clinical results of resection arthrodesis by triangular external fixation for posttraumatic arthrosis of the ankle joint in 89 cases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The methods for ankle arthrodesis differ significantly, probably a sign that no method is clearly superior to others. In the last ten years there is a clear favour toward internal fixation. We retrospectively evaluate the technique and evaluate the clinical long term results of external fixation in a triangular frame. Patients and Methods From 1994 to 2001 a consecutive series of 95 patients with end stage arthritis of the ankle joint were treated. Retrospectively the case notes were evaluated regarding trauma history, medical complaints, further injuries and illnesses, walking and pain status and occupational issues and the clinical examination before arthrodesis. Mean age at the index procedure was 45.4 years (18-82), 67 patients were male (70.5%). Via a bilateral approach the malleoli and the joint surfaces were resected. An AO fixator was applied with two Steinmann-nails inserted with approximately 8 cm distance in the distal tibia, one in the neck of the talus and one in the dorsal calcaneus. The fixator was removed after approximately 12 weeks. Follow up examination at mean 4.4 years included a standardised questionnaire and a clinical examination including the criteria of the AOFAS-Score and radiographs. Results: Due to different complications, 8 (8.9%) further surgical procedures were necessary including 1 below knee amputation. In 4 patients a non-union of the ankle arthrodesis developed (4.5%). The mean AOFAS score improved from 20.8 to 69.3 points. Conclusion Non-union rates and clinical results of arthrodesis by triangular external fixation of the ankle joint do not differ to internal fixation methods. The complication rate and the reduced patient comfort reserve this method mainly for infected arthritis and complicated soft tissue situations. PMID:19258207

  10. Oscillation of the human ankle joint in response to applied sinusoidal torque on the foot

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Gyan C.; Gottlieb, Gerald L.

    1977-01-01

    1. Low-frequency (3-30 Hz) oscillatory rotation of the ankle joint in plantarflexion—dorsiflexion was generated with a torque motor. Torque, rotation about the ankle and electromyograms (e.m.g.s) for the gastrocnemius—soleus and the anterior tibial muscles were recorded. 2. Fourier coefficients at each drive frequency were used to calculate the effective compliance (ratio of rotation and torque). The compliance has a sharp resonance when tonic, voluntary muscle activity is present. 3. The resonant frequency of compliance is between 3 and 8 Hz. The location of the resonant frequency and the magnitude of the compliance at resonance depend upon both the degree of tonic muscle activity and the amplitude of the driving torque. The resonant frequency increases with increasing tonic activity. 4. With tonic muscle activity, the compliance in the frequency range below resonance increases with increasing amplitudes of driving torque. 5. The e.m.g., when evoked by the rhythmic stretch, lags the start of stretching by between 50 and 70 msec. 6. When tonic muscle activity is present, the resonant frequency of the stretch reflex is between 5 and 6·5 Hz. 7. Following the start of driven oscillation at frequencies near resonance, slowly increasing amplitudes of angular rotation (to a limit) are observed. 8. Distortion (from the sinusoidal wave shape) of angular rotation is frequently observed with drive frequencies between 8 and 12 Hz during which there sometimes occur spontaneous recurrences of oscillation at the drive frequency. For the angular rotation, a significant portion of the power may be in subharmonic frequency components of the drive frequency when that frequency is between 8 and 12 Hz. 9. Self-sustaining oscillation (clonus) near the resonant frequency of the compliance is sometimes observed after the modulation signal to the motor is turned off. This is most often seen when the gastrocnemius—soleus muscles are fatigued. Clonus may be evoked by driven

  11. [Osteosynthesis after periprosthetic fractures of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    von Matthey, F; Ruchholtz, S; Biberthaler, P; Hanschen, M

    2016-04-01

    Periprosthetic fractures around the knee joint are of increasing relevance due to increasing numbers of total knee replacements and increasing life expectations. These fractures can be a real challenge due to an often limited patient compliance, reduced bone quality and impaired bone perfusion of potential intramedullary shafts resulting in poor healing and lack of fixation options for screws. These fractures necessitate special knowledge and approaches, which are systematically dealt with in this article, beginning with the correct diagnostics through to the most recent developments in the field of osteosynthetic techniques. The trends of minimally invasive techniques are presented and the options and limitations are described. PMID:26992714

  12. The Effect of Velocity of Joint Mobilization on Corticospinal Excitability in Individuals With a History of Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Piraino, Andrew; Lee, Ya-Yun; Smith, Jo Armour; Johnson, Sean; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Joint mobilization and manipulation decrease pain and improve patient function. Yet, the processes underlying these changes are not well understood. Measures of corticospinal excitability provide insight into potential mechanisms mediated by the central nervous system. Objectives To investigate the differential effects of joint mobilization and manipulation at the talocrural joint on corticospinal excitability in individuals with resolved symptoms following ankle sprain. Methods Twenty-seven participants with a history of ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the control, joint mobilization, or thrust manipulation group. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were obtained with transcranial magnetic stimulation at rest and during active contraction of the tibialis anterior. The slopes of MEP/CSP input/output curves and the maximal MEP/CSP values were calculated to indicate corticospinal excitability. Behavioral measures, including ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance, were evaluated. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance of the MEP slope showed a significant group-by-time interaction for the tibialis anterior at rest (P = .002) and during active contraction (P = .042). After intervention, the thrust manipulation group had an increase in corticospinal excitability, while the corticospinal excitability decreased in the mobilization group. The thrust manipulation group, but not other groups, also demonstrated a significant increase in the maximal MEP amplitude of the tibialis anterior after intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that joint manipulation and mobilization have different effects on corticospinal excitability. The increased corticospinal excitability following thrust manipulation may provide a window for physical therapists to optimize muscle recruitment and subsequently movement. The trial was registered at

  13. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic stroke were divided into three groups: MWM (n = 12), WBE (n = 8), and control (n = 10). All groups attended physical therapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Subjects in the MWM group performed mobilization with movement exercises, whilst participants in the WBE group performed weight-bearing exercises. Knee peak torque, ankle range of motion, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] Knee extensor peak torque increased significantly in both MWM and WBE groups. However, only the MWM group showed significant improvement in passive and active ankle range of motion and gait velocity, among the three groups. [Conclusion] Ankle joint mobilization with movement intervention is more effective than simple weight-bearing intervention in improving gait speed in stroke patients with limited ankle motion. PMID:27065565

  14. Fracture dislocation of carpometacarpal joints: a missed injury.

    PubMed

    Gaheer, Rajinder Singh; Ferdinand, Rupert D

    2011-05-01

    Fracture dislocation of the carpometacarpal joints on the ulnar side of the hand is an uncommon injury. These are high-energy injuries seen in motorcyclists and boxers. The mechanism of injury involves violent, forceful dorsiflexion of the wrist combined with longitudinal impact on the closed hand. This article reports a case of fracture of the base of the middle finger with dislocation of the ring and little finger carpometacarpal joints. On first examination, a diagnosis of isolated, minimally-displaced, middle-metacarpal base fracture was made and deemed suitable for nonoperative management. The hand was splinted in a plaster-of-Paris slab. Later, a true lateral radiograph showed the exact nature of the injury. The fracture was successfully treated with closed reduction under general anesthesia and transfixation using Kirschner wires. Functional results were excellent with return to work at 10 weeks and excellent grip strength at 14 weeks. This injury may be missed in an acute setting in a busy accident and emergency unit. Swelling around the wrist with shortening of the knuckle should alert the clinician towards the possibility of such an injury. On routine anteroposterior view, overlap of joint surfaces, loss of parallelism, and asymmetry at the carpometacarpal joints should raise suspicion of the possibility of a subtle carpometacarpal injury. This article highlights the importance of a high index of suspicion, a true lateral radiograph, and careful evaluation of radiographs in diagnosing these injuries. Intensive postoperative physiotherapy is vital to achieving a satisfactory outcome. PMID:21598884

  15. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle surgery; Arthroscopy - ankle; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic ... You will likely receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means you will be asleep and unable ...

  16. Military Exercises, Knee and Ankle Joint Position Sense, and Injury in Male Conscripts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Azma, Kamran; Naseh, Iman; Emadifard, Reza; Etemadi, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Context: The high incidence of lower limb injuries associated with physical exercises in military conscripts suggests that fatigue may be a risk factor for injuries. Researchers have hypothesized that lower limb injuries may be related to altered ankle and knee joint position sense (JPS) due to fatigue. Objective: To evaluate if military exercises could alter JPS and to examine the possible relation of JPS to future lower extremity injuries in military service. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 50 male conscripts (age = 21.4 ± 2.3 years, height = 174.5 ± 6.4 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 6.3 kg) from a unique military base were recruited randomly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants performed 8 weeks of physical activities at the beginning of a military course. In the first part of the study, we instructed participants to recognize predetermined positions before and after military exercises so we could examine the effects of military exercise on JPS. The averages of the absolute error and the variable error of 3 trials were recorded. We collected data on the frequency of lower extremity injuries over 8 weeks. Next, the participants were divided into 2 groups: injured and uninjured. Separate 2 × 2 × 2 (group-by-time-by-joint) mixed-model analyses of variance were used to determine main effects and interactions of these factors for each JPS measure. In the second part of the study, we examined whether the effects of fatigue on JPS were related to the development of injury during an 8-week training program. We calculated Hedges effect sizes for JPS changes postexercise in each group and compared change scores between groups. Results: We found group-by-time interactions for all JPS variables (F range = 2.86–4.05, P < .01). All participants showed increases in JPS errors postexercise (P < .01), but the injured group had greater changes for all the variables (P < .01). Conclusions: Military conscripts who sustained lower

  17. Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation and Medication on Strength, Bradykinesia, and Electromyographic Patterns of the Ankle Joint in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, David E.; Prodoehl, Janey; Sturman, Molly M.; Bakay, Roy A.E.; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the control of movement in 12 patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) after they received surgically implanted high-frequency stimulating electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The experiment studied ankle strength, movement velocity, and the associated electromyographic patterns in PD patients, six of whom had tremor at the ankle. The patients were studied off treatment, ON STN deep brain stimulation (DBS), on medication, and on medication plus STN DBS. Twelve matched control subjects were also examined. Medication alone and STN DBS alone increased patients’ ankle strength, ankle velocity, agonist muscle burst amplitude, and agonist burst duration, while reducing the number of agonist bursts during movement. These findings were similar for PD patients with and without tremor. The combination of medication plus STN DBS normalized maximal strength at the ankle joint, but ankle movement velocity and electromyographic patterns were not normalized. The findings are the first to demonstrate that STN DBS and medication increase strength and movement velocity at the ankle joint. PMID:16124011

  18. Assessment of Ankle and Hindfoot Stability and Joint Pressures Using a Human Cadaveric Model of a Large Lateral Talar Process Excision

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E.; Richards, R. Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability. A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm3 and 10 cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment. In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm3 fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm3 excision in comparison with the pre-excison state. An excision of up to 10 cm3 of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection. PMID:25789950

  19. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO THE REHABILITATION OF A COLLEGIATE FOOTBALL PLAYER FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Lee D.; Musto, Tony; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A.; Gailey, Robert S.; Kelley, William P.; Alemi, Timothy J.; Espinosa, Braulio; Mandler, Eli; Scavo, Vincent A.; West, Dustin C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Multiple rehabilitation factors including overall wellness need to be considered when an athlete returns to sport after an injury. The purpose of this case report is to describe a multidisciplinary approach for return to sport of a Division I collegiate football player following a traumatic ankle fracture requiring surgical repair. The assessment and treatment approach included the use of a performance-based physical therapy outcome measure, self-reported functional abilities, body composition assessments, and nutritional counseling. Case Description A 21 year-old running back fractured his lateral malleolus due to a mechanism of injury of excessive eversion with external rotation of the ankle. Surgical intervention included an open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) of the fibula and syndesmosis. In addition to six months of rehabilitation, the patient received consultations from the team sports nutritionist specialist to provide dietary counseling and body composition testing. The Comprehensive High-level Activity Mobility Predictor-Sport (CHAMP-S), a performance-based outcome measure, self-report on the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI-ADL, FADI-S), and body composition testing using whole body densitometry (BOD POD®), were administered throughout rehabilitation. Outcomes The subject was successfully rehabilitated, returned to his starting role, and subsequently was drafted by a National Football League (NFL) franchise. High-level mobility returned to above pre-injury values, achieving 105% of his preseason CHAMP-S score at discharge. Self-reported function on the FADI-ADL and FADI-Sport improved to 100% at discharge. Body fat percentages decreased (13.3% to 11.9%) and fat mass decreased (12.0 kg to 11.0kg). Lean body mass (78.1 kg to 81.5 kg) and lbm/in increased (1.14 kg/in to 1.19 kg/in). His BMI changed from 29.8 kg/m2 to 30.6 kg/m2. Discussion This case report illustrates the positive effects of a

  20. Functional outcome of tarsometatarsal joint fracture dislocation managed according to Myerson classification

    PubMed Central

    YU, Xiao; PANG, Qing-Jiang; YANG, Chang-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Objective : To summarize the functional outcome of tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation managed according to Myerson classification. Methods : Total eighty cases of tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation were treated from Mar 2004 to Feb 2012. According to the Myerson classification, there were 14 cases in type A, 12 cases in type B1, 28 cases in type B2, 11 cases in type C1 and 15 cases in type C2. All the cases were treated with open reduction and internal fixation and the incisions and implants were also selected according to the Myerson classification. X-ray was examined during the follow-up period and functional evaluation was carried out by American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) midfoot score system. Analysis of variance was used to test the different types of Myerson classification. Results : Sixty eight patients got a mean follow-up of 24 months (15-36 months). No patient suffered from infection, skin flap necrosis and X-ray showed there were no implants loosening or breakage. The mean AOFAS score was 88.4(47-100) and excellent and good result was 89.7%. The differences among Myerson classifications showed that there were statistical significance between type B and type A, type C (P<0.05) Three patients suffered from severe pain and difficult walking, X-ray showed the ambiguity of the joint space, which can be diagnosed as posttraumatic arthritis. One patient had arthrodesis finally. Conclusion : The Myerson classification is helpful to make preoperative plan and judging prognosis to the tarsometatarsal joint injuries. In type B, single or double incisions with screw or plate fixation is enough, while in type A and type C, double or triple incisions with screw or plate fixation in medial joints and Kirschner wire fixation in lateral joints are needed. Postoperatively, the type B patients had better prognosis than type A and type C patients. However, the concomitant injuries around the tarsometatarsal joint were not included in Myerson

  1. Talus fractures: surgical principles.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Jennings, Meagan; Hamilton, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    Surgical treatment of talus fractures can challenge even the most skilled foot and ankle surgeon. Complicated fracture patterns combined with joint dislocation of variable degrees require accurate assessment, sound understanding of principles of fracture care, and broad command of internal fixation techniques needed for successful surgical care. Elimination of unnecessary soft tissue dissection, a low threshold for surgical reduction, liberal use of malleolar osteotomy to expose body fracture, and detailed attention to fracture reduction and joint alignment are critical to the success of treatment. Even with the best surgical care complications are common and seem to correlate with injury severity and open injuries. PMID:19121756

  2. Fracturing behavior of aluminum alloys with welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Salita, D. S.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Lependin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys with welded joints are investigated. The joints are produced by the friction stir welding under various conditions. This fact is used for studying the principles and patterns of defect structure development. Mechanical properties are evaluated by static tension tests. The impact of welding process conditions on loading curves and strength properties is analysed. Fracture surface structures for samples with and without welded joints are studied, and results are compared. It is revealed, that differences in deformation behavior and mechanical properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys produced under different welding process conditions are caused by developing of structure defects in a welded joints, mostly, nonuniformities/discontinuities of various types. The obtained results can be used for improvement and development of new welding process conditions for aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  3. Effects of muscle strength asymmetry between left and right on isokinetic strength of the knee and ankle joints depending on athletic performance level

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Chun, Sungyung; Seo, Byoungdo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to collect basic data on the effect of asymmetry on the muscle strength of the left and right knee and ankle joints of soccer players at varying athletic performance levels, to guide the development of improved exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine soccer players at three athletic performance levels participated: 15 professional, 16 amateur, and 18 college. Knee extensor and flexor strength were measured at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, and ankle plantar flexor and dorsiflexor strength were measured at 30°/sec and at 120°/sec. Variables were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. [Results] College soccer players showed greater muscle strength at 60°/sec and 180°/sec in the knee extension muscles of both the right and the left sides, lower muscle strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec in the dorsiflexor of the right ankle, and similar levels of asymmetry between left and right. The maximum muscle strength on the same side significantly differed in the right ankle joint, with asymmetry between left and right at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that muscle strength asymmetry in the ankle joint may lead to counterbalancing muscle strengthening of the knee joint to maintain the center of body mass. PMID:27190469

  4. Effects of muscle strength asymmetry between left and right on isokinetic strength of the knee and ankle joints depending on athletic performance level.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Chun, Sungyung; Seo, Byoungdo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to collect basic data on the effect of asymmetry on the muscle strength of the left and right knee and ankle joints of soccer players at varying athletic performance levels, to guide the development of improved exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine soccer players at three athletic performance levels participated: 15 professional, 16 amateur, and 18 college. Knee extensor and flexor strength were measured at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, and ankle plantar flexor and dorsiflexor strength were measured at 30°/sec and at 120°/sec. Variables were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. [Results] College soccer players showed greater muscle strength at 60°/sec and 180°/sec in the knee extension muscles of both the right and the left sides, lower muscle strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec in the dorsiflexor of the right ankle, and similar levels of asymmetry between left and right. The maximum muscle strength on the same side significantly differed in the right ankle joint, with asymmetry between left and right at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that muscle strength asymmetry in the ankle joint may lead to counterbalancing muscle strengthening of the knee joint to maintain the center of body mass. PMID:27190469

  5. [Fractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint: Diagnostic and operative therapy options].

    PubMed

    Unglaub, F; Langer, M F; Hahn, P; Müller, L P; Ahrens, C; Spies, C K

    2016-02-01

    Joint fractures of the fingers often entail operative interventions in contrast to extra-articular fractures. These types of fracture are inclined to dislocate in addition to the actual fracture. The proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint in particular often shows comminuted fractures due to the long leverage of the finger and a relatively small diameter of the joint. The clinical examination, X-ray diagnostics and if necessary computed tomography allow the classification into stable and unstable fractures. Unstable fractures must be treated by surgical reduction and fixation. A multitude of operative techniques are available for these mostly complicated fractures. The foremost goal is a stable osteosynthesis of the fracture with repositioning of the dislocation, which enables early physiotherapy in order to prevent tendon adhesion and contracture. This article presents the different types of PIP joint fractures, their specific surgical treatment and postoperative treatment regimens. PMID:26826026

  6. Shoe collar height effect on athletic performance, ankle joint kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated maximum-effort side-cutting performance.

    PubMed

    Lam, Gilbert Wing Kai; Park, Eun Jung; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man

    2015-01-01

    Side-step cutting manoeuvres comprise the coordination between planting and non-planting legs. Increased shoe collar height is expected to influence ankle biomechanics of both legs and possibly respective cutting performance. This study examined the shoe collar height effect on kinematics and kinetics of planting and non-planting legs during an unanticipated side-step cutting. Fifteen university basketball players performed maximum-effort side-step cutting to the left 45° direction or a straight ahead run in response to a random light signal. Seven successful cutting trials were collected for each condition. Athletic performance, ground reaction force, ankle kinematics and kinetics of both legs were analysed using paired t-tests. Results indicated that high-collar shoes resulted in less ankle inversion and external rotation during initial contact for the planting leg. The high-collar shoes also exhibited a smaller ankle range of motion in the sagittal and transverse planes for both legs, respectively. However, no collar effect was found for ankle moments and performance indicators including cutting performance time, ground contact time, propulsion ground reaction forces and impulses. These findings indicated that high-collar shoes altered ankle positioning and restricted ankle joint freedom movements in both legs, while no negative effect was found for athletic cutting performance. PMID:25671398

  7. Use of dual Euler angles to quantify the three-dimensional joint motion and its application to the ankle joint complex.

    PubMed

    Ying, Ning; Kim, Wangdo

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents a modified Euler angles method, dual Euler angles approach, to describe general spatial human joint motions. In dual Euler angles approach, the three-dimensional joint motion is considered as three successive screw motions with respect to the axes of the moving segment coordinate system; accordingly, the screw motion displacements are represented by dual Euler angles. The algorithm for calculating dual Euler angles from coordinates of markers on the moving segment is also provided in this study. As an example, the proposed method is applied to describe motions of ankle joint complex during dorsiflexion-plantarflexion. A Flock of Birds electromagnetic tracking device (FOB) was used to measure joint motion in vivo. Preliminary accuracy tests on a gimbal structure demonstrate that the mean errors of dual Euler angles evaluated by using source data from FOB are less than 1 degrees for rotations and 1mm for translations, respectively. Based on the pilot study, FOB is feasible for quantifying human joint motions using dual Euler angles approach. PMID:12445618

  8. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  9. Design of a Robotic Ankle Joint for a Microspine-Based Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thatte, Nitish

    2011-01-01

    Successful robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids necessitates a method of securely anchoring to the surface of these bodies without gravitational assistance. Microspine grip- per arrays that can grasp rock faces are a potential solution to this problem. A key component of a future microspine-based rover will be the ankle used to attach each microspine gripper to the robot. The ankle's purpose is twofold: 1) to allow the gripper to conform to the rock so a higher percentage of microspines attach to the surface, and 2) to neutralize torques that may dislodge the grippers from the wall. Parts were developed using computer aided design and manufactured using a variety of methods including selective laser sintering, CNC milling, and traditional manual machining techniques. Upon completion of the final prototype, the gripper and ankle system was tested to demonstrate robotic engagement and disengagement of the gripper and to determine load bearing ability. The immediate application of this project is to out t the Lemur IIb robot so it can climb and hang from rock walls.

  10. Dorsal Buttress Plate Fixation of Ulnar Carpometacarpal Joint Fracture Dislocations.

    PubMed

    Tan, En Si; Chao, Tay Shian

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for open reduction and internal fixation of early and unstable ulnar (fourth and/or fifth) carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) fracture subluxations or dislocations using a dorsal buttress plate. In ulnar CMCJ fracture dislocations, the metacarpal has a tendency to displace dorsally and proximally when there is an axial load. Using the dorsal buttress plate method of fixation, a plate is fixed proximally to the hamate, aligned parallel and dorsal to the metacarpal to act as a buttress, to resist this movement. To preserve the fourth and the fifth CMCJ mobility, the distal end of the plate is not fixed to the metacarpal base. We illustrate the use of this technique on 4 patients who had different patterns of injury at the ulnar CMCJ. All patients regained excellent range of motion and function. None of the patients had redisplacement or nonunion of fracture. The dorsal buttress plate is a viable option for fixation of early and unstable ulnar CMCJ fracture subluxations or dislocations. PMID:27077465

  11. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  12. Posterior talar fracture with dislocation of both talo-navicular and subtalar joints: a variant type II of the Sneppens classification

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old man fell from a ladder, thus causing an axial compression injury to the right ankle. Severe deformity was evident and the ankle could not be reduced by simple manipulation. The skin was tented and appearing critically contused. Radiographs revealed an oblique fracture of the posterior aspect of the talar body with dislocation of both the talo-navicular and subtalar joints, an injury previously not described in the literature. The fracture–dislocation was anatomically reduced within 3 h of presentation and stability achieved with two headless buried compression screws. CT scan confirmed anatomical reduction and the patient remained non-weight bearing in a cast for 6 weeks. One year postoperatively, the patient remains pain-free with no radiological signs of avascular necrosis of the talus. This injury is unique and despite its severity and soft tissue compromise good quality reduction and internal fixation resulted in an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:22847568

  13. Comparisons of knee and ankle joint angles and ground reaction force according to functional differences during single-leg drop landing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine potential predictors of functional instability of the knee and ankle joints during single-leg drop landing based on the prior history of injury. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 24 collegiate soccer players without pain or dysfunction. To compare the differences between the stable and unstable sides during single-leg drop landing, 8 motion analysis cameras and a force plate were used. The Cortex 4 software was used for a biomechanical analysis of 3 events. An independent t-test was used for statistical comparison between both sides; p<0.05 indicated significance. [Results] The knee joint movements showed gradual flexion in the sagittal plane. The unstable-side ankle joint showed plantar flexion of approximately 2° relative to the stable side. In the coronal plane, the unstable-side knee joint differed from the stable side in its tendency for valgus movement. The unstable-side ankle joint showed contrasting movement compared with the stable side, and the difference was significant. Regarding the vertical ground reaction force, the stable side showed maximum knee flexion that was approximately 0.1 BW lower than that of the unstable side. [Conclusion] Increasing the flexion angle of the knee joint can help prevent injury during landing. PMID:27190444

  14. Models of fracture lineaments - Joint swarms, fracture corridors and faults in crystalline rocks, and their genetic relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielsen, Roy H.; Braathen, Alvar

    2014-07-01

    Fracture lineaments in crystalline and metamorphic rocks of southern Norway can be subdivided into joint swarms, fracture corridors and faults, depending on displacement, the fracture mode and patterns, and the presence of fault rocks. Their physical appearance as lineaments seen by remote sensing is not discernible, as they define km-long and narrow tabular zones of high fracture intensity. Intrinsically, fracture zonation becomes better expressed from joint swarms to fracture corridors and especially faults as a consequence of increasing accumulate strain. Joint swarms and fracture corridors commonly reveal a symmetric fracture zonation on both sides of its core, whereas inclined extensional faults tend to have asymmetric patterns with enhanced strain and a wider damage zone in the hanging wall. Fracture lineament can be mapped in subzones A-B (core), which are typically some cm up to some tens of meters wide. Common structural elements are fault rocks/shear zones, lenses, and a network of fractures often with very high fracture frequency. Secondary minerals are common. Outside this, subzones C-D (damage zone) are commonly 20-50-m\\ wide with lower fracture intensity of lineament-parallel fracturing, defining the topographic boundary of the lineament. Mineralisation is rarer. The transitional subzone E of multi-orientation fractures defines the transition to the background fracture system. We propose a model for the classification and development of fracture lineaments, applying their architecture (intrinsic geometry, spatial fracture pattern and spatial distribution of fault rocks) as tools for the systematic description. This links fault growth processes and mechanisms that can be ascribed to strain hardening and softening scenarios in a model of fault architecture.

  15. The contribution of anterior deltoid ligament to ankle stability in isolated lateral malleolar fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Jang, Kyu Sun; Choi, Gi Won; Jeong, Chan Dong; Hong, Suk Joo; Yoon, Min A; Kim, Hak Jun

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of isolated lateral malleolar fractures with deltoid ligament rupture remains controversial. We prospectively analysed 35 patients with isolated lateral malleolar fractures during 2006-2013. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to assess the degree of reduction, ligament damage, and stability. Internal fixation was performed for all unstable valgus fractures with unacceptable fracture parameters. Fractures with residual valgus instability after fixation underwent anterior deltoid repair. The mean anterior deltoid ligament grade based on MRI was significantly different between the high-grade unstable group and the stable and low-grade unstable groups (p=0.037 and 0.004, respectively). Postoperative medial clear space measurements were not significantly different between groups. MRI was shown to be a useful tool in the preoperative identification of isolated lateral malleolus fractures prone to valgus instability. In the case of high-grade unstable fractures of the lateral malleolus, repair of the anterior deltoid ligament is adequate for restoring medial stability. PMID:27133289

  16. Changes in the radiological measurements of the tibiofibular syndesmal area in patients with Weber C ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction, internal fixation, and transyndesmal screw.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, S; Torres-Gómez, A; Salas-Morales, G A; Hernández-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    The tibiofibular syndesmosis provides stability to the ankle mortise. The ankle syndesmosis is compromised in all Weber C type injuries. The radiographic method described by Merle DAubigné considers the bony relationships as a measure of syndesmotic widening. We sought to investigate whether the patients with a C type ankle fracture treated with ORIF and placement of a transyndesmal screw have an increment of the tibiofibular space and decrease of the tibiofibular overlap after the transyndesmal screw is removed. Our sample included 52 patients with Weber C ankle fractures treated by ORIF and transyndesmal screw at a level II trauma center. We measured the tibiofibular clear space and tibiofibular overlap in each phase of the treatment. The transyndesmal screw was removed at day 55.56 (± 21.83). We found an increase of the tibiofibular overlap of 0.20 mm (± 2.29, p = 0.532); and 0.21 mm (± 0.97, p = 0.146) in the tibiofibular clear space. The changes of 2.38% in the tibiofibular overlap and 5.29% in the tibiofibular clear space between the postoperative and post-removal periods were not statistically significant. After removal of the syndesmal screw, there is a slight radiographic broadening of the syndesmosis; however, it is small and statistically not significant. PMID:27403518

  17. [Talus fractures--fractures of the most important tarsal bone].

    PubMed

    Klaue, K

    2004-07-01

    The talus is the key bone of the foot due to its location between the ankle and the subtalar joints. Through the flexion and extension of the ankle joint, the talus is the "propulsive bone" situated at the root of the first ray and the hallux. Through the subtalar and talo-navicular joints, the talus allows the foot to be "suspended" using a fancy spring mechanism involving ligaments and tendons. The talus thus transmits forces through two important joints without any direct muscular constraint. The talo-calcaneo-navicular joint may be called the "coxa pedis" due to the anatomical and functional similitudes with the coxofemoral joint ("coxa pelvis"). Fractures of the talus are rare. Talus fractures can be classified in "central" and "peripheral" fractures. Central fractures occur through a strong axial blow provided that the ankle and coxa pedis are locked by extrinsic muscular contraction. Peripheral fractures instead occur in an extreme position of the ankle or the coxa pedis, with a subluxation or complete dislocation of one or more of those joints. Central fractures produce a bony solution of continuity in between at least two of the ankle, subtalar and talo-navicular joints. Peripheral fractures mostly do implement joint surfaces which are sheared off. Aim of treating talus fractures is precise and stable reduction of the fragments because most often, the fractures cross the articular layers. The surgical approaches are critical, especially in displaced central fractures, because the reduction may require visual control all around the bone. There are three approaches which might be used as single approaches or combined simultaneously: the anteromedial approach along the subtalar joint from the navicular to the retro-malleolar region, the anterolateral approach centered on the sinus tarsi (Ollier) and the postero-lateral approach (Gallie). In many cases, a joint distraction device may help visualization of the different joint spaces as well as assist reduction

  18. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential. PMID:8536029

  19. The effect of ankle joint muscle strengthening training and static muscle stretching training on stroke patients' C.o.p sway amplitude.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Joo Soo; Lee, Jin Hwan

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This study implement ankle joint dorsiflexion training for ankle muscle the weakness that impairs stroke patients' gait performance, to examine the effect of the training on stroke patients' plantar pressure and gait ability. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 36 stroke patients diagnosed with stroke due to cerebral infarction or cerebral hemorrhage performed the training. Static muscle stretching was performed four times a week for 20 minutes at a time for 6 weeks by the training group. Ankle dorsiflexor training was performed four times a week, two sets per time in the case of females and three sets per time in the case of males for 6 weeks, by another group. Center of pressure sway amplitude was measured using the F-scan system during gait. All subjects were assessed with the same measurements at a pre-study examination and reassessed at eight weeks. Data were analyzed statistically using the paired t-test and one-way ANOVA. [Results] Among the between ankle dorsiflexor training group, static muscle stretching group, and control group, the difference before and after the training were proven to be statistically significant. [Conclusion] Compared to other training groups, the ankle muscle strength training group showed statistically significant increases of forward thrust at stroke patients' toe-off which positively affected stroke patients' ability to perform gait. PMID:24409032

  20. Bilateral Ankle and Subtalar Joint Fusion Secondary to Guillain Barré-Induced Foot Drop.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Jay; Mathew, Bindu; Marks, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is a serious disorder that occurs when the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the peripheral nervous system. This leads to nerve inflammation and damage that can cause muscle weakness and/or paralysis, including foot drop. Therapy ranges from supportive measures, such as physical therapy, to surgical intervention. It appears from the published data that these patients, generally, have been left to their own devices, because no known cure is available, necessitating reliance on others for their daily activities and ambulation. We present a unique surgical option, with a follow-up period of 24 months, in which bilateral subtalar and ankle fusion allowed unassisted ambulation to a patient who might otherwise have never walked again. PMID:25128306

  1. Topography of human ankle joint: focused on posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Yi-Suk; Han, Seung-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Most of foot pain occurs by the entrapment of the tibial nerve and its branches. Some studies have reported the location of the tibial nerve; however, textbooks and researches have not described the posterior tibial artery and the relationship between the tibal nerve and the posterior tibial artery in detail. The purpose of this study was to analyze the location of neurovascular structures and bifurcations of the nerve and artery in the ankle region based on the anatomical landmarks. Ninety feet of embalmed human cadavers were examined. All measurements were evaluated based on a reference line. Neurovascular structures were classified based on the relationship between the tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery. The bifurcation of arteries and nerves were expressed by X- and Y-coordinates. Based on the reference line, 9 measurements were examined. The most common type I (55.6%), was the posterior tibial artery located medial to the tibial nerve. Neurovascular structures were located less than 50% of the distance between M and C from M at the reference line. The bifurcation of the posterior tibial artery was 41% in X-coordinate, -38% in Y-coordinate, and that of the tibial nerve was 48%, and -10%, respectively. Thirteen measurements and classification showed statistically significant differences between both sexes (P<0.05). It is determined the average position of neurovascular structures in the human ankle region and recorded the differences between the sexes and amongst the populations. These results would be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of foot pain. PMID:26140224

  2. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern. PMID:27152288

  3. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern. PMID:27152288

  4. Ankle Fractures and Modality of Hospital Transport at a Single Level 1 Trauma Center: Does Transport by Helicopter or Ground Ambulance Influence the Incidence of Complications?

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sarah E; Ihejirika, Rivka C; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Lang, Maximilian F; Estevez-Ordonez, Dagoberto; Prablek, Marc A; Chern, Alexander Y; Thakore, Rachel V; Obremskey, William T; Joyce, David; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    In an era of concern over the rising cost of health care, cost-effectiveness of auxiliary services merits careful evaluation. We compared costs and benefits of Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) with Ground Emergency Medical Service (GEMS) in patients with an isolated ankle fracture. A medical record review was conducted for patients with an isolated ankle fracture who had been transported to a level 1 trauma center by either HEMS or GEMS from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010. We abstracted demographic data, fracture grade, complications, and transportation mode. Transportation costs were obtained by examining medical center financial records. A total of 303 patients was included in the analysis. Of 87 (28.71%) HEMS patients, 53 (60.92%) had sustained closed injuries and 34 (39.08%) had open injuries. Of the 216 (71.29%) GEMS patients, 156 (72.22%) had closed injuries and 60 (27.78%) had open injuries. No significant difference was seen between the groups regarding the percentage of patients with open fractures or the grade of the open fracture (p = .07). No significant difference in the rate of complications was found between the 2 groups (p = 18). The mean baseline cost to transport a patient via HEMS was $10,220 + a $108/mile surcharge, whereas the mean transport cost using GEMS was $976 per patient + $16/mile. Because the HEMS mode of emergency transport did not significantly improve patient outcomes, health systems should reconsider the use of HEMS for patients with isolated ankle fractures. PMID:25840759

  5. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining. PMID:24485809

  6. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  7. Doctor, I sprained my ankle.

    PubMed

    How, Choon How; Tan, Ken Jin

    2014-10-01

    Ankle sprains constitute the majority of ankle injuries, and result in pain, limited mobility/exercise and loss of school/work days. Ankle sprains involve at least one of the ankle ligaments and range from a micro tear to complete tear of the ligament or group of ligaments. The most common mechanism of ankle sprains is inversion stress of a plantar-flexed foot, while the most frequently injured ligament is the anterior talofibular ligament. The attending clinician needs to stratify the risk of fracture through history-taking and physical examination, manage the pain, assess long‑term complications and provide certification for rest and recovery. The Ottawa ankle rules may be useful. Graduated exercises to maintain the ankle's range of motion should be started early, after the resolution of initial pain and swelling. The risk of recurrent ankle injuries is often a combination of both mechanical and functional disabilities. PMID:25631892

  8. Fracture toughness of thick section dissimilar electron beam weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, M.; Junghans, E.

    1994-12-31

    Microstructural investigations as well as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness test based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics were performed on single pass, full penetration similar and dissimilar electron beam (EB) welds of 40 mm thick 316L type austenitic steel and high alloyed fine tempered martensitic 9Cr 1Mo Nb V (P91 -ASTM A213) steel. The latter modified steel has been developed to fill up the gap between 12Cr steel and austenitic stainless steels with respect to the high temperature properties and better weldability. Furthermore, it shows a small thermal expansion coefficient and is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking like the austenitic steel. The weldment properties were evaluated by microstructural analysis, microhardness, Charpy V- notch impact, and by newly developed flat microtensile specimens (0.5 mm thick). The dissimilar EB weld metal and HAZ of P91 steel has been shown to be microstructurally and mechanically distinct from both austenitic and martenistic parent metals. The use of microsized rectangular tensile specimens provides unique solution to the problem of the mechanical property determination of the narrow EB weld joint. The HAZ of the 9Cr1Mo steel exhibits extremely poor CTOD toughness properties in as-welded condition at room temperature. The CTOD values obtained were believed to be represent the intrinsic property of this zone, since the distance of the crack tip to the austenitic steel part was too large to receive a stress relaxation effect from low strength side on the crack tip (by accommodating the applied strains in the high toughness, lower strength 316L plate).

  9. SUBJECT-SPECIFIC MODELS REVEAL THE EXISTANCE OF A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MORPHOLOGY OF THE ANKLE JOINT COMPLEX AND ITS PASSIVE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    PubMed Central

    Imhauser, Carl W.; Siegler, Sorin; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Toy, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The morphology of the bones, articular surfaces and ligaments and the passive mechanical characteristics of the ankle complex were reported to vary greatly among individuals. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the variations observed in the passive mechanical properties of the healthy ankle complex are strongly influenced by morphological variations. To evaluate this hypothesis six numerical models of the ankle joint complex were developed from morphological data obtained from MRI of six cadaver lower limbs, and from average reported data on the mechanical properties of ligaments and articular cartilage. The passive mechanical behavior of each model, under a variety of loading conditions, was found to closely match the experimental data obtained from each corresponding specimen. Since all models used identical material properties and were subjected to identical loads and boundary conditions, it was concluded that the observed variations in passive mechanical characteristics were due to variations in morphology, thus confirming the hypothesis. In addition, the average and large variations in passive mechanical behavior observed between the models were similar to those observed experimentally between cadaver specimens. The results suggest that individualized subject-specific treatment procedures for ankle complex disorders are potentially superior to one-size-fits-all approach. PMID:18316088

  10. Use of noninvasive interactive neurostimulation to improve short-term recovery in patients with surgically repaired bimalleolar ankle fractures: a prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gorodetskyi, Igor G; Gorodnichenko, Anatolyi I; Tursin, Petr S; Reshetnyak, Vitalyi K; Uskov, Oleg N

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a trial with 60 patients who had undergone operative reduction and internal fixation of bimalleolar, AO type B2 ankle fractures with comminution. Patients were randomized into 2 groups, one of which received postoperative treatment using a noninvasive interactive neurostimulation device (InterX) and the other with a sham device. The trial was designed to test the hypothesis that incorporation of noninvasive interactive neurostimulation into the rehabilitation protocol would result in reduced pain, increased range of motion, reduced edema, and reduced consumption of pain medication, in comparison with the sham therapy group. Outcome measurements included the patient's subjective assessment of level of pain, range of motion, and the extent of edema in the involved ankle, and the use of ketorolac for postoperative control of pain. The results showed significantly better results in the patients receiving treatment with active neurostimulation (repeated measures analysis of variance, P < .001). PMID:20688546

  11. Effect of Ankle Joint Contact Angle and Ground Contact Time on Depth Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua H; Flanagan, Sean P

    2015-11-01

    Athletes often need to both jump high and get off the ground quickly, but getting off the ground quickly can decrease the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) impulse, impeding jump height. Energy stored in the muscle-tendon complex during the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) may mitigate the effects of short ground contact times (GCTs). To take advantage of the SSC, several coaches recommend "attacking" the ground with the foot in a dorsiflexed (DF) position at contact. However, the efficacy of this technique has not been tested. This investigation tested the hypotheses that shorter GCTs would lead to smaller vertical depth jump heights (VDJH), and that this difference could be mitigated by instructing the athletes to land in a DF as opposed to a plantar flexed (PF) foot position. Eighteen healthy junior college athletes performed depth jumps from a 45-cm box onto force platforms under instruction to achieve one of the 2 objectives (maximum jump height [hmax] or minimal GCT [tmin]), with one of the 2 foot conditions (DF or PF). These variations created 4 distinct jump conditions: DF-hmax, DF-tmin, PF-hmax, and PF-tmin. For all variables examined, there were no significant interactions. For all 4 conditions, the ankle was PF during landing, but the DF condition was 28.87% less PF than the PF condition. The tmin conditions had a 23.48% shorter GCT than hmax. There were no significant main effects for jump height. The peak impact force for tmin was 22.14% greater than hmax and 19.11% greater for DF compared with PF conditions. A shorter GCT did not necessitate a smaller jump height, and a less PF foot did not lead to improvements in jump height or contact time during a depth jump from a 45-cm box. The same jump height was attained in less PF and shorter GCT conditions by larger impact forces. To decrease contact time while maintaining jump height, athletes should be instructed to "get off the ground as fast as possible." This cue seems to be more important than foot

  12. Doctor, I sprained my ankle

    PubMed Central

    How, Choon How; Tan, Ken Jin

    2014-01-01

    Ankle sprains constitute the majority of ankle injuries, and result in pain, limited mobility/exercise and loss of school/work days. Ankle sprains involve at least one of the ankle ligaments and range from a micro tear to complete tear of the ligament or group of ligaments. The most common mechanism of ankle sprains is inversion stress of a plantar-flexed foot, while the most frequently injured ligament is the anterior talofibular ligament. The attending clinician needs to stratify the risk of fracture through history-taking and physical examination, manage the pain, assess long-term complications and provide certification for rest and recovery. The Ottawa ankle rules may be useful. Graduated exercises to maintain the ankle’s range of motion should be started early, after the resolution of initial pain and swelling. The risk of recurrent ankle injuries is often a combination of both mechanical and functional disabilities. PMID:25631892

  13. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  14. Joint evaluation of fracture azimuth by electromagnetic wave and elastic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuan; Liu, Cai; Wang, Qiao; Wang, Kai; Lu, Qi; Xue, Jian; Liang, Wenjing; Yu, Yue; Ren, Qianci

    2013-12-01

    With the multi-wave, multi-component seismic wave exploration, one can apply the anisotropy of fracture media to analyze the attributes of the fracture media, including the fracture azimuth. In the meantime, the techniques of full-polarimetric electromagnetic wave, including full-polarimetric borehole radar, can also be used to analyze the attributes of the fracture. However, the analysis precision of both the multi-component elastic wave exploration and full-polarimetric electromagnetic wave exploration is prone to the influence of noise and other factors. So far, some researchers have conducted studies on the joint inversion of electromagnetic waves and seismic waves. This paper develops evaluation techniques of fracture azimuth by electromagnetic wave, elastic wave, and joint analysis of coincident elastic reflection and electromagnetic data. Firstly, based on the shear wave splitting of elastic waves, this paper develops a statistical analysis technique which applies Pearson correlation coefficient to count and analyze the azimuth angle of fracture. Secondly, based on the information of electromagnetic polarization rotated by fracture, this paper develops a statistical analysis method of full-polarimetric electromagnetic waves which applies the maximum amplitude ratio between the co-polarization and cross-polarization to analyze the azimuth angle of fracture. Furthermore, based on the analysis result of the elastic wave and full-polarimetric electromagnetic wave, this paper develops a joint analysis technique which adopts the standard deviation. At last, authors in this study conduct joint detection experiments on the coincident fracture medium by using the ultrasonic and full-polarimetric ground penetrating radar. The experimental result indicates that both single geophysical methods are capable of analyzing the fracture azimuth angle, but the joint analysis is more accurate.

  15. Radial sesamoid fracture of the second MCP joint – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta; Nowicki, Paweł; Płaza, Mateusz; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    A fracture of the sesamoid bone of the hand is rarely seen. In most cases, it is strictly associated with the trauma. The patient complains of a long-lasting, due to unclear diagnosis, painful swelling of the joint with an inability to flex the affected finger. Limited blood supply makes the untreated fracture prone to avascular necrosis. Thus, it is extremely important to make a proper diagnosis early. Bilateral comparing the affected areas with ultrasonography seems to be the method of choice. The treatment is conservative or surgical when needed. We present a case of a radial sesamoid fracture of the second metacarpophalangeal joint without a history of trauma. PMID:26675122

  16. [The supinator fat pad in fractures of the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Schunk, K; Grossholz, M; Schild, H

    1989-03-01

    The position of the supinator fat pad is regarded as a valuable sign in fractures of the elbow. In our patients the pad was visible in 277 out of 337 cases (82%). The sign was positive in only 27 out of 55 proximal fractures of the radius (sensitivity 0.49). There was no correlation between the severity of the fracture and the sign. There was marked variation in the distance between the pad and the radius, depending on age, build and projection. Our results indicate that the sign is not suitable for the diagnosis of fracture of the elbow. PMID:2538879

  17. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by chondroid hyperplasia from the callus of condylar neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min; Park, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyuck; Kwon, Kwang Jun; Park, Young Wook; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Sang Shin; Lee, Suk Keun

    2009-01-01

    A patient who complained of difficulty in opening his mouth after condylar neck fracture 1 year ago presented typical features of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in clinical and radiologic examinations. To demonstrate a possible pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar neck fracture, the fractured condylar portion removed was examined by histologic and immunohistochemical stainings. Interpositional gap arthroplasty was performed by removing the inferomesially displaced fractured condyle, and reconstruction with subcutaneous dermis to the previous vertical height was performed immediately. The fractured condylar portion was almost intact with slight erosion of the condylar cartilage. In the hematoxylin and eosin and Masson trichrome stainings, an extensive chondroid hyperplasia with abundant hyaline cartilage was shown in the removed condylar portion. There were also hyperplastic features of the synovial membrane, which were abnormally distributed throughout the chondroid tissues. In the immunohistochemical stainings of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4, the chondroid tissues were conspicuously hyperplastic and strongly positive for BMP-4 but sparse for BMP-2. From these results, we think that the hyperplastic chondroid tissue was derived from the callus of the primary fractured site of the condylar neck and propose that the chondroid tissue could proliferate continuously because of synovial tissue support from around the temporomandibular joint, resulting in temporomandibular joint ankylosis. This pathogenesis is quite different from those of other diaphyseal fracture of long bones. PMID:19165036

  18. Fracture of the articular disc in the temporomandibular joint: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    An, S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Disc fracture of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a little-known pathological condition owing to its extreme rarity. We report two cases of elderly patients who were diagnosed with disc fracture of the TMJ based on MRI, and we review related reports. On physical examination, an incomplete bite and mild joint pain were observed on the affected side in both patients. An MRI showed a complete fracture in the intermediate zone of the articular disc in the TMJ; the posterior fragment was displaced posteriorly, causing occlusal change in the closed position of the condyle and an incomplete bite. Conservative treatment including manual manipulation, physical therapy and oral appliance had no effect on the occlusal abnormality. Although the inciting cause of the disc fracture remained unclear, the degenerative changes in the joint may have been a factor by increasing the brittleness and reducing the elasticity of the disc. PMID:25308829

  19. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES – IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Tang, Lars; Zebis, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). Design Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using reflective markers and 3-dimensional recordings and expressed as inversion-eversion range of motion variability, peak velocity of inversion and number of inversion-eversion direction changes. Peroneus longus EMG activity was averaged and normalized to maximal activity during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. Results Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared to the other surfaces. BOSU® Ball was the most challenging in terms of inversion-eversion variability while wobble board was associated with a higher number of inversion-eversion direction changes. No differences in average muscle activation level were found between these two surfaces, but the BOSU® Ball did show a more variable activation pattern in terms of APDF. Conclusion The results showed large kinematic variability among different balance training devices and

  20. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  1. Measurement of adhesive joint fracture properties as a function of environmental degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wylde, J.W.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The increased use of structural adhesives in industry would benefit from a comprehensive failure load prediction tool to ensure competent design. The work of Fernlund and Spelt has proposed a fracture envelope that relates the critical strain energy release rate to the nominal phase angle of loading. The work of Plasinus and Spelt extended this work to incorporate the viscoelastic effect of the adhesive. The objective of the present research is to incorporate the effects of temperature and water absorption into the prediction of adhesive joint fracture. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate the notion that absorbed water has an effect predominantly detrimental, on the strength of an adhesive joint. Past work was concentrated on degrading typical, in service joints such as the Single Lap Shear (SLS) joint or the Cracked Lap Shear (CLS) joint. Since water is absorbed through the exposed edges, typically small in area compared to the volume of the joint, degradation times are usually long and the water concentration varies both with time and spatially throughout the joint. In this research, a novel method of degrading adhesive fracture specimens to a spatially constant degradation condition is being used to incorporate environmental effects into the fracture load prediction tool of Spelt et al.

  2. Movement within foot and ankle joint in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a 3-dimensional ultrasound analysis of medial gastrocnemius length with correction for effects of foot deformation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), a limited range of motion of the foot (ROM), limits gait and other activities. Assessment of this limitation of ROM and knowledge of active mechanisms is of crucial importance for clinical treatment. Methods For a comparison between spastic cerebral palsy (SCP) children and typically developing children (TD), medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon complex length was assessed using 3-D ultrasound imaging techniques, while exerting externally standardized moments via a hand-held dynamometer. Exemplary X-ray imaging of ankle and foot was used to confirm possible TD-SCP differences in foot deformation. Results SCP and TD did not differ in normalized level of excitation (EMG) of muscles studied. For given moments exerted in SCP, foot plate angles were all more towards plantar flexion than in TD. However, foot plate angle proved to be an invalid estimator of talocrural joint angle, since at equal foot plate angles, GM muscle-tendon complex was shorter in SCP (corresponding to an equivalent of 1 cm). A substantial difference remained even after normalizing for individual differences in tibia length. X-ray imaging of ankle and foot of one SCP child and two typically developed adults, confirmed that in SCP that of total footplate angle changes (0-4 Nm: 15°), the contribution of foot deformation to changes in foot plate angle (8) were as big as the contribution of dorsal flexion at the talocrural joint (7°). In typically developed individuals there were relatively smaller contributions (10 -11%) by foot deformation to changes in foot plate angle, indicating that the contribution of talocrural angle changes was most important. Using a new estimate for position at the talocrural joint (the difference between GM muscle–tendon complex length and tibia length, GM relative length) removed this effect, thus allowing more fair comparison of SCP and TD data. On the basis of analysis of foot plate angle and GM relative length as a function

  3. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Search the Foot and Ankle Foot conditions in this region: Bunions (Hallux Valgus) » ... Injuries » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) » Tarsal Coalition » Ankle Fractures » Ankle Sprain » Chronic Ankle Instability » Equinus » Gout » ...

  4. Closed Talar Dislocation without Associated Fracture a Very Rare Injury, a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yashavntha C; Reddy, Sandeep; Golla, Dinesh Kumar; Ganesh, Niranthara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Total talar dislocations are uncommon injuries and usually seen following high velocity injuries. Total talar dislocations (missing talus) without fractures around the ankle are extremely rare. There are no consensuses on the best treatment of such injuries. To best of our knowledge very few cases have been reported in literature. We hereby report a closed total talar dislocation in a 25 year old male without an associated fracture around ankle. He was managed with emergency closed reduction and below knee splint. At one year follow up there were no complications. Case Report: A 25 year old male presented to orthopaedic causality with injury to right ankle following a road traffic accident. Patient complained of severe pain and deformity of ankle following injury. On examination ankle was deformed and swollen. Plain radiographs of right ankle joint revealed total anterolateral dislocation of talus without any accompanying ankle fracture. CT scan with 3D reconstruction also confirmed our radiographic findings. Under spinal anaesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance closed reduction was performed. To maintain reduction a 3mm K-wire was passed from calcaneum to tibia through talus. A posterior below knee splint was applied. Patient was followed every three months till one year. At one year follow up patient had good range of motion at ankle and subtalar joint. Conclusion: Total talar dislocations are very rare injuries and should be treated as impending open fractures. There is no consensus on treatment of such complex injuries as very few cases have been reported in literature. PMID:27298950

  5. [The Use of Pedobarographic Examination to Biomechanical Evaluation of Foot and Ankle Joint in Adult - Own Experience].

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive method, that can be used to describe the underfoot pressure distribution during stance and gait, is pedobarography. This examination helps to describe biomechanics of foot and ankle. It has been used to diagnose foot disorders, assess the disease progression, monitor the progress of rehabilitation and also evaluate the effectivness of undergone surgical treatment. In this article we describe chosen issues of pedobarographic examination in diagnostics and treatment of foot and ankle in adults. We base on our own experience (about 10 thousand examinations) and review of literature. In our opinion, pedobarography should be used in diagnostics and treatment of foot and ankle more often and widely than now. PMID:26248765

  6. Joints and Mineral Veins in Limestone-Marl Alternations: Arrest and Fracture Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, S. L.; Reyer, D.

    2009-05-01

    Layering is a common feature of many rock masses. In particular, many sedimentary rocks are layered because of depositional changes (stratification), and diagenetic processes. Mechanical layering, where the mechanical properties, particularly the Young's moduli (stiffness), change between layers, may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content or facies. The mechanical layering of the rock is important because layering commonly results in abrupt changes in local stress fields that may lead to fracture arrest. However, if all the beds in a rock mass have essentially the same Young's modulus and their contacts are welded together (sealed or healed) the beds may function mechanically as a single layer. Here we explore how mechanical layers relate to sedimentary layers in limestone-marl alternations. This we do by investigating the effects of sedimentary layering of the host rock, on the emplacement and geometries of extension fractures such as joints and mineral veins. Detailed field studies were carried out at two localities of well-exposed limestone-marl alternations: (1) the Jurassic Blue Lias at the Glamorgan Coast of South Wales, UK, and (2) the Triassic Muschelkalk in the Kraichgau area, Southwest Germany. In both study areas, calcite veins occur almost exclusively in the cores and damage zones of faults, whereas jointing is pervasive. Fracture arrest, common in mechanically layered host rocks, is primarily controlled by local variations in the stress field, mainly due to three factors: discontinuities (fractures and contacts), changes in host rock mechanical properties, and stress barriers, where the local stress field is unfavorable to fracture propagation. These factors are related in that changes in stiffness and stress barriers are common at contacts between different rock types. A fourth mechanism, namely the material toughness (critical strain energy release rate) of the contact in relation to that of the adjacent layers has been much studied in

  7. Ipsilateral Closed Clavicle and Scapular spine Fracture with Acromioclavicular Joint Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kembhavi, Raghavendra s; James, Boblee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Injuries around shoulder and clavicle are quite common. Injuries involving lateral end of clavicle involving acromioclavicular joints are commoner injuries. In this rare injury, we report about a case involving clavicle and scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular disruption which has never been described in English literature as per our knowledge. Case Report: A patient with closed clavicle and scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular joint disruption was treated with open reduction and internal fixation of clavicle and scapular spine as a staged procedures. Six months post operatively, patient had excellent functional recovery with near full range of movements. Conclusion: Though rare complex injury, clavicle fracture with scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular disruption, when managed properly with good physiotherapy protocol post operatively will result in good clinical and functional outcome. PMID:27299047

  8. DIAGNOSIS OF AN ISOLATED POSTERIOR MALLEOLAR FRACTURE IN A YOUNG FEMALE MILITARY CADET: A RESIDENT CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Steven J.; Gerber, J. Parry

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The ankle is the most commonly injured joint during athletic activity. While ankle sprains are certainly the most common injury, ankle fractures can occur frequently. One type of ankle fracture with a reportedly low incidence is the isolated posterior malleolar fracture. Because of the low incidence, isolated posterior malleolar fractures can present a diagnostic challenge. The purpose of this case report is to describe the diagnostic process used for this rare injury that occurred in a physically active college-aged female who injured her ankle when landing from a fall during performance on a military obstacle course. Case Description: A 19 year old female United States Military Academy cadet presented to a direct access physical therapy clinic. She was limping, not using any assistive device, and was wearing an ace bandage around her right ankle/foot. Two days earlier she fell from a “10 foot high” structure while performing the military obstacle course. She did not recall details of impact, but she was told by several bystanders that it appeared that she landed on her right foot followed immediately by a transition to her buttocks and then to her back. Outcomes: Ottawa Ankle Rules and ligamentous testing were negative; however, she was tender to palpation just anterior to the achilles tendon and lateral to the posterior edge of the medial malleolus. Based on mechanism of injury and tenderness of the posterior ankle, a potential posterior ankle fracture was suspected and subsequently confirmed by radiographic studies of the ankle including standard radiographs and computerized tomography. Discussion: While the Ottawa Ankle Rules are generally effective in detecting many types of ankle fractures, clinicians should not rely solely on such prediction rules. This case highlights the importance of completing a thorough history and performing a thorough physical examination. This case report focuses on differential diagnosis. It is important

  9. Fracture Behaviour of Nickel-Titanium Laser Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletta, C.; Falvo, A.; Furgiuele, F.; Barbieri, G.; Brandizzi, M.

    2009-08-01

    In this study, the effects of Nd:YAG laser welding on the fracture behavior of Ni-rich nickel-titanium sheets are analyzed by experimental investigations. The welding was carried out in open air conditions by using a special shielding/clamping system to avoid the chemical contamination of the molten zone and the formation of hot cracks. Mechanical tests of standard dog bone-shaped and single edge crack specimens were carried out to measure the stress-strain response and the fracture resistance of both the base and the welded materials. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy observations of the fracture surfaces were carried out in order to better understand the failure mechanisms. Finally, systematic comparative studies between base and laser-welded materials were carried out.

  10. A joint fracture toughness evaluation of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, H.; Sargent, G. A.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point bend specimens cut from hot-pressed beryllium obtained from two suppliers. The test specimens had dimensions conforming to ASTM fracture toughness standard E399-72. A total of 42 specimens were machined from each batch of material. Six specimens from each batch were then distributed to seven independent laboratories for testing. The test data from the laboratories were collected and analyzed for differences between the laboratories and the two batches of material. It is concluded that ASTM 399-72 can be used as a valid test procedure for determining the fracture toughness of beryllium, providing that Kf(max) in fatigue cracking could be up to 80 percent of the K(0) value.