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Sample records for annotation databases improves

  1. Considerations to improve functional annotations in biological databases.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Despite the great effort to design efficient systems allowing the electronic indexation of information concerning genes, proteins, structures, and interactions published daily in scientific journals, some problems are still observed in specific tasks such as functional annotation. The annotation of function is a critical issue for bioinformatic routines, such as for instance, in functional genomics and the further prediction of unknown protein function, which are highly dependent of the quality of existing annotations. Some information management systems evolve to efficiently incorporate information from large-scale projects, but often, annotation of single records from the literature is difficult and slow. In this short report, functional characterizations of a representative sample of the entire set of uncharacterized proteins from Escherichia coli K12 was compiled from Swiss-Prot, PubMed, and EcoCyc and demonstrate a functional annotation deficit in biological databases. Some issues are postulated as causes of the lack of annotation, and different solutions are evaluated and proposed to avoid them. The hope is that as a consequence of these observations, there will be new impetus to improve the speed and quality of functional annotation and ultimately provide updated, reliable information to the scientific community. PMID:20050264

  2. The annotation and the usage of scientific databases could be improved with public issue tracker software

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Olio, Giovanni Marco; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Laayouni, Hafid

    2010-01-01

    Since the publication of their longtime predecessor The Atlas of Protein Sequences and Structures in 1965 by Margaret Dayhoff, scientific databases have become a key factor in the organization of modern science. All the information and knowledge described in the novel scientific literature is translated into entries in many different scientific databases, making it possible to obtain very accurate information on a biological entity like genes or proteins without having to manually review the literature on it. However, even for the databases with the finest annotation procedures, errors or unclear parts sometimes appear in the publicly released version and influence the research of unaware scientists using them. The researcher that finds an error in a database is often left in a uncertain state, and often abandons the effort of reporting it because of a lack of a standard procedure to do so. In the present work, we propose that the simple adoption of a public error tracker application, as in many open software projects, could improve the quality of the annotations in many databases and encourage feedback from the scientific community on the data annotated publicly. In order to illustrate the situation, we describe a series of errors that we found and helped solve on the genes of a very well-known pathway in various biomedically relevant databases. We would like to show that, even if a majority of the most important scientific databases have procedures for reporting errors, these are usually not publicly visible, making the process of reporting errors time consuming and not useful. Also, the effort made by the user that reports the error often goes unacknowledged, putting him in a discouraging position. PMID:21186182

  3. Annotation and retrieval in protein interaction databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannataro, Mario; Hiram Guzzi, Pietro; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Biological databases have been developed with a special focus on the efficient retrieval of single records or the efficient computation of specialized bioinformatics algorithms against the overall database, such as in sequence alignment. The continuos production of biological knowledge spread on several biological databases and ontologies, such as Gene Ontology, and the availability of efficient techniques to handle such knowledge, such as annotation and semantic similarity measures, enable the development on novel bioinformatics applications that explicitly use and integrate such knowledge. After introducing the annotation process and the main semantic similarity measures, this paper shows how annotations and semantic similarity can be exploited to improve the extraction and analysis of biologically relevant data from protein interaction databases. As case studies, the paper presents two novel software tools, OntoPIN and CytoSeVis, both based on the use of Gene Ontology annotations, for the advanced querying of protein interaction databases and for the enhanced visualization of protein interaction networks.

  4. Improvements to GALA and dbERGE II: databases featuring genomic sequence alignment, annotation and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Elnitski, Laura; Giardine, Belinda; Shah, Prachi; Zhang, Yi; Riemer, Cathy; Weirauch, Matthew; Burhans, Richard; Miller, Webb; Hardison, Ross C

    2005-01-01

    We describe improvements to two databases that give access to information on genomic sequence similarities, functional elements in DNA and experimental results that demonstrate those functions. GALA, the database of Genome ALignments and Annotations, is now a set of interlinked relational databases for five vertebrate species, human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat and chicken. For each species, GALA records pairwise and multiple sequence alignments, scores derived from those alignments that reflect the likelihood of being under purifying selection or being a regulatory element, and extensive annotations such as genes, gene expression patterns and transcription factor binding sites. The user interface supports simple and complex queries, including operations such as subtraction and intersections as well as clustering and finding elements in proximity to features. dbERGE II, the database of Experimental Results on Gene Expression, contains experimental data from a variety of functional assays. Both databases are now run on the DB2 database management system. Improved hardware and tuning has reduced response times and increased querying capacity, while simplified query interfaces will help direct new users through the querying process. Links are available at http://www.bx.psu.edu/. PMID:15608239

  5. Expanded microbial genome coverage and improved protein family annotation in the COG database

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial genome sequencing projects produce numerous sequences of deduced proteins, only a small fraction of which have been or will ever be studied experimentally. This leaves sequence analysis as the only feasible way to annotate these proteins and assign to them tentative functions. The Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/COG/), first created in 1997, has been a popular tool for functional annotation. Its success was largely based on (i) its reliance on complete microbial genomes, which allowed reliable assignment of orthologs and paralogs for most genes; (ii) orthology-based approach, which used the function(s) of the characterized member(s) of the protein family (COG) to assign function(s) to the entire set of carefully identified orthologs and describe the range of potential functions when there were more than one; and (iii) careful manual curation of the annotation of the COGs, aimed at detailed prediction of the biological function(s) for each COG while avoiding annotation errors and overprediction. Here we present an update of the COGs, the first since 2003, and a comprehensive revision of the COG annotations and expansion of the genome coverage to include representative complete genomes from all bacterial and archaeal lineages down to the genus level. This re-analysis of the COGs shows that the original COG assignments had an error rate below 0.5% and allows an assessment of the progress in functional genomics in the past 12 years. During this time, functions of many previously uncharacterized COGs have been elucidated and tentative functional assignments of many COGs have been validated, either by targeted experiments or through the use of high-throughput methods. A particularly important development is the assignment of functions to several widespread, conserved proteins many of which turned out to participate in translation, in particular rRNA maturation and tRNA modification. The new version of the

  6. Improving the consistency of domain annotation within the Conserved Domain Database

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, Myra K.; Gonzales, Noreen R.; Lu, Shennan; He, Jane; Marchler, Gabriele H.; Wang, Zhouxi; Marchler-Bauer, Aron

    2015-01-01

    When annotating protein sequences with the footprints of evolutionarily conserved domains, conservative score or E-value thresholds need to be applied for RPS-BLAST hits, to avoid many false positives. We notice that manual inspection and classification of hits gathered at a higher threshold can add a significant amount of valuable domain annotation. We report an automated algorithm that ‘rescues’ valuable borderline-scoring domain hits that are well-supported by domain architecture (DA, the sequential order of conserved domains in a protein query), including tandem repeats of domain hits reported at a more conservative threshold. This algorithm is now available as a selectable option on the public conserved domain search (CD-Search) pages. We also report on the possibility to ‘suppress’ domain hits close to the threshold based on a lack of well-supported DA and to implement this conservatively as an option in live conserved domain searches and for pre-computed results. Improving domain annotation consistency will in turn reduce the fraction of NR sequences with incomplete DAs. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi PMID:25767294

  7. The annotation-enriched non-redundant patent sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizhong; Kondratowicz, Bartosz; McWilliam, Hamish; Nauche, Stephane; Lopez, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) offers public access to patent sequence data, providing a valuable service to the intellectual property and scientific communities. The non-redundant (NR) patent sequence databases comprise two-level nucleotide and protein sequence clusters (NRNL1, NRNL2, NRPL1 and NRPL2) based on sequence identity (level-1) and patent family (level-2). Annotation from the source entries in these databases is merged and enhanced with additional information from the patent literature and biological context. Corrections in patent publication numbers, kind-codes and patent equivalents significantly improve the data quality. Data are available through various user interfaces including web browser, downloads via FTP, SRS, Dbfetch and EBI-Search. Sequence similarity/homology searches against the databases are available using BLAST, FASTA and PSI-Search. In this article, we describe the data collection and annotation and also outline major changes and improvements introduced since 2009. Apart from data growth, these changes include additional annotation for singleton clusters, the identifier versioning for tracking entry change and the entry mappings between the two-level databases. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/patentdata/nr/ PMID:23396323

  8. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine

    PubMed Central

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M.; Unni, Deepak R.; Emery, Marianne L.; Nguyen, Hung N.; Hagen, Darren E.

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  9. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine.

    PubMed

    Elsik, Christine G; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M; Unni, Deepak R; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  10. The UniProt-GO Annotation database in 2011.

    PubMed

    Dimmer, Emily C; Huntley, Rachael P; Alam-Faruque, Yasmin; Sawford, Tony; O'Donovan, Claire; Martin, Maria J; Bely, Benoit; Browne, Paul; Mun Chan, Wei; Eberhardt, Ruth; Gardner, Michael; Laiho, Kati; Legge, Duncan; Magrane, Michele; Pichler, Klemens; Poggioli, Diego; Sehra, Harminder; Auchincloss, Andrea; Axelsen, Kristian; Blatter, Marie-Claude; Boutet, Emmanuel; Braconi-Quintaje, Silvia; Breuza, Lionel; Bridge, Alan; Coudert, Elizabeth; Estreicher, Anne; Famiglietti, Livia; Ferro-Rojas, Serenella; Feuermann, Marc; Gos, Arnaud; Gruaz-Gumowski, Nadine; Hinz, Ursula; Hulo, Chantal; James, Janet; Jimenez, Silvia; Jungo, Florence; Keller, Guillaume; Lemercier, Phillippe; Lieberherr, Damien; Masson, Patrick; Moinat, Madelaine; Pedruzzi, Ivo; Poux, Sylvain; Rivoire, Catherine; Roechert, Bernd; Schneider, Michael; Stutz, Andre; Sundaram, Shyamala; Tognolli, Michael; Bougueleret, Lydie; Argoud-Puy, Ghislaine; Cusin, Isabelle; Duek-Roggli, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Apweiler, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The GO annotation dataset provided by the UniProt Consortium (GOA: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/GOA) is a comprehensive set of evidenced-based associations between terms from the Gene Ontology resource and UniProtKB proteins. Currently supplying over 100 million annotations to 11 million proteins in more than 360,000 taxa, this resource has increased 2-fold over the last 2 years and has benefited from a wealth of checks to improve annotation correctness and consistency as well as now supplying a greater information content enabled by GO Consortium annotation format developments. Detailed, manual GO annotations obtained from the curation of peer-reviewed papers are directly contributed by all UniProt curators and supplemented with manual and electronic annotations from 36 model organism and domain-focused scientific resources. The inclusion of high-quality, automatic annotation predictions ensures the UniProt GO annotation dataset supplies functional information to a wide range of proteins, including those from poorly characterized, non-model organism species. UniProt GO annotations are freely available in a range of formats accessible by both file downloads and web-based views. In addition, the introduction of a new, normalized file format in 2010 has made for easier handling of the complete UniProt-GOA data set. PMID:22123736

  11. The UniProt-GO Annotation database in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Dimmer, Emily C.; Huntley, Rachael P.; Alam-Faruque, Yasmin; Sawford, Tony; O'Donovan, Claire; Martin, Maria J.; Bely, Benoit; Browne, Paul; Mun Chan, Wei; Eberhardt, Ruth; Gardner, Michael; Laiho, Kati; Legge, Duncan; Magrane, Michele; Pichler, Klemens; Poggioli, Diego; Sehra, Harminder; Auchincloss, Andrea; Axelsen, Kristian; Blatter, Marie-Claude; Boutet, Emmanuel; Braconi-Quintaje, Silvia; Breuza, Lionel; Bridge, Alan; Coudert, Elizabeth; Estreicher, Anne; Famiglietti, Livia; Ferro-Rojas, Serenella; Feuermann, Marc; Gos, Arnaud; Gruaz-Gumowski, Nadine; Hinz, Ursula; Hulo, Chantal; James, Janet; Jimenez, Silvia; Jungo, Florence; Keller, Guillaume; Lemercier, Phillippe; Lieberherr, Damien; Masson, Patrick; Moinat, Madelaine; Pedruzzi, Ivo; Poux, Sylvain; Rivoire, Catherine; Roechert, Bernd; Schneider, Michael; Stutz, Andre; Sundaram, Shyamala; Tognolli, Michael; Bougueleret, Lydie; Argoud-Puy, Ghislaine; Cusin, Isabelle; Duek- Roggli, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Apweiler, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The GO annotation dataset provided by the UniProt Consortium (GOA: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/GOA) is a comprehensive set of evidenced-based associations between terms from the Gene Ontology resource and UniProtKB proteins. Currently supplying over 100 million annotations to 11 million proteins in more than 360 000 taxa, this resource has increased 2-fold over the last 2 years and has benefited from a wealth of checks to improve annotation correctness and consistency as well as now supplying a greater information content enabled by GO Consortium annotation format developments. Detailed, manual GO annotations obtained from the curation of peer-reviewed papers are directly contributed by all UniProt curators and supplemented with manual and electronic annotations from 36 model organism and domain-focused scientific resources. The inclusion of high-quality, automatic annotation predictions ensures the UniProt GO annotation dataset supplies functional information to a wide range of proteins, including those from poorly characterized, non-model organism species. UniProt GO annotations are freely available in a range of formats accessible by both file downloads and web-based views. In addition, the introduction of a new, normalized file format in 2010 has made for easier handling of the complete UniProt-GOA data set. PMID:22123736

  12. Annotation of glycoproteins in the SWISS-PROT database.

    PubMed

    Jung, E; Veuthey, A L; Gasteiger, E; Bairoch, A

    2001-02-01

    SWISS-PROT is a protein sequence database, which aims to be nonredundant, fully annotated and highly cross-referenced. Most eukaryotic gene products undergo co- and/or post-translational modifications, and these need to be included in the database in order to describe the mature protein. SWISS-PROT includes information on many types of different protein modifications. As glycosylation is the most common type of post-translational protein modification, we are currently placing an emphasis on annotation of protein glycosylation in SWISS-PROT. Information on the position of the sugar within the polypeptide chain, the reducing terminal linkage as well as additional information on biological function of the sugar is included in the database. In this paper we describe how we account for the different types of protein glycosylation, namely N-linked glycosylation, O-linked glycosylation, proteoglycans, C-linked glycosylation and the attachment of glycosyl-phosphatidylinosital anchors to proteins. PMID:11680872

  13. Rice Annotation Database (RAD): a contig-oriented database for map-based rice genomics.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuichi; Arikawa, Kohji; Antonio, Baltazar A; Ohta, Isamu; Naito, Shinji; Mukai, Yoshiyuki; Shimano, Atsuko; Masukawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Michie; Yamamoto, Mayu; Ito, Yukiyo; Yokoyama, Junri; Sakai, Yasumichi; Sakata, Katsumi; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Namiki, Nobukazu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Higo, Kenichi; Sasaki, Takuji

    2005-01-01

    A contig-oriented database for annotation of the rice genome has been constructed to facilitate map-based rice genomics. The Rice Annotation Database has the following functional features: (i) extensive effort of manual annotations of P1-derived artificial chromosome/bacterial artificial chromosome clones can be merged at chromosome and contig-level; (ii) concise visualization of the annotation information such as the predicted genes, results of various prediction programs (RiceHMM, Genscan, Genscan+, Fgenesh, GeneMark, etc.), homology to expressed sequence tag, full-length cDNA and protein; (iii) user-friendly clone / gene query system; (iv) download functions for nucleotide, amino acid and coding sequences; (v) analysis of various features of the genome (GC-content, average value, etc.); and (vi) genome-wide homology search (BLAST) of contig- and chromosome-level genome sequence to allow comparative analysis with the genome sequence of other organisms. As of October 2004, the database contains a total of 215 Mb sequence with relevant annotation results including 30 000 manually curated genes. The database can provide the latest information on manual annotation as well as a comprehensive structural analysis of various features of the rice genome. The database can be accessed at http://rad.dna.affrc.go.jp/. PMID:15608281

  14. The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB): 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Antonio, Baltazar A; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Numa, Hisataka; Sakai, Hiroaki; Wu, Jianzhong; Itoh, Takeshi; Sasaki, Takuji; Aono, Ryo; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Habara, Takuya; Harada, Erimi; Kanno, Masako; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Kawashima, Hiroaki; Kubooka, Hiromi; Matsuya, Akihiro; Nakaoka, Hajime; Saichi, Naomi; Sanbonmatsu, Ryoko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Shinso, Yuji; Suzuki, Mami; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Tanino, Motohiko; Todokoro, Fusano; Yamaguchi, Kaori; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Imanishi, Tadashi; Okido, Toshihisa; Tada, Masahito; Ikeo, Kazuho; Tateno, Yoshio; Gojobori, Takashi; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Wei, Fu-Jin; Hsing, Yue-ie; Zhao, Qiang; Han, Bin; Kramer, Melissa R; McCombie, Richard W; Lonsdale, David; O'Donovan, Claire C; Whitfield, Eleanor J; Apweiler, Rolf; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Khurana, Jitendra P; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Singh, Nagendra K; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Haberer, Georg; Fujisawa, Masaki; Hosokawa, Satomi; Ito, Yukiyo; Ikawa, Hiroshi; Shibata, Michie; Yamamoto, Mayu; Bruskiewich, Richard M; Hoen, Douglas R; Bureau, Thomas E; Namiki, Nobukazu; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sakai, Yasumichi; Nobushima, Satoshi; Sakata, Katsumi; Barrero, Roberto A; Sato, Yutaka; Souvorov, Alexandre; Smith-White, Brian; Tatusova, Tatiana; An, Suyoung; An, Gynheung; OOta, Satoshi; Fuks, Galina; Fuks, Galina; Messing, Joachim; Christie, Karen R; Lieberherr, Damien; Kim, HyeRan; Zuccolo, Andrea; Wing, Rod A; Nobuta, Kan; Green, Pamela J; Lu, Cheng; Meyers, Blake C; Chaparro, Cristian; Piegu, Benoit; Panaud, Olivier; Echeverria, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB) was created to provide the genome sequence assembly of the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP), manually curated annotation of the sequence, and other genomics information that could be useful for comprehensive understanding of the rice biology. Since the last publication of the RAP-DB, the IRGSP genome has been revised and reassembled. In addition, a large number of rice-expressed sequence tags have been released, and functional genomics resources have been produced worldwide. Thus, we have thoroughly updated our genome annotation by manual curation of all the functional descriptions of rice genes. The latest version of the RAP-DB contains a variety of annotation data as follows: clone positions, structures and functions of 31 439 genes validated by cDNAs, RNA genes detected by massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) technology and sequence similarity, flanking sequences of mutant lines, transposable elements, etc. Other annotation data such as Gnomon can be displayed along with those of RAP for comparison. We have also developed a new keyword search system to allow the user to access useful information. The RAP-DB is available at: http://rapdb.dna.affrc.go.jp/ and http://rapdb.lab.nig.ac.jp/. PMID:18089549

  15. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database.

    PubMed

    Winsor, Geoffrey L; Griffiths, Emma J; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K; Shay, Julie A; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  16. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Griffiths, Emma J.; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K.; Shay, Julie A.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  17. SATPdb: a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Gautam, Ankur; Tuknait, Abhishek; Agrawal, Piyush; Mathur, Deepika; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    SATPdb (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/satpdb/) is a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides, curated from 22 public domain peptide databases/datasets including 9 of our own. The current version holds 19192 unique experimentally validated therapeutic peptide sequences having length between 2 and 50 amino acids. It covers peptides having natural, non-natural and modified residues. These peptides were systematically grouped into 10 categories based on their major function or therapeutic property like 1099 anticancer, 10585 antimicrobial, 1642 drug delivery and 1698 antihypertensive peptides. We assigned or annotated structure of these therapeutic peptides using structural databases (Protein Data Bank) and state-of-the-art structure prediction methods like I-TASSER, HHsearch and PEPstrMOD. In addition, SATPdb facilitates users in performing various tasks that include: (i) structure and sequence similarity search, (ii) peptide browsing based on their function and properties, (iii) identification of moonlighting peptides and (iv) searching of peptides having desired structure and therapeutic activities. We hope this database will be useful for researchers working in the field of peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:26527728

  18. SATPdb: a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Gautam, Ankur; Tuknait, Abhishek; Agrawal, Piyush; Mathur, Deepika; Raghava, Gajendra P.S.

    2016-01-01

    SATPdb (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/satpdb/) is a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides, curated from 22 public domain peptide databases/datasets including 9 of our own. The current version holds 19192 unique experimentally validated therapeutic peptide sequences having length between 2 and 50 amino acids. It covers peptides having natural, non-natural and modified residues. These peptides were systematically grouped into 10 categories based on their major function or therapeutic property like 1099 anticancer, 10585 antimicrobial, 1642 drug delivery and 1698 antihypertensive peptides. We assigned or annotated structure of these therapeutic peptides using structural databases (Protein Data Bank) and state-of-the-art structure prediction methods like I-TASSER, HHsearch and PEPstrMOD. In addition, SATPdb facilitates users in performing various tasks that include: (i) structure and sequence similarity search, (ii) peptide browsing based on their function and properties, (iii) identification of moonlighting peptides and (iv) searching of peptides having desired structure and therapeutic activities. We hope this database will be useful for researchers working in the field of peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:26527728

  19. Vespucci: a system for building annotated databases of nascent transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Karmel A.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Gaasterland, Terry; Glass, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) is a recent addition to the series of high-throughput sequencing methods that enables new insights into transcriptional dynamics within a cell. However, GRO-sequencing presents new algorithmic challenges, as existing analysis platforms for ChIP-seq and RNA-seq do not address the unique problem of identifying transcriptional units de novo from short reads located all across the genome. Here, we present a novel algorithm for de novo transcript identification from GRO-sequencing data, along with a system that determines transcript regions, stores them in a relational database and associates them with known reference annotations. We use this method to analyze GRO-sequencing data from primary mouse macrophages and derive novel quantitative insights into the extent and characteristics of non-coding transcription in mammalian cells. In doing so, we demonstrate that Vespucci expands existing annotations for mRNAs and lincRNAs by defining the primary transcript beyond the polyadenylation site. In addition, Vespucci generates assemblies for un-annotated non-coding RNAs such as those transcribed from enhancer-like elements. Vespucci thereby provides a robust system for defining, storing and analyzing diverse classes of primary RNA transcripts that are of increasing biological interest. PMID:24304890

  20. Vespucci: a system for building annotated databases of nascent transcripts.

    PubMed

    Allison, Karmel A; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Gaasterland, Terry; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-02-01

    Global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) is a recent addition to the series of high-throughput sequencing methods that enables new insights into transcriptional dynamics within a cell. However, GRO-sequencing presents new algorithmic challenges, as existing analysis platforms for ChIP-seq and RNA-seq do not address the unique problem of identifying transcriptional units de novo from short reads located all across the genome. Here, we present a novel algorithm for de novo transcript identification from GRO-sequencing data, along with a system that determines transcript regions, stores them in a relational database and associates them with known reference annotations. We use this method to analyze GRO-sequencing data from primary mouse macrophages and derive novel quantitative insights into the extent and characteristics of non-coding transcription in mammalian cells. In doing so, we demonstrate that Vespucci expands existing annotations for mRNAs and lincRNAs by defining the primary transcript beyond the polyadenylation site. In addition, Vespucci generates assemblies for un-annotated non-coding RNAs such as those transcribed from enhancer-like elements. Vespucci thereby provides a robust system for defining, storing and analyzing diverse classes of primary RNA transcripts that are of increasing biological interest. PMID:24304890

  1. A Manual Curation Strategy to Improve Genome Annotation: Application to a Set of Haloarchael Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Genome annotation errors are a persistent problem that impede research in the biosciences. A manual curation effort is described that attempts to produce high-quality genome annotations for a set of haloarchaeal genomes (Halobacterium salinarum and Hbt. hubeiense, Haloferax volcanii and Hfx. mediterranei, Natronomonas pharaonis and Nmn. moolapensis, Haloquadratum walsbyi strains HBSQ001 and C23, Natrialba magadii, Haloarcula marismortui and Har. hispanica, and Halohasta litchfieldiae). Genomes are checked for missing genes, start codon misassignments, and disrupted genes. Assignments of a specific function are preferably based on experimentally characterized homologs (Gold Standard Proteins). To avoid overannotation, which is a major source of database errors, we restrict annotation to only general function assignments when support for a specific substrate assignment is insufficient. This strategy results in annotations that are resistant to the plethora of errors that compromise public databases. Annotation consistency is rigorously validated for ortholog pairs from the genomes surveyed. The annotation is regularly crosschecked against the UniProt database to further improve annotations and increase the level of standardization. Enhanced genome annotations are submitted to public databases (EMBL/GenBank, UniProt), to the benefit of the scientific community. The enhanced annotations are also publically available via HaloLex. PMID:26042526

  2. DIDA: A curated and annotated digenic diseases database.

    PubMed

    Gazzo, Andrea M; Daneels, Dorien; Cilia, Elisa; Bonduelle, Maryse; Abramowicz, Marc; Van Dooren, Sonia; Smits, Guillaume; Lenaerts, Tom

    2016-01-01

    DIDA (DIgenic diseases DAtabase) is a novel database that provides for the first time detailed information on genes and associated genetic variants involved in digenic diseases, the simplest form of oligogenic inheritance. The database is accessible via http://dida.ibsquare.be and currently includes 213 digenic combinations involved in 44 different digenic diseases. These combinations are composed of 364 distinct variants, which are distributed over 136 distinct genes. The web interface provides browsing and search functionalities, as well as documentation and help pages, general database statistics and references to the original publications from which the data have been collected. The possibility to submit novel digenic data to DIDA is also provided. Creating this new repository was essential as current databases do not allow one to retrieve detailed records regarding digenic combinations. Genes, variants, diseases and digenic combinations in DIDA are annotated with manually curated information and information mined from other online resources. Next to providing a unique resource for the development of new analysis methods, DIDA gives clinical and molecular geneticists a tool to find the most comprehensive information on the digenic nature of their diseases of interest. PMID:26481352

  3. Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB): an integrative and interactive database for rice genomics.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Lee, Sung Shin; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Numa, Hisataka; Kim, Jungsok; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Wakimoto, Hironobu; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwamoto, Masao; Abe, Takashi; Yamada, Yuko; Muto, Akira; Inokuchi, Hachiro; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji; Itoh, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB, http://rapdb.dna.affrc.go.jp/) has been providing a comprehensive set of gene annotations for the genome sequence of rice, Oryza sativa (japonica group) cv. Nipponbare. Since the first release in 2005, RAP-DB has been updated several times along with the genome assembly updates. Here, we present our newest RAP-DB based on the latest genome assembly, Os-Nipponbare-Reference-IRGSP-1.0 (IRGSP-1.0), which was released in 2011. We detected 37,869 loci by mapping transcript and protein sequences of 150 monocot species. To provide plant researchers with highly reliable and up to date rice gene annotations, we have been incorporating literature-based manually curated data, and 1,626 loci currently incorporate literature-based annotation data, including commonly used gene names or gene symbols. Transcriptional activities are shown at the nucleotide level by mapping RNA-Seq reads derived from 27 samples. We also mapped the Illumina reads of a Japanese leading japonica cultivar, Koshihikari, and a Chinese indica cultivar, Guangluai-4, to the genome and show alignments together with the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene functional annotations through a newly developed browser, Short-Read Assembly Browser (S-RAB). We have developed two satellite databases, Plant Gene Family Database (PGFD) and Integrative Database of Cereal Gene Phylogeny (IDCGP), which display gene family and homologous gene relationships among diverse plant species. RAP-DB and the satellite databases offer simple and user-friendly web interfaces, enabling plant and genome researchers to access the data easily and facilitating a broad range of plant research topics. PMID:23299411

  4. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator: A Mitochondrial Genome Database of Fish with an Accurate and Automatic Annotation Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Isagozawa, Ryota; Yamada, Koichiro; Maeda, Yasunobu; Satoh, Takashi P.; Sado, Tetsuya; Mabuchi, Kohji; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Miya, Masaki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2013-01-01

    Mitofish is a database of fish mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) that includes powerful and precise de novo annotations for mitogenome sequences. Fish occupy an important position in the evolution of vertebrates and the ecology of the hydrosphere, and mitogenomic sequence data have served as a rich source of information for resolving fish phylogenies and identifying new fish species. The importance of a mitogenomic database continues to grow at a rapid pace as massive amounts of mitogenomic data are generated with the advent of new sequencing technologies. A severe bottleneck seems likely to occur with regard to mitogenome annotation because of the overwhelming pace of data accumulation and the intrinsic difficulties in annotating sequences with degenerating transfer RNA structures, divergent start/stop codons of the coding elements, and the overlapping of adjacent elements. To ease this data backlog, we developed an annotation pipeline named MitoAnnotator. MitoAnnotator automatically annotates a fish mitogenome with a high degree of accuracy in approximately 5 min; thus, it is readily applicable to data sets of dozens of sequences. MitoFish also contains re-annotations of previously sequenced fish mitogenomes, enabling researchers to refer to them when they find annotations that are likely to be erroneous or while conducting comparative mitogenomic analyses. For users who need more information on the taxonomy, habitats, phenotypes, or life cycles of fish, MitoFish provides links to related databases. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator are freely available at http://mitofish.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ (last accessed August 28, 2013); all of the data can be batch downloaded, and the annotation pipeline can be used via a web interface. PMID:23955518

  5. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator: a mitochondrial genome database of fish with an accurate and automatic annotation pipeline.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Isagozawa, Ryota; Yamada, Koichiro; Maeda, Yasunobu; Satoh, Takashi P; Sado, Tetsuya; Mabuchi, Kohji; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Miya, Masaki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2013-11-01

    Mitofish is a database of fish mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) that includes powerful and precise de novo annotations for mitogenome sequences. Fish occupy an important position in the evolution of vertebrates and the ecology of the hydrosphere, and mitogenomic sequence data have served as a rich source of information for resolving fish phylogenies and identifying new fish species. The importance of a mitogenomic database continues to grow at a rapid pace as massive amounts of mitogenomic data are generated with the advent of new sequencing technologies. A severe bottleneck seems likely to occur with regard to mitogenome annotation because of the overwhelming pace of data accumulation and the intrinsic difficulties in annotating sequences with degenerating transfer RNA structures, divergent start/stop codons of the coding elements, and the overlapping of adjacent elements. To ease this data backlog, we developed an annotation pipeline named MitoAnnotator. MitoAnnotator automatically annotates a fish mitogenome with a high degree of accuracy in approximately 5 min; thus, it is readily applicable to data sets of dozens of sequences. MitoFish also contains re-annotations of previously sequenced fish mitogenomes, enabling researchers to refer to them when they find annotations that are likely to be erroneous or while conducting comparative mitogenomic analyses. For users who need more information on the taxonomy, habitats, phenotypes, or life cycles of fish, MitoFish provides links to related databases. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator are freely available at http://mitofish.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ (last accessed August 28, 2013); all of the data can be batch downloaded, and the annotation pipeline can be used via a web interface. PMID:23955518

  6. MannDB: A microbial annotation database for protein characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C; Lam, M; Smith, J; Zemla, A; Dyer, M; Kuczmarski, T; Vitalis, E; Slezak, T

    2006-05-19

    MannDB was created to meet a need for rapid, comprehensive automated protein sequence analyses to support selection of proteins suitable as targets for driving the development of reagents for pathogen or protein toxin detection. Because a large number of open-source tools were needed, it was necessary to produce a software system to scale the computations for whole-proteome analysis. Thus, we built a fully automated system for executing software tools and for storage, integration, and display of automated protein sequence analysis and annotation data. MannDB is a relational database that organizes data resulting from fully automated, high-throughput protein-sequence analyses using open-source tools. Types of analyses provided include predictions of cleavage, chemical properties, classification, features, functional assignment, post-translational modifications, motifs, antigenicity, and secondary structure. Proteomes (lists of hypothetical and known proteins) are downloaded and parsed from Genbank and then inserted into MannDB, and annotations from SwissProt are downloaded when identifiers are found in the Genbank entry or when identical sequences are identified. Currently 36 open-source tools are run against MannDB protein sequences either on local systems or by means of batch submission to external servers. In addition, BLAST against protein entries in MvirDB, our database of microbial virulence factors, is performed. A web client browser enables viewing of computational results and downloaded annotations, and a query tool enables structured and free-text search capabilities. When available, links to external databases, including MvirDB, are provided. MannDB contains whole-proteome analyses for at least one representative organism from each category of biological threat organism listed by APHIS, CDC, HHS, NIAID, USDA, USFDA, and WHO. MannDB comprises a large number of genomes and comprehensive protein sequence analyses representing organisms listed as high

  7. GLAD: an Online Database of Gene List Annotation for Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanhui; Comjean, Aram; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Perrimon, Norbert; Mohr, Stephanie E

    2015-01-01

    We present a resource of high quality lists of functionally related Drosophila genes, e.g. based on protein domains (kinases, transcription factors, etc.) or cellular function (e.g. autophagy, signal transduction). To establish these lists, we relied on different inputs, including curation from databases or the literature and mapping from other species. Moreover, as an added curation and quality control step, we asked experts in relevant fields to review many of the lists. The resource is available online for scientists to search and view, and is editable based on community input. Annotation of gene groups is an ongoing effort and scientific need will typically drive decisions regarding which gene lists to pursue. We anticipate that the number of lists will increase over time; that the composition of some lists will grow and/or change over time as new information becomes available; and that the lists will benefit the scientific community, e.g. at experimental design and data analysis stages. Based on this, we present an easily updatable online database, available at www.flyrnai.org/glad, at which gene group lists can be viewed, searched and downloaded. PMID:26157507

  8. An Improved microRNA Annotation of the Canine Genome.

    PubMed

    Penso-Dolfin, Luca; Swofford, Ross; Johnson, Jeremy; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Swarbreck, David; Moxon, Simon; Di Palma, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a valuable model for studying human diseases. The publication of the latest Canine genome build and annotation, CanFam3.1 provides an opportunity to enhance our understanding of gene regulation across tissues in the dog model system. In this study, we used the latest dog genome assembly and small RNA sequencing data from 9 different dog tissues to predict novel miRNAs in the dog genome, as well as to annotate conserved miRNAs from the miRBase database that were missing from the current dog annotation. We used both miRCat and miRDeep2 algorithms to computationally predict miRNA loci. The resulting, putative hairpin sequences were analysed in order to discard false positives, based on predicted secondary structures and patterns of small RNA read alignments. Results were further divided into high and low confidence miRNAs, using the same criteria. We generated tissue specific expression profiles for the resulting set of 811 loci: 720 conserved miRNAs, (207 of which had not been previously annotated in the dog genome) and 91 novel miRNA loci. Comparative analyses revealed 8 putative homologues of some novel miRNA in ferret, and one in microbat. All miRNAs were also classified into the genic and intergenic categories, based on the Ensembl RefSeq gene annotation for CanFam3.1. This additionally allowed us to identify four previously undescribed MiRtrons among our total set of miRNAs. We additionally annotated piRNAs, using proTRAC on the same input data. We thus identified 263 putative clusters, most of which (211 clusters) were found to be expressed in testis. Our results represent an important improvement of the dog genome annotation, paving the way to further research on the evolution of gene regulation, as well as on the contribution of post-transcriptional regulation to pathological conditions. PMID:27119849

  9. An Improved microRNA Annotation of the Canine Genome

    PubMed Central

    Swofford, Ross; Johnson, Jeremy; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Swarbreck, David; Moxon, Simon; Di Palma, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a valuable model for studying human diseases. The publication of the latest Canine genome build and annotation, CanFam3.1 provides an opportunity to enhance our understanding of gene regulation across tissues in the dog model system. In this study, we used the latest dog genome assembly and small RNA sequencing data from 9 different dog tissues to predict novel miRNAs in the dog genome, as well as to annotate conserved miRNAs from the miRBase database that were missing from the current dog annotation. We used both miRCat and miRDeep2 algorithms to computationally predict miRNA loci. The resulting, putative hairpin sequences were analysed in order to discard false positives, based on predicted secondary structures and patterns of small RNA read alignments. Results were further divided into high and low confidence miRNAs, using the same criteria. We generated tissue specific expression profiles for the resulting set of 811 loci: 720 conserved miRNAs, (207 of which had not been previously annotated in the dog genome) and 91 novel miRNA loci. Comparative analyses revealed 8 putative homologues of some novel miRNA in ferret, and one in microbat. All miRNAs were also classified into the genic and intergenic categories, based on the Ensembl RefSeq gene annotation for CanFam3.1. This additionally allowed us to identify four previously undescribed MiRtrons among our total set of miRNAs. We additionally annotated piRNAs, using proTRAC on the same input data. We thus identified 263 putative clusters, most of which (211 clusters) were found to be expressed in testis. Our results represent an important improvement of the dog genome annotation, paving the way to further research on the evolution of gene regulation, as well as on the contribution of post-transcriptional regulation to pathological conditions. PMID:27119849

  10. Combining computational models, semantic annotations and simulation experiments in a graph database

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Ron; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Model repositories such as the BioModels Database, the CellML Model Repository or JWS Online are frequently accessed to retrieve computational models of biological systems. However, their storage concepts support only restricted types of queries and not all data inside the repositories can be retrieved. In this article we present a storage concept that meets this challenge. It grounds on a graph database, reflects the models’ structure, incorporates semantic annotations and simulation descriptions and ultimately connects different types of model-related data. The connections between heterogeneous model-related data and bio-ontologies enable efficient search via biological facts and grant access to new model features. The introduced concept notably improves the access of computational models and associated simulations in a model repository. This has positive effects on tasks such as model search, retrieval, ranking, matching and filtering. Furthermore, our work for the first time enables CellML- and Systems Biology Markup Language-encoded models to be effectively maintained in one database. We show how these models can be linked via annotations and queried. Database URL: https://sems.uni-rostock.de/projects/masymos/ PMID:25754863

  11. Applying negative rule mining to improve genome annotation

    PubMed Central

    Artamonova, Irena I; Frishman, Goar; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2007-01-01

    Background Unsupervised annotation of proteins by software pipelines suffers from very high error rates. Spurious functional assignments are usually caused by unwarranted homology-based transfer of information from existing database entries to the new target sequences. We have previously demonstrated that data mining in large sequence annotation databanks can help identify annotation items that are strongly associated with each other, and that exceptions from strong positive association rules often point to potential annotation errors. Here we investigate the applicability of negative association rule mining to revealing erroneously assigned annotation items. Results Almost all exceptions from strong negative association rules are connected to at least one wrong attribute in the feature combination making up the rule. The fraction of annotation features flagged by this approach as suspicious is strongly enriched in errors and constitutes about 0.6% of the whole body of the similarity-transferred annotation in the PEDANT genome database. Positive rule mining does not identify two thirds of these errors. The approach based on exceptions from negative rules is much more specific than positive rule mining, but its coverage is significantly lower. Conclusion Mining of both negative and positive association rules is a potent tool for finding significant trends in protein annotation and flagging doubtful features for further inspection. PMID:17659089

  12. Reference sequence (RefSeq) database at NCBI: current status, taxonomic expansion, and functional annotation

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Nuala A.; Wright, Mathew W.; Brister, J. Rodney; Ciufo, Stacy; Haddad, Diana; McVeigh, Rich; Rajput, Bhanu; Robbertse, Barbara; Smith-White, Brian; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Astashyn, Alexander; Badretdin, Azat; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga; Brover, Vyacheslav; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Choi, Jinna; Cox, Eric; Ermolaeva, Olga; Farrell, Catherine M.; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gupta, Tripti; Haft, Daniel; Hatcher, Eneida; Hlavina, Wratko; Joardar, Vinita S.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Li, Wenjun; Maglott, Donna; Masterson, Patrick; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Murphy, Michael R.; O'Neill, Kathleen; Pujar, Shashikant; Rangwala, Sanjida H.; Rausch, Daniel; Riddick, Lillian D.; Schoch, Conrad; Shkeda, Andrei; Storz, Susan S.; Sun, Hanzhen; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Tolstoy, Igor; Tully, Raymond E.; Vatsan, Anjana R.; Wallin, Craig; Webb, David; Wu, Wendy; Landrum, Melissa J.; Kimchi, Avi; Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Murphy, Terence D.; Pruitt, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) against a combination of computation, manual curation, and collaboration to produce a standard set of stable, non-redundant reference sequences. The RefSeq project augments these reference sequences with current knowledge including publications, functional features and informative nomenclature. The database currently represents sequences from more than 55 000 organisms (>4800 viruses, >40 000 prokaryotes and >10 000 eukaryotes; RefSeq release 71), ranging from a single record to complete genomes. This paper summarizes the current status of the viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic branches of the RefSeq project, reports on improvements to data access and details efforts to further expand the taxonomic representation of the collection. We also highlight diverse functional curation initiatives that support multiple uses of RefSeq data including taxonomic validation, genome annotation, comparative genomics, and clinical testing. We summarize our approach to utilizing available RNA-Seq and other data types in our manual curation process for vertebrate, plant, and other species, and describe a new direction for prokaryotic genomes and protein name management. PMID:26553804

  13. An integrated computational pipeline and database to support whole-genome sequence annotation

    PubMed Central

    Mungall, CJ; Misra, S; Berman, BP; Carlson, J; Frise, E; Harris, N; Marshall, B; Shu, S; Kaminker, JS; Prochnik, SE; Smith, CD; Smith, E; Tupy, JL; Wiel, C; Rubin, GM; Lewis, SE

    2002-01-01

    We describe here our experience in annotating the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence, in the course of which we developed several new open-source software tools and a database schema to support large-scale genome annotation. We have developed these into an integrated and reusable software system for whole-genome annotation. The key contributions to overall annotation quality are the marshalling of high-quality sequences for alignments and the design of a system with an adaptable and expandable flexible architecture. PMID:12537570

  14. BioBuilder as a database development and functional annotation platform for proteins

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, J Daniel; Talreja, Naveen; Peri, Suraj; Vrushabendra, BM; Rashmi, BP; Padma, N; Surendranath, Vineeth; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Kousthub, PS; Deshpande, Nandan; Shanker, K; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2004-01-01

    Background The explosion in biological information creates the need for databases that are easy to develop, easy to maintain and can be easily manipulated by annotators who are most likely to be biologists. However, deployment of scalable and extensible databases is not an easy task and generally requires substantial expertise in database development. Results BioBuilder is a Zope-based software tool that was developed to facilitate intuitive creation of protein databases. Protein data can be entered and annotated through web forms along with the flexibility to add customized annotation features to protein entries. A built-in review system permits a global team of scientists to coordinate their annotation efforts. We have already used BioBuilder to develop Human Protein Reference Database , a comprehensive annotated repository of the human proteome. The data can be exported in the extensible markup language (XML) format, which is rapidly becoming as the standard format for data exchange. Conclusions As the proteomic data for several organisms begins to accumulate, BioBuilder will prove to be an invaluable platform for functional annotation and development of customizable protein centric databases. BioBuilder is open source and is available under the terms of LGPL. PMID:15099404

  15. The H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB), a comprehensive annotation resource for human genes and transcripts.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Chisato; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Sato, Yoshiharu; Harada, Erimi; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Taniya, Takayuki; Sakate, Ryuichi; Kikugawa, Shingo; Shimada, Makoto; Tanino, Motohiko; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Barrero, Roberto A; Gough, Craig; Chun, Hong-Woo; Habara, Takuya; Hanaoka, Hideki; Hayakawa, Yosuke; Hilton, Phillip B; Kaneko, Yayoi; Kanno, Masako; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Toshiyuki; Matsuya, Akihiro; Nagata, Naoki; Nishikata, Kensaku; Noda, Akiko Ogura; Nurimoto, Shin; Saichi, Naomi; Sakai, Hiroaki; Sanbonmatsu, Ryoko; Shiba, Rie; Suzuki, Mami; Takabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Aiko; Tamura, Takuro; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tanaka, Susumu; Todokoro, Fusano; Yamaguchi, Kaori; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Okido, Toshihisa; Mashima, Jun; Hashizume, Aki; Jin, Lihua; Lee, Kyung-Bum; Lin, Yi-Chueh; Nozaki, Asami; Sakai, Katsunaga; Tada, Masahito; Miyazaki, Satoru; Makino, Takashi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Osato, Naoki; Tanaka, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ikeo, Kazuho; Saitou, Naruya; Sugawara, Hideaki; O'Donovan, Claire; Kulikova, Tamara; Whitfield, Eleanor; Halligan, Brian; Shimoyama, Mary; Twigger, Simon; Yura, Kei; Kimura, Kouichi; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Akiyama, Yutaka; Motono, Chie; Mukai, Yuri; Nagasaki, Hideki; Suwa, Makiko; Horton, Paul; Kikuno, Reiko; Ohara, Osamu; Lancet, Doron; Eveno, Eric; Graudens, Esther; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Debily, Marie Anne; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Amid, Clara; Han, Michael; Osanger, Andreas; Endo, Toshinori; Thomas, Michael A; Hirakawa, Mika; Makalowski, Wojciech; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Kim, Nam-Soon; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; De Souza, Sandro J; Bonaldo, Maria de Fatima; Niimura, Yoshihito; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Schupp, Ingo; Wiemann, Stefan; Bellgard, Matthew; Shionyu, Masafumi; Jia, Libin; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Wagner, Lukas; Zhang, Qinghua; Go, Mitiko; Minoshima, Shinsei; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Hanada, Kousuke; Tonellato, Peter; Isogai, Takao; Zhang, Ji; Lenhard, Boris; Kim, Sangsoo; Chen, Zhu; Hinz, Ursula; Estreicher, Anne; Nakai, Kenta; Makalowska, Izabela; Hide, Winston; Tiffin, Nicola; Wilming, Laurens; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Soares, Marcelo Bento; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Suzuki, Yutaka; Auffray, Charles; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Itoh, Takeshi; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Ken; Sugano, Sumio; Nomura, Nobuo; Tateno, Yoshio; Imanishi, Tadashi; Gojobori, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the new features and improvements in our latest release of the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/), a comprehensive annotation resource for human genes and transcripts. H-InvDB, originally developed as an integrated database of the human transcriptome based on extensive annotation of large sets of full-length cDNA (FLcDNA) clones, now provides annotation for 120 558 human mRNAs extracted from the International Nucleotide Sequence Databases (INSD), in addition to 54 978 human FLcDNAs, in the latest release H-InvDB_4.6. We mapped those human transcripts onto the human genome sequences (NCBI build 36.1) and determined 34 699 human gene clusters, which could define 34 057 (98.1%) protein-coding and 642 (1.9%) non-protein-coding loci; 858 (2.5%) transcribed loci overlapped with predicted pseudogenes. For all these transcripts and genes, we provide comprehensive annotation including gene structures, gene functions, alternative splicing variants, functional non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, predicted sub cellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein 3D structure, mapping of SNPs and microsatellite repeat motifs, co-localization with orphan diseases, gene expression profiles, orthologous genes, protein-protein interactions (PPI) and annotation for gene families. The current H-InvDB annotation resources consist of two main views: Transcript view and Locus view and eight sub-databases: the DiseaseInfo Viewer, H-ANGEL, the Clustering Viewer, G-integra, the TOPO Viewer, Evola, the PPI view and the Gene family/group. PMID:18089548

  16. ASGARD: an open-access database of annotated transcriptomes for emerging model arthropod species.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Victor; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2012-01-01

    The increased throughput and decreased cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS) have shifted the bottleneck genomic research from sequencing to annotation, analysis and accessibility. This is particularly challenging for research communities working on organisms that lack the basic infrastructure of a sequenced genome, or an efficient way to utilize whatever sequence data may be available. Here we present a new database, the Assembled Searchable Giant Arthropod Read Database (ASGARD). This database is a repository and search engine for transcriptomic data from arthropods that are of high interest to multiple research communities but currently lack sequenced genomes. We demonstrate the functionality and utility of ASGARD using de novo assembled transcriptomes from the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. We have annotated these transcriptomes to assign putative orthology, coding region determination, protein domain identification and Gene Ontology (GO) term annotation to all possible assembly products. ASGARD allows users to search all assemblies by orthology annotation, GO term annotation or Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. User-friendly features of ASGARD include search term auto-completion suggestions based on database content, the ability to download assembly product sequences in FASTA format, direct links to NCBI data for predicted orthologs and graphical representation of the location of protein domains and matches to similar sequences from the NCBI non-redundant database. ASGARD will be a useful repository for transcriptome data from future NGS studies on these and other emerging model arthropods, regardless of sequencing platform, assembly or annotation status. This database thus provides easy, one-stop access to multi-species annotated transcriptome information. We anticipate that this database will be useful for members of multiple research communities, including developmental

  17. Assessment of community-submitted ontology annotations from a novel database-journal partnership.

    PubMed

    Berardini, Tanya Z; Li, Donghui; Muller, Robert; Chetty, Raymond; Ploetz, Larry; Singh, Shanker; Wensel, April; Huala, Eva

    2012-01-01

    As the scientific literature grows, leading to an increasing volume of published experimental data, so does the need to access and analyze this data using computational tools. The most commonly used method to convert published experimental data on gene function into controlled vocabulary annotations relies on a professional curator, employed by a model organism database or a more general resource such as UniProt, to read published articles and compose annotation statements based on the articles' contents. A more cost-effective and scalable approach capable of capturing gene function data across the whole range of biological research organisms in computable form is urgently needed. We have analyzed a set of ontology annotations generated through collaborations between the Arabidopsis Information Resource and several plant science journals. Analysis of the submissions entered using the online submission tool shows that most community annotations were well supported and the ontology terms chosen were at an appropriate level of specificity. Of the 503 individual annotations that were submitted, 97% were approved and community submissions captured 72% of all possible annotations. This new method for capturing experimental results in a computable form provides a cost-effective way to greatly increase the available body of annotations without sacrificing annotation quality. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org. PMID:22859749

  18. PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Christian J A; Cerutti, Lorenzo; de Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S; Bulliard, Virginie; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 ( approximately 70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:19858104

  19. PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Christian J. A.; Cerutti, Lorenzo; de Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S.; Bulliard, Virginie; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 (∼70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:19858104

  20. PTM-SD: a database of structurally resolved and annotated posttranslational modifications in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Craveur, Pierrick; Rebehmed, Joseph; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2014-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) define covalent and chemical modifications of protein residues. They play important roles in modulating various biological functions. Current PTM databases contain important sequence annotations but do not provide informative 3D structural resource about these modifications. Posttranslational modification structural database (PTM-SD) provides access to structurally solved modified residues, which are experimentally annotated as PTMs. It combines different PTM information and annotation gathered from other databases, e.g. Protein DataBank for the protein structures and dbPTM and PTMCuration for fine sequence annotation. PTM-SD gives an accurate detection of PTMs in structural data. PTM-SD can be browsed by PDB id, UniProt accession number, organism and classic PTM annotation. Advanced queries can also be performed, i.e. detailed PTM annotations, amino acid type, secondary structure, SCOP class classification, PDB chain length and number of PTMs by chain. Statistics and analyses can be computed on a selected dataset of PTMs. Each PTM entry is detailed in a dedicated page with information on the protein sequence, local conformation with secondary structure and Protein Blocks. PTM-SD gives valuable information on observed PTMs in protein 3D structure, which is of great interest for studying sequence–structure– function relationships at the light of PTMs, and could provide insights for comparative modeling and PTM predictions protocols. Database URL: PTM-SD can be accessed at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/dsimb_tools/PTM-SD/. PMID:24857970

  1. BioModels Database: An enhanced, curated and annotated resource for published quantitative kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative models of biochemical and cellular systems are used to answer a variety of questions in the biological sciences. The number of published quantitative models is growing steadily thanks to increasing interest in the use of models as well as the development of improved software systems and the availability of better, cheaper computer hardware. To maximise the benefits of this growing body of models, the field needs centralised model repositories that will encourage, facilitate and promote model dissemination and reuse. Ideally, the models stored in these repositories should be extensively tested and encoded in community-supported and standardised formats. In addition, the models and their components should be cross-referenced with other resources in order to allow their unambiguous identification. Description BioModels Database http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels/ is aimed at addressing exactly these needs. It is a freely-accessible online resource for storing, viewing, retrieving, and analysing published, peer-reviewed quantitative models of biochemical and cellular systems. The structure and behaviour of each simulation model distributed by BioModels Database are thoroughly checked; in addition, model elements are annotated with terms from controlled vocabularies as well as linked to relevant data resources. Models can be examined online or downloaded in various formats. Reaction network diagrams generated from the models are also available in several formats. BioModels Database also provides features such as online simulation and the extraction of components from large scale models into smaller submodels. Finally, the system provides a range of web services that external software systems can use to access up-to-date data from the database. Conclusions BioModels Database has become a recognised reference resource for systems biology. It is being used by the community in a variety of ways; for example, it is used to benchmark different simulation

  2. TogoTable: cross-database annotation system using the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Shin; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Mizuguchi, Sohei; Araki, Norie; Katayama, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    TogoTable (http://togotable.dbcls.jp/) is a web tool that adds user-specified annotations to a table that a user uploads. Annotations are drawn from several biological databases that use the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model. TogoTable uses database identifiers (IDs) in the table as a query key for searching. RDF data, which form a network called Linked Open Data (LOD), can be searched from SPARQL endpoints using a SPARQL query language. Because TogoTable uses RDF, it can integrate annotations from not only the reference database to which the IDs originally belong, but also externally linked databases via the LOD network. For example, annotations in the Protein Data Bank can be retrieved using GeneID through links provided by the UniProt RDF. Because RDF has been standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium, any database with annotations based on the RDF data model can be easily incorporated into this tool. We believe that TogoTable is a valuable Web tool, particularly for experimental biologists who need to process huge amounts of data such as high-throughput experimental output. PMID:24829452

  3. Structuring osteosarcoma knowledge: an osteosarcoma-gene association database based on literature mining and manual annotation.

    PubMed

    Poos, Kathrin; Smida, Jan; Nathrath, Michaela; Maugg, Doris; Baumhoer, Daniel; Neumann, Anna; Korsching, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone cancer exhibiting high genomic instability. This genomic instability affects multiple genes and microRNAs to a varying extent depending on patient and tumor subtype. Massive research is ongoing to identify genes including their gene products and microRNAs that correlate with disease progression and might be used as biomarkers for OS. However, the genomic complexity hampers the identification of reliable biomarkers. Up to now, clinico-pathological factors are the key determinants to guide prognosis and therapeutic treatments. Each day, new studies about OS are published and complicate the acquisition of information to support biomarker discovery and therapeutic improvements. Thus, it is necessary to provide a structured and annotated view on the current OS knowledge that is quick and easily accessible to researchers of the field. Therefore, we developed a publicly available database and Web interface that serves as resource for OS-associated genes and microRNAs. Genes and microRNAs were collected using an automated dictionary-based gene recognition procedure followed by manual review and annotation by experts of the field. In total, 911 genes and 81 microRNAs related to 1331 PubMed abstracts were collected (last update: 29 October 2013). Users can evaluate genes and microRNAs according to their potential prognostic and therapeutic impact, the experimental procedures, the sample types, the biological contexts and microRNA target gene interactions. Additionally, a pathway enrichment analysis of the collected genes highlights different aspects of OS progression. OS requires pathways commonly deregulated in cancer but also features OS-specific alterations like deregulated osteoclast differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first effort of an OS database containing manual reviewed and annotated up-to-date OS knowledge. It might be a useful resource especially for the bone tumor research community, as specific

  4. Manual curation is not sufficient for annotation of genomic databases

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, William A.; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Fox, Lynne M.; Acquaah-Mensah, George; Hunter, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Motivation Knowledge base construction has been an area of intense activity and great importance in the growth of computational biology. However, there is little or no history of work on the subject of evaluation of knowledge bases, either with respect to their contents or with respect to the processes by which they are constructed. This article proposes the application of a metric from software engineering known as the found/fixed graph to the problem of evaluating the processes by which genomic knowledge bases are built, as well as the completeness of their contents. Results Well-understood patterns of change in the found/fixed graph are found to occur in two large publicly available knowledge bases. These patterns suggest that the current manual curation processes will take far too long to complete the annotations of even just the most important model organisms, and that at their current rate of production, they will never be sufficient for completing the annotation of all currently available proteomes. Contact larry.hunter@uchsc.edu PMID:17646325

  5. The Flux: creating a large annotated image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburrino, Daniel; Schönmann, Patrick; Vandewalle, Patrick; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    From image retrieval to image classification, all research shares one common requirement: a good image database to test or train the algorithms. In order to create a large database of images, we set up a project that allowed gathering a collection of more than 33000 photographs with keywords and tags from all over the world. This project was part of the "We Are All Photographers Now!" exhibition at the Musee de l'Elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland. The "Flux," as it was called, gave all photographers, professional or amateur, the opportunity to have their images shown in the museum. Anyone could upload pictures on a website. We required that some simple tags were filled in. Keywords were optional. The information was collected in a MySQL database along with the original photos. The pictures were projected at the museum in five second intervals. A webcam snapshot was taken and sent back to the photographers via email to show how and when their image was displayed at the museum. During the 14 weeks of the exhibition, we collected more than 33000 JPEG pictures with tags and keywords. These pictures come from 133 countries and were taken by 9042 different photographers. This database can be used for non-commercial research at EPFL. We present some preliminary analysis here.

  6. A Tunable Machine Vision-based Strategy for Automated Annotation of Chemical Databases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungkap; Rosania, Gus R.; Saitou, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We present a tunable, machine vision-based strategy for automated annotation of virtual small molecule databases. The proposed strategy is based on the use of a machine vision based tool for extracting structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into connection tables, a virtual “Chemical Expert” system for screening the converted structures based on the adjustable levels of estimated conversion accuracy, and a fragment-based measure for calculating intermolecular similarity. For annotation, calculated chemical similarity between the converted structures and entries in a virtual small molecule database is used to establish the links. The overall annotation performances can be tuned by adjusting the cutoff threshold of the estimated conversion accuracy. We performed an annotation test which attempts to link 121 journal articles registered in the PubMed to entries in the PubChem which is the largest, publicly accessible chemical database. Two cases of tests are performed and their results are compared to see how the overall annotation performances are affected by the different threshold levels of the estimated accuracy of the converted structure. Our work demonstrates that over 45% of articles could have true positive links to entries in the PubChem database with promising recall and precision rates in both tests. Furthermore, we illustrates that Chemical Expert system which can screen the converted structures based on the adjustable levels of estimated conversion accuracy is a key factor impacting the overall annotation performance. We propose that this machine vision based strategy can be incorporated with the text-mining approach to facilitate extraction of contextual scientific knowledge about a chemical structure, from the scientific literature. PMID:19621901

  7. SIMAP—the database of all-against-all protein sequence similarities and annotations with new interfaces and increased coverage

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Goldenberg, Florian; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Rattei, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Similarity Matrix of Proteins (SIMAP, http://mips.gsf.de/simap/) database has been designed to massively accelerate computationally expensive protein sequence analysis tasks in bioinformatics. It provides pre-calculated sequence similarities interconnecting the entire known protein sequence universe, complemented by pre-calculated protein features and domains, similarity clusters and functional annotations. SIMAP covers all major public protein databases as well as many consistently re-annotated metagenomes from different repositories. As of September 2013, SIMAP contains >163 million proteins corresponding to ∼70 million non-redundant sequences. SIMAP uses the sensitive FASTA search heuristics, the Smith–Waterman alignment algorithm, the InterPro database of protein domain models and the BLAST2GO functional annotation algorithm. SIMAP assists biologists by facilitating the interactive exploration of the protein sequence universe. Web-Service and DAS interfaces allow connecting SIMAP with any other bioinformatic tool and resource. All-against-all protein sequence similarity matrices of project-specific protein collections are generated on request. Recent improvements allow SIMAP to cover the rapidly growing sequenced protein sequence universe. New Web-Service interfaces enhance the connectivity of SIMAP. Novel tools for interactive extraction of protein similarity networks have been added. Open access to SIMAP is provided through the web portal; the portal also contains instructions and links for software access and flat file downloads. PMID:24165881

  8. Work and Family Functioning: An Annotated Bibliography Selected from Family Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mari, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography lists works published in Australia on issues regarding work obligations and family responsibilities. All works cited are included in Australia's FAMILY database. The following topics are covered: (1) adolescents and attitudes to employment (14 citations); (2) the aged and employment (20 citations); (3) career…

  9. An update on LNCipedia: a database for annotated human lncRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Volders, Pieter-Jan; Verheggen, Kenneth; Menschaert, Gerben; Vandepoele, Klaas; Martens, Lennart; Vandesompele, Jo; Mestdagh, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is pervasively transcribed, producing thousands of non-coding RNA transcripts. The majority of these transcripts are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and novel lncRNA genes are being identified at rapid pace. To streamline these efforts, we created LNCipedia, an online repository of lncRNA transcripts and annotation. Here, we present LNCipedia 3.0 (http://www.lncipedia.org), the latest version of the publicly available human lncRNA database. Compared to the previous version of LNCipedia, the database grew over five times in size, gaining over 90 000 new lncRNA transcripts. Assessment of the protein-coding potential of LNCipedia entries is improved with state-of-the art methods that include large-scale reprocessing of publicly available proteomics data. As a result, a high-confidence set of lncRNA transcripts with low coding potential is defined and made available for download. In addition, a tool to assess lncRNA gene conservation between human, mouse and zebrafish has been implemented. PMID:25378313

  10. The Saccharomyces Genome Database: Exploring Genome Features and Their Annotations.

    PubMed

    Cherry, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    Genomic-scale assays result in data that provide information over the entire genome. Such base pair resolution data cannot be summarized easily except via a graphical viewer. A genome browser is a tool that displays genomic data and experimental results as horizontal tracks. Genome browsers allow searches for a chromosomal coordinate or a feature, such as a gene name, but they do not allow searches by function or upstream binding site. Entry into a genome browser requires that you identify the gene name or chromosomal coordinates for a region of interest. A track provides a representation for genomic results and is displayed as a row of data shown as line segments to indicate regions of the chromosome with a feature. Another type of track presents a graph or wiggle plot that indicates the processed signal intensity computed for a particular experiment or set of experiments. Wiggle plots are typical for genomic assays such as the various next-generation sequencing methods (e.g., chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP]-seq or RNA-seq), where it represents a peak of DNA binding, histone modification, or the mapping of an RNA sequence. Here we explore the browser that has been built into the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). PMID:26631126

  11. Non-redundant patent sequence databases with value-added annotations at two levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizhong; McWilliam, Hamish; de la Torre, Ana Richart; Grodowski, Adam; Benediktovich, Irina; Goujon, Mickael; Nauche, Stephane; Lopez, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) provides public access to patent data, including abstracts, chemical compounds and sequences. Sequences can appear multiple times due to the filing of the same invention with multiple patent offices, or the use of the same sequence by different inventors in different contexts. Information relating to the source invention may be incomplete, and biological information available in patent documents elsewhere may not be reflected in the annotation of the sequence. Search and analysis of these data have become increasingly challenging for both the scientific and intellectual-property communities. Here, we report a collection of non-redundant patent sequence databases, which cover the EMBL-Bank nucleotides patent class and the patent protein databases and contain value-added annotations from patent documents. The databases were created at two levels by the use of sequence MD5 checksums. Sequences within a level-1 cluster are 100% identical over their whole length. Level-2 clusters were defined by sub-grouping level-1 clusters based on patent family information. Value-added annotations, such as publication number corrections, earliest publication dates and feature collations, significantly enhance the quality of the data, allowing for better tracking and cross-referencing. The databases are available format: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/patentdata/nr/. PMID:19884134

  12. OryzaExpress: An Integrated Database of Gene Expression Networks and Omics Annotations in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Kazuki; Hongo, Kohei; Suwabe, Keita; Shimizu, Akifumi; Nagayama, Taishi; Abe, Reina; Kikuchi, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Naoki; Fujii, Takaaki; Yokoyama, Koji; Tsuchida, Hiroko; Sano, Kazumi; Mochizuki, Takako; Oki, Nobuhiko; Horiuchi, Youko; Fujita, Masahiro; Watanabe, Masao; Matsuoka, Makoto; Kurata, Nori; Yano, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    Similarity of gene expression profiles provides important clues for understanding the biological functions of genes, biological processes and metabolic pathways related to genes. A gene expression network (GEN) is an ideal choice to grasp such expression profile similarities among genes simultaneously. For GEN construction, the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) has been widely used as an index to evaluate the similarities of expression profiles for gene pairs. However, calculation of PCCs for all gene pairs requires large amounts of both time and computer resources. Based on correspondence analysis, we developed a new method for GEN construction, which takes minimal time even for large-scale expression data with general computational circumstances. Moreover, our method requires no prior parameters to remove sample redundancies in the data set. Using the new method, we constructed rice GENs from large-scale microarray data stored in a public database. We then collected and integrated various principal rice omics annotations in public and distinct databases. The integrated information contains annotations of genome, transcriptome and metabolic pathways. We thus developed the integrated database OryzaExpress for browsing GENs with an interactive and graphical viewer and principal omics annotations (http://riceball.lab.nig.ac.jp/oryzaexpress/). With integration of Arabidopsis GEN data from ATTED-II, OryzaExpress also allows us to compare GENs between rice and Arabidopsis. Thus, OryzaExpress is a comprehensive rice database that exploits powerful omics approaches from all perspectives in plant science and leads to systems biology. PMID:21186175

  13. The Genomic Threading Database: a comprehensive resource for structural annotations of the genomes from key organisms.

    PubMed

    McGuffin, Liam J; Street, Stefano A; Bryson, Kevin; Sørensen, Søren-Aksel; Jones, David T

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the Genomic Threading Database (GTD) contains structural assignments for the proteins encoded within the genomes of nine eukaryotes and 101 prokaryotes. Structural annotations are carried out using a modified version of GenTHREADER, a reliable fold recognition method. The Gen THREADER annotation jobs are distributed across multiple clusters of processors using grid technology and the predictions are deposited in a relational database accessible via a web interface at http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/GTD. Using this system, up to 84% of proteins encoded within a genome can be confidently assigned to known folds with 72% of the residues aligned. On average in the GTD, 64% of proteins encoded within a genome are confidently assigned to known folds and 58% of the residues are aligned to structures. PMID:14681393

  14. Annotated checklist and database for vascular plants of the Jemez Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Foxx, T. S.; Pierce, L.; Tierney, G. D.; Hansen, L. A.

    1998-03-01

    Studies done in the last 40 years have provided information to construct a checklist of the Jemez Mountains. The present database and checklist builds on the basic list compiled by Teralene Foxx and Gail Tierney in the early 1980s. The checklist is annotated with taxonomic information, geographic and biological information, economic uses, wildlife cover, revegetation potential, and ethnographic uses. There are nearly 1000 species that have been noted for the Jemez Mountains. This list is cross-referenced with the US Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service PLANTS database species names and acronyms. All information will soon be available on a Web Page.

  15. Improving Genome Assemblies and Annotations for Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Norgren, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The study of nonhuman primates (NHP) is key to understanding human evolution, in addition to being an important model for biomedical research. NHPs are especially important for translational medicine. There are now exciting opportunities to greatly increase the utility of these models by incorporating Next Generation (NextGen) sequencing into study design. Unfortunately, the draft status of nonhuman genomes greatly constrains what can currently be accomplished with available technology. Although all genomes contain errors, draft assemblies and annotations contain so many mistakes that they make currently available nonhuman primate genomes misleading to investigators conducting evolutionary studies; and these genomes are of insufficient quality to serve as references for NextGen studies. Fortunately, NextGen sequencing can be used in the production of greatly improved genomes. Existing Sanger sequences can be supplemented with NextGen whole genome, and exomic genomic sequences to create new, more complete and correct assemblies. Additional physical mapping, and an incorporation of information about gene structure, can be used to improve assignment of scaffolds to chromosomes. In addition, mRNA-sequence data can be used to economically acquire transcriptome information, which can be used for annotation. Some highly polymorphic and complex regions, for example MHC class I and immunoglobulin loci, will require extra effort to properly assemble and annotate. However, for the vast majority of genes, a modest investment in money, and a somewhat greater investment in time, can greatly improve assemblies and annotations sufficient to produce true, reference grade nonhuman primate genomes. Such resources can reasonably be expected to transform nonhuman primate research. PMID:24174438

  16. The Saccharomyces Genome Database: Gene Product Annotation of Function, Process, and Component.

    PubMed

    Cherry, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    An ontology is a highly structured form of controlled vocabulary. Each entry in the ontology is commonly called a term. These terms are used when talking about an annotation. However, each term has a definition that, like the definition of a word found within a dictionary, provides the complete usage and detailed explanation of the term. It is critical to consult a term's definition because the distinction between terms can be subtle. The use of ontologies in biology started as a way of unifying communication between scientific communities and to provide a standard dictionary for different topics, including molecular functions, biological processes, mutant phenotypes, chemical properties and structures. The creation of ontology terms and their definitions often requires debate to reach agreement but the result has been a unified descriptive language used to communicate knowledge. In addition to terms and definitions, ontologies require a relationship used to define the type of connection between terms. In an ontology, a term can have more than one parent term, the term above it in an ontology, as well as more than one child, the term below it in the ontology. Many ontologies are used to construct annotations in the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD), as in all modern biological databases; however, Gene Ontology (GO), a descriptive system used to categorize gene function, is the most extensively used ontology in SGD annotations. Examples included in this protocol illustrate the structure and features of this ontology. PMID:26631125

  17. Global profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Expression of hypothetical genes and improved functional annotations

    SciTech Connect

    Picone, Alex F.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Romine, Margaret; Higdon, Roger; Makarova, Kira S.; Kolker, Natali; Anderson, Gordon A; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Beliaev, Alexander S; Edlefsen, Paul; Elias, Dwayne A.; Gorby, Dr. Yuri A.; Holzman, Ted; Klappenbach, Joel; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Land, Miriam L; Lipton, Mary S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Monroe, Matthew; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Purvine, Samuel; Serres, Margrethe H.; Tsapin, Sasha; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Zhu, Wenguang; Zhou, Jizhong; Larimer, Frank W; Lawrence, Charles E.; Riley, Monica; Collart, Frank; YatesIII, John R.; Smith, Richard D.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M.

    2005-01-01

    The gamma-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a metabolically versatile organism that can reduce a wide range of organic compounds, metal ions, and radionuclides. Similar to most other sequenced organisms, approximate to40% of the predicted ORFs in the S. oneidensis genome were annotated as uncharacterized "hypothetical" genes. We implemented an integrative approach by using experimental and computational analyses to provide more detailed insight into gene function. Global expression profiles were determined for cells after UV irradiation and under aerobic and suboxic growth conditions. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses confidently identified 538 hypothetical genes as expressed in S. oneidensis cells both as mRNAs and proteins (33% of all predicted hypothetical proteins). Publicly available analysis tools and databases and the expression data were applied to improve the annotation of these genes. The annotation results were scored by using a seven-category schema that ranked both confidence and precision of the functional assignment. We were able to identify homologs for nearly all of these hypothetical proteins (97%), but could confidently assign exact biochemical functions for only 16 proteins (category 1; 3%). Altogether, computational and experimental evidence provided functional assignments or insights for 240 more genes (categories 2-5; 45%). These functional annotations advance our understanding of genes involved in vital cellular processes, including energy conversion, ion transport, secondary metabolism, and signal transduction. We propose that this integrative approach offers a valuable means to undertake the enormous challenge of characterizing the rapidly growing number of hypothetical proteins with each newly sequenced genome.

  18. Construction of customized sub-databases from NCBI-nr database for rapid annotation of huge metagenomic datasets using a combined BLAST and MEGAN approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    We developed a fast method to construct local sub-databases from the NCBI-nr database for the quick similarity search and annotation of huge metagenomic datasets based on BLAST-MEGAN approach. A three-step sub-database annotation pipeline (SAP) was further proposed to conduct the annotation in a much more time-efficient way which required far less computational capacity than the direct NCBI-nr database BLAST-MEGAN approach. The 1(st) BLAST of SAP was conducted using the original metagenomic dataset against the constructed sub-database for a quick screening of candidate target sequences. Then, the candidate target sequences identified in the 1(st) BLAST were subjected to the 2(nd) BLAST against the whole NCBI-nr database. The BLAST results were finally annotated using MEGAN to filter out those mistakenly selected sequences in the 1(st) BLAST to guarantee the accuracy of the results. Based on the tests conducted in this study, SAP achieved a speedup of ~150-385 times at the BLAST e-value of 1e-5, compared to the direct BLAST against NCBI-nr database. The annotation results of SAP are exactly in agreement with those of the direct NCBI-nr database BLAST-MEGAN approach, which is very time-consuming and computationally intensive. Selecting rigorous thresholds (e.g. e-value of 1e-10) would further accelerate SAP process. The SAP pipeline may also be coupled with novel similarity search tools (e.g. RAPsearch) other than BLAST to achieve even faster annotation of huge metagenomic datasets. Above all, this sub-database construction method and SAP pipeline provides a new time-efficient and convenient annotation similarity search strategy for laboratories without access to high performance computing facilities. SAP also offers a solution to high performance computing facilities for the processing of more similarity search tasks. PMID:23573212

  19. Design and implementation of a database for Brucella melitensis genome annotation.

    PubMed

    De Hertogh, Benoît; Lahlimi, Leïla; Lambert, Christophe; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Depiereux, Eric

    2008-03-18

    The genome sequences of three Brucella biovars and of some species close to Brucella sp. have become available, leading to new relationship analysis. Moreover, the automatic genome annotation of the pathogenic bacteria Brucella melitensis has been manually corrected by a consortium of experts, leading to 899 modifications of start sites predictions among the 3198 open reading frames (ORFs) examined. This new annotation, coupled with the results of automatic annotation tools of the complete genome sequences of the B. melitensis genome (including BLASTs to 9 genomes close to Brucella), provides numerous data sets related to predicted functions, biochemical properties and phylogenic comparisons. To made these results available, alphaPAGe, a functional auto-updatable database of the corrected sequence genome of B. melitensis, has been built, using the entity-relationship (ER) approach and a multi-purpose database structure. A friendly graphical user interface has been designed, and users can carry out different kinds of information by three levels of queries: (1) the basic search use the classical keywords or sequence identifiers; (2) the original advanced search engine allows to combine (by using logical operators) numerous criteria: (a) keywords (textual comparison) related to the pCDS's function, family domains and cellular localization; (b) physico-chemical characteristics (numerical comparison) such as isoelectric point or molecular weight and structural criteria such as the nucleic length or the number of transmembrane helix (TMH); (c) similarity scores with Escherichia coli and 10 species phylogenetically close to B. melitensis; (3) complex queries can be performed by using a SQL field, which allows all queries respecting the database's structure. The database is publicly available through a Web server at the following url: http://www.fundp.ac.be/urbm/bioinfo/aPAGe. PMID:18160234

  20. LNCipedia: a database for annotated human lncRNA transcript sequences and structures.

    PubMed

    Volders, Pieter-Jan; Helsens, Kenny; Wang, Xiaowei; Menten, Björn; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris; Vandesompele, Jo; Mestdagh, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present LNCipedia (http://www.lncipedia.org), a novel database for human long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts and genes. LncRNAs constitute a large and diverse class of non-coding RNA genes. Although several lncRNAs have been functionally annotated, the majority remains to be characterized. Different high-throughput methods to identify new lncRNAs (including RNA sequencing and annotation of chromatin-state maps) have been applied in various studies resulting in multiple unrelated lncRNA data sets. LNCipedia offers 21 488 annotated human lncRNA transcripts obtained from different sources. In addition to basic transcript information and gene structure, several statistics are determined for each entry in the database, such as secondary structure information, protein coding potential and microRNA binding sites. Our analyses suggest that, much like microRNAs, many lncRNAs have a significant secondary structure, in-line with their presumed association with proteins or protein complexes. Available literature on specific lncRNAs is linked, and users or authors can submit articles through a web interface. Protein coding potential is assessed by two different prediction algorithms: Coding Potential Calculator and HMMER. In addition, a novel strategy has been integrated for detecting potentially coding lncRNAs by automatically re-analysing the large body of publicly available mass spectrometry data in the PRIDE database. LNCipedia is publicly available and allows users to query and download lncRNA sequences and structures based on different search criteria. The database may serve as a resource to initiate small- and large-scale lncRNA studies. As an example, the LNCipedia content was used to develop a custom microarray for expression profiling of all available lncRNAs. PMID:23042674

  1. The Otter Annotation System

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Stephen M.J.; Gilbert, James; Iyer, Vivek; Clamp, Michele

    2004-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence and genome sequence available for other vertebrate genomes, the task of manual annotation at the large genome scale has become a priority. Possibly even more important, is the requirement to curate and improve this annotation in the light of future data. For this to be possible, there is a need for tools to access and manage the annotation. Ensembl provides an excellent means for storing gene structures, genome features, and sequence, but it does not support the extra textual data necessary for manual annotation. We have extended Ensembl to create the Otter manual annotation system. This comprises a relational database schema for storing the manual annotation data, an application-programming interface (API) to access it, an extensible markup language (XML) format to allow transfer of the data, and a server to allow multiuser/multimachine access to the data. We have also written a data-adaptor plugin for the Apollo Browser/Editor to enable it to utilize an Otter server. The otter database is currently used by the Vertebrate Genome Annotation (VEGA) site (http://vega.sanger.ac.uk), which provides access to manually curated human chromosomes. Support is also being developed for using the AceDB annotation editor, FMap, via a perl wrapper called Lace. The Human and Vertebrate Annotation (HAVANA) group annotators at the Sanger center are using this to annotate human chromosomes 1 and 20. PMID:15123593

  2. The Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase): an annotation database for rice comparative genomics and evolutionary biology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dapeng; Xia, Yan; Li, Xinna; Hou, Lixia; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, genomes of cultivated rice cultivars and their wild counterparts have been sequenced although most efforts are focused on genome assembly and annotation of two major cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) subspecies, 93-11 (indica) and Nipponbare (japonica). To integrate information from genome assemblies and annotations for better analysis and application, we now introduce a comparative rice genome database, the Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase, http://rgkbase.big.ac.cn/RGKbase/). RGKbase is built to have three major components: (i) integrated data curation for rice genomics and molecular biology, which includes genome sequence assemblies, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, genetic variations, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and the relevant literature; (ii) User-friendly viewers, such as Gbrowse, GeneBrowse and Circos, for genome annotations and evolutionary dynamics and (iii) Bioinformatic tools for compositional and synteny analyses, gene family classifications, gene ontology terms and pathways and gene co-expression networks. RGKbase current includes data from five rice cultivars and species: Nipponbare (japonica), 93-11 (indica), PA64s (indica), the African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and a wild rice species (Oryza brachyantha). We are also constantly introducing new datasets from variety of public efforts, such as two recent releases—sequence data from ∼1000 rice varieties, which are mapped into the reference genome, yielding ample high-quality single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions–deletions. PMID:23193278

  3. Global Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Expression of Hypothetical Genes and Improved functional annotations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, Eugene; Picone, Alessandro F.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Romine, Margaret F.; Higdon, Roger; Makarova, Kira S.; Kolker, Natali; Anderson, Gordon A.; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Beliaev, Alex S.; Edlefsen, Paul; Elias, Dwayne A.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Holzman, Ted; Klappenbach, Joel; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Land, Miriam L.; Lipton, Mary S.; McCue, Lee-Ann; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Serres, Margaret; Tsapin, Sasha; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Zhu, Wenhong; Zhou, Jizhong; Larimer, Frank; Lawrence, Charles; Riley, Monica; Collart, Frank R.; Yates, III, John R.; Smith, Richard D.; Giometti, Carol S.; Nealson, Kenneth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.

    2005-02-08

    The y-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a respiratory versatile organism that can reduce a wide range of organics, metals, and radionuclides. Similar to most other sequenced organisms, approximately 40% of the predicted ORFs in the MR-1 genome were annotated as uncharacterized ''hypothetical'' genes. We implemented an integrative approach using experimental and computational analyses to provide more detailed insight into their function. Global expression studies were conducted using RNA and protein expression profiling of cells cultivated under aerobic, suboxic, and fumarate reducing conditions, phosphate limitation and UV irradiation. transcriptomic and proteomic analyses confidently identified 538 ''hypothetical'' genes as expressed in S. oneidensis cells both as mRNAs and proteins (33% of all ''hypothetical'' proteins). Publicly available analysis tools and databases and our own expression data were applied to improve the annotation of these genes. The annotation results were scored using a seven-category schema that ranked both confidence and precision of the functional assignment. We identified homologs for nearly all of these ''hypothetical'' proteins (96%), thus allowing us to minimally classify them as ''conserved proteins''. Computational and/or experimental evidence provided more precise functional assignments for 297 genes (categories 1-4; 55%). These improved functional annotations will significantly widen our understanding of vital cellular processes including signal transduction, ion transport, secondary metabolism, and transcription, as well as structural elements, such as cellular membranes. We propose that this integrative approach offers a viable means to undertake the enormous challenge of characterizing the rapidly growing number of ''hypothetical'' proteins with each newly sequenced genome.

  4. Novel transcriptome assembly and improved annotation of the whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), a dominant crustacean in global seafood mariculture

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Noushin; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Doan, Ryan; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Chen, Patricia L.; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrian; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; Carrasco, J. Salvador; Hong, Chris; Brieba, Luis G.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Blood, Philip D.; Sawyer, Jason E.; Johnson, Charles D.; Dindot, Scott V.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new transcriptome assembly of the Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), the species most farmed for human consumption. Its functional annotation, a substantial improvement over previous ones, is provided freely. RNA-Seq with Illumina HiSeq technology was used to analyze samples extracted from shrimp abdominal muscle, hepatopancreas, gills and pleopods. We used the Trinity and Trinotate software suites for transcriptome assembly and annotation, respectively. The quality of this assembly and the affiliated targeted homology searches greatly enrich the curated transcripts currently available in public databases for this species. Comparison with the model arthropod Daphnia allows some insights into defining characteristics of decapod crustaceans. This large-scale gene discovery gives the broadest depth yet to the annotated transcriptome of this important species and should be of value to ongoing genomics and immunogenetic resistance studies in this shrimp of paramount global economic importance. PMID:25420880

  5. Novel transcriptome assembly and improved annotation of the whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), a dominant crustacean in global seafood mariculture.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Noushin; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Doan, Ryan; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Chen, Patricia L; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrian; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Carrasco, J Salvador; Hong, Chris; Brieba, Luis G; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Blood, Philip D; Sawyer, Jason E; Johnson, Charles D; Dindot, Scott V; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Criscitiello, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    We present a new transcriptome assembly of the Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), the species most farmed for human consumption. Its functional annotation, a substantial improvement over previous ones, is provided freely. RNA-Seq with Illumina HiSeq technology was used to analyze samples extracted from shrimp abdominal muscle, hepatopancreas, gills and pleopods. We used the Trinity and Trinotate software suites for transcriptome assembly and annotation, respectively. The quality of this assembly and the affiliated targeted homology searches greatly enrich the curated transcripts currently available in public databases for this species. Comparison with the model arthropod Daphnia allows some insights into defining characteristics of decapod crustaceans. This large-scale gene discovery gives the broadest depth yet to the annotated transcriptome of this important species and should be of value to ongoing genomics and immunogenetic resistance studies in this shrimp of paramount global economic importance. PMID:25420880

  6. deepBase: a database for deeply annotating and mining deep sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Shao, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yue-Qin; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2010-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput next-generation sequencing technology have reshaped the transcriptomic research landscape. However, exploration of these massive data remains a daunting challenge. In this study, we describe a novel database, deepBase, which we have developed to facilitate the comprehensive annotation and discovery of small RNAs from transcriptomic data. The current release of deepBase contains deep sequencing data from 185 small RNA libraries from diverse tissues and cell lines of seven organisms: human, mouse, chicken, Ciona intestinalis, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenhorhabditis elegans and Arabidopsis thaliana. By analyzing ∼14.6 million unique reads that perfectly mapped to more than 284 million genomic loci, we annotated and identified ∼380 000 unique ncRNA-associated small RNAs (nasRNAs), ∼1.5 million unique promoter-associated small RNAs (pasRNAs), ∼4.0 million unique exon-associated small RNAs (easRNAs) and ∼6 million unique repeat-associated small RNAs (rasRNAs). Furthermore, 2038 miRNA and 1889 snoRNA candidates were predicted by miRDeep and snoSeeker. All of the mapped reads can be grouped into about 1.2 million RNA clusters. For the purpose of comparative analysis, deepBase provides an integrative, interactive and versatile display. A convenient search option, related publications and other useful information are also provided for further investigation. deepBase is available at: http://deepbase.sysu.edu.cn/. PMID:19966272

  7. Semi-Automated Annotation of Biobank Data Using Standard Medical Terminologies in a Graph Database.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Philipp; Neururer, Sabrina; Goebel, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Data describing biobank resources frequently contains unstructured free-text information or insufficient coding standards. (Bio-) medical ontologies like Orphanet Rare Diseases Ontology (ORDO) or the Human Disease Ontology (DOID) provide a high number of concepts, synonyms and entity relationship properties. Such standard terminologies increase quality and granularity of input data by adding comprehensive semantic background knowledge from validated entity relationships. Moreover, cross-references between terminology concepts facilitate data integration across databases using different coding standards. In order to encourage the use of standard terminologies, our aim is to identify and link relevant concepts with free-text diagnosis inputs within a biobank registry. Relevant concepts are selected automatically by lexical matching and SPARQL queries against a RDF triplestore. To ensure correctness of annotations, proposed concepts have to be confirmed by medical data administration experts before they are entered into the registry database. Relevant (bio-) medical terminologies describing diseases and phenotypes were identified and stored in a graph database which was tied to a local biobank registry. Concept recommendations during data input trigger a structured description of medical data and facilitate data linkage between heterogeneous systems. PMID:27577487

  8. SureChEMBL: a large-scale, chemically annotated patent document database.

    PubMed

    Papadatos, George; Davies, Mark; Dedman, Nathan; Chambers, Jon; Gaulton, Anna; Siddle, James; Koks, Richard; Irvine, Sean A; Pettersson, Joe; Goncharoff, Nicko; Hersey, Anne; Overington, John P

    2016-01-01

    SureChEMBL is a publicly available large-scale resource containing compounds extracted from the full text, images and attachments of patent documents. The data are extracted from the patent literature according to an automated text and image-mining pipeline on a daily basis. SureChEMBL provides access to a previously unavailable, open and timely set of annotated compound-patent associations, complemented with sophisticated combined structure and keyword-based search capabilities against the compound repository and patent document corpus; given the wealth of knowledge hidden in patent documents, analysis of SureChEMBL data has immediate applications in drug discovery, medicinal chemistry and other commercial areas of chemical science. Currently, the database contains 17 million compounds extracted from 14 million patent documents. Access is available through a dedicated web-based interface and data downloads at: https://www.surechembl.org/. PMID:26582922

  9. SureChEMBL: a large-scale, chemically annotated patent document database

    PubMed Central

    Papadatos, George; Davies, Mark; Dedman, Nathan; Chambers, Jon; Gaulton, Anna; Siddle, James; Koks, Richard; Irvine, Sean A.; Pettersson, Joe; Goncharoff, Nicko; Hersey, Anne; Overington, John P.

    2016-01-01

    SureChEMBL is a publicly available large-scale resource containing compounds extracted from the full text, images and attachments of patent documents. The data are extracted from the patent literature according to an automated text and image-mining pipeline on a daily basis. SureChEMBL provides access to a previously unavailable, open and timely set of annotated compound-patent associations, complemented with sophisticated combined structure and keyword-based search capabilities against the compound repository and patent document corpus; given the wealth of knowledge hidden in patent documents, analysis of SureChEMBL data has immediate applications in drug discovery, medicinal chemistry and other commercial areas of chemical science. Currently, the database contains 17 million compounds extracted from 14 million patent documents. Access is available through a dedicated web-based interface and data downloads at: https://www.surechembl.org/. PMID:26582922

  10. Mouse SNP Miner: an annotated database of mouse functional single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Reuveni, Eli; Ramensky, Vasily E; Gross, Cornelius

    2007-01-01

    Background The mapping of quantitative trait loci in rat and mouse has been extremely successful in identifying chromosomal regions associated with human disease-related phenotypes. However, identifying the specific phenotype-causing DNA sequence variations within a quantitative trait locus has been much more difficult. The recent availability of genomic sequence from several mouse inbred strains (including C57BL/6J, 129X1/SvJ, 129S1/SvImJ, A/J, and DBA/2J) has made it possible to catalog DNA sequence differences within a quantitative trait locus derived from crosses between these strains. However, even for well-defined quantitative trait loci (<10 Mb) the identification of candidate functional DNA sequence changes remains challenging due to the high density of sequence variation between strains. Description To help identify functional DNA sequence variations within quantitative trait loci we have used the Ensembl annotated genome sequence to compile a database of mouse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are predicted to cause missense, nonsense, frameshift, or splice site mutations (available at ). For missense mutations we have used the PolyPhen and PANTHER algorithms to predict whether amino acid changes are likely to disrupt protein function. Conclusion We have developed a database of mouse SNPs predicted to cause missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations. Our analysis revealed that 20% and 14% of missense SNPs are likely to be deleterious according to PolyPhen and PANTHER, respectively, and 6% are considered deleterious by both algorithms. The database also provides gene expression and functional annotations from the Symatlas, Gene Ontology, and OMIM databases to further assess candidate phenotype-causing mutations. To demonstrate its utility, we show that Mouse SNP Miner successfully finds a previously identified candidate SNP in the taste receptor, Tas1r3, that underlies sucrose preference in the C57BL/6J strain. We also use Mouse

  11. miRFANs: an integrated database for Arabidopsis thaliana microRNA function annotations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) have been revealed to play important roles in developmental control, hormone secretion, cell differentiation and proliferation, and response to environmental stresses. However, our knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms and functions of miRNAs remains very limited. The main difficulties lie in two aspects. On one hand, the number of experimentally validated miRNA targets is very limited and the predicted targets often include many false positives, which constrains us to reveal the functions of miRNAs. On the other hand, the regulation of miRNAs is known to be spatio-temporally specific, which increases the difficulty for us to understand the regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs. Description In this paper we present miRFANs, an online database for Arabidopsis thalianamiRNA function annotations. We integrated various type of datasets, including miRNA-target interactions, transcription factor (TF) and their targets, expression profiles, genomic annotations and pathways, into a comprehensive database, and developed various statistical and mining tools, together with a user-friendly web interface. For each miRNA target predicted by psRNATarget, TargetAlign and UEA target-finder, or recorded in TarBase and miRTarBase, the effect of its up-regulated or down-regulated miRNA on the expression level of the target gene is evaluated by carrying out differential expression analysis of both miRNA and targets expression profiles acquired under the same (or similar) experimental condition and in the same tissue. Moreover, each miRNA target is associated with gene ontology and pathway terms, together with the target site information and regulating miRNAs predicted by different computational methods. These associated terms may provide valuable insight for the functions of each miRNA. Conclusion First, a comprehensive collection of miRNA targets for Arabidopsis thaliana provides valuable information about the functions of plant miRNAs. Second, a

  12. A database for coconut crop improvement

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Velamoor; Manimekalai, Ramaswamy; Devakumar, Krishnamurthy; Rajesh; Karun, Anitha; Niral, Vittal; Gopal, Murali; Aziz, Shamina; Gunasekaran, Marimuthu; Kumar, Mundappurathe Ramesh; Chandrasekar, Arumugam

    2005-01-01

    Coconut crop improvement requires a number of biotechnology and bioinformatics tools. A database containing information on CG (coconut germplasm), CCI (coconut cultivar identification), CD (coconut disease), MIFSPC (microbial information systems in plantation crops) and VO (vegetable oils) is described. The database was developed using MySQL and PostgreSQL running in Linux operating system. The database interface is developed in PHP, HTML and JAVA. Availability http://www.bioinfcpcri.org PMID:17597858

  13. PDEStrIAn: A Phosphodiesterase Structure and Ligand Interaction Annotated Database As a Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Chimed; Kooistra, Albert J; Kanev, Georgi K; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-08-11

    A systematic analysis is presented of the 220 phosphodiesterase (PDE) catalytic domain crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) with a focus on PDE-ligand interactions. The consistent structural alignment of 57 PDE ligand binding site residues enables the systematic analysis of PDE-ligand interaction fingerprints (IFPs), the identification of subtype-specific PDE-ligand interaction features, and the classification of ligands according to their binding modes. We illustrate how systematic mining of this phosphodiesterase structure and ligand interaction annotated (PDEStrIAn) database provides new insights into how conserved and selective PDE interaction hot spots can accommodate the large diversity of chemical scaffolds in PDE ligands. A substructure analysis of the cocrystallized PDE ligands in combination with those in the ChEMBL database provides a toolbox for scaffold hopping and ligand design. These analyses lead to an improved understanding of the structural requirements of PDE binding that will be useful in future drug discovery studies. PMID:26908025

  14. Improving the Annotation of Arabidopsis lyrata Using RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Vimal; Abdelsamad, Ahmed; Pietzenuk, Björn; Seymour, Danelle K.; Koenig, Daniel; Weigel, Detlef; Pecinka, Ales; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    Gene model annotations are important community resources that ensure comparability and reproducibility of analyses and are typically the first step for functional annotation of genomic regions. Without up-to-date genome annotations, genome sequences cannot be used to maximum advantage. It is therefore essential to regularly update gene annotations by integrating the latest information to guarantee that reference annotations can remain a common basis for various types of analyses. Here, we report an improvement of the Arabidopsis lyrata gene annotation using extensive RNA-seq data. This new annotation consists of 31,132 protein coding gene models in addition to 2,089 genes with high similarity to transposable elements. Overall, ~87% of the gene models are corroborated by evidence of expression and 2,235 of these models feature multiple transcripts. Our updated gene annotation corrects hundreds of incorrectly split or merged gene models in the original annotation, and as a result the identification of alternative splicing events and differential isoform usage are vastly improved. PMID:26382944

  15. Clever generation of rich SPARQL queries from annotated relational schema: application to Semantic Web Service creation for biological databases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, a large amount of “-omics” data have been produced. However, these data are stored in many different species-specific databases that are managed by different institutes and laboratories. Biologists often need to find and assemble data from disparate sources to perform certain analyses. Searching for these data and assembling them is a time-consuming task. The Semantic Web helps to facilitate interoperability across databases. A common approach involves the development of wrapper systems that map a relational database schema onto existing domain ontologies. However, few attempts have been made to automate the creation of such wrappers. Results We developed a framework, named BioSemantic, for the creation of Semantic Web Services that are applicable to relational biological databases. This framework makes use of both Semantic Web and Web Services technologies and can be divided into two main parts: (i) the generation and semi-automatic annotation of an RDF view; and (ii) the automatic generation of SPARQL queries and their integration into Semantic Web Services backbones. We have used our framework to integrate genomic data from different plant databases. Conclusions BioSemantic is a framework that was designed to speed integration of relational databases. We present how it can be used to speed the development of Semantic Web Services for existing relational biological databases. Currently, it creates and annotates RDF views that enable the automatic generation of SPARQL queries. Web Services are also created and deployed automatically, and the semantic annotations of our Web Services are added automatically using SAWSDL attributes. BioSemantic is downloadable at http://southgreen.cirad.fr/?q=content/Biosemantic. PMID:23586394

  16. Perceptual Annotation: Measuring Human Vision to Improve Computer Vision.

    PubMed

    Scheirer, Walter J; Anthony, Samuel E; Nakayama, Ken; Cox, David D

    2014-08-01

    For many problems in computer vision, human learners are considerably better than machines. Humans possess highly accurate internal recognition and learning mechanisms that are not yet understood, and they frequently have access to more extensive training data through a lifetime of unbiased experience with the visual world. We propose to use visual psychophysics to directly leverage the abilities of human subjects to build better machine learning systems. First, we use an advanced online psychometric testing platform to make new kinds of annotation data available for learning. Second, we develop a technique for harnessing these new kinds of information-"perceptual annotations"-for support vector machines. A key intuition for this approach is that while it may remain infeasible to dramatically increase the amount of data and high-quality labels available for the training of a given system, measuring the exemplar-by-exemplar difficulty and pattern of errors of human annotators can provide important information for regularizing the solution of the system at hand. A case study for the problem face detection demonstrates that this approach yields state-of-the-art results on the challenging FDDB data set. PMID:26353347

  17. Improving HIV proteome annotation: new features of BioAfrica HIV Proteomics Resource

    PubMed Central

    Druce, Megan; Hulo, Chantal; Masson, Patrick; Sommer, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Le Mercier, Philippe; De Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is one of the pathogens that cause the greatest global concern, with approximately 35 million people currently infected with HIV. Extensive HIV research has been performed, generating a large amount of HIV and host genomic data. However, no effective vaccine that protects the host from HIV infection is available and HIV is still spreading at an alarming rate, despite effective antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. In order to develop effective therapies, we need to expand our knowledge of the interaction between HIV and host proteins. In contrast to virus proteins, which often rapidly evolve drug resistance mutations, the host proteins are essentially invariant within all humans. Thus, if we can identify the host proteins needed for virus replication, such as those involved in transporting viral proteins to the cell surface, we have a chance of interrupting viral replication. There is no proteome resource that summarizes this interaction, making research on this subject a difficult enterprise. In order to fill this gap in knowledge, we curated a resource presents detailed annotation on the interaction between the HIV proteome and host proteins. Our resource was produced in collaboration with ViralZone and used manual curation techniques developed by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Our new website also used previous annotations of the BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource, which has been accessed by approximately 10 000 unique users a year since its inception in 2005. The novel features include a dedicated new page for each HIV protein, a graphic display of its function and a section on its interaction with host proteins. Our new webpages also add information on the genomic location of each HIV protein and the position of ARV drug resistance mutations. Our improved BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource fills a gap in the current knowledge of biocuration. Database URL: http://www.bioafrica.net/proteomics/HIVproteome.html PMID:27087306

  18. Improving HIV proteome annotation: new features of BioAfrica HIV Proteomics Resource.

    PubMed

    Druce, Megan; Hulo, Chantal; Masson, Patrick; Sommer, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Le Mercier, Philippe; De Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is one of the pathogens that cause the greatest global concern, with approximately 35 million people currently infected with HIV. Extensive HIV research has been performed, generating a large amount of HIV and host genomic data. However, no effective vaccine that protects the host from HIV infection is available and HIV is still spreading at an alarming rate, despite effective antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. In order to develop effective therapies, we need to expand our knowledge of the interaction between HIV and host proteins. In contrast to virus proteins, which often rapidly evolve drug resistance mutations, the host proteins are essentially invariant within all humans. Thus, if we can identify the host proteins needed for virus replication, such as those involved in transporting viral proteins to the cell surface, we have a chance of interrupting viral replication. There is no proteome resource that summarizes this interaction, making research on this subject a difficult enterprise. In order to fill this gap in knowledge, we curated a resource presents detailed annotation on the interaction between the HIV proteome and host proteins. Our resource was produced in collaboration with ViralZone and used manual curation techniques developed by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Our new website also used previous annotations of the BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource, which has been accessed by approximately 10 000 unique users a year since its inception in 2005. The novel features include a dedicated new page for each HIV protein, a graphic display of its function and a section on its interaction with host proteins. Our new webpages also add information on the genomic location of each HIV protein and the position of ARV drug resistance mutations. Our improved BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource fills a gap in the current knowledge of biocuration.Database URL:http://www.bioafrica.net/proteomics/HIVproteome.html. PMID:27087306

  19. The Disease Portals, disease-gene annotation and the RGD disease ontology at the Rat Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Hayman, G Thomas; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Smith, Jennifer R; Wang, Shur-Jen; Petri, Victoria; Nigam, Rajni; Tutaj, Marek; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD;http://rgd.mcw.edu/) provides critical datasets and software tools to a diverse community of rat and non-rat researchers worldwide. To meet the needs of the many users whose research is disease oriented, RGD has created a series of Disease Portals and has prioritized its curation efforts on the datasets important to understanding the mechanisms of various diseases. Gene-disease relationships for three species, rat, human and mouse, are annotated to capture biomarkers, genetic associations, molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. To generate gene-disease annotations more effectively and in greater detail, RGD initially adopted the MEDIC disease vocabulary from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database and adapted it for use by expanding this framework with the addition of over 1000 terms to create the RGD Disease Ontology (RDO). The RDO provides the foundation for, at present, 10 comprehensive disease area-related dataset and analysis platforms at RGD, the Disease Portals. Two major disease areas are the focus of data acquisition and curation efforts each year, leading to the release of the related Disease Portals. Collaborative efforts to realize a more robust disease ontology are underway. Database URL:http://rgd.mcw.edu. PMID:27009807

  20. The Disease Portals, disease–gene annotation and the RGD disease ontology at the Rat Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, G. Thomas; Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; Smith, Jennifer R.; Wang, Shur-Jen; Petri, Victoria; Nigam, Rajni; Tutaj, Marek; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R.; Shimoyama, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu/) provides critical datasets and software tools to a diverse community of rat and non-rat researchers worldwide. To meet the needs of the many users whose research is disease oriented, RGD has created a series of Disease Portals and has prioritized its curation efforts on the datasets important to understanding the mechanisms of various diseases. Gene-disease relationships for three species, rat, human and mouse, are annotated to capture biomarkers, genetic associations, molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. To generate gene–disease annotations more effectively and in greater detail, RGD initially adopted the MEDIC disease vocabulary from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database and adapted it for use by expanding this framework with the addition of over 1000 terms to create the RGD Disease Ontology (RDO). The RDO provides the foundation for, at present, 10 comprehensive disease area-related dataset and analysis platforms at RGD, the Disease Portals. Two major disease areas are the focus of data acquisition and curation efforts each year, leading to the release of the related Disease Portals. Collaborative efforts to realize a more robust disease ontology are underway. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu PMID:27009807

  1. Strategies for annotation and curation of translational databases: the eTUMOUR project.

    PubMed

    Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Lurgi, Miguel; Mier, Mariola; Estanyol, Francesc; Rafael, Xavier; Candiota, Ana Paula; Barceló, Anna; García, Alina; Martínez-Bisbal, M Carmen; Ferrer-Luna, Rubén; Moreno-Torres, Ángel; Celda, Bernardo; Arús, Carles

    2012-01-01

    The eTUMOUR (eT) multi-centre project gathered in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance (MR) data, as well as transcriptomic and clinical information from brain tumour patients, with the purpose of improving the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of future patients. In order to carry this out, among other work, a database--the eTDB--was developed. In addition to complex permission rules and software and management quality control (QC), it was necessary to develop anonymization, processing and data visualization tools for the data uploaded. It was also necessary to develop sophisticated curation strategies that involved on one hand, dedicated fields for QC-generated meta-data and specialized queries and global permissions for senior curators and on the other, to establish a set of metrics to quantify its contents. The indispensable dataset (ID), completeness and pairedness indices were set. The database contains 1317 cases created as a result of the eT project and 304 from a previous project, INTERPRET. The number of cases fulfilling the ID was 656. Completeness and pairedness were heterogeneous, depending on the data type involved. PMID:23180768

  2. INTERFEROME v2.0: an updated database of annotated interferon-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Rusinova, Irina; Forster, Sam; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Masse, Marion; Cumming, Helen; Chapman, Ross; Hertzog, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interferome v2.0 (http://interferome.its.monash.edu.au/interferome/) is an update of an earlier version of the Interferome DB published in the 2009 NAR database edition. Vastly improved computational infrastructure now enables more complex and faster queries, and supports more data sets from types I, II and III interferon (IFN)-treated cells, mice or humans. Quantitative, MIAME compliant data are collected, subjected to thorough, standardized, quantitative and statistical analyses and then significant changes in gene expression are uploaded. Comprehensive manual collection of metadata in v2.0 allows flexible, detailed search capacity including the parameters: range of -fold change, IFN type, concentration and time, and cell/tissue type. There is no limit to the number of genes that can be used to search the database in a single query. Secondary analysis such as gene ontology, regulatory factors, chromosomal location or tissue expression plots of IFN-regulated genes (IRGs) can be performed in Interferome v2.0, or data can be downloaded in convenient text formats compatible with common secondary analysis programs. Given the importance of IFN to innate immune responses in infectious, inflammatory diseases and cancer, this upgrade of the Interferome to version 2.0 will facilitate the identification of gene signatures of importance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:23203888

  3. Interferome v2.0: an updated database of annotated interferon-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Rusinova, Irina; Forster, Sam; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Masse, Marion; Cumming, Helen; Chapman, Ross; Hertzog, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Interferome v2.0 (http://interferome.its.monash.edu.au/interferome/) is an update of an earlier version of the Interferome DB published in the 2009 NAR database edition. Vastly improved computational infrastructure now enables more complex and faster queries, and supports more data sets from types I, II and III interferon (IFN)-treated cells, mice or humans. Quantitative, MIAME compliant data are collected, subjected to thorough, standardized, quantitative and statistical analyses and then significant changes in gene expression are uploaded. Comprehensive manual collection of metadata in v2.0 allows flexible, detailed search capacity including the parameters: range of -fold change, IFN type, concentration and time, and cell/tissue type. There is no limit to the number of genes that can be used to search the database in a single query. Secondary analysis such as gene ontology, regulatory factors, chromosomal location or tissue expression plots of IFN-regulated genes (IRGs) can be performed in Interferome v2.0, or data can be downloaded in convenient text formats compatible with common secondary analysis programs. Given the importance of IFN to innate immune responses in infectious, inflammatory diseases and cancer, this upgrade of the Interferome to version 2.0 will facilitate the identification of gene signatures of importance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:23203888

  4. Recent improvements to the SMART domain-based sequence annotation resource.

    PubMed

    Letunic, Ivica; Goodstadt, Leo; Dickens, Nicholas J; Doerks, Tobias; Schultz, Joerg; Mott, Richard; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Copley, Richard R; Ponting, Chris P; Bork, Peer

    2002-01-01

    SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool, http://smart.embl-heidelberg.de) is a web-based resource used for the annotation of protein domains and the analysis of domain architectures, with particular emphasis on mobile eukaryotic domains. Extensive annotation for each domain family is available, providing information relating to function, subcellular localization, phyletic distribution and tertiary structure. The January 2002 release has added more than 200 hand-curated domain models. This brings the total to over 600 domain families that are widely represented among nuclear, signalling and extracellular proteins. Annotation now includes links to the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database in cases where a human disease is associated with one or more mutations in a particular domain. We have implemented new analysis methods and updated others. New advanced queries provide direct access to the SMART relational database using SQL. This database now contains information on intrinsic sequence features such as transmembrane regions, coiled-coils, signal peptides and internal repeats. SMART output can now be easily included in users' documents. A SMART mirror has been created at http://smart.ox.ac.uk. PMID:11752305

  5. Recent improvements to the SMART domain-based sequence annotation resource

    PubMed Central

    Letunic, Ivica; Goodstadt, Leo; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Doerks, Tobias; Schultz, Joerg; Mott, Richard; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Copley, Richard R.; Ponting, Chris P.; Bork, Peer

    2002-01-01

    SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool, http://smart.embl-heidelberg.de) is a web-based resource used for the annotation of protein domains and the analysis of domain architectures, with particular emphasis on mobile eukaryotic domains. Extensive annotation for each domain family is available, providing information relating to function, subcellular localization, phyletic distribution and tertiary structure. The January 2002 release has added more than 200 hand-curated domain models. This brings the total to over 600 domain families that are widely represented among nuclear, signalling and extracellular proteins. Annotation now includes links to the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database in cases where a human disease is associated with one or more mutations in a particular domain. We have implemented new analysis methods and updated others. New advanced queries provide direct access to the SMART relational database using SQL. This database now contains information on intrinsic sequence features such as transmembrane regions, coiled-coils, signal peptides and internal repeats. SMART output can now be easily included in users’ documents. A SMART mirror has been created at http://smart.ox.ac.uk. PMID:11752305

  6. ASPicDB: a database of annotated transcript and protein variants generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Pier L.; D’Antonio, Mattia; Bonizzoni, Paola; Castrignanò, Tiziana; D’Erchia, Anna M.; D’Onorio De Meo, Paolo; Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Licciulli, Flavio; Mangiulli, Marina; Mignone, Flavio; Pavesi, Giulio; Picardi, Ernesto; Rizzi, Raffaella; Rossi, Ivan; Valletti, Alessio; Zauli, Andrea; Zambelli, Federico; Casadio, Rita; Pesole, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is emerging as a major mechanism for the expansion of the transcriptome and proteome diversity, particularly in human and other vertebrates. However, the proportion of alternative transcripts and proteins actually endowed with functional activity is currently highly debated. We present here a new release of ASPicDB which now provides a unique annotation resource of human protein variants generated by alternative splicing. A total of 256 939 protein variants from 17 191 multi-exon genes have been extensively annotated through state of the art machine learning tools providing information of the protein type (globular and transmembrane), localization, presence of PFAM domains, signal peptides, GPI-anchor propeptides, transmembrane and coiled-coil segments. Furthermore, full-length variants can be now specifically selected based on the annotation of CAGE-tags and polyA signal and/or polyA sites, marking transcription initiation and termination sites, respectively. The retrieval can be carried out at gene, transcript, exon, protein or splice site level allowing the selection of data sets fulfilling one or more features settled by the user. The retrieval interface also enables the selection of protein variants showing specific differences in the annotated features. ASPicDB is available at http://www.caspur.it/ASPicDB/. PMID:21051348

  7. A computational platform to maintain and migrate manual functional annotations for BioCyc databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Model organism databases are an important resource for information on biological pathways and genomic data. Such databases represent the accumulation of biological data, some of which has been manually curated from literature. An essential feature of these databases is the continuing data integratio...

  8. A kingdom-specific protein domain HMM library for improved annotation of fungal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Intikhab; Hubbard, Simon J; Oliver, Stephen G; Rattray, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    Background Pfam is a general-purpose database of protein domain alignments and profile Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), which is very popular for the annotation of sequence data produced by genome sequencing projects. Pfam provides models that are often very general in terms of the taxa that they cover and it has previously been suggested that such general models may lack some of the specificity or selectivity that would be provided by kingdom-specific models. Results Here we present a general approach to create domain libraries of HMMs for sub-taxa of a kingdom. Taking fungal species as an example, we construct a domain library of HMMs (called Fungal Pfam or FPfam) using sequences from 30 genomes, consisting of 24 species from the ascomycetes group and two basidiomycetes, Ustilago maydis, a fungal pathogen of maize, and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. In addition, we include the Microsporidion Encephalitozoon cuniculi, an obligate intracellular parasite, and two non-fungal species, the oomycetes Phytophthora sojae and Phytophthora ramorum, both plant pathogens. We evaluate the performance in terms of coverage against the original 30 genomes used in training FPfam and against five more recently sequenced fungal genomes that can be considered as an independent test set. We show that kingdom-specific models such as FPfam can find instances of both novel and well characterized domains, increases overall coverage and detects more domains per sequence with typically higher bitscores than Pfam for the same domain families. An evaluation of the effect of changing E-values on the coverage shows that the performance of FPfam is consistent over the range of E-values applied. Conclusion Kingdom-specific models are shown to provide improved coverage. However, as the models become more specific, some sequences found by Pfam may be missed by the models in FPfam and some of the families represented in the test set are not present in FPfam. Therefore, we recommend

  9. Biological database of images and genomes: tools for community annotations linking image and genomic information.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Andrew T; Jurkovic, Dominika A; Balish, Mitchell F; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic data and biomedical imaging data are undergoing exponential growth. However, our understanding of the phenotype-genotype connection linking the two types of data is lagging behind. While there are many types of software that enable the manipulation and analysis of image data and genomic data as separate entities, there is no framework established for linking the two. We present a generic set of software tools, BioDIG, that allows linking of image data to genomic data. BioDIG tools can be applied to a wide range of research problems that require linking images to genomes. BioDIG features the following: rapid construction of web-based workbenches, community-based annotation, user management and web services. By using BioDIG to create websites, researchers and curators can rapidly annotate a large number of images with genomic information. Here we present the BioDIG software tools that include an image module, a genome module and a user management module. We also introduce a BioDIG-based website, MyDIG, which is being used to annotate images of mycoplasmas. PMID:23550062

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of the Desert Locust Central Nervous System: Production and Annotation of a Schistocerca gregaria EST Database

    PubMed Central

    Badisco, Liesbeth; Huybrechts, Jurgen; Simonet, Gert; Verlinden, Heleen; Marchal, Elisabeth; Huybrechts, Roger; Schoofs, Liliane; De Loof, Arnold; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Background The desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) displays a fascinating type of phenotypic plasticity, designated as ‘phase polyphenism’. Depending on environmental conditions, one genome can be translated into two highly divergent phenotypes, termed the solitarious and gregarious (swarming) phase. Although many of the underlying molecular events remain elusive, the central nervous system (CNS) is expected to play a crucial role in the phase transition process. Locusts have also proven to be interesting model organisms in a physiological and neurobiological research context. However, molecular studies in locusts are hampered by the fact that genome/transcriptome sequence information available for this branch of insects is still limited. Methodology We have generated 34,672 raw expressed sequence tags (EST) from the CNS of desert locusts in both phases. These ESTs were assembled in 12,709 unique transcript sequences and nearly 4,000 sequences were functionally annotated. Moreover, the obtained S. gregaria EST information is highly complementary to the existing orthopteran transcriptomic data. Since many novel transcripts encode neuronal signaling and signal transduction components, this paper includes an overview of these sequences. Furthermore, several transcripts being differentially represented in solitarious and gregarious locusts were retrieved from this EST database. The findings highlight the involvement of the CNS in the phase transition process and indicate that this novel annotated database may also add to the emerging knowledge of concomitant neuronal signaling and neuroplasticity events. Conclusions In summary, we met the need for novel sequence data from desert locust CNS. To our knowledge, we hereby also present the first insect EST database that is derived from the complete CNS. The obtained S. gregaria EST data constitute an important new source of information that will be instrumental in further unraveling the molecular principles of phase

  11. Strategies for annotation and curation of translational databases: the eTUMOUR project

    PubMed Central

    Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Lurgi, Miguel; Mier, Mariola; Estanyol, Francesc; Rafael, Xavier; Candiota, Ana Paula; Barceló, Anna; García, Alina; Martínez-Bisbal, M. Carmen; Ferrer-Luna, Rubén; Moreno-Torres, Àngel; Celda, Bernardo; Arús, Carles

    2012-01-01

    The eTUMOUR (eT) multi-centre project gathered in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance (MR) data, as well as transcriptomic and clinical information from brain tumour patients, with the purpose of improving the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of future patients. In order to carry this out, among other work, a database—the eTDB—was developed. In addition to complex permission rules and software and management quality control (QC), it was necessary to develop anonymization, processing and data visualization tools for the data uploaded. It was also necessary to develop sophisticated curation strategies that involved on one hand, dedicated fields for QC-generated meta-data and specialized queries and global permissions for senior curators and on the other, to establish a set of metrics to quantify its contents. The indispensable dataset (ID), completeness and pairedness indices were set. The database contains 1317 cases created as a result of the eT project and 304 from a previous project, INTERPRET. The number of cases fulfilling the ID was 656. Completeness and pairedness were heterogeneous, depending on the data type involved. PMID:23180768

  12. Improvement of whole-genome annotation of cereals through comparative analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Buell, C. Robin

    2007-01-01

    Rice is an important model species for the Poaceae and other monocotyledonous plants. With the availability of a near-complete, finished, and annotated rice genome, we performed genome level comparisons between rice and all plant species in which large genomic or transcriptomic data sets are available to determine the utility of cross-species sequence for structural and functional annotation of the rice genome. Through comparative analyses with four plant genome sequence data sets and transcript assemblies from 185 plant species, we were able to confirm and improve the structural annotation of the rice genome. Support for 38,109 (89.3%) of the total 42,653 nontransposable element-related genes in the rice genome in the form of a rice expressed sequence tag, full-length cDNA, or plant homolog from our comparative analyses could be found. Although the majority of the putative homologs were obtained from Poaceae species, putative homologs were identified in dicotyledonous angiosperms, gymnosperms, and other plants such as algae, moss, and fern. A set of rice genes (7669) lacking a putative homolog was identified which may be lineage-specific genes that evolved after speciation and have a role in species diversity. Improvements to the current rice gene structural annotation could be identified from our comparative alignments and we were able to identify 487 genes which were mostly likely missed in the current rice genome annotation and another 500 genes for structural annotation review. We were able to demonstrate the utility of cross-species comparative alignments in the identification of noncoding sequences and in confirmation of gene nesting in rice. PMID:17284677

  13. Comparative high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and development of SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genus Silene is widely used as a model system for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions in plants, but advances in using the genus as a model system are impeded by the lack of available resources for studying its genome. Massively parallel sequencing cDNA has recently developed into an efficient method for characterizing the transcriptomes of non-model organisms, generating massive amounts of data that enable the study of multiple species in a comparative framework. The sequences generated provide an excellent resource for identifying expressed genes, characterizing functional variation and developing molecular markers, thereby laying the foundations for future studies on gene sequence and gene expression divergence. Here, we report the results of a comparative transcriptome sequencing study of eight individuals representing four Silene and one Dianthus species as outgroup. All sequences and annotations have been deposited in a newly developed and publicly available database called SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database. Results A total of 1,041,122 EST reads were generated in two runs on a Roche GS-FLX 454 pyrosequencing platform. EST reads were analyzed separately for all eight individuals sequenced and were assembled into contigs using TGICL. These were annotated with results from BLASTX searches and Gene Ontology (GO) terms, and thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized. Unassembled reads were kept as singletons and together with the contigs contributed to the unigenes characterized in each individual. The high quality of unigenes is evidenced by the proportion (49%) that have significant hits in similarity searches with the A. thaliana proteome. The SiESTa database is accessible at http://www.siesta.ethz.ch. Conclusion The sequence collections established in the present study provide an important genomic resource for four Silene and one Dianthus species and will help to further develop Silene as a

  14. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck. PMID:27021133

  15. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I.; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck. PMID:27021133

  16. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I.; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck.

  17. Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP): a comprehensive database for sweet orange genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Chen, Dijun; Lei, Yang; Chang, Ji-Wei; Hao, Bao-Hai; Xing, Feng; Li, Sen; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia), and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP) to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-based organization of sweet orange genomic data, which integrates ab initio gene prediction, EST, RNA-seq and RNA-paired end tag (RNA-PET) evidence-based gene annotation. Furthermore, we provide a user-friendly web interface to show the predicted protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and metabolic pathways in sweet orange. CAP provides comprehensive information beneficial to the researchers of sweet orange and other woody plants, which is freely available at http://citrus.hzau.edu.cn/. PMID:24489955

  18. Eight Elements of High School Improvement: An Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Wehmah

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a table that contains a summary of resources available that support the National High School Center's "Eight Elements of High School Improvement: A Mapping Framework". This framework is based on eight common elements of systemic school reform and provides a structure for understanding, aligning, and prioritizing…

  19. A semi-quantitative, synteny-based method to improve functional predictions for hypothetical and poorly annotated bacterial and archaeal genes.

    PubMed

    Yelton, Alexis P; Thomas, Brian C; Simmons, Sheri L; Wilmes, Paul; Zemla, Adam; Thelen, Michael P; Justice, Nicholas; Banfield, Jillian F

    2011-10-01

    During microbial evolution, genome rearrangement increases with increasing sequence divergence. If the relationship between synteny and sequence divergence can be modeled, gene clusters in genomes of distantly related organisms exhibiting anomalous synteny can be identified and used to infer functional conservation. We applied the phylogenetic pairwise comparison method to establish and model a strong correlation between synteny and sequence divergence in all 634 available Archaeal and Bacterial genomes from the NCBI database and four newly assembled genomes of uncultivated Archaea from an acid mine drainage (AMD) community. In parallel, we established and modeled the trend between synteny and functional relatedness in the 118 genomes available in the STRING database. By combining these models, we developed a gene functional annotation method that weights evolutionary distance to estimate the probability of functional associations of syntenous proteins between genome pairs. The method was applied to the hypothetical proteins and poorly annotated genes in newly assembled acid mine drainage Archaeal genomes to add or improve gene annotations. This is the first method to assign possible functions to poorly annotated genes through quantification of the probability of gene functional relationships based on synteny at a significant evolutionary distance, and has the potential for broad application. PMID:22028637

  20. A Semi-Quantitative, Synteny-Based Method to Improve Functional Predictions for Hypothetical and Poorly Annotated Bacterial and Archaeal Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yelton, Alexis P.; Thomas, Brian C.; Simmons, Sheri L.; Wilmes, Paul; Zemla, Adam; Thelen, Michael P.; Justice, Nicholas; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2011-01-01

    During microbial evolution, genome rearrangement increases with increasing sequence divergence. If the relationship between synteny and sequence divergence can be modeled, gene clusters in genomes of distantly related organisms exhibiting anomalous synteny can be identified and used to infer functional conservation. We applied the phylogenetic pairwise comparison method to establish and model a strong correlation between synteny and sequence divergence in all 634 available Archaeal and Bacterial genomes from the NCBI database and four newly assembled genomes of uncultivated Archaea from an acid mine drainage (AMD) community. In parallel, we established and modeled the trend between synteny and functional relatedness in the 118 genomes available in the STRING database. By combining these models, we developed a gene functional annotation method that weights evolutionary distance to estimate the probability of functional associations of syntenous proteins between genome pairs. The method was applied to the hypothetical proteins and poorly annotated genes in newly assembled acid mine drainage Archaeal genomes to add or improve gene annotations. This is the first method to assign possible functions to poorly annotated genes through quantification of the probability of gene functional relationships based on synteny at a significant evolutionary distance, and has the potential for broad application. PMID:22028637

  1. Polymorphism Identification and Improved Genome Annotation of Brassica rapa Through Deep RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Devisetty, Upendra Kumar; Covington, Michael F.; Tat, An V.; Lekkala, Saradadevi; Maloof, Julin N.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping and functional analysis of quantitative traits in Brassica rapa can be greatly improved with the availability of physically positioned, gene-based genetic markers and accurate genome annotation. In this study, deep transcriptome RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of Brassica rapa was undertaken with two objectives: SNP detection and improved transcriptome annotation. We performed SNP detection on two varieties that are parents of a mapping population to aid in development of a marker system for this population and subsequent development of high-resolution genetic map. An improved Brassica rapa transcriptome was constructed to detect novel transcripts and to improve the current genome annotation. This is useful for accurate mRNA abundance and detection of expression QTL (eQTLs) in mapping populations. Deep RNA-Seq of two Brassica rapa genotypes—R500 (var. trilocularis, Yellow Sarson) and IMB211 (a rapid cycling variety)—using eight different tissues (root, internode, leaf, petiole, apical meristem, floral meristem, silique, and seedling) grown across three different environments (growth chamber, greenhouse and field) and under two different treatments (simulated sun and simulated shade) generated 2.3 billion high-quality Illumina reads. A total of 330,995 SNPs were identified in transcribed regions between the two genotypes with an average frequency of one SNP in every 200 bases. The deep RNA-Seq reassembled Brassica rapa transcriptome identified 44,239 protein-coding genes. Compared with current gene models of B. rapa, we detected 3537 novel transcripts, 23,754 gene models had structural modifications, and 3655 annotated proteins changed. Gaps in the current genome assembly of B. rapa are highlighted by our identification of 780 unmapped transcripts. All the SNPs, annotations, and predicted transcripts can be viewed at http://phytonetworks.ucdavis.edu/. PMID:25122667

  2. An annotated bibliography of selected guides for stream habitat improvement in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keim, R.F.; Price, A.B.; Hardin, T. S.; Skaugset, Arne E.; Bateman, D.S.; Gresswell, R.E.; Tesch, S. D.

    2004-01-01

    This annotated bibliography is a response to widespread interest in stream habitat improvement in the Pacific Northwest by land managers, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and the lay public. Several guides to stream habitat improvement have been written in the past, but may not be easily accessible to people from diverse backgrounds. This annotated bibliography reviews 11 guides to stream habitat improvement so that readers can find literature appropriate to their needs. All reviews begin with summaries of the contents, stated audiences, and goals of each guide. Reviews also include subjective comments on the strengths and weaknesses of each guide. Finally, this bibliography includes recommendations of guides and combinations of guides judged most useful for a range of purposes. 

  3. GELBANK : A database of annotated two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns of biological systems with completed genomes.

    SciTech Connect

    Babnigg, G.; Giometti, C. S.; Biosciences Division

    2004-01-01

    GELBANK is a publicly available database of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) gel patterns of proteomes from organisms with known genome information (available at and ftp://bioinformatics.anl.gov/gelbank/). Currently it includes 131 completed, mostly microbial proteomes available from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. A web interface allows the upload of 2D gel patterns and their annotation for registered users. The images are organized by species, tissue type, separation method, sample type and staining method. The database can be queried based on protein or 2DE-pattern attributes. A web interface allows registered users to assign molecular weight and pH gradient profiles to their own 2D gel patterns as well as to link protein identifications to a given spot on the pattern. The website presents all of the submitted 2D gel patterns where the end-user can dynamically display the images or parts of images along with molecular weight, pH profile information and linked protein identification. A collection of images can be selected for the creation of animations from which the user can select sub-regions of interest and unlimited 2D gel patterns for visualization. The website currently presents 233 identifications for 81 gel patterns for Homo sapiens, Methanococcus jannaschii, Pyro coccus furiosus, Shewanella oneidensis, Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans.

  4. Method for the Compound Annotation of Conjugates in Nontargeted Metabolomics Using Accurate Mass Spectrometry, Multistage Product Ion Spectra and Compound Database Searching

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Tairo; Bamba, Takeshi; Tai, Akihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Owing to biotransformation, xenobiotics are often found in conjugated form in biological samples such as urine and plasma. Liquid chromatography coupled with accurate mass spectrometry with multistage collision-induced dissociation provides spectral information concerning these metabolites in complex materials. Unfortunately, compound databases typically do not contain a sufficient number of records for such conjugates. We report here on the development of a novel protocol, referred to as ChemProphet, to annotate compounds, including conjugates, using compound databases such as PubChem and ChemSpider. The annotation of conjugates involves three steps: 1. Recognition of the type and number of conjugates in the sample; 2. Compound search and annotation of the deconjugated form; and 3. In silico evaluation of the candidate conjugate. ChemProphet assigns a spectrum to each candidate by automatically exploring the substructures corresponding to the observed product ion spectrum. When finished, it annotates the candidates assigning a rank for each candidate based on the calculated score that ranks its relative likelihood. We assessed our protocol by annotating a benchmark dataset by including the product ion spectra for 102 compounds, annotating the commercially available standard for quercetin 3-glucuronide, and by conducting a model experiment using urine from mice that had been administered a green tea extract. The results show that by using the ChemProphet approach, it is possible to annotate not only the deconjugated molecules but also the conjugated molecules using an automatic interpretation method based on deconjugation that involves multistage collision-induced dissociation and in silico calculated conjugation. PMID:26819907

  5. Enchytraeus albidus Microarray: Enrichment, Design, Annotation and Database (EnchyBASE)

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Sara C.; Arrais, Joel; Lopes, Pedro; Vandenbrouck, Tine; De Coen, Wim; Roelofs, Dick; Soares, Amadeu M. V. M.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta) is an ecologically relevant species used as standard test organisms for risk assessment. Effects of stressors in this species are commonly determined at the population level using reproduction and survival as endpoints. The assessment of transcriptomic responses can be very useful e.g. to understand underlying mechanisms of toxicity with gene expression fingerprinting. In the present paper the following is being addressed: 1) development of suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries enriched for differentially expressed genes after metal and pesticide exposures; 2) sequencing and characterization of all generated cDNA inserts; 3) development of a publicly available genomic database on E. albidus. A total of 2100 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were isolated, sequenced and assembled into 1124 clusters (947 singletons and 177 contigs). From these sequences, 41% matched known proteins in GenBank (BLASTX, e-value≤10-5) and 37% had at least one Gene Ontology (GO) term assigned. In total, 5.5% of the sequences were assigned to a metabolic pathway, based on KEGG. With this new sequencing information, an Agilent custom oligonucleotide microarray was designed, representing a potential tool for transcriptomic studies. EnchyBASE (http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/enchybase/) was developed as a web freely available database containing genomic information on E. albidus and will be further extended in the near future for other enchytraeid species. The database so far includes all ESTs generated for E. albidus from three cDNA libraries. This information can be downloaded and applied in functional genomics and transcription studies. PMID:22558086

  6. VibrioBase: a model for next-generation genome and annotation database development.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Heydari, Hamed; Tan, Tze King; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Beh, Ching Yew; Wee, Wei Yee; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wong, Guat Jah; Ang, Mia Yang; Yazdi, Amir Hessam

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate the ongoing research of Vibrio spp., a dedicated platform for the Vibrio research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. We present VibrioBase, a useful resource platform, providing all basic features of a sequence database with the addition of unique analysis tools which could be valuable for the Vibrio research community. VibrioBase currently houses a total of 252 Vibrio genomes developed in a user-friendly manner and useful to enable the analysis of these genomic data, particularly in the field of comparative genomics. Besides general data browsing features, VibrioBase offers analysis tools such as BLAST interfaces and JBrowse genome browser. Other important features of this platform include our newly developed in-house tools, the pairwise genome comparison (PGC) tool, and pathogenomics profiling tool (PathoProT). The PGC tool is useful in the identification and comparative analysis of two genomes, whereas PathoProT is designed for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Vibrio strains. Both of these tools will enable researchers with little experience in bioinformatics to get meaningful information from Vibrio genomes with ease. We have tested the validity and suitability of these tools and features for use in the next-generation database development. PMID:25243218

  7. CrAgDb--a database of annotated chaperone repertoire in archaeal genomes.

    PubMed

    Rani, Shikha; Srivastava, Abhishikha; Kumar, Manish; Goel, Manisha

    2016-03-01

    Chaperones are a diverse class of ubiquitous proteins that assist other cellular proteins in folding correctly and maintaining their native structure. Many different chaperones cooperate to constitute the 'proteostasis' machinery in the cells. It has been proposed earlier that archaeal organisms could be ideal model systems for deciphering the basic functioning of the 'protein folding machinery' in higher eukaryotes. Several chaperone families have been characterized in archaea over the years but mostly one protein at a time, making it difficult to decipher the composition and mechanistics of the protein folding system as a whole. In order to deal with these lacunae, we have developed a database of all archaeal chaperone proteins, CrAgDb (Chaperone repertoire in Archaeal genomes). The data have been presented in a systematic way with intuitive browse and search facilities for easy retrieval of information. Access to these curated datasets should expedite large-scale analysis of archaeal chaperone networks and significantly advance our understanding of operation and regulation of the protein folding machinery in archaea. Researchers could then translate this knowledge to comprehend the more complex protein folding pathways in eukaryotic systems. The database is freely available at http://14.139.227.92/mkumar/cragdb/. PMID:26862144

  8. VibrioBase: A Model for Next-Generation Genome and Annotation Database Development

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Tan, Tze King; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wong, Guat Jah

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate the ongoing research of Vibrio spp., a dedicated platform for the Vibrio research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. We present VibrioBase, a useful resource platform, providing all basic features of a sequence database with the addition of unique analysis tools which could be valuable for the Vibrio research community. VibrioBase currently houses a total of 252 Vibrio genomes developed in a user-friendly manner and useful to enable the analysis of these genomic data, particularly in the field of comparative genomics. Besides general data browsing features, VibrioBase offers analysis tools such as BLAST interfaces and JBrowse genome browser. Other important features of this platform include our newly developed in-house tools, the pairwise genome comparison (PGC) tool, and pathogenomics profiling tool (PathoProT). The PGC tool is useful in the identification and comparative analysis of two genomes, whereas PathoProT is designed for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Vibrio strains. Both of these tools will enable researchers with little experience in bioinformatics to get meaningful information from Vibrio genomes with ease. We have tested the validity and suitability of these tools and features for use in the next-generation database development. PMID:25243218

  9. Mining locus tags in PubMed Central to improve microbial gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The scientific literature contains millions of microbial gene identifiers within the full text and tables, but these annotations rarely get incorporated into public sequence databases. We propose to utilize the Open Access (OA) subset of PubMed Central (PMC) as a gene annotation database and have developed an R package called pmcXML to automatically mine and extract locus tags from full text, tables and supplements. Results We mined locus tags from 1835 OA publications in ten microbial genomes and extracted tags mentioned in 30,891 sentences in main text and 20,489 rows in tables. We identified locus tag pairs marking the start and end of a region such as an operon or genomic island and expanded these ranges to add another 13,043 tags. We also searched for locus tags in supplementary tables and publications outside the OA subset in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 for comparison. There were 168 publications containing 48,470 locus tags and 83% of mentions were from supplementary materials and 9% from publications outside the OA subset. Conclusions B. pseudomallei locus tags within the full text and tables of OA publications represent only a small fraction of the total mentions in the literature. For microbial genomes with very few functionally characterized proteins, the locus tags mentioned in supplementary tables and within ranges like genomic islands contain the majority of locus tags. Significantly, the functions in the R package provide access to additional resources in the OA subset that are not currently indexed or returned by searching PMC. PMID:24499370

  10. Quality of Computationally Inferred Gene Ontology Annotations

    PubMed Central

    Škunca, Nives; Altenhoff, Adrian; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Gene Ontology (GO) has established itself as the undisputed standard for protein function annotation. Most annotations are inferred electronically, i.e. without individual curator supervision, but they are widely considered unreliable. At the same time, we crucially depend on those automated annotations, as most newly sequenced genomes are non-model organisms. Here, we introduce a methodology to systematically and quantitatively evaluate electronic annotations. By exploiting changes in successive releases of the UniProt Gene Ontology Annotation database, we assessed the quality of electronic annotations in terms of specificity, reliability, and coverage. Overall, we not only found that electronic annotations have significantly improved in recent years, but also that their reliability now rivals that of annotations inferred by curators when they use evidence other than experiments from primary literature. This work provides the means to identify the subset of electronic annotations that can be relied upon—an important outcome given that >98% of all annotations are inferred without direct curation. PMID:22693439

  11. Recent improvements to the PROSITE database.

    PubMed

    Hulo, Nicolas; Sigrist, Christian J A; Le Saux, Virginie; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S; Bordoli, Lorenza; Gattiker, Alexandre; De Castro, Edouard; Bucher, Philipp; Bairoch, Amos

    2004-01-01

    The PROSITE database consists of a large collection of biologically meaningful signatures that are described as patterns or profiles. Each signature is linked to documentation that provides useful biological information on the protein family, domain or functional site identified by the signature. The PROSITE web page has been redesigned and several tools have been implemented to help the user discover new conserved regions in their own proteins and to visualize domain arrangements. We also introduced the facility to search PDB with a PROSITE entry or a user's pattern and visualize matched positions on 3D structures. The latest version of PROSITE (release 18.17 of November 30, 2003) contains 1676 entries. The database is accessible at http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:14681377

  12. Recent improvements to the PROSITE database

    PubMed Central

    Hulo, Nicolas; Sigrist, Christian J. A.; Le Saux, Virginie; S. Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra; Bordoli, Lorenza; Gattiker, Alexandre; De Castro, Edouard; Bucher, Philipp; Bairoch, Amos

    2004-01-01

    The PROSITE database consists of a large collection of biologically meaningful signatures that are described as patterns or profiles. Each signature is linked to documentation that provides useful biological information on the protein family, domain or functional site identified by the signature. The PROSITE web page has been redesigned and several tools have been implemented to help the user discover new conserved regions in their own proteins and to visualize domain arrangements. We also introduced the facility to search PDB with a PROSITE entry or a user’s pattern and visualize matched positions on 3D structures. The latest version of PROSITE (release 18.17 of November 30, 2003) contains 1676 entries. The database is accessible at http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:14681377

  13. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP . PMID:26542446

  14. MobiDB 2.0: an improved database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Emilio; Domenico, Tomás Di; Walsh, Ian; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2015-01-01

    MobiDB (http://mobidb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins. Intrinsically disordered regions are key for the function of numerous proteins. Here we provide a new version of MobiDB, a centralized source aimed at providing the most complete picture on different flavors of disorder in protein structures covering all UniProt sequences (currently over 80 million). The database features three levels of annotation: manually curated, indirect and predicted. Manually curated data is extracted from the DisProt database. Indirect data is inferred from PDB structures that are considered an indication of intrinsic disorder. The 10 predictors currently included (three ESpritz flavors, two IUPred flavors, two DisEMBL flavors, GlobPlot, VSL2b and JRONN) enable MobiDB to provide disorder annotations for every protein in absence of more reliable data. The new version also features a consensus annotation and classification for long disordered regions. In order to complement the disorder annotations, MobiDB features additional annotations from external sources. Annotations from the UniProt database include post-translational modifications and linear motifs. Pfam annotations are displayed in graphical form and are link-enabled, allowing the user to visit the corresponding Pfam page for further information. Experimental protein–protein interactions from STRING are also classified for disorder content. PMID:25361972

  15. KEGG orthology-based annotation of the predicted proteome of Acropora digitifera: ZoophyteBase - an open access and searchable database of a coral genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Contemporary coral reef research has firmly established that a genomic approach is urgently needed to better understand the effects of anthropogenic environmental stress and global climate change on coral holobiont interactions. Here we present KEGG orthology-based annotation of the complete genome sequence of the scleractinian coral Acropora digitifera and provide the first comprehensive view of the genome of a reef-building coral by applying advanced bioinformatics. Description Sequences from the KEGG database of protein function were used to construct hidden Markov models. These models were used to search the predicted proteome of A. digitifera to establish complete genomic annotation. The annotated dataset is published in ZoophyteBase, an open access format with different options for searching the data. A particularly useful feature is the ability to use a Google-like search engine that links query words to protein attributes. We present features of the annotation that underpin the molecular structure of key processes of coral physiology that include (1) regulatory proteins of symbiosis, (2) planula and early developmental proteins, (3) neural messengers, receptors and sensory proteins, (4) calcification and Ca2+-signalling proteins, (5) plant-derived proteins, (6) proteins of nitrogen metabolism, (7) DNA repair proteins, (8) stress response proteins, (9) antioxidant and redox-protective proteins, (10) proteins of cellular apoptosis, (11) microbial symbioses and pathogenicity proteins, (12) proteins of viral pathogenicity, (13) toxins and venom, (14) proteins of the chemical defensome and (15) coral epigenetics. Conclusions We advocate that providing annotation in an open-access searchable database available to the public domain will give an unprecedented foundation to interrogate the fundamental molecular structure and interactions of coral symbiosis and allow critical questions to be addressed at the genomic level based on combined aspects of

  16. NDER: A novel web application using annotated whole slide images for rapid improvements in human pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Reder, Nicholas P.; Glasser, Daniel; Dintzis, Suzanne M.; Rendi, Mara H.; Garcia, Rochelle L.; Henriksen, Jonathan C.; Kilgore, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Whole-slide images (WSIs) present a rich source of information for education, training, and quality assurance. However, they are often used in a fashion similar to glass slides rather than in novel ways that leverage the advantages of WSI. We have created a pipeline to transform annotated WSI into pattern recognition training, and quality assurance web application called novel diagnostic electronic resource (NDER). Aims: Create an efficient workflow for extracting annotated WSI for use by NDER, an attractive web application that provides high-throughput training. Materials and Methods: WSI were annotated by a resident and classified into five categories. Two methods of extracting images and creating image databases were compared. Extraction Method 1: Manual extraction of still images and validation of each image by four breast pathologists. Extraction Method 2: Validation of annotated regions on the WSI by a single experienced breast pathologist and automated extraction of still images tagged by diagnosis. The extracted still images were used by NDER. NDER briefly displays an image, requires users to classify the image after time has expired, then gives users immediate feedback. Results: The NDER workflow is efficient: annotation of a WSI requires 5 min and validation by an expert pathologist requires An additional one to 2 min. The pipeline is highly automated, with only annotation and validation requiring human input. NDER effectively displays hundreds of high-quality, high-resolution images and provides immediate feedback to users during a 30 min session. Conclusions: NDER efficiently uses annotated WSI to rapidly increase pattern recognition and evaluate for diagnostic proficiency. PMID:27563490

  17. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals

    PubMed Central

    Damienikan, Aliaksandr U.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a ‘gene by gene’ approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows) open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators) in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB) and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp.) and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn’t fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci. PMID:27257541

  18. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals.

    PubMed

    Nikolaichik, Yevgeny; Damienikan, Aliaksandr U

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a 'gene by gene' approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows) open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators) in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB) and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp.) and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn't fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci. PMID:27257541

  19. A semantic analysis of the annotations of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Purvesh; Done, Bogdan; Rao, Archana; Done, Arina; Draghici, Sorin

    2005-08-15

    The correct interpretation of any biological experiment depends in an essential way on the accuracy and consistency of the existing annotation databases. Such databases are ubiquitous and used by all life scientists in most experiments. However, it is well known that such databases are incomplete and many annotations may also be incorrect. In this paper we describe a technique that can be used to analyze the semantic content of such annotation databases. Our approach is able to extract implicit semantic relationships between genes and functions. This ability allows us to discover novel functions for known genes. This approach is able to identify missing and inaccurate annotations in existing annotation databases, and thus help improve their accuracy. We used our technique to analyze the current annotations of the human genome. From this body of annotations, we were able to predict 212 additional gene-function assignments. A subsequent literature search found that 138 of these gene-functions assignments are supported by existing peer-reviewed papers. An additional 23 assignments have been confirmed in the meantime by the addition of the respective annotations in later releases of the Gene Ontology database. Overall, the 161 confirmed assignments represent 75.95% of the proposed gene-function assignments. Only one of our predictions (0.4%) was contradicted by the existing literature. We could not find any relevant articles for 50 of our predictions (23.58%). The method is independent of the organism and can be used to analyze and improve the quality of the data of any public or private annotation database. PMID:15955782

  20. The new modern era of yeast genomics: community sequencing and the resulting annotation of multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains at the Saccharomyces Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stacia R.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first completed eukaryotic genome sequence was that of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the original model organism database. SGD remains the authoritative community resource for the S. cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation, and continues to provide comprehensive biological information correlated with S. cerevisiae genes and their products. A diverse set of yeast strains have been sequenced to explore commercial and laboratory applications, and a brief history of those strains is provided. The publication of these new genomes has motivated the creation of new tools, and SGD will annotate and provide comparative analyses of these sequences, correlating changes with variations in strain phenotypes and protein function. We are entering a new era at SGD, as we incorporate these new sequences and make them accessible to the scientific community, all in an effort to continue in our mission of educating researchers and facilitating discovery. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:23487186

  1. dbNSFP v3.0: A One-Stop Database of Functional Predictions and Annotations for Human Nonsynonymous and Splice-Site SNVs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Wu, Chunlei; Li, Chang; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the dbNSFP is to provide a one-stop resource for functional predictions and annotations for human nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) and splice-site variants (ssSNVs), and to facilitate the steps of filtering and prioritizing SNVs from a large list of SNVs discovered in an exome-sequencing study. A list of all potential nsSNVs and ssSNVs based on the human reference sequence were created and functional predictions and annotations were curated and compiled for each SNV. Here, we report a recent major update of the database to version 3.0. The SNV list has been rebuilt based on GENCODE 22 and currently the database includes 82,832,027 nsSNVs and ssSNVs. An attached database dbscSNV, which compiled all potential human SNVs within splicing consensus regions and their deleteriousness predictions, add another 15,030,459 potentially functional SNVs. Eleven prediction scores (MetaSVM, MetaLR, CADD, VEST3, PROVEAN, 4× fitCons, fathmm-MKL, and DANN) and allele frequencies from the UK10K cohorts and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), among others, have been added. The original seven prediction scores in v2.0 (SIFT, 2× Polyphen2, LRT, MutationTaster, MutationAssessor, and FATHMM) as well as many SNV and gene functional annotations have been updated. dbNSFP v3.0 is freely available at http://sites.google.com/site/jpopgen/dbNSFP. PMID:26555599

  2. Improving Functional Annotation in the DRE-TIM Metallolyase Superfamily through Identification of Active Site Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Garima; Johnson, Jordyn L; Frantom, Patrick A

    2016-03-29

    Within the DRE-TIM metallolyase superfamily, members of the Claisen-like condensation (CC-like) subgroup catalyze C-C bond-forming reactions between various α-ketoacids and acetyl-coenzyme A. These reactions are important in the metabolic pathways of many bacterial pathogens and serve as engineering scaffolds for the production of long-chain alcohol biofuels. To improve functional annotation and identify sequences that might use novel substrates in the CC-like subgroup, a combination of structural modeling and multiple-sequence alignments identified active site residues on the third, fourth, and fifth β-strands of the TIM-barrel catalytic domain that are differentially conserved within the substrate-diverse enzyme families. Using α-isopropylmalate synthase and citramalate synthase from Methanococcus jannaschii (MjIPMS and MjCMS), site-directed mutagenesis was used to test the role of each identified position in substrate selectivity. Kinetic data suggest that residues at the β3-5 and β4-7 positions play a significant role in the selection of α-ketoisovalerate over pyruvate in MjIPMS. However, complementary substitutions in MjCMS fail to alter substrate specificity, suggesting residues in these positions do not contribute to substrate selectivity in this enzyme. Analysis of the kinetic data with respect to a protein similarity network for the CC-like subgroup suggests that evolutionarily distinct forms of IPMS utilize residues at the β3-5 and β4-7 positions to affect substrate selectivity while the different versions of CMS use unique architectures. Importantly, mapping the identities of residues at the β3-5 and β4-7 positions onto the protein similarity network allows for rapid annotation of probable IPMS enzymes as well as several outlier sequences that may represent novel functions in the subgroup. PMID:26935545

  3. Perceived Usefulness of a Strategy-Based Peer Annotation System for Improving Academic Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, I-Jung; Chen, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the enhancing effect of peer annotation on the academic English reading of nonnative-Englishspeaking graduate students. To facilitate peer collaboration, the present study included the development of a strategybased online reading system. Through peer annotation, the students not only achieved enhanced reading comprehension but…

  4. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 Genome Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Bert; Scott, LaTia Etheredge

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%. PMID:24621776

  5. Improving GENCODE reference gene annotation using a high-stringency proteogenomics workflow.

    PubMed

    Wright, James C; Mudge, Jonathan; Weisser, Hendrik; Barzine, Mitra P; Gonzalez, Jose M; Brazma, Alvis; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Harrow, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Complete annotation of the human genome is indispensable for medical research. The GENCODE consortium strives to provide this, augmenting computational and experimental evidence with manual annotation. The rapidly developing field of proteogenomics provides evidence for the translation of genes into proteins and can be used to discover and refine gene models. However, for both the proteomics and annotation groups, there is a lack of guidelines for integrating this data. Here we report a stringent workflow for the interpretation of proteogenomic data that could be used by the annotation community to interpret novel proteogenomic evidence. Based on reprocessing of three large-scale publicly available human data sets, we show that a conservative approach, using stringent filtering is required to generate valid identifications. Evidence has been found supporting 16 novel protein-coding genes being added to GENCODE. Despite this many peptide identifications in pseudogenes cannot be annotated due to the absence of orthogonal supporting evidence. PMID:27250503

  6. Improving GENCODE reference gene annotation using a high-stringency proteogenomics workflow

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James C.; Mudge, Jonathan; Weisser, Hendrik; Barzine, Mitra P.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Brazma, Alvis; Choudhary, Jyoti S.; Harrow, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Complete annotation of the human genome is indispensable for medical research. The GENCODE consortium strives to provide this, augmenting computational and experimental evidence with manual annotation. The rapidly developing field of proteogenomics provides evidence for the translation of genes into proteins and can be used to discover and refine gene models. However, for both the proteomics and annotation groups, there is a lack of guidelines for integrating this data. Here we report a stringent workflow for the interpretation of proteogenomic data that could be used by the annotation community to interpret novel proteogenomic evidence. Based on reprocessing of three large-scale publicly available human data sets, we show that a conservative approach, using stringent filtering is required to generate valid identifications. Evidence has been found supporting 16 novel protein-coding genes being added to GENCODE. Despite this many peptide identifications in pseudogenes cannot be annotated due to the absence of orthogonal supporting evidence. PMID:27250503

  7. Image Annotation and Database Mining to Create a Novel Screen for the Chemotype-Dependent Crystallization of HCV NS3 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    H Klei; K Kish; M Russo; S Michalczyk; M Cahn; J Tredup; C Chang; J Khan; E Baldwin

    2011-12-31

    An effective process for screening, imaging, and optimizing crystallization trials using a combination of external and internal hardware and software has been deployed. The combination of this infrastructure with a vast annotated crystallization database enables the creation of custom crystallization screening strategies. Because of the strong chemotype-dependent crystallization observed with HCV NS3 protease (HCVPr), this strategy was applied to a chemotype resistant to all prior crystallization efforts. The crystallization database was mined for ingredients used to generate earlier HCVPr/inhibitor co-crystals. A random screen was created from the most prolific ingredients. A previously untested combination of proven ingredients was identified that led to a successful crystallization condition for the resistant chemotype.

  8. Efficient similarity search on 3D bounding box annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, Hans-Peter; Petri, Marisa; Schubert, Matthias; Shekelyan, Michael; Stockerl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Searching for similar image regions in medical databases yields valuable information for diagnosis. However, most of the current approaches are restricted to special cases or they are only available for rather small data stores. In this paper, we propose a fast query pipeline for 3D similarity queries on large databases of computed tomography (CT) scans consisting of minimum bounding box annotations. As these box annotations also contain background information which is not part of the item that was actually annotated, we employ approximate segmentation approaches for distinguishing between within-object texture and background texture in order to correctly describe the annotated objects. Our method allows a compact form of object description. In our framework, we exploit this advantage for enabling very fast query times. We have validated our method on data sets of 111 and 1293 bounding box lesion annotations within the liver and other organs. Our experiments show a significant performance improvement over previous approaches in both runtime and precision.

  9. Database construction for improving patient safety by examining pathology errors.

    PubMed

    Grzybicki, Dana Marie; Turcsanyi, Brian; Becich, Michael J; Gupta, Dilip; Gilbertson, John R; Raab, Stephen S

    2005-10-01

    A critical component of improving patient safety is reducing medical errors. "Improving Patient Safety by Examining Pathology Errors" is a project designed to collect data about and analyze diagnostic errors voluntarily reported by 4 academic anatomic pathology laboratories and to develop and implement interventions to reduce errors and improve patient outcomes. The study database is Web-mediated and Oracle-based, and it houses de-identified error data detected by cytologic-histologic correlation and interdepartmental conference review. We describe the basic design of the database with a focus on challenges faced as a consequence of the absence of standardized and detailed laboratory workload and quality assurance data sets in widely used laboratory information systems and the lack of efficient and comprehensive electronic de-identification of unlinked institutional laboratory information systems and clinical data. Development of these electronic data abstraction capabilities is critical for efforts to improve patient safety through the examination of pathology diagnostic errors. PMID:16146808

  10. Deep RNA sequencing improved the structural annotation of the Tuber melanosporum transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Tisserant, E; Da Silva, C; Kohler, A; Morin, E; Wincker, P; Martin, F

    2011-02-01

    • The functional complexity of the Tuber melanosporum transcriptome has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we applied high-throughput Illumina RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) to the transcriptome of T. melanosporum at different major developmental stages, that is free-living mycelium, fruiting body and ectomycorrhiza. • Sequencing of cDNA libraries generated a total of c. 24 million sequence reads representing > 882 Mb of sequence data. To construct a coverage signal profile across the genome, all reads were then aligned to the reference genome assembly of T. melanosporum Mel28. • We were able to identify a substantial number of novel transcripts, antisense transcripts, new exons, untranslated regions (UTRs), alternative upstream initiation codons and upstream open reading frames. • This RNA-Seq analysis allowed us to improve the genome annotation. It also provided us with a genome-wide view of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms generating an increased number of transcript isoforms during major developmental transitions in T. melanosporum. PMID:21223284

  11. Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2008-10-27

    Hypothetical and conserved hypothetical genes account for>30percent of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved hypothetical (9.5percent) along with 887 hypothetical genes (24.4percent). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 hypothetical and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC-MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. 1212 of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes. Except for the latter, monocistronic gene annotation was expanded using the above criteria along with matching Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Polycistronic genes were annotated in the same manner with inferences from their proximity to more confidently annotated genes. Two targeted deletion mutants were used as test cases to determine the relevance of the inferred functional annotations.

  12. Development of the Community Health Improvement Navigator Database of Interventions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Brita; Stanojevich, Joel; Stange, Paul; Jiwani, Nafisa; King, Raymond; Koo, Denise

    2016-02-26

    With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the requirements for hospitals to achieve tax-exempt status include performing a triennial community health needs assessment and developing a plan to address identified needs. To address community health needs, multisector collaborative efforts to improve both health care and non-health care determinants of health outcomes have been the most effective and sustainable. In 2015, CDC released the Community Health Improvement Navigator to facilitate the development of these efforts. This report describes the development of the database of interventions included in the Community Health Improvement Navigator. The database of interventions allows the user to easily search for multisector, collaborative, evidence-based interventions to address the underlying causes of the greatest morbidity and mortality in the United States: tobacco use and exposure, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. PMID:26917110

  13. An automated system designed for large scale NMR data deposition and annotation: application to over 600 assigned chemical shift data entries to the BioMagResBank from the Riken Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative internal database.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Harano, Yoko; Tochio, Naoya; Nakatani, Eiichi; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Mading, Steve; Ulrich, Eldon L; Markley, John L; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2012-08-01

    Biomolecular NMR chemical shift data are key information for the functional analysis of biomolecules and the development of new techniques for NMR studies utilizing chemical shift statistical information. Structural genomics projects are major contributors to the accumulation of protein chemical shift information. The management of the large quantities of NMR data generated by each project in a local database and the transfer of the data to the public databases are still formidable tasks because of the complicated nature of NMR data. Here we report an automated and efficient system developed for the deposition and annotation of a large number of data sets including (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments used for the structure determination of proteins. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our system by applying it to over 600 entries from the internal database generated by the RIKEN Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative (RSGI) to the public database, BioMagResBank (BMRB). We have assessed the quality of the deposited chemical shifts by comparing them with those predicted from the PDB coordinate entry for the corresponding protein. The same comparison for other matched BMRB/PDB entries deposited from 2001-2011 has been carried out and the results suggest that the RSGI entries greatly improved the quality of the BMRB database. Since the entries include chemical shifts acquired under strikingly similar experimental conditions, these NMR data can be expected to be a promising resource to improve current technologies as well as to develop new NMR methods for protein studies. PMID:22689068

  14. GO annotation in InterPro: why stability does not indicate accuracy in a sea of changing annotations

    PubMed Central

    Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Mitchell, Alex L.; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Yong, Siew-Yit; Finn, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    The removal of annotation from biological databases is often perceived as an indicator of erroneous annotation. As a corollary, annotation stability is considered to be a measure of reliability. However, diverse data-driven events can affect the stability of annotations in both primary protein sequence databases and the protein family databases that are built upon the sequence databases and used to help annotate them. Here, we describe some of these events and their consequences for the InterPro database, and demonstrate that annotation removal or reassignment is not always linked to incorrect annotation by the curator. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro PMID:26994912

  15. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO). However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM) tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and will be updated on regular

  16. A Coding System with Independent Annotations of Gesture Forms and Functions during Verbal Communication: Development of a Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE)

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Anthony Pak-Hin; Law, Sam-Po; Kwan, Connie Ching-Yin; Lai, Christy; Lam, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Gestures are commonly used together with spoken language in human communication. One major limitation of gesture investigations in the existing literature lies in the fact that the coding of forms and functions of gestures has not been clearly differentiated. This paper first described a recently developed Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE) based on independent annotation of gesture forms and functions among 119 neurologically unimpaired right-handed native speakers of Cantonese (divided into three age and two education levels), and presented findings of an investigation examining how gesture use was related to age and linguistic performance. Consideration of these two factors, for which normative data are currently very limited or lacking in the literature, is relevant and necessary when one evaluates gesture employment among individuals with and without language impairment. Three speech tasks, including monologue of a personally important event, sequential description, and story-telling, were used for elicitation. The EUDICO Linguistic ANnotator (ELAN) software was used to independently annotate each participant’s linguistic information of the transcript, forms of gestures used, and the function for each gesture. About one-third of the subjects did not use any co-verbal gestures. While the majority of gestures were non-content-carrying, which functioned mainly for reinforcing speech intonation or controlling speech flow, the content-carrying ones were used to enhance speech content. Furthermore, individuals who are younger or linguistically more proficient tended to use fewer gestures, suggesting that normal speakers gesture differently as a function of age and linguistic performance. PMID:25667563

  17. An improved method for specificity annotation shows a distinct evolutionary divergence among the microbial enzymes of the cholylglycine hydrolase family.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Sule, Manas; Sharma, Ranu; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C G

    2014-06-01

    Bile salt hydrolases (BSHs) are gut microbial enzymes that play a significant role in the bile acid modification pathway. Penicillin V acylases (PVAs) are enzymes produced by environmental microbes, having a possible role in pathogenesis or scavenging of phenolic compounds in their microbial habitats. The correct annotation of such physiologically and industrially important enzymes is thus vital. The current methods relying solely on sequence homology do not always provide accurate annotations for these two members of the cholylglycine hydrolase (CGH) family as BSH/PVA enzymes. Here, we present an improved method [binding site similarity (BSS)-based scoring system] for the correct annotation of the CGH family members as BSH/PVA enzymes, which along with the phylogenetic information incorporates the substrate specificity as well as the binding site information. The BSS scoring system was developed through the analysis of the binding sites and binding modes of the available BSH/PVA structures with substrates glycocholic acid and penicillin V. The 198 sequences in the dataset were then annotated accurately using BSS scores as BSH/PVA enzymes. The dataset presented contained sequences from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and archaea. The clustering obtained for the dataset using the method described above showed a clear distinction in annotation of Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Based on this clustering and a detailed analysis of the sequences of the CGH family in the dataset, we could infer that the CGH genes might have evolved in accordance with the hypothesis stating the evolution of diderms and archaea from the monoderms. PMID:24644246

  18. AraPPISite: a database of fine-grained protein-protein interaction site annotations for Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Yang, Shiping; Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Ziding

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about protein interaction sites provides detailed information of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). To date, nearly 20,000 of PPIs from Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified. Nevertheless, the interaction site information has been largely missed by previously published PPI databases. Here, AraPPISite, a database that presents fine-grained interaction details for A. thaliana PPIs is established. First, the experimentally determined 3D structures of 27 A. thaliana PPIs are collected from the Protein Data Bank database and the predicted 3D structures of 3023 A. thaliana PPIs are modeled by using two well-established template-based docking methods. For each experimental/predicted complex structure, AraPPISite not only provides an interactive user interface for browsing interaction sites, but also lists detailed evolutionary and physicochemical properties of these sites. Second, AraPPISite assigns domain-domain interactions or domain-motif interactions to 4286 PPIs whose 3D structures cannot be modeled. In this case, users can easily query protein interaction regions at the sequence level. AraPPISite is a free and user-friendly database, which does not require user registration or any configuration on local machines. We anticipate AraPPISite can serve as a helpful database resource for the users with less experience in structural biology or protein bioinformatics to probe the details of PPIs, and thus accelerate the studies of plant genetics and functional genomics. AraPPISite is available at http://systbio.cau.edu.cn/arappisite/index.html . PMID:27338257

  19. Aviation and the Environment. A Selected, Annotated Bibliography Related to Aviation's Responses Toward Improving the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jane

    This informal, brief bibliography attempts to stress the positive side of aviation, annotating documents that explain how the airlines, aircraft engine manufacturers, government agencies, military aviation, and general aviation are meeting their responsibilities in solving environmental problems. Topics arousing public concern are identified:…

  20. The FEATURE framework for protein function annotation: modeling new functions, improving performance, and extending to novel applications

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Inbal; Glazer, Dariya S; Wu, Shirley; Altman, Russ B

    2008-01-01

    Structural genomics efforts contribute new protein structures that often lack significant sequence and fold similarity to known proteins. Traditional sequence and structure-based methods may not be sufficient to annotate the molecular functions of these structures. Techniques that combine structural and functional modeling can be valuable for functional annotation. FEATURE is a flexible framework for modeling and recognition of functional sites in macromolecular structures. Here, we present an overview of the main components of the FEATURE framework, and describe the recent developments in its use. These include automating training sets selection to increase functional coverage, coupling FEATURE to structural diversity generating methods such as molecular dynamics simulations and loop modeling methods to improve performance, and using FEATURE in large-scale modeling and structure determination efforts. PMID:18831785

  1. Community gene annotation in practice

    PubMed Central

    Loveland, Jane E.; Gilbert, James G.R.; Griffiths, Ed; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Manual annotation of genomic data is extremely valuable to produce an accurate reference gene set but is expensive compared with automatic methods and so has been limited to model organisms. Annotation tools that have been developed at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI, http://www.sanger.ac.uk/.) are being used to fill that gap, as they can be used remotely and so open up viable community annotation collaborations. We introduce the ‘Blessed’ annotator and ‘Gatekeeper’ approach to Community Annotation using the Otterlace/ZMap genome annotation tool. We also describe the strategies adopted for annotation consistency, quality control and viewing of the annotation. Database URL: http://vega.sanger.ac.uk/index.html PMID:22434843

  2. Improving knowledge management through the support of image examination and data annotation using DICOM structured reporting.

    PubMed

    Torres, José Salavert; Damian Segrelles Quilis, J; Espert, Ignacio Blanquer; García, Vicente Hernandez

    2012-12-01

    An important effort has been invested on improving the image diagnosis process in different medical areas using information technologies. The field of medical imaging involves two main data types: medical imaging and reports. Developments based on the DICOM standard have demonstrated to be a convenient and widespread solution among the medical community. The main objective of this work is to design a Web application prototype that will be able to improve diagnosis and follow-on of breast cancer patients. It is based on TRENCADIS middleware, which provides a knowledge-oriented storage model composed by federated repositories of DICOM image studies and DICOM-SR medical reports. The full structure and contents of the diagnosis reports are used as metadata for indexing images. The TRENCADIS infrastructure takes full advantage of Grid technologies by deploying multi-resource grid services that enable multiple views (reports schemes) of the knowledge database. The paper presents a real deployment of such Web application prototype in the Dr. Peset Hospital providing radiologists with a tool to create, store and search diagnostic reports based on breast cancer explorations (mammography, magnetic resonance, ultrasound, pre-surgery biopsy and post-surgery biopsy), improving support for diagnostics decisions. A technical details for use cases (outlining enhanced multi-resource grid services communication and processing steps) and interactions between actors and the deployed prototype are described. As a result, information is more structured, the logic is clearer, network messages have been reduced and, in general, the system is more resistant to failures. PMID:22841747

  3. ERIC Digests: An Annotated Bibliography of All ERIC Digests Announced in the ERIC Database through March 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Elizabeth, Comp.; Brandhorst, Ted, Comp.

    Digests prepared by clearinghouses of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) began to emerge seriously in 1984 as one of the most desirable and popular products of the various clearinghouses. Although ERIC Digests were not initially listed in the ERIC database because of their brevity, today they are entered routinely. This…

  4. The Plant Ontology Database: A community resource for plant structure and developmental stages controlled vocabulary and annotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Plant Ontology Consortium (POC, http://www.plantontology.org) is a collaborative effort among model plant genome databases and plant researchers that aim to create, maintain, and facilitate the use of a controlled vocabulary(ontology) for plants. The ontology allows users to ascribe attributes o...

  5. The Plant Ontology Database: A Community Resource for Plant Structure and Developmental Stages Controlled Vocabulary and Annotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Plant Ontology Consortium (POC, http://www.plantontology.org) is a collaborative effort among model plant genome databases and plant researchers that aims to create, maintain and facilitate the use of a controlled vocabulary(ontology) for plants. The ontology allows users to ascribe attributes o...

  6. Managing the data deluge: data-driven GO category assignment improves while complexity of functional annotation increases.

    PubMed

    Gobeill, Julien; Pasche, Emilie; Vishnyakova, Dina; Ruch, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The available curated data lag behind current biological knowledge contained in the literature. Text mining can assist biologists and curators to locate and access this knowledge, for instance by characterizing the functional profile of publications. Gene Ontology (GO) category assignment in free text already supports various applications, such as powering ontology-based search engines, finding curation-relevant articles (triage) or helping the curator to identify and encode functions. Popular text mining tools for GO classification are based on so called thesaurus-based--or dictionary-based--approaches, which exploit similarities between the input text and GO terms themselves. But their effectiveness remains limited owing to the complex nature of GO terms, which rarely occur in text. In contrast, machine learning approaches exploit similarities between the input text and already curated instances contained in a knowledge base to infer a functional profile. GO Annotations (GOA) and MEDLINE make possible to exploit a growing amount of curated abstracts (97 000 in November 2012) for populating this knowledge base. Our study compares a state-of-the-art thesaurus-based system with a machine learning system (based on a k-Nearest Neighbours algorithm) for the task of proposing a functional profile for unseen MEDLINE abstracts, and shows how resources and performances have evolved. Systems are evaluated on their ability to propose for a given abstract the GO terms (2.8 on average) used for curation in GOA. We show that since 2006, although a massive effort was put into adding synonyms in GO (+300%), our thesaurus-based system effectiveness is rather constant, reaching from 0.28 to 0.31 for Recall at 20 (R20). In contrast, thanks to its knowledge base growth, our machine learning system has steadily improved, reaching from 0.38 in 2006 to 0.56 for R20 in 2012. Integrated in semi-automatic workflows or in fully automatic pipelines, such systems are more and more efficient

  7. Algal functional annotation tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations tomore » interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on

  8. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  9. Genome and proteome annotation: organization, interpretation and integration

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Gabrielle A.; Talavera, David; Thornton, Janet M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent years have seen a huge increase in the generation of genomic and proteomic data. This has been due to improvements in current biological methodologies, the development of new experimental techniques and the use of computers as support tools. All these raw data are useless if they cannot be properly analysed, annotated, stored and displayed. Consequently, a vast number of resources have been created to present the data to the wider community. Annotation tools and databases provide the means to disseminate these data and to comprehend their biological importance. This review examines the various aspects of annotation: type, methodology and availability. Moreover, it puts a special interest on novel annotation fields, such as that of phenotypes, and highlights the recent efforts focused on the integrating annotations. PMID:19019817

  10. DSSTOX STRUCTURE-SEARCHABLE PUBLIC TOXICITY DATABASE NETWORK: CURRENT PROGRESS AND NEW INITIATIVES TO IMPROVE CHEMO-BIOINFORMATICS CAPABILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA DSSTox website (http://www/epa.gov/nheerl/dsstox) publishes standardized, structure-annotated toxicity databases, covering a broad range of toxicity disciplines. Each DSSTox database features documentation written in collaboration with the source authors and toxicity expe...

  11. Improving the quality of genome, protein sequence, and taxonomy databases: a prerequisite for microbiome meta-omics 2.0.

    PubMed

    Pible, Olivier; Armengaud, Jean

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput shotgun metaproteomic approaches on environmental or medical microbiomes are producing huge amounts of tandem mass spectrometry data. These can be interpreted either with a general protein sequence database comprising tens of thousands of sequenced genomes or with a more customized database such as those obtained after metagenome sequencing of the DNA extracted from the same sample. However, not all entries in a nucleotide or protein sequence database are of equal quality and this can critically impact metaproteomic data interpretation. In this viewpoint article, we exemplify several key issues. First, either genome or transcriptome data interpretation due to inaccurate contig assembly and gene prediction may be erroneous, for its mitigation the metaproteogenomic strategies could have an interesting perspective. Errors in sample handling and taxonomical characterization may also be problematic. Cross-contamination of genome sequences is also underestimated while frequent. As a consequence of these structural errors regarding protein sequences and additional problems due to homology-based functional annotation of proteins, specific efforts for better interpretation of metaproteomic data are required. We propose the development of new bioinformatic pipelines devoted to detection and correction of errors and contaminations to improve the overall quality of sequence and taxonomy databases for metaproteomics. PMID:26038180

  12. Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcine P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2009-03-17

    Hypothetical (HyP) and conserved HyP genes account for >30% of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved HyP (9.5%) along with 887 HyP genes (24.4%). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 HyP and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC–MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. One thousand two hundred and twelve of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes.

  13. Genic and Intergenic SSR Database Generation, SNPs Determination and Pathway Annotations, in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.).

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Morad M; Adawy, Sami S; El-Assal, Salah El-Din S; Hussein, Ebtissam H A

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out aiming to use the bioinformatics tools in order to identify and characterize, simple sequence repeats within the third Version of the date palm genome and develop a new SSR primers database. In addition single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are located within the SSR flanking regions were recognized. Moreover, the pathways for the sequences assigned by SSR primers, the biological functions and gene interaction were determined. A total of 172,075 SSR motifs was identified on date palm genome sequence with a frequency of 450.97 SSRs per Mb. Out of these, 130,014 SSRs (75.6%) were located within the intergenic regions with a frequency of 499 SSRs per Mb. While, only 42,061 SSRs (24.4%) were located within the genic regions with a frequency of 347.5 SSRs per Mb. A total of 111,403 of SSR primer pairs were designed, that represents 291.9 SSR primers per Mb. Out of the 111,403, only 31,380 SSR primers were in the genic regions, while 80,023 primers were in the intergenic regions. A number of 250,507 SNPs were recognized in 84,172 SSR flanking regions, which represents 75.55% of the total SSR flanking regions. Out of 12,274 genes only 463 genes comprising 896 SSR primers were mapped onto 111 pathways using KEGG data base. The most abundant enzymes were identified in the pathway related to the biosynthesis of antibiotics. We tested 1031 SSR primers using both publicly available date palm genome sequences as templates in the in silico PCR reactions. Concerning in vitro validation, 31 SSR primers among those used in the in silico PCR were synthesized and tested for their ability to detect polymorphism among six Egyptian date palm cultivars. All tested primers have successfully amplified products, but only 18 primers detected polymorphic amplicons among the studied date palm cultivars. PMID:27434138

  14. Genic and Intergenic SSR Database Generation, SNPs Determination and Pathway Annotations, in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out aiming to use the bioinformatics tools in order to identify and characterize, simple sequence repeats within the third Version of the date palm genome and develop a new SSR primers database. In addition single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are located within the SSR flanking regions were recognized. Moreover, the pathways for the sequences assigned by SSR primers, the biological functions and gene interaction were determined. A total of 172,075 SSR motifs was identified on date palm genome sequence with a frequency of 450.97 SSRs per Mb. Out of these, 130,014 SSRs (75.6%) were located within the intergenic regions with a frequency of 499 SSRs per Mb. While, only 42,061 SSRs (24.4%) were located within the genic regions with a frequency of 347.5 SSRs per Mb. A total of 111,403 of SSR primer pairs were designed, that represents 291.9 SSR primers per Mb. Out of the 111,403, only 31,380 SSR primers were in the genic regions, while 80,023 primers were in the intergenic regions. A number of 250,507 SNPs were recognized in 84,172 SSR flanking regions, which represents 75.55% of the total SSR flanking regions. Out of 12,274 genes only 463 genes comprising 896 SSR primers were mapped onto 111 pathways using KEGG data base. The most abundant enzymes were identified in the pathway related to the biosynthesis of antibiotics. We tested 1031 SSR primers using both publicly available date palm genome sequences as templates in the in silico PCR reactions. Concerning in vitro validation, 31 SSR primers among those used in the in silico PCR were synthesized and tested for their ability to detect polymorphism among six Egyptian date palm cultivars. All tested primers have successfully amplified products, but only 18 primers detected polymorphic amplicons among the studied date palm cultivars. PMID:27434138

  15. U.S. EPA computational toxicology programs: Central role of chemical-annotation efforts and molecular databases

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology is engaged in high-profile research efforts to improve the ability to more efficiently and effectively prioritize and screen thousands of environmental chemicals for potential toxicity. A central component of these efforts invol...

  16. Metabolomic database annotations via query of elemental compositions: Mass accuracy is insufficient even at less than 1 ppm

    PubMed Central

    Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Background Metabolomic studies are targeted at identifying and quantifying all metabolites in a given biological context. Among the tools used for metabolomic research, mass spectrometry is one of the most powerful tools. However, metabolomics by mass spectrometry always reveals a high number of unknown compounds which complicate in depth mechanistic or biochemical understanding. In principle, mass spectrometry can be utilized within strategies of de novo structure elucidation of small molecules, starting with the computation of the elemental composition of an unknown metabolite using accurate masses with errors <5 ppm (parts per million). However even with very high mass accuracy (<1 ppm) many chemically possible formulae are obtained in higher mass regions. In automatic routines an additional orthogonal filter therefore needs to be applied in order to reduce the number of potential elemental compositions. This report demonstrates the necessity of isotope abundance information by mathematical confirmation of the concept. Results High mass accuracy (<1 ppm) alone is not enough to exclude enough candidates with complex elemental compositions (C, H, N, S, O, P, and potentially F, Cl, Br and Si). Use of isotopic abundance patterns as a single further constraint removes >95% of false candidates. This orthogonal filter can condense several thousand candidates down to only a small number of molecular formulas. Example calculations for 10, 5, 3, 1 and 0.1 ppm mass accuracy are given. Corresponding software scripts can be downloaded from . A comparison of eight chemical databases revealed that PubChem and the Dictionary of Natural Products can be recommended for automatic queries using molecular formulae. Conclusion More than 1.6 million molecular formulae in the range 0–500 Da were generated in an exhaustive manner under strict observation of mathematical and chemical rules. Assuming that ion species are fully resolved (either by chromatography or by high resolution

  17. The Ensembl gene annotation system.

    PubMed

    Aken, Bronwen L; Ayling, Sarah; Barrell, Daniel; Clarke, Laura; Curwen, Valery; Fairley, Susan; Fernandez Banet, Julio; Billis, Konstantinos; García Girón, Carlos; Hourlier, Thibaut; Howe, Kevin; Kähäri, Andreas; Kokocinski, Felix; Martin, Fergal J; Murphy, Daniel N; Nag, Rishi; Ruffier, Magali; Schuster, Michael; Tang, Y Amy; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; White, Simon; Zadissa, Amonida; Flicek, Paul; Searle, Stephen M J

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl gene annotation system has been used to annotate over 70 different vertebrate species across a wide range of genome projects. Furthermore, it generates the automatic alignment-based annotation for the human and mouse GENCODE gene sets. The system is based on the alignment of biological sequences, including cDNAs, proteins and RNA-seq reads, to the target genome in order to construct candidate transcript models. Careful assessment and filtering of these candidate transcripts ultimately leads to the final gene set, which is made available on the Ensembl website. Here, we describe the annotation process in detail.Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org/index.html. PMID:27337980

  18. The Ensembl gene annotation system

    PubMed Central

    Aken, Bronwen L.; Ayling, Sarah; Barrell, Daniel; Clarke, Laura; Curwen, Valery; Fairley, Susan; Fernandez Banet, Julio; Billis, Konstantinos; García Girón, Carlos; Hourlier, Thibaut; Howe, Kevin; Kähäri, Andreas; Kokocinski, Felix; Martin, Fergal J.; Murphy, Daniel N.; Nag, Rishi; Ruffier, Magali; Schuster, Michael; Tang, Y. Amy; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; White, Simon; Zadissa, Amonida; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl gene annotation system has been used to annotate over 70 different vertebrate species across a wide range of genome projects. Furthermore, it generates the automatic alignment-based annotation for the human and mouse GENCODE gene sets. The system is based on the alignment of biological sequences, including cDNAs, proteins and RNA-seq reads, to the target genome in order to construct candidate transcript models. Careful assessment and filtering of these candidate transcripts ultimately leads to the final gene set, which is made available on the Ensembl website. Here, we describe the annotation process in detail. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org/index.html PMID:27337980

  19. Pathway Analysis Software: Annotation Errors and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Henderson-MacLennan, Nicole K.; Papp, Jeanette C.; Talbot, C. Conover; McCabe, Edward R.B.; Presson, Angela P.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic databases contain a variety of annotation errors that often go unnoticed due to the large size of modern genetic data sets. Interpretation of these data sets requires bioinformatics tools that may contribute to this problem. While providing gene symbol annotations for identifiers (IDs) such as microarray probeset, RefSeq, GenBank and Entrez Gene is seemingly trivial, the accuracy is fundamental to any subsequent conclusions. We examine gene symbol annotations and results from three commercial pathway analysis software (PAS) packages: Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, GeneGO and Pathway Studio. We compare gene symbol annotations and canonical pathway results over time and among different input ID types. We find that PAS results can be affected by variation in gene symbol annotations across software releases and the input ID type analyzed. As a result, we offer suggestions for using commercial PAS and reporting microarray results to improve research quality. We propose a wiki type website to facilitate communication of bioinformatics software problems within the scientific community. PMID:20663702

  20. Improvement of barley genome annotations by deciphering the Haruna Nijo genome

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Motoi, Yuka; Wu, Jianzhong; Itoh, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Full-length (FL) cDNA sequences provide the most reliable evidence for the presence of genes in genomes. In this report, detailed gene structures of barley, whole genome shotgun (WGS) and additional transcript data of the cultivar Haruna Nijo were quality controlled and compared with the published Morex genome information. Haruna Nijo scaffolds have longer total sequence length with much higher N50 and fewer sequences than those in Morex WGS contigs. The longer Haruna Nijo scaffolds provided efficient FLcDNA mapping, resulting in high coverage and detection of the transcription start sites. In combination with FLcDNAs and RNA-Seq data from four different tissue samples of Haruna Nijo, we identified 51,249 gene models on 30,606 loci. Overall sequence similarity between Haruna Nijo and Morex genome was 95.99%, while that of exon regions was higher (99.71%). These sequence and annotation data of Haruna Nijo are combined with Morex genome data and released from a genome browser. The genome sequence of Haruna Nijo may provide detailed gene structures in addition to the current Morex barley genome information. PMID:26622062

  1. Directory of clinical databases: improving and promoting their use

    PubMed Central

    Black, N; Payne, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: The controversy surrounding the actual and potential use of clinical databases partly reflects the huge variation in their content and quality. In addition, use of existing clinical databases is severely limited by a lack of knowledge of their availability. Objectives: To develop and test a standardised method for assessing the quality (completeness and accuracy) of clinical databases and to establish a web based directory of databases in the UK. Methods: An expert group was set up (1) to establish the criteria for inclusion of databases; (2) to develop a quality assessment instrument with high content validity, based on epidemiological theory; (3) to test empirically, modify, and retest the acceptability to database custodians, face validity and floor/ceiling effects; and (4) to design a website. Results: Criteria for inclusion of databases were the provision of individual level data; inclusion in the database defined by a common circumstance (e.g. condition, treatment), an administrative arrangement, or an adverse outcome; and inclusion of data from more than one provider. A quality assessment instrument consisting of 10 items (four on coverage, six on reliability and validity) was developed and shown to have good face and content validity, no floor/ceiling effects, and to be acceptable to database custodians. A website (www.docdat.org) was developed. Indications over the first 18 months (number of visitors to the site) are that it is increasingly popular. By November 2002 there were around 3500 hits a month. Conclusions: A website now exists where visitors can identify clinical databases in the UK that may be suitable to meet their aims. It is planned both to develop a local version for use within a hospital and to encourage similar national systems in other countries. PMID:14532366

  2. Leveraging Genomic Annotations and Pleiotropic Enrichment for Improved Replication Rates in Schizophrenia GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Bettella, Francesco; Desikan, Rahul S.; Li, Wen; Witoelar, Aree; Zuber, Verena; Devor, Anna; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Chen, Qiang; Werge, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Djurovic, Srdjan; O’Donovan, Michael; Visscher, Peter M.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia (SCZ) has not yet been identified. Here, we apply a novel statistical algorithm called Covariate-Modulated Mixture Modeling (CM3), which incorporates auxiliary information (heterozygosity, total linkage disequilibrium, genomic annotations, pleiotropy) for each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) to enable more accurate estimation of replication probabilities, conditional on the observed test statistic (“z-score”) of the SNP. We use a multiple logistic regression on z-scores to combine information from auxiliary information to derive a “relative enrichment score” for each SNP. For each stratum of these relative enrichment scores, we obtain nonparametric estimates of posterior expected test statistics and replication probabilities as a function of discovery z-scores, using a resampling-based approach that repeatedly and randomly partitions meta-analysis sub-studies into training and replication samples. We fit a scale mixture of two Gaussians model to each stratum, obtaining parameter estimates that minimize the sum of squared differences of the scale-mixture model with the stratified nonparametric estimates. We apply this approach to the recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of SCZ (n = 82,315), obtaining a good fit between the model-based and observed effect sizes and replication probabilities. We observed that SNPs with low enrichment scores replicate with a lower probability than SNPs with high enrichment scores even when both they are genome-wide significant (p < 5x10-8). There were 693 and 219 independent loci with model-based replication rates ≥80% and ≥90%, respectively. Compared to analyses not incorporating relative enrichment scores, CM3 increased out-of-sample yield for SNPs that replicate at a given rate. This demonstrates that replication probabilities can be more accurately estimated using prior enrichment information with CM3. PMID:26808560

  3. Leveraging Genomic Annotations and Pleiotropic Enrichment for Improved Replication Rates in Schizophrenia GWAS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Bettella, Francesco; Desikan, Rahul S; Li, Wen; Witoelar, Aree; Zuber, Verena; Devor, Anna; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; Chen, Qiang; Werge, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Weinberger, Daniel R; Djurovic, Srdjan; O'Donovan, Michael; Visscher, Peter M; Andreassen, Ole A; Dale, Anders M

    2016-01-01

    Most of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia (SCZ) has not yet been identified. Here, we apply a novel statistical algorithm called Covariate-Modulated Mixture Modeling (CM3), which incorporates auxiliary information (heterozygosity, total linkage disequilibrium, genomic annotations, pleiotropy) for each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) to enable more accurate estimation of replication probabilities, conditional on the observed test statistic ("z-score") of the SNP. We use a multiple logistic regression on z-scores to combine information from auxiliary information to derive a "relative enrichment score" for each SNP. For each stratum of these relative enrichment scores, we obtain nonparametric estimates of posterior expected test statistics and replication probabilities as a function of discovery z-scores, using a resampling-based approach that repeatedly and randomly partitions meta-analysis sub-studies into training and replication samples. We fit a scale mixture of two Gaussians model to each stratum, obtaining parameter estimates that minimize the sum of squared differences of the scale-mixture model with the stratified nonparametric estimates. We apply this approach to the recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of SCZ (n = 82,315), obtaining a good fit between the model-based and observed effect sizes and replication probabilities. We observed that SNPs with low enrichment scores replicate with a lower probability than SNPs with high enrichment scores even when both they are genome-wide significant (p < 5x10-8). There were 693 and 219 independent loci with model-based replication rates ≥80% and ≥90%, respectively. Compared to analyses not incorporating relative enrichment scores, CM3 increased out-of-sample yield for SNPs that replicate at a given rate. This demonstrates that replication probabilities can be more accurately estimated using prior enrichment information with CM3. PMID:26808560

  4. Improving Recall Using Database Management Systems: A Learning Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of microcomputer database management systems to facilitate the instructional uses of learning strategies relating to information processing skills, especially recall. Two learning strategies, cross-classification matrixing and node acquisition and integration, are highlighted. (Author/LRW)

  5. Next generation models for storage and representation of microbial biological annotation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional genome annotation systems were developed in a very different computing era, one where the World Wide Web was just emerging. Consequently, these systems are built as centralized black boxes focused on generating high quality annotation submissions to GenBank/EMBL supported by expert manual curation. The exponential growth of sequence data drives a growing need for increasingly higher quality and automatically generated annotation. Typical annotation pipelines utilize traditional database technologies, clustered computing resources, Perl, C, and UNIX file systems to process raw sequence data, identify genes, and predict and categorize gene function. These technologies tightly couple the annotation software system to hardware and third party software (e.g. relational database systems and schemas). This makes annotation systems hard to reproduce, inflexible to modification over time, difficult to assess, difficult to partition across multiple geographic sites, and difficult to understand for those who are not domain experts. These systems are not readily open to scrutiny and therefore not scientifically tractable. The advent of Semantic Web standards such as Resource Description Framework (RDF) and OWL Web Ontology Language (OWL) enables us to construct systems that address these challenges in a new comprehensive way. Results Here, we develop a framework for linking traditional data to OWL-based ontologies in genome annotation. We show how data standards can decouple hardware and third party software tools from annotation pipelines, thereby making annotation pipelines easier to reproduce and assess. An illustrative example shows how TURTLE (Terse RDF Triple Language) can be used as a human readable, but also semantically-aware, equivalent to GenBank/EMBL files. Conclusions The power of this approach lies in its ability to assemble annotation data from multiple databases across multiple locations into a representation that is understandable to

  6. Next Generation Models for Storage and Representation of Microbial Biological Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Quest, Daniel J; Land, Miriam L; Brettin, Thomas S; Cottingham, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional genome annotation systems were developed in a very different computing era, one where the World Wide Web was just emerging. Consequently, these systems are built as centralized black boxes focused on generating high quality annotation submissions to GenBank/EMBL supported by expert manual curation. The exponential growth of sequence data drives a growing need for increasingly higher quality and automatically generated annotation. Typical annotation pipelines utilize traditional database technologies, clustered computing resources, Perl, C, and UNIX file systems to process raw sequence data, identify genes, and predict and categorize gene function. These technologies tightly couple the annotation software system to hardware and third party software (e.g. relational database systems and schemas). This makes annotation systems hard to reproduce, inflexible to modification over time, difficult to assess, difficult to partition across multiple geographic sites, and difficult to understand for those who are not domain experts. These systems are not readily open to scrutiny and therefore not scientifically tractable. The advent of Semantic Web standards such as Resource Description Framework (RDF) and OWL Web Ontology Language (OWL) enables us to construct systems that address these challenges in a new comprehensive way. Results Here, we develop a framework for linking traditional data to OWL-based ontologies in genome annotation. We show how data standards can decouple hardware and third party software tools from annotation pipelines, thereby making annotation pipelines easier to reproduce and assess. An illustrative example shows how TURTLE (Terse RDF Triple Language) can be used as a human readable, but also semantically-aware, equivalent to GenBank/EMBL files. Conclusions The power of this approach lies in its ability to assemble annotation data from multiple databases across multiple locations into a representation that is understandable to

  7. Improving the gene structure annotation of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum fulfils a vital requirement towards an in silico-derived vaccine.

    PubMed

    Goodswen, Stephen J; Barratt, Joel L N; Kennedy, Paul J; Ellis, John T

    2015-04-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite which can cause abortion in cattle, instigating major economic burden. Vaccination has been proposed as the most cost-effective control measure to alleviate this burden. Consequently the overriding aspiration for N. caninum research is the identification and subsequent evaluation of vaccine candidates in animal models. To save time, cost and effort, it is now feasible to use an in silico approach for vaccine candidate prediction. Precise protein sequences, derived from the correct open reading frame, are paramount and arguably the most important factor determining the success or failure of this approach. The challenge is that publicly available N. caninum sequences are mostly derived from gene predictions. Annotated inaccuracies can lead to erroneously predicted vaccine candidates by bioinformatics programs. This study evaluates the current N. caninum annotation for potential inaccuracies. Comparisons with annotation from a closely related pathogen, Toxoplasma gondii, are also made to distinguish patterns of inconsistency. More importantly, a mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiment is used to validate the annotation. Potential discrepancies originating from a questionable start codon context and exon boundaries were identified in 1943 protein coding sequences. We conclude, where experimental data were available, that the majority of N. caninum gene sequences were reliably predicted. Nevertheless, almost 28% of genes were identified as questionable. Given the limitations of RNA-Seq, the intention of this study was not to replace the existing annotation but to support or oppose particular aspects of it. Ideally, many studies aimed at improving the annotation are required to build a consensus. We believe this study, in providing a new resource on gene structure and annotation, is a worthy contributor to this endeavour. PMID:25747726

  8. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, D.; Casero, D.; Cokus, S. J.; Merchant, S. S.; Pellegrini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  9. Improving data accuracy of commercial food outlet databases.

    PubMed

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Martinez, Diane; Yedidia, Michael J; Petlick, Nirvana

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. Assessing food environments often requires using commercially available data. Disparate methods used for classifying food outlets in these databases call for creating a classification approach using common definitions. A systematic strategy for reclassifying food stores and restaurants, as they appear in commercial databases, into categories that differentiate the availability of healthy options is described here. DESIGN AND SETTING. Commercially available data on food outlets including names, addresses, North American Industry Classification System codes, and associated characteristics was obtained for five New Jersey communities. ANALYSIS. A reclassification methodology was developed using criteria and definitions from the literature to categorize food outlets based on availability of healthy options. Information in the database was supplemented by systematic Internet and key word searches, and from phone calls to food outlets. RESULTS. The methodology resulted in 622 supermarket/grocery stores, 183 convenience stores, and 148 specialty stores in the original data to be reclassified into 58 supermarkets, 30 grocery stores, 692 convenience stores, and 115 specialty stores. Outlets from the original list of 1485 full-service restaurants and 506 limited-service restaurants were reclassified as 563 full-service restaurants and 1247 limited-service restaurants. Reclassification resulted in less than one-seventh the number of supermarkets and grocery stores, more than three times the number of convenience stores, and twice as many limited-service restaurants-a much less healthy profile than the one generated by using exclusively the commercial databases. CONCLUSION. An explicit and replicable strategy is proposed for reclassifying food outlets in commercial databases into categories that differentiate on the basis of healthy food availability. The intent is to contribute towards building a consensus among researchers on definitions used in public health

  10. WOVOdat, A Worldwide Volcano Unrest Database, to Improve Eruption Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiwijayanti, C.; Costa, F.; Win, N. T. Z.; Tan, K.; Newhall, C. G.; Ratdomopurbo, A.

    2015-12-01

    WOVOdat is the World Organization of Volcano Observatories' Database of Volcanic Unrest. An international effort to develop common standards for compiling and storing data on volcanic unrests in a centralized database and freely web-accessible for reference during volcanic crises, comparative studies, and basic research on pre-eruption processes. WOVOdat will be to volcanology as an epidemiological database is to medicine. Despite the large spectrum of monitoring techniques, the interpretation of monitoring data throughout the evolution of the unrest and making timely forecasts remain the most challenging tasks for volcanologists. The field of eruption forecasting is becoming more quantitative, based on the understanding of the pre-eruptive magmatic processes and dynamic interaction between variables that are at play in a volcanic system. Such forecasts must also acknowledge and express the uncertainties, therefore most of current research in this field focused on the application of event tree analysis to reflect multiple possible scenarios and the probability of each scenario. Such forecasts are critically dependent on comprehensive and authoritative global volcano unrest data sets - the very information currently collected in WOVOdat. As the database becomes more complete, Boolean searches, side-by-side digital and thus scalable comparisons of unrest, pattern recognition, will generate reliable results. Statistical distribution obtained from WOVOdat can be then used to estimate the probabilities of each scenario after specific patterns of unrest. We established main web interface for data submission and visualizations, and have now incorporated ~20% of worldwide unrest data into the database, covering more than 100 eruptive episodes. In the upcoming years we will concentrate in acquiring data from volcano observatories develop a robust data query interface, optimizing data mining, and creating tools by which WOVOdat can be used for probabilistic eruption

  11. Chemical annotation of small and peptide-like molecules at the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Young, Jasmine Y; Feng, Zukang; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Sala, Raul; Westbrook, John; Zhuravleva, Marina; Shao, Chenghua; Quesada, Martha; Peisach, Ezra; Berman, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of polymers and their complexes with small molecules in the Protein Data Bank archive (PDB) has continued to increase significantly. To support scientific advancements and ensure the best quality and completeness of the data files over the next 10 years and beyond, the Worldwide PDB partnership that manages the PDB archive is developing a new deposition and annotation system. This system focuses on efficient data capture across all supported experimental methods. The new deposition and annotation system is composed of four major modules that together support all of the processing requirements for a PDB entry. In this article, we describe one such module called the Chemical Component Annotation Tool. This tool uses information from both the Chemical Component Dictionary and Biologically Interesting molecule Reference Dictionary to aid in annotation. Benchmark studies have shown that the Chemical Component Annotation Tool provides significant improvements in processing efficiency and data quality. Database URL: http://wwpdb.org. PMID:24291661

  12. DSSTOX WEBSITE LAUNCH: IMPROVING PUBLIC ACCESS TO DATABASES FOR BUILDING STRUCTURE-TOXICITY PREDICTION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DSSTox Website Launch: Improving Public Access to Databases for Building Structure-Toxicity Prediction Models
    Ann M. Richard
    US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

    Distributed: Decentralized set of standardized, field-delimited databases,...

  13. Collaborative annotation of genes and proteins between UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and dictyBase.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, P; Lane, L; Fey, P; Bridge, A; Poux, S; Auchincloss, A; Axelsen, K; Braconi Quintaje, S; Boutet, E; Brown, P; Coudert, E; Datta, R S; de Lima, W C; de Oliveira Lima, T; Duvaud, S; Farriol-Mathis, N; Ferro Rojas, S; Feuermann, M; Gateau, A; Hinz, U; Hulo, C; James, J; Jimenez, S; Jungo, F; Keller, G; Lemercier, P; Lieberherr, D; Moinat, M; Nikolskaya, A; Pedruzzi, I; Rivoire, C; Roechert, B; Schneider, M; Stanley, E; Tognolli, M; Sjölander, K; Bougueleret, L; Chisholm, R L; Bairoch, A

    2009-01-01

    UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, a curated protein database, and dictyBase, the Model Organism Database for Dictyostelium discoideum, have established a collaboration to improve data sharing. One of the major steps in this effort was the 'Dicty annotation marathon', a week-long exercise with 30 annotators aimed at achieving a major increase in the number of D. discoideum proteins represented in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. The marathon led to the annotation of over 1000 D. discoideum proteins in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Concomitantly, there were a large number of updates in dictyBase concerning gene symbols, protein names and gene models. This exercise demonstrates how UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot can work in very close cooperation with model organism databases and how the annotation of proteins can be accelerated through those collaborations. PMID:20157489

  14. Collaborative annotation of genes and proteins between UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and dictyBase

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, P.; Lane, L.; Fey, P.; Bridge, A.; Poux, S.; Auchincloss, A.; Axelsen, K.; Braconi Quintaje, S.; Boutet, E.; Brown, P.; Coudert, E.; Datta, R.S.; de Lima, W.C.; de Oliveira Lima, T.; Duvaud, S.; Farriol-Mathis, N.; Ferro Rojas, S.; Feuermann, M.; Gateau, A.; Hinz, U.; Hulo, C.; James, J.; Jimenez, S.; Jungo, F.; Keller, G.; Lemercier, P.; Lieberherr, D.; Moinat, M.; Nikolskaya, A.; Pedruzzi, I.; Rivoire, C.; Roechert, B.; Schneider, M.; Stanley, E.; Tognolli, M.; Sjölander, K.; Bougueleret, L.; Chisholm, R.L.; Bairoch, A.

    2009-01-01

    UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, a curated protein database, and dictyBase, the Model Organism Database for Dictyostelium discoideum, have established a collaboration to improve data sharing. One of the major steps in this effort was the ‘Dicty annotation marathon’, a week-long exercise with 30 annotators aimed at achieving a major increase in the number of D. discoideum proteins represented in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. The marathon led to the annotation of over 1000 D. discoideum proteins in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Concomitantly, there were a large number of updates in dictyBase concerning gene symbols, protein names and gene models. This exercise demonstrates how UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot can work in very close cooperation with model organism databases and how the annotation of proteins can be accelerated through those collaborations. PMID:20157489

  15. The national clinical database as an initiative for quality improvement in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Arata; Hirata, Yasutaka; Motomura, Noboru; Miyata, Hiroaki; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    The JCVSD (Japan Cardiovascular Surgery Database) was organized in 2000 to improve the quality of cardiovascular surgery in Japan. Web-based data harvesting on adult cardiac surgery was started (Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database, JACVSD) in 2001, and on congenital heart surgery (Japan Congenital Cardiovascular Surgery Database, JCCVSD) in 2008. Both databases grew to become national databases by the end of 2013. This was influenced by the success of the Society for Thoracic Surgeons' National Database, which contains comparable input items. In 2011, the Japanese Board of Cardiovascular Surgery announced that the JACVSD and JCCVSD data are to be used for board certification, which improved the quality of the first paperless and web-based board certification review undertaken in 2013. These changes led to a further step. In 2011, the National Clinical Database (NCD) was organized to investigate the feasibility of clinical databases in other medical fields, especially surgery. In the NCD, the board certification system of the Japan Surgical Society, the basic association of surgery was set as the first level in the hierarchy of specialties, and nine associations and six board certification systems were set at the second level as subspecialties. The NCD grew rapidly, and now covers 95% of total surgical procedures. The participating associations will release or have released risk models, and studies that use 'big data' from these databases have been published. The national databases have contributed to evidence-based medicine, to the accountability of medical professionals, and to quality assessment and quality improvement of surgery in Japan. PMID:25346898

  16. The National Clinical Database as an Initiative for Quality Improvement in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Arata; Hirata, Yasutaka; Motomura, Noboru; Miyata, Hiroaki; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    The JCVSD (Japan Cardiovascular Surgery Database) was organized in 2000 to improve the quality of cardiovascular surgery in Japan. Web-based data harvesting on adult cardiac surgery was started (Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database, JACVSD) in 2001, and on congenital heart surgery (Japan Congenital Cardiovascular Surgery Database, JCCVSD) in 2008. Both databases grew to become national databases by the end of 2013. This was influenced by the success of the Society for Thoracic Surgeons’ National Database, which contains comparable input items. In 2011, the Japanese Board of Cardiovascular Surgery announced that the JACVSD and JCCVSD data are to be used for board certification, which improved the quality of the first paperless and web-based board certification review undertaken in 2013. These changes led to a further step. In 2011, the National Clinical Database (NCD) was organized to investigate the feasibility of clinical databases in other medical fields, especially surgery. In the NCD, the board certification system of the Japan Surgical Society, the basic association of surgery was set as the first level in the hierarchy of specialties, and nine associations and six board certification systems were set at the second level as subspecialties. The NCD grew rapidly, and now covers 95% of total surgical procedures. The participating associations will release or have released risk models, and studies that use ‘big data’ from these databases have been published. The national databases have contributed to evidence-based medicine, to the accountability of medical professionals, and to quality assessment and quality improvement of surgery in Japan. PMID:25346898

  17. PolyQ 2.0: an improved version of PolyQ, a database of human polyglutamine proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Nagel, Jeremy; Androulakis, Steve; Song, Jiangning; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeats are involved in human neurodegenerative diseases, via a gain-of-function mechanism of neuronal toxicity involving protein conformational changes that result in the formation and deposition of β-sheet-rich aggregates. Aggregation is dependent on the context and properties of the host protein, such as domain context and location of the repeat tract. In order to explore this relationship in greater detail, here we describe PolyQ 2.0, an updated database that provides a comprehensive knowledgebase for human polyQ proteins. Compared with the previous PolyQ database, our new database provides a variety of substantial updates including detailed biological annotations and search options. Biological annotations in terms of domain context information, protein structural and functional annotation, single point mutations, predicted disordered regions, protein–protein interaction partners, metabolic/signaling pathways, post-translational modification sites and evolutionary information are made available. Several new database functionalities have also been provided, including search using multiple/combinatory keywords, and submission of new data entries. Also, several third-party plug-ins are employed to enhance data visualization in PolyQ 2.0. In PolyQ 2.0 the proteins are reclassified into 3 new categories and contain 9 reviewed disease-associated polyQ proteins, 105 reviewed non-disease polyQ proteins and 146 un-reviewed polyQ proteins (reviewed by UniProt curators). We envisage that this updated database will be a useful resource for functional and structural investigation of human polyQ proteins. Database URL: http://lightning.med.monash.edu/polyq2/ PMID:26980520

  18. PolyQ 2.0: an improved version of PolyQ, a database of human polyglutamine proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Nagel, Jeremy; Androulakis, Steve; Song, Jiangning; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-01-01

    Proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeats are involved in human neurodegenerative diseases, via a gain-of-function mechanism of neuronal toxicity involving protein conformational changes that result in the formation and deposition of β-sheet-rich aggregates. Aggregation is dependent on the context and properties of the host protein, such as domain context and location of the repeat tract. In order to explore this relationship in greater detail, here we describe PolyQ 2.0, an updated database that provides a comprehensive knowledgebase for human polyQ proteins. Compared with the previous PolyQ database, our new database provides a variety of substantial updates including detailed biological annotations and search options. Biological annotations in terms of domain context information, protein structural and functional annotation, single point mutations, predicted disordered regions, protein-protein interaction partners, metabolic/signaling pathways, post-translational modification sites and evolutionary information are made available. Several new database functionalities have also been provided, including search using multiple/combinatory keywords, and submission of new data entries. Also, several third-party plug-ins are employed to enhance data visualization in PolyQ 2.0. In PolyQ 2.0 the proteins are reclassified into 3 new categories and contain 9 reviewed disease-associated polyQ proteins, 105 reviewed non-disease polyQ proteins and 146 un-reviewed polyQ proteins (reviewed by UniProt curators). We envisage that this updated database will be a useful resource for functional and structural investigation of human polyQ proteins. Database URL: http://lightning.med.monash.edu/polyq2/. PMID:26980520

  19. eggNOG 4.5: a hierarchical orthology framework with improved functional annotations for eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral sequences

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Szklarczyk, Damian; Forslund, Kristoffer; Cook, Helen; Heller, Davide; Walter, Mathias C.; Rattei, Thomas; Mende, Daniel R.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Kuhn, Michael; Jensen, Lars Juhl; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    eggNOG is a public resource that provides Orthologous Groups (OGs) of proteins at different taxonomic levels, each with integrated and summarized functional annotations. Developments since the latest public release include changes to the algorithm for creating OGs across taxonomic levels, making nested groups hierarchically consistent. This allows for a better propagation of functional terms across nested OGs and led to the novel annotation of 95 890 previously uncharacterized OGs, increasing overall annotation coverage from 67% to 72%. The functional annotations of OGs have been expanded to also provide Gene Ontology terms, KEGG pathways and SMART/Pfam domains for each group. Moreover, eggNOG now provides pairwise orthology relationships within OGs based on analysis of phylogenetic trees. We have also incorporated a framework for quickly mapping novel sequences to OGs based on precomputed HMM profiles. Finally, eggNOG version 4.5 incorporates a novel data set spanning 2605 viral OGs, covering 5228 proteins from 352 viral proteomes. All data are accessible for bulk downloading, as a web-service, and through a completely redesigned web interface. The new access points provide faster searches and a number of new browsing and visualization capabilities, facilitating the needs of both experts and less experienced users. eggNOG v4.5 is available at http://eggnog.embl.de. PMID:26582926

  20. eggNOG 4.5: a hierarchical orthology framework with improved functional annotations for eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral sequences.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Szklarczyk, Damian; Forslund, Kristoffer; Cook, Helen; Heller, Davide; Walter, Mathias C; Rattei, Thomas; Mende, Daniel R; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Kuhn, Michael; Jensen, Lars Juhl; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    eggNOG is a public resource that provides Orthologous Groups (OGs) of proteins at different taxonomic levels, each with integrated and summarized functional annotations. Developments since the latest public release include changes to the algorithm for creating OGs across taxonomic levels, making nested groups hierarchically consistent. This allows for a better propagation of functional terms across nested OGs and led to the novel annotation of 95 890 previously uncharacterized OGs, increasing overall annotation coverage from 67% to 72%. The functional annotations of OGs have been expanded to also provide Gene Ontology terms, KEGG pathways and SMART/Pfam domains for each group. Moreover, eggNOG now provides pairwise orthology relationships within OGs based on analysis of phylogenetic trees. We have also incorporated a framework for quickly mapping novel sequences to OGs based on precomputed HMM profiles. Finally, eggNOG version 4.5 incorporates a novel data set spanning 2605 viral OGs, covering 5228 proteins from 352 viral proteomes. All data are accessible for bulk downloading, as a web-service, and through a completely redesigned web interface. The new access points provide faster searches and a number of new browsing and visualization capabilities, facilitating the needs of both experts and less experienced users. eggNOG v4.5 is available at http://eggnog.embl.de. PMID:26582926

  1. Mouse Phenome Database

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Stephen C.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  2. Mouse phenome database.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Stephen C; Bult, Carol J; Bogue, Molly A

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  3. Improving the quality of NMR and crystallographic protein structures by means of a conformational database potential derived from structure databases.

    PubMed

    Kuszewski, J; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1996-06-01

    A new conformational database potential involving dihedral angle relationships in databases of high-resolution highly refined protein crystal structures is presented as a method for improving the quality of structures generated from NMR data. The rationale for this procedure is based on the observation that uncertainties in the description of the nonbonded contacts present a key limiting factor in the attainable accuracy of protein NMR structures and that the nonbonded interaction terms presently used have poor discriminatory power between high- and low-probability local conformations. The idea behind the conformational database potential is to restrict sampling during simulated annealing refinement to conformations that are likely to be energetically possible by effectively limiting the choices of dihedral angles to those that are known to be physically realizable. In this manner, the variability in the structures produced by this method is primarily a function of the experimental restraints, rather than an artifact of a poor nonbonded interaction model. We tested this approach with the experimental NMR data (comprising an average of about 30 restraints per residue and consisting of interproton distances, torsion angles, 3JHN alpha coupling constants, and 13C chemical shifts) used previously to calculate the solution structure of reduced human thioredoxin (Qin J, Clore GM, Gronenborn AM, 1994, Structure 2:503-522). Incorporation of the conformational database potential into the target function used for refinement (which also includes terms for the experimental restraints, covalent geometry, and nonbonded interactions in the form of either a repulsive, repulsive-attractive, or 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential) results in a significant improvement in various quantitative measures of quality (Ramachandran plot, side-chain torsion angles, overall packing). This is achieved without compromising the agreement with the experimental restraints and the deviations from

  4. Towards a Library of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for (meta)genomic annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Cochrane, Guy; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gussman, Aaron; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Klimke, William; Kyrpides, Nikos; Madupu, Ramana; Markowitz, Victor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Thomson, Nick; White, Owen

    2008-04-01

    Genome annotations describe the features of genomes and accompany sequences in genome databases. The methodologies used to generate genome annotation are diverse and typically vary amongst groups. Descriptions of the annotation procedure are helpful in interpreting genome annotation data. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for genome annotation describe the processes that generate genome annotations. Some groups are currently documenting procedures but standards are lacking for structure and content of annotation SOPs. In addition, there is no central repository to store and disseminate procedures and protocols for genome annotation. We highlight the importance of SOPs for genome annotation and endorse a central online repository of SOPs.

  5. UCSC Data Integrator and Variant Annotation Integrator

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, Angie S.; Raney, Brian J.; Speir, Matthew L.; Rhead, Brooke; Casper, Jonathan; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Two new tools on the UCSC Genome Browser web site provide improved ways of combining information from multiple datasets, optionally including the user's own custom track data and/or data from track hubs. The Data Integrator combines columns from multiple data tracks, showing all items from the first track along with overlapping items from the other tracks. The Variant Annotation Integrator is tailored to adding functional annotations to variant calls; it offers a more restricted set of underlying data tracks but adds predictions of each variant's consequences for any overlapping or nearby gene transcript. When available, it optionally adds additional annotations including effect prediction scores from dbNSFP for missense mutations, ENCODE regulatory summary tracks and conservation scores. Availability and implementation: The web tools are freely available at http://genome.ucsc.edu/ and the underlying database is available for download at http://hgdownload.cse.ucsc.edu/. The software (written in C and Javascript) is available from https://genome-store.ucsc.edu/ and is freely available for academic and non-profit usage; commercial users must obtain a license. Contact: angie@soe.ucsc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26740527

  6. Ranking Biomedical Annotations with Annotator's Semantic Relevancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  7. Ranking biomedical annotations with annotator's semantic relevancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aihua

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  8. Improvements to the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of data uploading and editing, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Online data editing is now available and the need for proprietary spreadsheet software is therefore entirely negated. The data owner can change values in the database or delete entries through an HTML 5 web interface that resembles typical spreadsheets in behavior and uses. Additive uploading now allows for additions to data sets to be uploaded with a simple drag and drop interface. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the facility to use them in complex combinations. A comprehensive summary view of a search result has been added for increased quick data comprehension while a raw data view is available if one desires to see all data columns as stored in the database. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. MagIC data associated with individual contributions or from online searches may be downloaded in the tab delimited MagIC text file format for susbsequent offline use and analysis. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  9. The Protein Information Resource: an integrated public resource of functional annotation of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cathy H.; Huang, Hongzhan; Arminski, Leslie; Castro-Alvear, Jorge; Chen, Yongxing; Hu, Zhang-Zhi; Ledley, Robert S.; Lewis, Kali C.; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Orcutt, Bruce C.; Suzek, Baris E.; Tsugita, Akira; Vinayaka, C. R.; Yeh, Lai-Su L.; Zhang, Jian; Barker, Winona C.

    2002-01-01

    The Protein Information Resource (PIR) serves as an integrated public resource of functional annotation of protein data to support genomic/proteomic research and scientific discovery. The PIR, in collaboration with the Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS) and the Japan International Protein Information Database (JIPID), produces the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database (PSD), the major annotated protein sequence database in the public domain, containing about 250 000 proteins. To improve protein annotation and the coverage of experimentally validated data, a bibliography submission system is developed for scientists to submit, categorize and retrieve literature information. Comprehensive protein information is available from iProClass, which includes family classification at the superfamily, domain and motif levels, structural and functional features of proteins, as well as cross-references to over 40 biological databases. To provide timely and comprehensive protein data with source attribution, we have introduced a non-redundant reference protein database, PIR-NREF. The database consists of about 800 000 proteins collected from PIR-PSD, SWISS-PROT, TrEMBL, GenPept, RefSeq and PDB, with composite protein names and literature data. To promote database interoperability, we provide XML data distribution and open database schema, and adopt common ontologies. The PIR web site (http://pir.georgetown.edu/) features data mining and sequence analysis tools for information retrieval and functional identification of proteins based on both sequence and annotation information. The PIR databases and other files are also available by FTP (ftp://nbrfa.georgetown.edu/pir_databases). PMID:11752247

  10. Curation of the genome annotation of Pichia pastoris (Komagataella phaffii) CBS7435 from gene level to protein function.

    PubMed

    Valli, Minoska; Tatto, Nadine E; Peymann, Armin; Gruber, Clemens; Landes, Nils; Ekker, Heinz; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte; Graf, Alexandra B

    2016-09-01

    As manually curated and non-automated BLAST analysis of the published Pichia pastoris genome sequences revealed many differences between the gene annotations of the strains GS115 and CBS7435, RNA-Seq analysis, supported by proteomics, was performed to improve the genome annotation. Detailed analysis of sequence alignment and protein domain predictions were made to extend the functional genome annotation to all P. pastoris sequences. This allowed the identification of 492 new ORFs, 4916 hypothetical UTRs and the correction of 341 incorrect ORF predictions, which were mainly due to the presence of upstream ATG or erroneous intron predictions. Moreover, 175 previously erroneously annotated ORFs need to be removed from the annotation. In total, we have annotated 5325 ORFs. Regarding the functionality of those genes, we improved all gene and protein descriptions. Thereby, the percentage of ORFs with functional annotation was increased from 48% to 73%. Furthermore, we defined functional groups, covering 25 biological cellular processes of interest, by grouping all genes that are part of the defined process. All data are presented in the newly launched genome browser and database available at www.pichiagenome.org In summary, we present a wide spectrum of curation of the P. pastoris genome annotation from gene level to protein function. PMID:27388471

  11. Lessons learned while building the Deepwater Horizon Database: Toward improved data sharing in coastal science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thessen, Anne E.; McGinnis, Sean; North, Elizabeth W.

    2016-02-01

    Process studies and coupled-model validation efforts in geosciences often require integration of multiple data types across time and space. For example, improved prediction of hydrocarbon fate and transport is an important societal need which fundamentally relies upon synthesis of oceanography and hydrocarbon chemistry. Yet, there are no publically accessible databases which integrate these diverse data types in a georeferenced format, nor are there guidelines for developing such a database. The objective of this research was to analyze the process of building one such database to provide baseline information on data sources and data sharing and to document the challenges and solutions that arose during this major undertaking. The resulting Deepwater Horizon Database was approximately 2.4 GB in size and contained over 8 million georeferenced data points collected from industry, government databases, volunteer networks, and individual researchers. The major technical challenges that were overcome were reconciliation of terms, units, and quality flags which were necessary to effectively integrate the disparate data sets. Assembling this database required the development of relationships with individual researchers and data managers which often involved extensive e-mail contacts. The average number of emails exchanged per data set was 7.8. Of the 95 relevant data sets that were discovered, 38 (40%) were obtained, either in whole or in part. Over one third (36%) of the requests for data went unanswered. The majority of responses were received after the first request (64%) and within the first week of the first request (67%). Although fewer than half of the potentially relevant datasets were incorporated into the database, the level of sharing (40%) was high compared to some other disciplines where sharing can be as low as 10%. Our suggestions for building integrated databases include budgeting significant time for e-mail exchanges, being cognizant of the cost versus

  12. Gene Ontology annotations and resources.

    PubMed

    Blake, J A; Dolan, M; Drabkin, H; Hill, D P; Li, Ni; Sitnikov, D; Bridges, S; Burgess, S; Buza, T; McCarthy, F; Peddinti, D; Pillai, L; Carbon, S; Dietze, H; Ireland, A; Lewis, S E; Mungall, C J; Gaudet, P; Chrisholm, R L; Fey, P; Kibbe, W A; Basu, S; Siegele, D A; McIntosh, B K; Renfro, D P; Zweifel, A E; Hu, J C; Brown, N H; Tweedie, S; Alam-Faruque, Y; Apweiler, R; Auchinchloss, A; Axelsen, K; Bely, B; Blatter, M -C; Bonilla, C; Bouguerleret, L; Boutet, E; Breuza, L; Bridge, A; Chan, W M; Chavali, G; Coudert, E; Dimmer, E; Estreicher, A; Famiglietti, L; Feuermann, M; Gos, A; Gruaz-Gumowski, N; Hieta, R; Hinz, C; Hulo, C; Huntley, R; James, J; Jungo, F; Keller, G; Laiho, K; Legge, D; Lemercier, P; Lieberherr, D; Magrane, M; Martin, M J; Masson, P; Mutowo-Muellenet, P; O'Donovan, C; Pedruzzi, I; Pichler, K; Poggioli, D; Porras Millán, P; Poux, S; Rivoire, C; Roechert, B; Sawford, T; Schneider, M; Stutz, A; Sundaram, S; Tognolli, M; Xenarios, I; Foulgar, R; Lomax, J; Roncaglia, P; Khodiyar, V K; Lovering, R C; Talmud, P J; Chibucos, M; Giglio, M Gwinn; Chang, H -Y; Hunter, S; McAnulla, C; Mitchell, A; Sangrador, A; Stephan, R; Harris, M A; Oliver, S G; Rutherford, K; Wood, V; Bahler, J; Lock, A; Kersey, P J; McDowall, D M; Staines, D M; Dwinell, M; Shimoyama, M; Laulederkind, S; Hayman, T; Wang, S -J; Petri, V; Lowry, T; D'Eustachio, P; Matthews, L; Balakrishnan, R; Binkley, G; Cherry, J M; Costanzo, M C; Dwight, S S; Engel, S R; Fisk, D G; Hitz, B C; Hong, E L; Karra, K; Miyasato, S R; Nash, R S; Park, J; Skrzypek, M S; Weng, S; Wong, E D; Berardini, T Z; Huala, E; Mi, H; Thomas, P D; Chan, J; Kishore, R; Sternberg, P; Van Auken, K; Howe, D; Westerfield, M

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium (GOC, http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that classifies gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. Over the past year, the GOC has implemented several processes to increase the quantity, quality and specificity of GO annotations. First, the number of manual, literature-based annotations has grown at an increasing rate. Second, as a result of a new 'phylogenetic annotation' process, manually reviewed, homology-based annotations are becoming available for a broad range of species. Third, the quality of GO annotations has been improved through a streamlined process for, and automated quality checks of, GO annotations deposited by different annotation groups. Fourth, the consistency and correctness of the ontology itself has increased by using automated reasoning tools. Finally, the GO has been expanded not only to cover new areas of biology through focused interaction with experts, but also to capture greater specificity in all areas of the ontology using tools for adding new combinatorial terms. The GOC works closely with other ontology developers to support integrated use of terminologies. The GOC supports its user community through the use of e-mail lists, social media and web-based resources. PMID:23161678

  13. USQA Health Profile Database as a tool for health plan quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Hanchak, N A; Murray, J F; Hirsch, A; McDermott, P D; Schlackman, N

    1996-01-01

    Managed care organizations are in a unique position to evaluate and improve the quality of care delivered to their defined memberships. Traditionally, health services delivery has been claims-focused. We describe a potentially richer, patient-centered approach, whereby patients with certain chronic diseases are first identified and then used as the unit of analysis. U.S. Quality Algorithms (USQA), a subsidiary of U.S. Healthcare (USHC) based in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, has developed selection criteria for 36 different chronic diseases and a new database, the USQA Health Profile Database (HPD), to identify and archive patients with those diseases. Examples of how this approach and database can be used as a quality tool are demonstrated. PMID:10157263

  14. Computational algorithms to predict Gene Ontology annotations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene function annotations, which are associations between a gene and a term of a controlled vocabulary describing gene functional features, are of paramount importance in modern biology. Datasets of these annotations, such as the ones provided by the Gene Ontology Consortium, are used to design novel biological experiments and interpret their results. Despite their importance, these sources of information have some known issues. They are incomplete, since biological knowledge is far from being definitive and it rapidly evolves, and some erroneous annotations may be present. Since the curation process of novel annotations is a costly procedure, both in economical and time terms, computational tools that can reliably predict likely annotations, and thus quicken the discovery of new gene annotations, are very useful. Methods We used a set of computational algorithms and weighting schemes to infer novel gene annotations from a set of known ones. We used the latent semantic analysis approach, implementing two popular algorithms (Latent Semantic Indexing and Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis) and propose a novel method, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis, which adds a clustering step on the set of considered genes. Furthermore, we propose the improvement of these algorithms by weighting the annotations in the input set. Results We tested our methods and their weighted variants on the Gene Ontology annotation sets of three model organism genes (Bos taurus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster ). The methods showed their ability in predicting novel gene annotations and the weighting procedures demonstrated to lead to a valuable improvement, although the obtained results vary according to the dimension of the input annotation set and the considered algorithm. Conclusions Out of the three considered methods, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis is the one that provides better results. In particular, when coupled with a proper

  15. An atlas of bovine gene expression reveals novel distinctive tissue characteristics and evidence for improving genome annotation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A comprehensive transcriptome survey, or gene atlas, provides information essential for a complete understanding of the genomic biology of an organism. We present an atlas of RNA abundance for 92 adult, juvenile and fetal cattle tissues and three cattle cell lines. Results The Bovine Gene Atlas was generated from 7.2 million unique digital gene expression tag sequences (300.2 million total raw tag sequences), from which 1.59 million unique tag sequences were identified that mapped to the draft bovine genome accounting for 85% of the total raw tag abundance. Filtering these tags yielded 87,764 unique tag sequences that unambiguously mapped to 16,517 annotated protein-coding loci in the draft genome accounting for 45% of the total raw tag abundance. Clustering of tissues based on tag abundance profiles generally confirmed ontology classification based on anatomy. There were 5,429 constitutively expressed loci and 3,445 constitutively expressed unique tag sequences mapping outside annotated gene boundaries that represent a resource for enhancing current gene models. Physical measures such as inferred transcript length or antisense tag abundance identified tissues with atypical transcriptional tag profiles. We report for the first time the tissue-specific variation in the proportion of mitochondrial transcriptional tag abundance. Conclusions The Bovine Gene Atlas is the deepest and broadest transcriptome survey of any livestock genome to date. Commonalities and variation in sense and antisense transcript tag profiles identified in different tissues facilitate the examination of the relationship between gene expression, tissue, and gene function. PMID:20961407

  16. TriAnnot: A Versatile and High Performance Pipeline for the Automated Annotation of Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Philippe; Guilhot, Nicolas; Sakai, Hiroaki; Bernard, Aurélien; Choulet, Frédéric; Theil, Sébastien; Reboux, Sébastien; Amano, Naoki; Flutre, Timothée; Pelegrin, Céline; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Seidel, Michael; Giacomoni, Franck; Reichstadt, Mathieu; Alaux, Michael; Gicquello, Emmanuelle; Legeai, Fabrice; Cerutti, Lorenzo; Numa, Hisataka; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Mayer, Klaus; Itoh, Takeshi; Quesneville, Hadi; Feuillet, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In support of the international effort to obtain a reference sequence of the bread wheat genome and to provide plant communities dealing with large and complex genomes with a versatile, easy-to-use online automated tool for annotation, we have developed the TriAnnot pipeline. Its modular architecture allows for the annotation and masking of transposable elements, the structural, and functional annotation of protein-coding genes with an evidence-based quality indexing, and the identification of conserved non-coding sequences and molecular markers. The TriAnnot pipeline is parallelized on a 712 CPU computing cluster that can run a 1-Gb sequence annotation in less than 5 days. It is accessible through a web interface for small scale analyses or through a server for large scale annotations. The performance of TriAnnot was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and general fitness using curated reference sequence sets from rice and wheat. In less than 8 h, TriAnnot was able to predict more than 83% of the 3,748 CDS from rice chromosome 1 with a fitness of 67.4%. On a set of 12 reference Mb-sized contigs from wheat chromosome 3B, TriAnnot predicted and annotated 93.3% of the genes among which 54% were perfectly identified in accordance with the reference annotation. It also allowed the curation of 12 genes based on new biological evidences, increasing the percentage of perfect gene prediction to 63%. TriAnnot systematically showed a higher fitness than other annotation pipelines that are not improved for wheat. As it is easily adaptable to the annotation of other plant genomes, TriAnnot should become a useful resource for the annotation of large and complex genomes in the future. PMID:22645565

  17. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, David Charles; Severin, Jessica

    2016-07-19

    There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

  18. Gene Ontology Annotations and Resources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium (GOC, http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that classifies gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. Over the past year, the GOC has implemented several processes to increase the quantity, quality and specificity of GO annotations. First, the number of manual, literature-based annotations has grown at an increasing rate. Second, as a result of a new ‘phylogenetic annotation’ process, manually reviewed, homology-based annotations are becoming available for a broad range of species. Third, the quality of GO annotations has been improved through a streamlined process for, and automated quality checks of, GO annotations deposited by different annotation groups. Fourth, the consistency and correctness of the ontology itself has increased by using automated reasoning tools. Finally, the GO has been expanded not only to cover new areas of biology through focused interaction with experts, but also to capture greater specificity in all areas of the ontology using tools for adding new combinatorial terms. The GOC works closely with other ontology developers to support integrated use of terminologies. The GOC supports its user community through the use of e-mail lists, social media and web-based resources. PMID:23161678

  19. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2014 update

    PubMed Central

    Karolchik, Donna; Barber, Galt P.; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Cline, Melissa S.; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A.; Heitner, Steve; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Learned, Katrina; Lee, Brian T.; Li, Chin H.; Raney, Brian J.; Rhead, Brooke; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Sloan, Cricket A.; Speir, Matthew L.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2014-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) offers online public access to a growing database of genomic sequence and annotations for a large collection of organisms, primarily vertebrates, with an emphasis on the human and mouse genomes. The Browser’s web-based tools provide an integrated environment for visualizing, comparing, analysing and sharing both publicly available and user-generated genomic data sets. As of September 2013, the database contained genomic sequence and a basic set of annotation ‘tracks’ for ∼90 organisms. Significant new annotations include a 60-species multiple alignment conservation track on the mouse, updated UCSC Genes tracks for human and mouse, and several new sets of variation and ENCODE data. New software tools include a Variant Annotation Integrator that returns predicted functional effects of a set of variants uploaded as a custom track, an extension to UCSC Genes that displays haplotype alleles for protein-coding genes and an expansion of data hubs that includes the capability to display remotely hosted user-provided assembly sequence in addition to annotation data. To improve European access, we have added a Genome Browser mirror (http://genome-euro.ucsc.edu) hosted at Bielefeld University in Germany. PMID:24270787

  20. Support Vector Machines for Improved Peptide Identification from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Database Search

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2009-05-06

    Accurate identification of peptides is a current challenge in mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics. The standard approach uses a search routine to compare tandem mass spectra to a database of peptides associated with the target organism. These database search routines yield multiple metrics associated with the quality of the mapping of the experimental spectrum to the theoretical spectrum of a peptide. The structure of these results make separating correct from false identifications difficult and has created a false identification problem. Statistical confidence scores are an approach to battle this false positive problem that has led to significant improvements in peptide identification. We have shown that machine learning, specifically support vector machine (SVM), is an effective approach to separating true peptide identifications from false ones. The SVM-based peptide statistical scoring method transforms a peptide into a vector representation based on database search metrics to train and validate the SVM. In practice, following the database search routine, a peptides is denoted in its vector representation and the SVM generates a single statistical score that is then used to classify presence or absence in the sample

  1. An extended bioreaction database that significantly improves reconstruction and analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Michael; Sun, Jibin; Kamphans, Tom; Fekete, Sándor P; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-11-01

    The bioreaction database established by Ma and Zeng (Bioinformatics, 2003, 19, 270-277) for in silico reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks has been widely used. Based on more recent information in the reference databases KEGG LIGAND and Brenda, we upgrade the bioreaction database in this work by almost doubling the number of reactions from 3565 to 6851. Over 70% of the reactions have been manually updated/revised in terms of reversibility, reactant pairs, currency metabolites and error correction. For the first time, 41 spontaneous sugar mutarotation reactions are introduced into the biochemical database. The upgrade significantly improves the reconstruction of genome scale metabolic networks. Many gaps or missing biochemical links can be recovered, as exemplified with three model organisms Homo sapiens, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli. The topological parameters of the constructed networks were also largely affected, however, the overall network structure remains scale-free. Furthermore, we consider the problem of computing biologically feasible shortest paths in reconstructed metabolic networks. We show that these paths are hard to compute and present solutions to find such paths in networks of small and medium size. PMID:21952610

  2. HERVd: the Human Endogenous RetroViruses Database: update.

    PubMed

    Paces, Jan; Pavlícek, Adam; Zika, Radek; Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Jurka, Jerzy; Paces, Václav

    2004-01-01

    An elaboration of HERVd (http://herv.img.cas.cz) is being carried out in two directions. One of them is the integration and better classification of families that diverge considerably from typical retroviral genomes. This leads to a more precise identification of members with individual families. The second improvement is better accessibility of the database and connection with human genome annotation. PMID:14681356

  3. Improvement of the Database on the 1.13-microns Band of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Schwenke, David W.; Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Varanasi, Prasad; Freedman, Richard S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Corrections have recently been reported (Giver et al.) on the short-wave (visible and near-infrared) line intensities of water vapor that were catalogued in the spectroscopic database known as HITRAN. These updates have been posted on www.hitran.com, and are being used to reanalyze the polar stratospheric absorption in the 0.94 microns band as observed in POAM. We are currently investigating additional improvement in the 1.13 microns band using data obtained by us with an absorption path length of 1.107 km and 4 torr of water vapor and the ab initio line list of Partridge and Schwenke (needs ref). We are proposing the following four types of improvement of the HITRAN database in this region: 1) HITRAN has nearly 200 lines in this region without proper assignments of rotational quantum levels. Nearly all of them can now be assigned. 2) We have measured positions of the observable H2O-17 and H2O-18 lines. These lines in HITRAN currently have approximate positions based upon rather aged computations. 3) Some additional lines are observed and assigned which should be included in the database. 4) Corrections are necessary for the lower state energies E" for the HITRAN lines of the 121-010 "hot" band.

  4. Improved classification of mass spectrometry database search results using newer machine learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Ulintz, Peter J; Zhu, Ji; Qin, Zhaohui S; Andrews, Philip C

    2006-03-01

    Manual analysis of mass spectrometry data is a current bottleneck in high throughput proteomics. In particular, the need to manually validate the results of mass spectrometry database searching algorithms can be prohibitively time-consuming. Development of software tools that attempt to quantify the confidence in the assignment of a protein or peptide identity to a mass spectrum is an area of active interest. We sought to extend work in this area by investigating the potential of recent machine learning algorithms to improve the accuracy of these approaches and as a flexible framework for accommodating new data features. Specifically we demonstrated the ability of boosting and random forest approaches to improve the discrimination of true hits from false positive identifications in the results of mass spectrometry database search engines compared with thresholding and other machine learning approaches. We accommodated additional attributes obtainable from database search results, including a factor addressing proton mobility. Performance was evaluated using publically available electrospray data and a new collection of MALDI data generated from purified human reference proteins. PMID:16321970

  5. Improving Hip Fracture Care in Ireland: A Preliminary Report of the Irish Hip Fracture Database

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Adam; Brent, Louise; Hurson, Conor; Ahern, Emer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Hip fractures are common injuries in the older persons, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. The Irish Hip Fracture Database (IHFD) was implemented to monitor standards of care against international standards. Methods. The IHFD is a clinically led web-based audit. We summarize the data collected on hip fractures from April 2012 to March 2013 from 8 centres. Results. There were 843 patients with the majority being (70%) female. The 80–89-year age group accounted for the majority of fractures (44%). Most (71%) sustained a fall at home. Intertrochanteric fractures (40%) were most common. Only 28% were admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 4 hours. The majority (97%) underwent surgery with 44% having surgery within 36 hours. Medical optimization (35%) and lack of theatre space (26%) accounted for most of the surgical delay. While 29% were discharged home, 33% were discharged to a nursing home or other long-stay facilities. There was a 4% in-hospital mortality rate. Conclusions. Several key areas in both the database and aspects of patient care needing improvement have been highlighted. The implementation of similar databases has led to improved hip fracture care in other countries and we believe this can be replicated in Ireland. PMID:25548713

  6. The SILVA ribosomal RNA gene database project: improved data processing and web-based tools

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Christian; Pruesse, Elmar; Yilmaz, Pelin; Gerken, Jan; Schweer, Timmy; Yarza, Pablo; Peplies, Jörg; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2013-01-01

    SILVA (from Latin silva, forest, http://www.arb-silva.de) is a comprehensive web resource for up to date, quality-controlled databases of aligned ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences from the Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota domains and supplementary online services. The referred database release 111 (July 2012) contains 3 194 778 small subunit and 288 717 large subunit rRNA gene sequences. Since the initial description of the project, substantial new features have been introduced, including advanced quality control procedures, an improved rRNA gene aligner, online tools for probe and primer evaluation and optimized browsing, searching and downloading on the website. Furthermore, the extensively curated SILVA taxonomy and the new non-redundant SILVA datasets provide an ideal reference for high-throughput classification of data from next-generation sequencing approaches. PMID:23193283

  7. MicroScope: a platform for microbial genome annotation and comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vallenet, D.; Engelen, S.; Mornico, D.; Cruveiller, S.; Fleury, L.; Lajus, A.; Rouy, Z.; Roche, D.; Salvignol, G.; Scarpelli, C.; Médigue, C.

    2009-01-01

    The initial outcome of genome sequencing is the creation of long text strings written in a four letter alphabet. The role of in silico sequence analysis is to assist biologists in the act of associating biological knowledge with these sequences, allowing investigators to make inferences and predictions that can be tested experimentally. A wide variety of software is available to the scientific community, and can be used to identify genomic objects, before predicting their biological functions. However, only a limited number of biologically interesting features can be revealed from an isolated sequence. Comparative genomics tools, on the other hand, by bringing together the information contained in numerous genomes simultaneously, allow annotators to make inferences based on the idea that evolution and natural selection are central to the definition of all biological processes. We have developed the MicroScope platform in order to offer a web-based framework for the systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotation and comparative analysis (http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/microscope). Starting with the description of the flow chart of the annotation processes implemented in the MicroScope pipeline, and the development of traditional and novel microbial annotation and comparative analysis tools, this article emphasizes the essential role of expert annotation as a complement of automatic annotation. Several examples illustrate the use of implemented tools for the review and curation of annotations of both new and publicly available microbial genomes within MicroScope’s rich integrated genome framework. The platform is used as a viewer in order to browse updated annotation information of available microbial genomes (more than 440 organisms to date), and in the context of new annotation projects (117 bacterial genomes). The human expertise gathered in the MicroScope database (about 280,000 independent annotations) contributes to improve the quality of

  8. Crowd-sourced annotation of ecg signals using contextual information.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tingting; Johnson, Alistair E W; Behar, Joachim; Clifford, Gari D

    2014-04-01

    For medical applications, the ground truth is ascertained through manual labels by clinical experts. However, significant inter-observer variability and various human biases limit accuracy. A probabilistic framework addresses these issues by comparing aggregated human and automated labels to provide a reliable ground truth, with no prior knowledge of the individual performance. As an alternative to median or mean voting strategies, novel contextual features (signal quality and physiology) were introduced to allow the Probabilistic Label Aggregator (PLA) to weight an algorithm or human based on its performance. As a proof of concept, the PLA was applied to QT interval (pro-arrhythmic indicator) estimation from the electrocardiogram using labels from 20 humans and 48 algorithms crowd-sourced from the 2006 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge database. For automatic annotations, the root mean square error of the PLA was 13.97 ± 0.46 ms, significantly outperforming the best Challenge entry (16.36 ms) as well as mean and median voting strategies (17.67 ± 0.56 ms and 14.44 ± 0.52 ms respectively with p < 0.05). When selecting three annotators, the PLA improved the annotation accuracy over median aggregation by 10.7% for human annotators and 14.4% for automated algorithms. The PLA could therefore provide an improved "gold standard" for medical annotation tasks even when ground truth is not available. PMID:24368593

  9. Novel definition files for human GeneChips based on GeneAnnot

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Francesco; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Coppe, Alessandro; Sirota, Alexandra; Safran, Marilyn; Shmoish, Michael; Ferrari, Sergio; Lancet, Doron; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    Background Improvements in genome sequence annotation revealed discrepancies in the original probeset/gene assignment in Affymetrix microarray and the existence of differences between annotations and effective alignments of probes and transcription products. In the current generation of Affymetrix human GeneChips, most probesets include probes matching transcripts from more than one gene and probes which do not match any transcribed sequence. Results We developed a novel set of custom Chip Definition Files (CDF) and the corresponding Bioconductor libraries for Affymetrix human GeneChips, based on the information contained in the GeneAnnot database. GeneAnnot-based CDFs are composed of unique custom-probesets, including only probes matching a single gene. Conclusion GeneAnnot-based custom CDFs solve the problem of a reliable reconstruction of expression levels and eliminate the existence of more than one probeset per gene, which often leads to discordant expression signals for the same transcript when gene differential expression is the focus of the analysis. GeneAnnot CDFs are freely distributed and fully compliant with Affymetrix standards and all available software for gene expression analysis. The CDF libraries are available from , along with supplementary information (CDF libraries, installation guidelines and R code, CDF statistics, and analysis results). PMID:18005434

  10. The Gene Ontology's Reference Genome Project: A Unified Framework for Functional Annotation across Species

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) is a collaborative effort that provides structured vocabularies for annotating the molecular function, biological role, and cellular location of gene products in a highly systematic way and in a species-neutral manner with the aim of unifying the representation of gene function across different organisms. Each contributing member of the GO Consortium independently associates GO terms to gene products from the organism(s) they are annotating. Here we introduce the Reference Genome project, which brings together those independent efforts into a unified framework based on the evolutionary relationships between genes in these different organisms. The Reference Genome project has two primary goals: to increase the depth and breadth of annotations for genes in each of the organisms in the project, and to create data sets and tools that enable other genome annotation efforts to infer GO annotations for homologous genes in their organisms. In addition, the project has several important incidental benefits, such as increasing annotation consistency across genome databases, and providing important improvements to the GO's logical structure and biological content. PMID:19578431

  11. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate…

  12. Database constraints applied to metabolic pathway reconstruction tools.

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, Jordi; Solsona, Francesc; Teixido, Ivan; Usié, Anabel; Karathia, Hiren; Alves, Rui; Mateo, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Our group developed two biological applications, Biblio-MetReS and Homol-MetReS, accessing the same database of organisms with annotated genes. Biblio-MetReS is a data-mining application that facilitates the reconstruction of molecular networks based on automated text-mining analysis of published scientific literature. Homol-MetReS allows functional (re)annotation of proteomes, to properly identify both the individual proteins involved in the process(es) of interest and their function. It also enables the sets of proteins involved in the process(es) in different organisms to be compared directly. The efficiency of these biological applications is directly related to the design of the shared database. We classified and analyzed the different kinds of access to the database. Based on this study, we tried to adjust and tune the configurable parameters of the database server to reach the best performance of the communication data link to/from the database system. Different database technologies were analyzed. We started the study with a public relational SQL database, MySQL. Then, the same database was implemented by a MapReduce-based database named HBase. The results indicated that the standard configuration of MySQL gives an acceptable performance for low or medium size databases. Nevertheless, tuning database parameters can greatly improve the performance and lead to very competitive runtimes. PMID:25202745

  13. Database Constraints Applied to Metabolic Pathway Reconstruction Tools

    PubMed Central

    Vilaplana, Jordi; Solsona, Francesc; Teixido, Ivan; Usié, Anabel; Karathia, Hiren; Alves, Rui; Mateo, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Our group developed two biological applications, Biblio-MetReS and Homol-MetReS, accessing the same database of organisms with annotated genes. Biblio-MetReS is a data-mining application that facilitates the reconstruction of molecular networks based on automated text-mining analysis of published scientific literature. Homol-MetReS allows functional (re)annotation of proteomes, to properly identify both the individual proteins involved in the process(es) of interest and their function. It also enables the sets of proteins involved in the process(es) in different organisms to be compared directly. The efficiency of these biological applications is directly related to the design of the shared database. We classified and analyzed the different kinds of access to the database. Based on this study, we tried to adjust and tune the configurable parameters of the database server to reach the best performance of the communication data link to/from the database system. Different database technologies were analyzed. We started the study with a public relational SQL database, MySQL. Then, the same database was implemented by a MapReduce-based database named HBase. The results indicated that the standard configuration of MySQL gives an acceptable performance for low or medium size databases. Nevertheless, tuning database parameters can greatly improve the performance and lead to very competitive runtimes. PMID:25202745

  14. Concept annotation in the CRAFT corpus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Manually annotated corpora are critical for the training and evaluation of automated methods to identify concepts in biomedical text. Results This paper presents the concept annotations of the Colorado Richly Annotated Full-Text (CRAFT) Corpus, a collection of 97 full-length, open-access biomedical journal articles that have been annotated both semantically and syntactically to serve as a research resource for the biomedical natural-language-processing (NLP) community. CRAFT identifies all mentions of nearly all concepts from nine prominent biomedical ontologies and terminologies: the Cell Type Ontology, the Chemical Entities of Biological Interest ontology, the NCBI Taxonomy, the Protein Ontology, the Sequence Ontology, the entries of the Entrez Gene database, and the three subontologies of the Gene Ontology. The first public release includes the annotations for 67 of the 97 articles, reserving two sets of 15 articles for future text-mining competitions (after which these too will be released). Concept annotations were created based on a single set of guidelines, which has enabled us to achieve consistently high interannotator agreement. Conclusions As the initial 67-article release contains more than 560,000 tokens (and the full set more than 790,000 tokens), our corpus is among the largest gold-standard annotated biomedical corpora. Unlike most others, the journal articles that comprise the corpus are drawn from diverse biomedical disciplines and are marked up in their entirety. Additionally, with a concept-annotation count of nearly 100,000 in the 67-article subset (and more than 140,000 in the full collection), the scale of conceptual markup is also among the largest of comparable corpora. The concept annotations of the CRAFT Corpus have the potential to significantly advance biomedical text mining by providing a high-quality gold standard for NLP systems. The corpus, annotation guidelines, and other associated resources are freely available at http

  15. Service Integration: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudry, Ajay; And Others

    This annotated bibliography describes 53 books, papers, and articles written about efforts toward integrating and improving human services for children, youth, and families living in poverty. The bibliography has been developed for individuals working on and interested in service integration, including policymakers, program administrators,…

  16. Automated annotation of microbial proteomes in SWISS-PROT.

    PubMed

    Gattiker, Alexandre; Michoud, Karine; Rivoire, Catherine; Auchincloss, Andrea H; Coudert, Elisabeth; Lima, Tania; Kersey, Paul; Pagni, Marco; Sigrist, Christian J A; Lachaize, Corinne; Veuthey, Anne Lise; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Bairoch, Amos

    2003-02-01

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic genomes demands the automation of certain annotation tasks currently manually performed in the production of the SWISS-PROT protein knowledgebase. The HAMAP project, or 'High-quality Automated and Manual Annotation of microbial Proteomes', aims to integrate manual and automatic annotation methods in order to enhance the speed of the curation process while preserving the quality of the database annotation. Automatic annotation is only applied to entries that belong to manually defined orthologous families and to entries with no identifiable similarities (ORFans). Many checks are enforced in order to prevent the propagation of wrong annotation and to spot problematic cases, which are channelled to manual curation. The results of this annotation are integrated in SWISS-PROT, and a website is provided at http://www.expasy.org/sprot/hamap/. PMID:12798039

  17. RCARE: RNA Sequence Comparison and Annotation for RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The post-transcriptional sequence modification of transcripts through RNA editing is an important mechanism for regulating protein function and is associated with human disease phenotypes. The identification of RNA editing or RNA-DNA difference (RDD) sites is a fundamental step in the study of RNA editing. However, a substantial number of false-positive RDD sites have been identified recently. A major challenge in identifying RDD sites is to distinguish between the true RNA editing sites and the false positives. Furthermore, determining the location of condition-specific RDD sites and elucidating their functional roles will help toward understanding various biological phenomena that are mediated by RNA editing. The present study developed RNA-sequence comparison and annotation for RNA editing (RCARE) for searching, annotating, and visualizing RDD sites using thousands of previously known editing sites, which can be used for comparative analyses between multiple samples. RCARE also provides evidence for improving the reliability of identified RDD sites. RCARE is a web-based comparison, annotation, and visualization tool, which provides rich biological annotations and useful summary plots. The developers of previous tools that identify or annotate RNA-editing sites seldom mention the reliability of their respective tools. In order to address the issue, RCARE utilizes a number of scientific publications and databases to find specific documentations respective to a particular RNA-editing site, which generates evidence levels to convey the reliability of RCARE. Sequence-based alignment files can be converted into VCF files using a Python script and uploaded to the RCARE server for further analysis. RCARE is available for free at http://www.snubi.org/software/rcare/. PMID:26043858

  18. An Improved Algorithm to Generate a Wi-Fi Fingerprint Database for Indoor Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lina; Li, Binghao; Zhao, Kai; Rizos, Chris; Zheng, Zhengqi

    2013-01-01

    The major problem of Wi-Fi fingerprint-based positioning technology is the signal strength fingerprint database creation and maintenance. The significant temporal variation of received signal strength (RSS) is the main factor responsible for the positioning error. A probabilistic approach can be used, but the RSS distribution is required. The Gaussian distribution or an empirically-derived distribution (histogram) is typically used. However, these distributions are either not always correct or require a large amount of data for each reference point. Double peaks of the RSS distribution have been observed in experiments at some reference points. In this paper a new algorithm based on an improved double-peak Gaussian distribution is proposed. Kurtosis testing is used to decide if this new distribution, or the normal Gaussian distribution, should be applied. Test results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly improve the positioning accuracy, as well as reduce the workload of the off-line data training phase. PMID:23966197

  19. Selectome update: quality control and computational improvements to a database of positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Sébastien; Laurenczy, Balazs; Gharib, Walid H.; Castella, Briséïs; Kuzniar, Arnold; Schabauer, Hannes; Studer, Romain A.; Valle, Mario; Salamin, Nicolas; Stockinger, Heinz; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selectome (http://selectome.unil.ch/) is a database of positive selection, based on a branch-site likelihood test. This model estimates the number of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) and synonymous substitutions (dS) to evaluate the variation in selective pressure (dN/dS ratio) over branches and over sites. Since the original release of Selectome, we have benchmarked and implemented a thorough quality control procedure on multiple sequence alignments, aiming to provide minimum false-positive results. We have also improved the computational efficiency of the branch-site test implementation, allowing larger data sets and more frequent updates. Release 6 of Selectome includes all gene trees from Ensembl for Primates and Glires, as well as a large set of vertebrate gene trees. A total of 6810 gene trees have some evidence of positive selection. Finally, the web interface has been improved to be more responsive and to facilitate searches and browsing. PMID:24225318

  20. Selectome update: quality control and computational improvements to a database of positive selection.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Sébastien; Laurenczy, Balazs; Gharib, Walid H; Castella, Briséïs; Kuzniar, Arnold; Schabauer, Hannes; Studer, Romain A; Valle, Mario; Salamin, Nicolas; Stockinger, Heinz; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selectome (http://selectome.unil.ch/) is a database of positive selection, based on a branch-site likelihood test. This model estimates the number of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) and synonymous substitutions (dS) to evaluate the variation in selective pressure (dN/dS ratio) over branches and over sites. Since the original release of Selectome, we have benchmarked and implemented a thorough quality control procedure on multiple sequence alignments, aiming to provide minimum false-positive results. We have also improved the computational efficiency of the branch-site test implementation, allowing larger data sets and more frequent updates. Release 6 of Selectome includes all gene trees from Ensembl for Primates and Glires, as well as a large set of vertebrate gene trees. A total of 6810 gene trees have some evidence of positive selection. Finally, the web interface has been improved to be more responsive and to facilitate searches and browsing. PMID:24225318

  1. Integrative Tissue-Specific Functional Annotations in the Human Genome Provide Novel Insights on Many Complex Traits and Improve Signal Prioritization in Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; He, Beixin Julie; Zhao, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to understand genomic function through both experimental and computational approaches, yet proper annotation still remains challenging, especially in non-coding regions. In this manuscript, we introduce GenoSkyline, an unsupervised learning framework to predict tissue-specific functional regions through integrating high-throughput epigenetic annotations. GenoSkyline successfully identified a variety of non-coding regulatory machinery including enhancers, regulatory miRNA, and hypomethylated transposable elements in extensive case studies. Integrative analysis of GenoSkyline annotations and results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to novel biological insights on the etiologies of a number of human complex traits. We also explored using tissue-specific functional annotations to prioritize GWAS signals and predict relevant tissue types for each risk locus. Brain and blood-specific annotations led to better prioritization performance for schizophrenia than standard GWAS p-values and non-tissue-specific annotations. As for coronary artery disease, heart-specific functional regions was highly enriched of GWAS signals, but previously identified risk loci were found to be most functional in other tissues, suggesting a substantial proportion of still undetected heart-related loci. In summary, GenoSkyline annotations can guide genetic studies at multiple resolutions and provide valuable insights in understanding complex diseases. GenoSkyline is available at http://genocanyon.med.yale.edu/GenoSkyline. PMID:27058395

  2. Improving Quality and Quantity of Contributions: Two Models for Promoting Knowledge Exchange with Shared Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cress, U.; Barquero, B.; Schwan, S.; Hesse, F. W.

    2007-01-01

    Shared databases are used for knowledge exchange in groups. Whether a person is willing to contribute knowledge to a shared database presents a social dilemma: Each group member saves time and energy by not contributing any information to the database and by using the database only to retrieve information which was contributed by others. But if…

  3. Improved Annotation of 3′ Untranslated Regions and Complex Loci by Combination of Strand-Specific Direct RNA Sequencing, RNA-Seq and ESTs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Junfang; Duc, Céline; Storey, Kate G.; McLean, W. H. Irwin; Brown, Sara J.; Simpson, Gordon G.; Barton, Geoffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    The reference annotations made for a genome sequence provide the framework for all subsequent analyses of the genome. Correct and complete annotation in addition to the underlying genomic sequence is particularly important when interpreting the results of RNA-seq experiments where short sequence reads are mapped against the genome and assigned to genes according to the annotation. Inconsistencies in annotations between the reference and the experimental system can lead to incorrect interpretation of the effect on RNA expression of an experimental treatment or mutation in the system under study. Until recently, the genome-wide annotation of 3′ untranslated regions received less attention than coding regions and the delineation of intron/exon boundaries. In this paper, data produced for samples in Human, Chicken and A. thaliana by the novel single-molecule, strand-specific, Direct RNA Sequencing technology from Helicos Biosciences which locates 3′ polyadenylation sites to within +/− 2 nt, were combined with archival EST and RNA-Seq data. Nine examples are illustrated where this combination of data allowed: (1) gene and 3′ UTR re-annotation (including extension of one 3′ UTR by 5.9 kb); (2) disentangling of gene expression in complex regions; (3) clearer interpretation of small RNA expression and (4) identification of novel genes. While the specific examples displayed here may become obsolete as genome sequences and their annotations are refined, the principles laid out in this paper will be of general use both to those annotating genomes and those seeking to interpret existing publically available annotations in the context of their own experimental data. PMID:24722185

  4. Orienteering: An Annotated Bibliography = Orientierungslauf: Eine kommentierte Bibliographie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiler, Roland, Ed.; Hartmann, Wolfgang, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Annotated bibliography of 220 books, monographs, and journal articles on orienteering published 1984-94, from SPOLIT database of the Federal Institute of Sport Science (Cologne, Germany). Annotations in English or German. Ten sections including psychological, physiological, health, sociological, and environmental aspects; training and coaching;…

  5. Automated Data Mining of A Proprietary Database System for Physician Quality Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, Peter Crenshaw, Tim; Cassels, Diane G.; Fox, Timothy H.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Physician practice quality improvement is a subject of intense national debate. This report describes using a software data acquisition program to mine an existing, commonly used proprietary radiation oncology database to assess physician performance. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2004, a manual analysis was performed of electronic portal image (EPI) review records. Custom software was recently developed to mine the record-and-verify database and the review process of EPI at our institution. In late 2006, a report was developed that allowed for immediate review of physician completeness and speed of EPI review for any prescribed period. Results: The software extracted >46,000 EPIs between 2003 and 2007, providing EPI review status and time to review by each physician. Between 2003 and 2007, the department EPI review improved from 77% to 97% (range, 85.4-100%), with a decrease in the mean time to review from 4.2 days to 2.4 days. The initial intervention in 2003 to 2004 was moderately successful in changing the EPI review patterns; it was not repeated because of the time required to perform it. However, the implementation in 2006 of the automated review tool yielded a profound change in practice. Using the software, the automated chart review required {approx}1.5 h for mining and extracting the data for the 4-year period. Conclusion: This study quantified the EPI review process as it evolved during a 4-year period at our institution and found that automation of data retrieval and review simplified and facilitated physician quality improvement.

  6. Strategy to Improve the Homogeneity of Meteorological Data in Mark3 Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bail, K.; Gipson, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    Errors in modeling the troposphere is a major part in the error budget in VLBI processing, making the meteorological data an element of high significance. The GSFC/NASA VLBI team is working actively on improving those data in the CALC/SOLVE database. Summary tables of the different missing meteorological data in the database point on the lack of data for stations of importance in the network (Zelenchukskaya during the CONT08 campaign for example). The first step is to detect such issues in an automatic way, then to correct them. To adopt the most suitable strategy, we perform various studies on the impact of pressure offset and the use of a constant value (as used by default by SOLVE), as well as comparisons with different models, such as ECMWF, or other onsite recorded meteorological data, such as sensors associated with GPS receivers. Different cases will be showed, but the presentation will be focused on the Westford station which represents a good study example.

  7. Evaluating techniques for metagenome annotation using simulated sequence data.

    PubMed

    Randle-Boggis, Richard J; Helgason, Thorunn; Sapp, Melanie; Ashton, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has allowed huge amounts of DNA sequence data to be produced, advancing the capabilities of microbial ecosystem studies. The current challenge is to identify from which microorganisms and genes the DNA originated. Several tools and databases are available for annotating DNA sequences. The tools, databases and parameters used can have a significant impact on the results: naïve choice of these factors can result in a false representation of community composition and function. We use a simulated metagenome to show how different parameters affect annotation accuracy by evaluating the sequence annotation performances of MEGAN, MG-RAST, One Codex and Megablast. This simulated metagenome allowed the recovery of known organism and function abundances to be quantitatively evaluated, which is not possible for environmental metagenomes. The performance of each program and database varied, e.g. One Codex correctly annotated many sequences at the genus level, whereas MG-RAST RefSeq produced many false positive annotations. This effect decreased as the taxonomic level investigated increased. Selecting more stringent parameters decreases the annotation sensitivity, but increases precision. Ultimately, there is a trade-off between taxonomic resolution and annotation accuracy. These results should be considered when annotating metagenomes and interpreting results from previous studies. PMID:27162180

  8. Evaluating techniques for metagenome annotation using simulated sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Randle-Boggis, Richard J.; Helgason, Thorunn; Sapp, Melanie; Ashton, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has allowed huge amounts of DNA sequence data to be produced, advancing the capabilities of microbial ecosystem studies. The current challenge is to identify from which microorganisms and genes the DNA originated. Several tools and databases are available for annotating DNA sequences. The tools, databases and parameters used can have a significant impact on the results: naïve choice of these factors can result in a false representation of community composition and function. We use a simulated metagenome to show how different parameters affect annotation accuracy by evaluating the sequence annotation performances of MEGAN, MG-RAST, One Codex and Megablast. This simulated metagenome allowed the recovery of known organism and function abundances to be quantitatively evaluated, which is not possible for environmental metagenomes. The performance of each program and database varied, e.g. One Codex correctly annotated many sequences at the genus level, whereas MG-RAST RefSeq produced many false positive annotations. This effect decreased as the taxonomic level investigated increased. Selecting more stringent parameters decreases the annotation sensitivity, but increases precision. Ultimately, there is a trade-off between taxonomic resolution and annotation accuracy. These results should be considered when annotating metagenomes and interpreting results from previous studies. PMID:27162180

  9. Computing human image annotation.

    PubMed

    Channin, David S; Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Kleper, Vladimir; Rubin, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    An image annotation is the explanatory or descriptive information about the pixel data of an image that is generated by a human (or machine) observer. An image markup is the graphical symbols placed over the image to depict an annotation. In the majority of current, clinical and research imaging practice, markup is captured in proprietary formats and annotations are referenced only in free text radiology reports. This makes these annotations difficult to query, retrieve and compute upon, hampering their integration into other data mining and analysis efforts. This paper describes the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid's (caBIG) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project, focusing on how to use AIM to query for annotations. The AIM project delivers an information model for image annotation and markup. The model uses controlled terminologies for important concepts. All of the classes and attributes of the model have been harmonized with the other models and common data elements in use at the National Cancer Institute. The project also delivers XML schemata necessary to instantiate AIMs in XML as well as a software application for translating AIM XML into DICOM S/R and HL7 CDA. Large collections of AIM annotations can be built and then queried as Grid or Web services. Using the tools of the AIM project, image annotations and their markup can be captured and stored in human and machine readable formats. This enables the inclusion of human image observation and inference as part of larger data mining and analysis activities. PMID:19964202

  10. PAnnBuilder: an R package for assembling proteomic annotation data.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Ding, Guohui; Xie, Lu; Li, Yixue

    2009-04-15

    PAnnBuilder is an R package to automatically assemble protein annotation information from public resources to provide uniform annotation data for large-scale proteomic studies. Sixteen public databases have been parsed and 54 annotation packages have been constructed based on R environment or SQLite database. These ready-to-use packages cover most frequently needed protein annotation for three model species including human, mouse and rat. Several extended applications such as annotation based on protein sequence similarity are also provided. Sophisticated users can develop their own packages using PAnnBuilder. PAnnBuilder may become an important tool for proteomic research. PMID:19237448

  11. Scientific and Technical Document Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Scientific and Technical Document Database (PC database for purchase)   The images in NIST Special Database 20 contain a very rich set of graphic elements from scientific and technical documents, such as graphs, tables, equations, two column text, maps, pictures, footnotes, annotations, and arrays of such elements.

  12. Retrieval-based face annotation by weak label regularized local coordinate coding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Hoi, Steven C H; He, Ying; Zhu, Jianke; Mei, Tao; Luo, Jiebo

    2014-03-01

    Auto face annotation, which aims to detect human faces from a facial image and assign them proper human names, is a fundamental research problem and beneficial to many real-world applications. In this work, we address this problem by investigating a retrieval-based annotation scheme of mining massive web facial images that are freely available over the Internet. In particular, given a facial image, we first retrieve the top $(n)$ similar instances from a large-scale web facial image database using content-based image retrieval techniques, and then use their labels for auto annotation. Such a scheme has two major challenges: 1) how to retrieve the similar facial images that truly match the query, and 2) how to exploit the noisy labels of the top similar facial images, which may be incorrect or incomplete due to the nature of web images. In this paper, we propose an effective Weak Label Regularized Local Coordinate Coding (WLRLCC) technique, which exploits the principle of local coordinate coding by learning sparse features, and employs the idea of graph-based weak label regularization to enhance the weak labels of the similar facial images. An efficient optimization algorithm is proposed to solve the WLRLCC problem. Moreover, an effective sparse reconstruction scheme is developed to perform the face annotation task. We conduct extensive empirical studies on several web facial image databases to evaluate the proposed WLRLCC algorithm from different aspects. The experimental results validate its efficacy. We share the two constructed databases "WDB" (714,454 images of 6,025 people) and "ADB" (126,070 images of 1,200 people) with the public. To further improve the efficiency and scalability, we also propose an offline approximation scheme (AWLRLCC) which generally maintains comparable results but significantly reduces the annotation time. PMID:24457510

  13. A Radiocarbon Database for Improving Understanding of Global Soil Carbon Dynamics: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torn, M. S.; Trumbore, S.; Smith, L. J.; Nave, L. E.; Sierra, C. A.; Harden, J. W.; Agarwal, D.; van Ingen, C.; Radiocarbon Database Workshop 2011

    2011-12-01

    Soils play a large role in the global carbon cycle, but soil carbon stocks and dynamics remain highly uncertain. Radiocarbon (14C) observations from soils and soil respiration provide one of the only ways to infer terrestrial carbon turnover times or to test ecosystem carbon models. Although a wealth of such observations exists, they are scattered in small data sets held by individual researchers, and have not been compiled in a form easy to use for multi-site analysis, global assessments, or model testing. Here we introduce a new, global radiocarbon database that will synthesize datasets from multiple contributors to facilitate research on three broad questions: (1) What are current patterns of soil carbon dynamics, and what factors influence these patterns? (2) What is the sequestration capacity of different soils? (3) What are likely impacts of global change on the soil resource? (4) How well do models represent important carbon cycle processes, and how can they be improved? In addition to assembling data in a common format for analyses, this database will offer query capabilities and the ability to combine data with gridded global products, such as temporally resolved temperature and precipitation, NPP and GPP, and a climate-based decomposition index. Some of the near-term synthesis goals include analyzing depth profiles of 14C for across gradients in ecosystem state factors (climate, organisms, relief, parent material, time, and human influence) and soil orders; mapping surface-soil 14C values on soil temperature and moisture; and comparing soil carbon turnover times to NPP and soil carbon stocks. We are currently incorporating data from 18 contributors and six continents, with 14C measurements from soils representing nine soil orders, plant and microbial tissues, and respiration fluxes. Our intention is to grow the database and make it available to a wide community of scientists. For example, observations for different disturbance, experimental treatment, or

  14. National Trauma Database (NTrD)--improving trauma care: first year report.

    PubMed

    Sabariah, F J; Ramesh, N; Mahathar, A W

    2008-09-01

    The first Malaysian National Trauma Database was launched in May 2006 with five tertiary referral centres to determine the fundamental data on major trauma, subsequently to evaluate the major trauma management and to come up with guidelines for improved trauma care. A prospective study, using standardized and validated questionnaires, was carried out from May 2006 till April 2007 for all cases admitted and referred to the participating hospitals. During the one year period, 123,916 trauma patients were registered, of which 933 (0.75%) were classified as major trauma. Patients with blunt injury made up for 83.9% of cases and RTA accounted for 72.6% of injuries with 64.9% involving motorcyclist and pillion rider. 42.8% had severe head injury with an admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 3-8 and the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) of 5-6 were recorded in 28.8% of patients. The distribution of Injury Severity Score (ISS) showed that 42.9% of cases were in the range of 16-24. Only 1.9% and 6.3% of the patients were reviewed by the Emergency Physician and Surgeon respectively. Patients with admission systolic blood pressure of less than 90 mmHg had a death rate of 54.6%. Patients with severe head injury (GCS < 9), 45.1% died while 79% patients with moderate head injury survived. There were more survivors within the higher RTS range compared to the lower RTS. Patients with direct admission accounted for 52.3% of survivors and there were 61.7% survivors for referred cases. In conclusion, NTrD first report has successfully demonstrated its significance in giving essential data on major trauma in Malaysia, however further expansion of the study may reflect more comprehensive trauma database in this country. PMID:19227673

  15. Omics data management and annotation.

    PubMed

    Harel, Arye; Dalah, Irina; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2011-01-01

    Technological Omics breakthroughs, including next generation sequencing, bring avalanches of data which need to undergo effective data management to ensure integrity, security, and maximal knowledge-gleaning. Data management system requirements include flexible input formats, diverse data entry mechanisms and views, user friendliness, attention to standards, hardware and software platform definition, as well as robustness. Relevant solutions elaborated by the scientific community include Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) and standardization protocols facilitating data sharing and managing. In project planning, special consideration has to be made when choosing relevant Omics annotation sources, since many of them overlap and require sophisticated integration heuristics. The data modeling step defines and categorizes the data into objects (e.g., genes, articles, disorders) and creates an application flow. A data storage/warehouse mechanism must be selected, such as file-based systems and relational databases, the latter typically used for larger projects. Omics project life cycle considerations must include the definition and deployment of new versions, incorporating either full or partial updates. Finally, quality assurance (QA) procedures must validate data and feature integrity, as well as system performance expectations. We illustrate these data management principles with examples from the life cycle of the GeneCards Omics project (http://www.genecards.org), a comprehensive, widely used compendium of annotative information about human genes. For example, the GeneCards infrastructure has recently been changed from text files to a relational database, enabling better organization and views of the growing data. Omics data handling benefits from the wealth of Web-based information, the vast amount of public domain software, increasingly affordable hardware, and effective use of data management and annotation principles as outlined in this chapter

  16. Automated Knowledge Annotation for Dynamic Collaborative Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Marshall, Eric J.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2009-05-19

    This paper describes the Knowledge Encapsulation Framework (KEF), a suite of tools to enable automated knowledge annotation for modeling and simulation projects. This framework can be used to capture evidence (e.g., facts extracted from journal articles and government reports), discover new evidence (from similar peer-reviewed material as well as social media), enable discussions surrounding domain-specific topics and provide automatically generated semantic annotations for improved corpus investigation. The current KEF implementation is presented within a wiki environment, providing a simple but powerful collaborative space for team members to review, annotate, discuss and align evidence with their modeling frameworks.

  17. The 1999 SWISS-2DPAGE database update.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, C; Sanchez, J C; Tonella, L; Binz, P A; Bairoch, A; Hochstrasser, D F; Appel, R D

    2000-01-01

    SWISS-2DPAGE (http://www.expasy.ch/ch2d/ ) is an annotated two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electro-phoresis (2-DE) database established in 1993. The current release contains 24 reference maps from human and mouse biological samples, as well as from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli and Dictyostelium discoideum origin. These reference maps have now 2824 identified spots, corresponding to 614 separate protein entries in the database, in addition to virtual entries for each SWISS-PROT sequence or any user-entered amino acids sequence. Last year improvements in the SWISS-2DPAGE database are as follows: three new maps have been created and several others have been updated; cross-references to newly built federated 2-DE databases have been added; new functions to access the data have been provided through the ExPASy proteomics server. PMID:10592248

  18. The 1999 SWISS-2DPAGE database update

    PubMed Central

    Hoogland, Christine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Tonella, Luisa; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Bairoch, Amos; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Appel, Ron D.

    2000-01-01

    SWISS-2DPAGE (http://www.expasy.ch/ch2d/ ) is an annotated two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) database established in 1993. The current release contains 24 reference maps from human and mouse biological samples, as well as from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli and Dictyostelium discoideum origin. These reference maps have now 2824 identified spots, corresponding to 614 separate protein entries in the database, in addition to virtual entries for each SWISS-PROT sequence or any user-entered amino acids sequence. Last year improvements in the SWISS-2DPAGE database are as follows: three new maps have been created and several others have been updated; cross-references to newly built federated 2-DE databases have been added; new functions to access the data have been provided through the ExPASy proteomics server. PMID:10592248

  19. SEED Software Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethke, Dee; And Others

    This document provides a composite index of the first five sets of software annotations produced by Project SEED. The software has been indexed by title, subject area, and grade level, and it covers sets of annotations distributed in September 1986, April 1987, September 1987, November 1987, and February 1988. The date column in the index…

  20. Annotation extension through protein family annotation coherence metrics

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Hugo P.; Clarke, Luka A.; Couto, Francisco M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein functional annotation consists in associating proteins with textual descriptors elucidating their biological roles. The bulk of annotation is done via automated procedures that ultimately rely on annotation transfer. Despite a large number of existing protein annotation procedures the ever growing protein space is never completely annotated. One of the facets of annotation incompleteness derives from annotation uncertainty. Often when protein function cannot be predicted with enough specificity it is instead conservatively annotated with more generic terms. In a scenario of protein families or functionally related (or even dissimilar) sets this leads to a more difficult task of using annotations to compare the extent of functional relatedness among all family or set members. However, we postulate that identifying sub-sets of functionally coherent proteins annotated at a very specific level, can help the annotation extension of other incompletely annotated proteins within the same family or functionally related set. As an example we analyse the status of annotation of a set of CAZy families belonging to the Polysaccharide Lyase class. We show that through the use of visualization methods and semantic similarity based metrics it is possible to identify families and respective annotation terms within them that are suitable for possible annotation extension. Based on our analysis we then propose a semi-automatic methodology leading to the extension of single annotation terms within these partially annotated protein sets or families. PMID:24130572

  1. GOChase-II: correcting semantic inconsistencies from Gene Ontology-based annotations for gene products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Gene Ontology (GO) provides a controlled vocabulary for describing genes and gene products. In spite of the undoubted importance of GO, several drawbacks associated with GO and GO-based annotations have been introduced. We identified three types of semantic inconsistencies in GO-based annotations; semantically redundant, biological-domain inconsistent and taxonomy inconsistent annotations. Methods To determine the semantic inconsistencies in GO annotation, we used the hierarchical structure of GO graph and tree structure of NCBI taxonomy. Twenty seven biological databases were collected for finding semantic inconsistent annotation. Results The distributions and possible causes of the semantic inconsistencies were investigated using twenty seven biological databases with GO-based annotations. We found that some evidence codes of annotation were associated with the inconsistencies. The numbers of gene products and species in a database that are related to the complexity of database management are also in correlation with the inconsistencies. Consequently, numerous annotation errors arise and are propagated throughout biological databases and GO-based high-level analyses. GOChase-II is developed to detect and correct both syntactic and semantic errors in GO-based annotations. Conclusions We identified some inconsistencies in GO-based annotation and provided software, GOChase-II, for correcting these semantic inconsistencies in addition to the previous corrections for the syntactic errors by GOChase-I. PMID:21342572

  2. Improving pharmaceutical innovation by building a more comprehensive database on drug development and use.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory W; Cazé, Alexis; Romine, Morgan H; Audibert, Céline; Leff, Jonathan S; McClellan, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    New drugs and biologics have had a tremendous impact on the treatment of many diseases. However, available measures suggest that pharmaceutical innovation has remained relatively flat, despite substantial growth in research and development spending. We review recent literature on pharmaceutical innovation to identify limitations in measuring and assessing innovation, and we describe the framework and collaborative approach we are using to develop more comprehensive, publicly available metrics for innovation. Our research teams at the Brookings Institution and Deerfield Institute are collaborating with experts from multiple areas of drug development and regulatory review to identify and collect comprehensive data elements related to key development and regulatory characteristics for each new molecular entity approved over the past several decades in the United States and the European Union. Subsequent phases of our effort will add data on downstream product use and patient outcomes and will also include drugs that have failed or been abandoned in development. Such a database will enable researchers to better analyze the drivers of drug innovation, trends in the output of new medicines, and the effect of policy efforts designed to improve innovation. PMID:25646113

  3. Improved survival following surgery and radiation therapy for olfactory neuroblastoma: analysis of the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Olfactory Neuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the olfactory tract. Reports in the literature comparing treatment modalities for this tumor are limited. Methods The SEER database (1973-2006) was queried by diagnosis code to identify patients with Olfactory Neuroblastoma. Kaplan-Meier was used to estimate survival distributions based on treatment modality. Differences in survival distributions were determined by the log-rank test. A Cox multiple regression analysis was then performed using treatment, race, SEER historic stage, sex, age at diagnosis, year at diagnosis and SEER geographic registry. Results A total of 511 Olfactory Neuroblastoma cases were reported. Five year overall survival, stratified by treatment modality was: 73% for surgery with radiotherapy, 68% for surgery only, 35% for radiotherapy only, and 26% for neither surgery nor radiotherapy. There was a significant difference in overall survival between the four treatment groups (p < 0.01). At ten years, overall survival stratified by treatment modality and stage, there was no significant improvement in survival with the addition of radiation to surgery. Conclusions Best survival results were obtained for surgery with radiotherapy. PMID:21518449

  4. ERAIZDA: a model for holistic annotation of animal infectious and zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Buza, Teresia M; Jack, Sherman W; Kirunda, Halid; Khaitsa, Margaret L; Lawrence, Mark L; Pruett, Stephen; Peterson, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a unified resource that integrates trans-disciplinary annotations of emerging and reemerging animal infectious and zoonotic diseases. Such data integration will provide wonderful opportunity for epidemiologists, researchers and health policy makers to make data-driven decisions designed to improve animal health. Integrating emerging and reemerging animal infectious and zoonotic disease data from a large variety of sources into a unified open-access resource provides more plausible arguments to achieve better understanding of infectious and zoonotic diseases. We have developed a model for interlinking annotations of these diseases. These diseases are of particular interest because of the threats they pose to animal health, human health and global health security. We demonstrated the application of this model using brucellosis, an infectious and zoonotic disease. Preliminary annotations were deposited into VetBioBase database (http://vetbiobase.igbb.msstate.edu). This database is associated with user-friendly tools to facilitate searching, retrieving and downloading of disease-related information. Database URL: http://vetbiobase.igbb.msstate.edu. PMID:26581408

  5. ERAIZDA: a model for holistic annotation of animal infectious and zoonotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Buza, Teresia M.; Jack, Sherman W.; Kirunda, Halid; Khaitsa, Margaret L.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Pruett, Stephen; Peterson, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a unified resource that integrates trans-disciplinary annotations of emerging and reemerging animal infectious and zoonotic diseases. Such data integration will provide wonderful opportunity for epidemiologists, researchers and health policy makers to make data-driven decisions designed to improve animal health. Integrating emerging and reemerging animal infectious and zoonotic disease data from a large variety of sources into a unified open-access resource provides more plausible arguments to achieve better understanding of infectious and zoonotic diseases. We have developed a model for interlinking annotations of these diseases. These diseases are of particular interest because of the threats they pose to animal health, human health and global health security. We demonstrated the application of this model using brucellosis, an infectious and zoonotic disease. Preliminary annotations were deposited into VetBioBase database (http://vetbiobase.igbb.msstate.edu). This database is associated with user-friendly tools to facilitate searching, retrieving and downloading of disease-related information. Database URL: http://vetbiobase.igbb.msstate.edu PMID:26581408

  6. ASAP, a systematic annotation package for community analysis of genomes.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Jeremy D; Liss, Paul; Plunkett, Guy; Darling, Aaron; Prasad, Tejasvini; Rusch, Michael; Byrnes, Alexis; Gilson, Michael; Biehl, Bryan; Blattner, Frederick R; Perna, Nicole T

    2003-01-01

    ASAP (a systematic annotation package for community analysis of genomes) is a relational database and web interface developed to store, update and distribute genome sequence data and functional characterization (https://asap.ahabs.wisc.edu/annotation/php/ASAP1.htm). ASAP facilitates ongoing community annotation of genomes and tracking of information as genome projects move from preliminary data collection through post-sequencing functional analysis. The ASAP database includes multiple genome sequences at various stages of analysis, corresponding experimental data and access to collections of related genome resources. ASAP supports three levels of users: public viewers, annotators and curators. Public viewers can currently browse updated annotation information for Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655, genome-wide transcript profiles from more than 50 microarray experiments and an extensive collection of mutant strains and associated phenotypic data. Annotators worldwide are currently using ASAP to participate in a community annotation project for the Erwinia chrysanthemi strain 3937 genome. Curation of the E. chrysanthemi genome annotation as well as those of additional published enterobacterial genomes is underway and will be publicly accessible in the near future. PMID:12519969

  7. Relational-database model for improving quality assurance and process control in a composite manufacturing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Jeffery D.

    2000-05-01

    A relational database is a powerful tool for collecting and analyzing the vast amounts of inner-related data associated with the manufacture of composite materials. A relational database contains many individual database tables that store data that are related in some fashion. Manufacturing process variables as well as quality assurance measurements can be collected and stored in database tables indexed according to lot numbers, part type or individual serial numbers. Relationships between manufacturing process and product quality can then be correlated over a wide range of product types and process variations. This paper presents details on how relational databases are used to collect, store, and analyze process variables and quality assurance data associated with the manufacture of advanced composite materials. Important considerations are covered including how the various types of data are organized and how relationships between the data are defined. Employing relational database techniques to establish correlative relationships between process variables and quality assurance measurements is then explored. Finally, the benefits of database techniques such as data warehousing, data mining and web based client/server architectures are discussed in the context of composite material manufacturing.

  8. Gene Ontology annotation quality analysis in model eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Buza, Teresia J.; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Wang, Nan; Bridges, Susan M.; Burgess, Shane C.

    2008-01-01

    Functional analysis using the Gene Ontology (GO) is crucial for array analysis, but it is often difficult for researchers to assess the amount and quality of GO annotations associated with different sets of gene products. In many cases the source of the GO annotations and the date the GO annotations were last updated is not apparent, further complicating a researchers’ ability to assess the quality of the GO data provided. Moreover, GO biocurators need to ensure that the GO quality is maintained and optimal for the functional processes that are most relevant for their research community. We report the GO Annotation Quality (GAQ) score, a quantitative measure of GO quality that includes breadth of GO annotation, the level of detail of annotation and the type of evidence used to make the annotation. As a case study, we apply the GAQ scoring method to a set of diverse eukaryotes and demonstrate how the GAQ score can be used to track changes in GO annotations over time and to assess the quality of GO annotations available for specific biological processes. The GAQ score also allows researchers to quantitatively assess the functional data available for their experimental systems (arrays or databases). PMID:18187504

  9. Deep Question Answering for protein annotation

    PubMed Central

    Gobeill, Julien; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Pasche, Emilie; Vishnyakova, Dina; Gaudet, Pascale; Bairoch, Amos; Ruch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical professionals have access to a huge amount of literature, but when they use a search engine, they often have to deal with too many documents to efficiently find the appropriate information in a reasonable time. In this perspective, question-answering (QA) engines are designed to display answers, which were automatically extracted from the retrieved documents. Standard QA engines in literature process a user question, then retrieve relevant documents and finally extract some possible answers out of these documents using various named-entity recognition processes. In our study, we try to answer complex genomics questions, which can be adequately answered only using Gene Ontology (GO) concepts. Such complex answers cannot be found using state-of-the-art dictionary- and redundancy-based QA engines. We compare the effectiveness of two dictionary-based classifiers for extracting correct GO answers from a large set of 100 retrieved abstracts per question. In the same way, we also investigate the power of GOCat, a GO supervised classifier. GOCat exploits the GOA database to propose GO concepts that were annotated by curators for similar abstracts. This approach is called deep QA, as it adds an original classification step, and exploits curated biological data to infer answers, which are not explicitly mentioned in the retrieved documents. We show that for complex answers such as protein functional descriptions, the redundancy phenomenon has a limited effect. Similarly usual dictionary-based approaches are relatively ineffective. In contrast, we demonstrate how existing curated data, beyond information extraction, can be exploited by a supervised classifier, such as GOCat, to massively improve both the quantity and the quality of the answers with a +100% improvement for both recall and precision. Database URL: http://eagl.unige.ch/DeepQA4PA/ PMID:26384372

  10. Deep Question Answering for protein annotation.

    PubMed

    Gobeill, Julien; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Pasche, Emilie; Vishnyakova, Dina; Gaudet, Pascale; Bairoch, Amos; Ruch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical professionals have access to a huge amount of literature, but when they use a search engine, they often have to deal with too many documents to efficiently find the appropriate information in a reasonable time. In this perspective, question-answering (QA) engines are designed to display answers, which were automatically extracted from the retrieved documents. Standard QA engines in literature process a user question, then retrieve relevant documents and finally extract some possible answers out of these documents using various named-entity recognition processes. In our study, we try to answer complex genomics questions, which can be adequately answered only using Gene Ontology (GO) concepts. Such complex answers cannot be found using state-of-the-art dictionary- and redundancy-based QA engines. We compare the effectiveness of two dictionary-based classifiers for extracting correct GO answers from a large set of 100 retrieved abstracts per question. In the same way, we also investigate the power of GOCat, a GO supervised classifier. GOCat exploits the GOA database to propose GO concepts that were annotated by curators for similar abstracts. This approach is called deep QA, as it adds an original classification step, and exploits curated biological data to infer answers, which are not explicitly mentioned in the retrieved documents. We show that for complex answers such as protein functional descriptions, the redundancy phenomenon has a limited effect. Similarly usual dictionary-based approaches are relatively ineffective. In contrast, we demonstrate how existing curated data, beyond information extraction, can be exploited by a supervised classifier, such as GOCat, to massively improve both the quantity and the quality of the answers with a +100% improvement for both recall and precision. Database URL: http://eagl.unige.ch/DeepQA4PA/. PMID:26384372

  11. An annotated energy bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blow, S. J.

    1979-01-01

    Comprehensive annotated compilation of books, journals, periodicals, and reports on energy and energy related topics, contains approximately 10,0000 tehcnical and nontechnical references from bibliographic and other sources dated January 1975 through May 1977.

  12. Biomedical article retrieval using multimodal features and image annotations in region-based CBIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Daekeun; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Govindaraju, Venu; Thoma, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical images are invaluable in establishing diagnosis, acquiring technical skills, and implementing best practices in many areas of medicine. At present, images needed for instructional purposes or in support of clinical decisions appear in specialized databases and in biomedical articles, and are often not easily accessible to retrieval tools. Our goal is to automatically annotate images extracted from scientific publications with respect to their usefulness for clinical decision support and instructional purposes, and project the annotations onto images stored in databases by linking images through content-based image similarity. Authors often use text labels and pointers overlaid on figures and illustrations in the articles to highlight regions of interest (ROI). These annotations are then referenced in the caption text or figure citations in the article text. In previous research we have developed two methods (a heuristic and dynamic time warping-based methods) for localizing and recognizing such pointers on biomedical images. In this work, we add robustness to our previous efforts by using a machine learning based approach to localizing and recognizing the pointers. Identifying these can assist in extracting relevant image content at regions within the image that are likely to be highly relevant to the discussion in the article text. Image regions can then be annotated using biomedical concepts from extracted snippets of text pertaining to images in scientific biomedical articles that are identified using National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System® (UMLS) Metathesaurus. The resulting regional annotation and extracted image content are then used as indices for biomedical article retrieval using the multimodal features and region-based content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques. The hypothesis that such an approach would improve biomedical document retrieval is validated through experiments on an expert-marked biomedical article

  13. ORegAnno 3.0: a community-driven resource for curated regulatory annotation

    PubMed Central

    Lesurf, Robert; Cotto, Kelsy C.; Wang, Grace; Griffith, Malachi; Kasaian, Katayoon; Jones, Steven J. M.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Griffith, Obi L.

    2016-01-01

    The Open Regulatory Annotation database (ORegAnno) is a resource for curated regulatory annotation. It contains information about regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites, RNA binding sites, regulatory variants, haplotypes, and other regulatory elements. ORegAnno differentiates itself from other regulatory resources by facilitating crowd-sourced interpretation and annotation of regulatory observations from the literature and highly curated resources. It contains a comprehensive annotation scheme that aims to describe both the elements and outcomes of regulatory events. Moreover, ORegAnno assembles these disparate data sources and annotations into a single, high quality catalogue of curated regulatory information. The current release is an update of the database previously featured in the NAR Database Issue, and now contains 1 948 307 records, across 18 species, with a combined coverage of 334 215 080 bp. Complete records, annotation, and other associated data are available for browsing and download at http://www.oreganno.org/. PMID:26578589

  14. ORegAnno 3.0: a community-driven resource for curated regulatory annotation.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Cotto, Kelsy C; Wang, Grace; Griffith, Malachi; Kasaian, Katayoon; Jones, Steven J M; Montgomery, Stephen B; Griffith, Obi L

    2016-01-01

    The Open Regulatory Annotation database (ORegAnno) is a resource for curated regulatory annotation. It contains information about regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites, RNA binding sites, regulatory variants, haplotypes, and other regulatory elements. ORegAnno differentiates itself from other regulatory resources by facilitating crowd-sourced interpretation and annotation of regulatory observations from the literature and highly curated resources. It contains a comprehensive annotation scheme that aims to describe both the elements and outcomes of regulatory events. Moreover, ORegAnno assembles these disparate data sources and annotations into a single, high quality catalogue of curated regulatory information. The current release is an update of the database previously featured in the NAR Database Issue, and now contains 1 948 307 records, across 18 species, with a combined coverage of 334 215 080 bp. Complete records, annotation, and other associated data are available for browsing and download at http://www.oreganno.org/. PMID:26578589

  15. Improved systematic tRNA gene annotation allows new insights into the evolution of mitochondrial tRNA structures and into the mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Jühling, Frank; Pütz, Joern; Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Middendorf, Martin; Florentz, Catherine; Stadler, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are present in all types of cells as well as in organelles. tRNAs of animal mitochondria show a low level of primary sequence conservation and exhibit ‘bizarre’ secondary structures, lacking complete domains of the common cloverleaf. Such sequences are hard to detect and hence frequently missed in computational analyses and mitochondrial genome annotation. Here, we introduce an automatic annotation procedure for mitochondrial tRNA genes in Metazoa based on sequence and structural information in manually curated covariance models. The method, applied to re-annotate 1876 available metazoan mitochondrial RefSeq genomes, allows to distinguish between remaining functional genes and degrading ‘pseudogenes’, even at early stages of divergence. The subsequent analysis of a comprehensive set of mitochondrial tRNA genes gives new insights into the evolution of structures of mitochondrial tRNA sequences as well as into the mechanisms of genome rearrangements. We find frequent losses of tRNA genes concentrated in basal Metazoa, frequent independent losses of individual parts of tRNA genes, particularly in Arthropoda, and wide-spread conserved overlaps of tRNAs in opposite reading direction. Direct evidence for several recent Tandem Duplication-Random Loss events is gained, demonstrating that this mechanism has an impact on the appearance of new mitochondrial gene orders. PMID:22139921

  16. Meeting report: a workshop on Best Practices in Genome Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Madupu, Ramana; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Harrow, Jennifer; Wilming, Laurens G.; Böhme, Ulrike; Lamesch, Philippe; Hannick, Linda I.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to annotate the genomes of a wide variety of model organisms are currently carried out by sequencing centers, model organism databases and academic/institutional laboratories around the world. Different annotation methods and tools have been developed over time to meet the needs of biologists faced with the task of annotating biological data. While standardized methods are essential for consistent curation within each annotation group, methods and tools can differ between groups, especially when the groups are curating different organisms. Biocurators from several institutes met at the Third International Biocuration Conference in Berlin, Germany, April 2009 and hosted the ‘Best Practices in Genome Annotation: Inference from Evidence’ workshop to share their strategies, pipelines, standards and tools. This article documents the material presented in the workshop. PMID:20428316

  17. Animal QTLdb: an improved database tool for livestock animal QTL/association data dissemination in the post-genome era.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Liang; Park, Carissa A; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Reecy, James M

    2013-01-01

    The Animal QTL database (QTLdb; http://www.animalgenome.org/QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and single-nucleotide polymorphism/gene association data on livestock animal species. An earlier version was published in the Nucleic Acids Research Database issue in 2007. Since then, we have continued our efforts to develop new and improved database tools to allow more data types, parameters and functions. Our efforts have transformed the Animal QTLdb into a tool that actively serves the research community as a quality data repository and more importantly, a provider of easily accessible tools and functions to disseminate QTL and gene association information. The QTLdb has been heavily used by the livestock genomics community since its first public release in 2004. To date, there are 5920 cattle, 3442 chicken, 7451 pigs, 753 sheep and 88 rainbow trout data points in the database, and at least 290 publications that cite use of the database. The rapid advancement in genomic studies of cattle, chicken, pigs, sheep and other livestock animals has presented us with challenges, as well as opportunities for the QTLdb to meet the evolving needs of the research community. Here, we report our progress over the recent years and highlight new functions and services available to the general public. PMID:23180796

  18. IUPHAR-DB: updated database content and new features

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Pawson, Adam J.; Lukito, Veny; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P.; Bombail, Vincent; Davenport, Anthony P.; Peters, John A.; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J.; NC-IUPHAR

    2013-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) database, IUPHAR-DB (http://www.iuphar-db.org) is an open access, online database providing detailed, expert-driven annotation of the primary literature on human and rodent receptors and other drug targets, together with the substances that act on them. The present release includes information on the products of 646 genes from four major protein classes (G protein-coupled receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels) and ∼3180 bioactive molecules (endogenous ligands, licensed drugs and key pharmacological tools) that interact with them. We have described previously the classification and curation of data for small molecule ligands in the database; in this update we have annotated 366 endogenous peptide ligands with their amino acid sequences, post-translational modifications, links to precursor genes, species differences and relationships with other molecules in the database (e.g. those derived from the same precursor). We have also matched targets with their endogenous ligands (peptides and small molecules), with particular attention paid to identifying bioactive peptide ligands generated by post-translational modification of precursor proteins. Other improvements to the database include enhanced information on the clinical relevance of targets and ligands in the database, more extensive links to other databases and a pilot project for the curation of enzymes as drug targets. PMID:23087376

  19. IUPHAR-DB: updated database content and new features.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Pawson, Adam J; Lukito, Veny; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P; Bombail, Vincent; Davenport, Anthony P; Peters, John A; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) database, IUPHAR-DB (http://www.iuphar-db.org) is an open access, online database providing detailed, expert-driven annotation of the primary literature on human and rodent receptors and other drug targets, together with the substances that act on them. The present release includes information on the products of 646 genes from four major protein classes (G protein-coupled receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels) and ∼3180 bioactive molecules (endogenous ligands, licensed drugs and key pharmacological tools) that interact with them. We have described previously the classification and curation of data for small molecule ligands in the database; in this update we have annotated 366 endogenous peptide ligands with their amino acid sequences, post-translational modifications, links to precursor genes, species differences and relationships with other molecules in the database (e.g. those derived from the same precursor). We have also matched targets with their endogenous ligands (peptides and small molecules), with particular attention paid to identifying bioactive peptide ligands generated by post-translational modification of precursor proteins. Other improvements to the database include enhanced information on the clinical relevance of targets and ligands in the database, more extensive links to other databases and a pilot project for the curation of enzymes as drug targets. PMID:23087376

  20. Asynchronous multimedia annotations for web-based collaboration in biology education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Dragutin; Lank, E.; Ramirez, F. A.; Raghavendra, S.; Chen, F.; Pekiner, C.; Fregoso, A.; Marquez, A.

    2004-12-01

    The focus of this paper is on the design, implementation, and validation of asynchronous multimedia annotations designed for Web-based collaboration in educational and research settings. The two key questions we explore in this paper are: How useful are such annotations and what purpose do annotations serve? What is the ease of use of our specific implementation of annotations? The context of our project has been in the area of multimedia information usage and collaboration in the biological sciences. We have developed asynchronous annotations for HTML and image data. Our annotations can be executed via any browser and require no downloads. They are stored in a central database allowing search and asynchronous access by all registered users. An easy to use user interface allows users to add, view and search annotations. We also performed a usability study that showed that our implementation of text annotations to validate our implementation.

  1. Asynchronous multimedia annotations for web-based collaboration in biology education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Dragutin; Lank, E.; Ramirez, F. A.; Raghavendra, S.; Chen, F.; Pekiner, C.; Fregoso, A.; Marquez, A.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the design, implementation, and validation of asynchronous multimedia annotations designed for Web-based collaboration in educational and research settings. The two key questions we explore in this paper are: How useful are such annotations and what purpose do annotations serve? What is the ease of use of our specific implementation of annotations? The context of our project has been in the area of multimedia information usage and collaboration in the biological sciences. We have developed asynchronous annotations for HTML and image data. Our annotations can be executed via any browser and require no downloads. They are stored in a central database allowing search and asynchronous access by all registered users. An easy to use user interface allows users to add, view and search annotations. We also performed a usability study that showed that our implementation of text annotations to validate our implementation.

  2. Semantic Annotation of Mutable Data

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Robert A.; Dou, Lei; Hanken, James; Kelly, Maureen; Lowery, David B.; Ludäscher, Bertram; Macklin, James A.; Morris, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic annotation of scientific data is very similar to annotation of documents. Both types of annotation amplify the original object, add related knowledge to it, and dispute or support assertions in it. In each case, annotation is a framework for discourse about the original object, and, in each case, an annotation needs to clearly identify its scope and its own terminology. However, electronic annotation of data differs from annotation of documents: the content of the annotations, including expectations and supporting evidence, is more often shared among members of networks. Any consequent actions taken by the holders of the annotated data could be shared as well. But even those current annotation systems that admit data as their subject often make it difficult or impossible to annotate at fine-enough granularity to use the results in this way for data quality control. We address these kinds of issues by offering simple extensions to an existing annotation ontology and describe how the results support an interest-based distribution of annotations. We are using the result to design and deploy a platform that supports annotation services overlaid on networks of distributed data, with particular application to data quality control. Our initial instance supports a set of natural science collection metadata services. An important application is the support for data quality control and provision of missing data. A previous proof of concept demonstrated such use based on data annotations modeled with XML-Schema. PMID:24223697

  3. Improved locus-specific database for OPA1 mutations allows inclusion of advanced clinical data.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Marc; Caignard, Angélique; Milea, Dan; Leruez, Stéphanie; Cassereau, Julien; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Verny, Christophe; Bonneau, Dominique; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most common inherited optic neuropathy, due to mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) in about 60%-80% of cases. At present, the clinical heterogeneity of patients carrying OPA1 variants renders genotype-phenotype correlations difficulty. Since 2005, when we published the first locus-specific database (LSDB) dedicated to OPA1, a large amount of new clinical and genetic knowledge has emerged, prompting us to update this database. We have used the Leiden Open-Source Variation Database to develop a clinico-biological database, aiming to add clinical phenotypes related to OPA1 variants. As a first step, we validated this new database by registering several patients previously reported in the literature, as well as new patients from our own institution. Contributors may now make online submissions of clinical and molecular descriptions of phenotypes due to OPA1 variants, including detailed ophthalmological and neurological data, with due respect to patient anonymity. The updated OPA1 LSDB (http://opa1.mitodyn.org/) should prove useful for molecular diagnoses, large-scale variant statistics, and genotype-phenotype correlations in ADOA studies. PMID:25243597

  4. IMPROVED SEARCH OF PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS DATABASES FOR SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC INVERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, R.; Lites, B. W.; Ramos, A. Asensio

    2013-08-20

    We describe a simple technique for the acceleration of spectro-polarimetric inversions based on principal component analysis (PCA) of Stokes profiles. This technique involves the indexing of the database models based on the sign of the projections (PCA coefficients) of the first few relevant orders of principal components of the four Stokes parameters. In this way, each model in the database can be attributed a distinctive binary number of 2{sup 4n} bits, where n is the number of PCA orders used for the indexing. Each of these binary numbers (indices) identifies a group of ''compatible'' models for the inversion of a given set of observed Stokes profiles sharing the same index. The complete set of the binary numbers so constructed evidently determines a partition of the database. The search of the database for the PCA inversion of spectro-polarimetric data can profit greatly from this indexing. In practical cases it becomes possible to approach the ideal acceleration factor of 2{sup 4n} as compared to the systematic search of a non-indexed database for a traditional PCA inversion. This indexing method relies on the existence of a physical meaning in the sign of the PCA coefficients of a model. For this reason, the presence of model ambiguities and of spectro-polarimetric noise in the observations limits in practice the number n of relevant PCA orders that can be used for the indexing.

  5. Improved Search of Principal Component Analysis Databases for Spectro-polarimetric Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Lites, B. W.; López Ariste, A.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for the acceleration of spectro-polarimetric inversions based on principal component analysis (PCA) of Stokes profiles. This technique involves the indexing of the database models based on the sign of the projections (PCA coefficients) of the first few relevant orders of principal components of the four Stokes parameters. In this way, each model in the database can be attributed a distinctive binary number of 24n bits, where n is the number of PCA orders used for the indexing. Each of these binary numbers (indices) identifies a group of "compatible" models for the inversion of a given set of observed Stokes profiles sharing the same index. The complete set of the binary numbers so constructed evidently determines a partition of the database. The search of the database for the PCA inversion of spectro-polarimetric data can profit greatly from this indexing. In practical cases it becomes possible to approach the ideal acceleration factor of 24n as compared to the systematic search of a non-indexed database for a traditional PCA inversion. This indexing method relies on the existence of a physical meaning in the sign of the PCA coefficients of a model. For this reason, the presence of model ambiguities and of spectro-polarimetric noise in the observations limits in practice the number n of relevant PCA orders that can be used for the indexing.

  6. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update.

    PubMed

    Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Raney, Brian J; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2016-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the "Data Integrator", for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment. PMID:26590259

  7. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update

    PubMed Central

    Speir, Matthew L.; Zweig, Ann S.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Raney, Brian J.; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T.; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A.; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A.; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2016-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the “Data Integrator”, for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment. PMID:26590259

  8. A robust data-driven approach for gene ontology annotation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanpeng; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Gene ontology (GO) and GO annotation are important resources for biological information management and knowledge discovery, but the speed of manual annotation became a major bottleneck of database curation. BioCreative IV GO annotation task aims to evaluate the performance of system that automatically assigns GO terms to genes based on the narrative sentences in biomedical literature. This article presents our work in this task as well as the experimental results after the competition. For the evidence sentence extraction subtask, we built a binary classifier to identify evidence sentences using reference distance estimator (RDE), a recently proposed semi-supervised learning method that learns new features from around 10 million unlabeled sentences, achieving an F1 of 19.3% in exact match and 32.5% in relaxed match. In the post-submission experiment, we obtained 22.1% and 35.7% F1 performance by incorporating bigram features in RDE learning. In both development and test sets, RDE-based method achieved over 20% relative improvement on F1 and AUC performance against classical supervised learning methods, e.g. support vector machine and logistic regression. For the GO term prediction subtask, we developed an information retrieval-based method to retrieve the GO term most relevant to each evidence sentence using a ranking function that combined cosine similarity and the frequency of GO terms in documents, and a filtering method based on high-level GO classes. The best performance of our submitted runs was 7.8% F1 and 22.2% hierarchy F1. We found that the incorporation of frequency information and hierarchy filtering substantially improved the performance. In the post-submission evaluation, we obtained a 10.6% F1 using a simpler setting. Overall, the experimental analysis showed our approaches were robust in both the two tasks. PMID:25425037

  9. Functional gene clustering via gene annotation sentences, MeSH and GO keywords from biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Jeyakumar; Ganapathy, Jawahar

    2007-01-01

    Gene function annotation remains a key challenge in modern biology. This is especially true for high-throughput techniques such as gene expression experiments. Vital information about genes is available electronically from biomedical literature in the form of full texts and abstracts. In addition, various publicly available databases (such as GenBank, Gene Ontology and Entrez) provide access to gene-related information at different levels of biological organization, granularity and data format. This information is being used to assess and interpret the results from high-throughput experiments. To improve keyword extraction for annotational clustering and other types of analyses, we have developed a novel text mining approach, which is based on keywords identified at the level of gene annotation sentences (in particular sentences characterizing biological function) instead of entire abstracts. Further, to improve the expressiveness and usefulness of gene annotation terms, we investigated the combination of sentence-level keywords with terms from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and Gene Ontology (GO) resources. We find that sentence-level keywords combined with MeSH terms outperforms the typical ‘baseline’ set-up (term frequencies at the level of abstracts) by a significant margin, whereas the addition of GO terms improves matters only marginally. We validated our approach on the basis of a manually annotated corpus of 200 abstracts generated on the basis of 2 cancer categories and 10 genes per category. We applied the method in the context of three sets of differentially expressed genes obtained from pediatric brain tumor samples. This analysis suggests novel interpretations of discovered gene expression patterns. PMID:18305827

  10. The Coral Triangle Atlas: an integrated online spatial database system for improving coral reef management.

    PubMed

    Cros, Annick; Ahamad Fatan, Nurulhuda; White, Alan; Teoh, Shwu Jiau; Tan, Stanley; Handayani, Christian; Huang, Charles; Peterson, Nate; Venegas Li, Ruben; Siry, Hendra Yusran; Fitriana, Ria; Gove, Jamison; Acoba, Tomoko; Knight, Maurice; Acosta, Renerio; Andrew, Neil; Beare, Doug

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the construction of an online GIS database system, hosted by WorldFish, which stores bio-physical, ecological and socio-economic data for the 'Coral Triangle Area' in South-east Asia and the Pacific. The database has been built in partnership with all six (Timor-Leste, Malaysia, Indonesia, The Philippines, Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea) of the Coral Triangle countries, and represents a valuable source of information for natural resource managers at the regional scale. Its utility is demonstrated using biophysical data, data summarising marine habitats, and data describing the extent of marine protected areas in the region. PMID:24941442

  11. The Coral Triangle Atlas: An Integrated Online Spatial Database System for Improving Coral Reef Management

    PubMed Central

    Cros, Annick; Ahamad Fatan, Nurulhuda; White, Alan; Teoh, Shwu Jiau; Tan, Stanley; Handayani, Christian; Huang, Charles; Peterson, Nate; Venegas Li, Ruben; Siry, Hendra Yusran; Fitriana, Ria; Gove, Jamison; Acoba, Tomoko; Knight, Maurice; Acosta, Renerio; Andrew, Neil; Beare, Doug

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the construction of an online GIS database system, hosted by WorldFish, which stores bio-physical, ecological and socio-economic data for the ‘Coral Triangle Area’ in South-east Asia and the Pacific. The database has been built in partnership with all six (Timor-Leste, Malaysia, Indonesia, The Philippines, Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea) of the Coral Triangle countries, and represents a valuable source of information for natural resource managers at the regional scale. Its utility is demonstrated using biophysical data, data summarising marine habitats, and data describing the extent of marine protected areas in the region. PMID:24941442

  12. An annotation system for 3D fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, Maria M.; Hughes, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Annotation is a key activity of data analysis. However, current systems for data analysis focus almost exclusively on visualization. We propose a system which integrates annotations into a visualization system. Annotations are embedded in 3D data space, using the Post-it metaphor. This embedding allows contextual-based information storage and retrieval, and facilitates information sharing in collaborative environments. We provide a traditional database filter and a Magic Lens filter to create specialized views of the data. The system has been customized for fluid flow applications, with features which allow users to store parameters of visualization tools and sketch 3D volumes.

  13. Gene ontology annotation by density and gravitation models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen-Juan; Lin, Kevin Hsin-Yih; Chen, Hsin-Hsi

    2006-01-01

    Gene Ontology (GO) is developed to provide standard vocabularies of gene products in different databases. The process of annotating GO terms to genes requires curators to read through lengthy articles. Methods for speeding up or automating the annotation process are thus of great importance. We propose a GO annotation approach using full-text biomedical documents for directing more relevant papers to curators. This system explores word density and gravitation relationships between genes and GO terms. Different density and gravitation models are built and several evaluation criteria are employed to assess the effects of the proposed methods. PMID:17503384

  14. Human Genome Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstein, Mark

    A central problem for 21st century science is annotating the human genome and making this annotation useful for the interpretation of personal genomes. My talk will focus on annotating the 99% of the genome that does not code for canonical genes, concentrating on intergenic features such as structural variants (SVs), pseudogenes (protein fossils), binding sites, and novel transcribed RNAs (ncRNAs). In particular, I will describe how we identify regulatory sites and variable blocks (SVs) based on processing next-generation sequencing experiments. I will further explain how we cluster together groups of sites to create larger annotations. Next, I will discuss a comprehensive pseudogene identification pipeline, which has enabled us to identify >10K pseudogenes in the genome and analyze their distribution with respect to age, protein family, and chromosomal location. Throughout, I will try to introduce some of the computational algorithms and approaches that are required for genome annotation. Much of this work has been carried out in the framework of the ENCODE, modENCODE, and 1000 genomes projects.

  15. Improving the U.S. EPA Toxic Release Inventory database for environmental health research.

    PubMed

    Neumann, C M

    1998-01-01

    In 1986, Congress passed the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) in response to the tragic death of thousands of people in Bhopal, India, following the accidental release of the toxic gas methyl isocyanate (MIC) from a Union Carbide facility. As a component of EPCRA, certain manufacturers are required to report annually the total mass (pounds per year, lb/yr) of toxic chemicals released into the environment (air, water, land, or underground injection), treated on-site, or shipped off-site for further waste treatment. This information is compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) into a publicly accessible database known as the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI). The TRI database is designed to encourage pollution prevention and waste reduction by increasing public access to and knowledge of environmental chemical releases. EPCRA has been generally considered by industry, government, and community representatives as one of the most successful environmental laws in U.S. history. Over the past few years, EPA has initiated a three-phased expansion to EPCRA reporting requirements that will enhance the overall usefulness of the TRI database. The focus of this article is to discuss these changes and highlight several current uses of the TRI database in environmental health research. PMID:9644330

  16. Improving Child Outcomes with Data-Based Decision Making: Collecting Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojnoski, Robin L.; Gischlar, Karen L.; Missall, Kristen N.

    2009-01-01

    Collecting and graphing performance data are important parts of the educational process. Such procedures help educators, caregivers, and other important stakeholders make data-based decisions to accelerate child progress. With school-age children, collecting and graphing data have been associated with more frequent instructional changes to better…

  17. tagtog: interactive and text-mining-assisted annotation of gene mentions in PLOS full-text articles

    PubMed Central

    Cejuela, Juan Miguel; McQuilton, Peter; Ponting, Laura; Marygold, Steven J.; Stefancsik, Raymund; Millburn, Gillian H.; Rost, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    The breadth and depth of biomedical literature are increasing year upon year. To keep abreast of these increases, FlyBase, a database for Drosophila genomic and genetic information, is constantly exploring new ways to mine the published literature to increase the efficiency and accuracy of manual curation and to automate some aspects, such as triaging and entity extraction. Toward this end, we present the ‘tagtog’ system, a web-based annotation framework that can be used to mark up biological entities (such as genes) and concepts (such as Gene Ontology terms) in full-text articles. tagtog leverages manual user annotation in combination with automatic machine-learned annotation to provide accurate identification of gene symbols and gene names. As part of the BioCreative IV Interactive Annotation Task, FlyBase has used tagtog to identify and extract mentions of Drosophila melanogaster gene symbols and names in full-text biomedical articles from the PLOS stable of journals. We show here the results of three experiments with different sized corpora and assess gene recognition performance and curation speed. We conclude that tagtog-named entity recognition improves with a larger corpus and that tagtog-assisted curation is quicker than manual curation. Database URL: www.tagtog.net, www.flybase.org PMID:24715220

  18. The GATO gene annotation tool for research laboratories.

    PubMed

    Fujita, A; Massirer, K B; Durham, A M; Ferreira, C E; Sogayar, M C

    2005-11-01

    Large-scale genome projects have generated a rapidly increasing number of DNA sequences. Therefore, development of computational methods to rapidly analyze these sequences is essential for progress in genomic research. Here we present an automatic annotation system for preliminary analysis of DNA sequences. The gene annotation tool (GATO) is a Bioinformatics pipeline designed to facilitate routine functional annotation and easy access to annotated genes. It was designed in view of the frequent need of genomic researchers to access data pertaining to a common set of genes. In the GATO system, annotation is generated by querying some of the Web-accessible resources and the information is stored in a local database, which keeps a record of all previous annotation results. GATO may be accessed from everywhere through the internet or may be run locally if a large number of sequences are going to be annotated. It is implemented in PHP and Perl and may be run on any suitable Web server. Usually, installation and application of annotation systems require experience and are time consuming, but GATO is simple and practical, allowing anyone with basic skills in informatics to access it without any special training. GATO can be downloaded at [http://mariwork.iq.usp.br/gato/]. Minimum computer free space required is 2 MB. PMID:16258624

  19. ProbMetab: an R package for Bayesian probabilistic annotation of LC-MS-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ricardo R; Jourdan, Fabien; Salvanha, Diego M; Letisse, Fabien; Jamin, Emilien L; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos A; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N

    2014-05-01

    We present ProbMetab, an R package that promotes substantial improvement in automatic probabilistic liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolome annotation. The inference engine core is based on a Bayesian model implemented to (i) allow diverse source of experimental data and metadata to be systematically incorporated into the model with alternative ways to calculate the likelihood function and (ii) allow sensitive selection of biologically meaningful biochemical reaction databases as Dirichlet-categorical prior distribution. Additionally, to ensure result interpretation by system biologists, we display the annotation in a network where observed mass peaks are connected if their candidate metabolites are substrate/product of known biochemical reactions. This graph can be overlaid with other graph-based analysis, such as partial correlation networks, in a visualization scheme exported to Cytoscape, with web and stand-alone versions. PMID:24443383

  20. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  1. Global Mapping of Traditional Chinese Medicine into Bioactivity Space and Pathways Annotation Improves Mechanistic Understanding and Discovers Relationships between Therapeutic Action (Sub)classes

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zobir, Siti Zuraidah; Mohd Fauzi, Fazlin; Liggi, Sonia; Drakakis, Georgios; Fu, Xianjun; Fan, Tai-Ping; Bender, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) still needs more scientific rationale to be proven for it to be accepted further in the West. We are now in the position to propose computational hypotheses for the mode-of-actions (MOAs) of 45 TCM therapeutic action (sub)classes from in silico target prediction algorithms, whose target was later annotated with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, and to discover the relationship between them by generating a hierarchical clustering. The results of 10,749 TCM compounds showed 183 enriched targets and 99 enriched pathways from Estimation Score ≤ 0 and ≥ 5% of compounds/targets in a (sub)class. The MOA of a (sub)class was established from supporting literature. Overall, the most frequent top three enriched targets/pathways were immune-related targets such as tyrosine-protein phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2) and digestive system such as mineral absorption. We found two major protein families, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), and protein kinase family contributed to the diversity of the bioactivity space, while digestive system was consistently annotated pathway motif, which agreed with the important treatment principle of TCM, “the foundation of acquired constitution” that includes spleen and stomach. In short, the TCM (sub)classes, in many cases share similar targets/pathways despite having different indications. PMID:26989424

  2. Global Mapping of Traditional Chinese Medicine into Bioactivity Space and Pathways Annotation Improves Mechanistic Understanding and Discovers Relationships between Therapeutic Action (Sub)classes.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Zobir, Siti Zuraidah; Mohd Fauzi, Fazlin; Liggi, Sonia; Drakakis, Georgios; Fu, Xianjun; Fan, Tai-Ping; Bender, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) still needs more scientific rationale to be proven for it to be accepted further in the West. We are now in the position to propose computational hypotheses for the mode-of-actions (MOAs) of 45 TCM therapeutic action (sub)classes from in silico target prediction algorithms, whose target was later annotated with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, and to discover the relationship between them by generating a hierarchical clustering. The results of 10,749 TCM compounds showed 183 enriched targets and 99 enriched pathways from Estimation Score ≤ 0 and ≥ 5% of compounds/targets in a (sub)class. The MOA of a (sub)class was established from supporting literature. Overall, the most frequent top three enriched targets/pathways were immune-related targets such as tyrosine-protein phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2) and digestive system such as mineral absorption. We found two major protein families, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), and protein kinase family contributed to the diversity of the bioactivity space, while digestive system was consistently annotated pathway motif, which agreed with the important treatment principle of TCM, "the foundation of acquired constitution" that includes spleen and stomach. In short, the TCM (sub)classes, in many cases share similar targets/pathways despite having different indications. PMID:26989424

  3. A Web 2.0-Based Collaborative Annotation System for Enhancing Knowledge Sharing in Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Addison Y. S.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Zhang, Jia

    2010-01-01

    A limitation of current Web-based collaborative learning is the restricted ability of students to create and share individual annotations with annotated documents. Applying Web 2.0 collaborative annotation systems and analyzing students' annotation behavior has attracted attention to improve collaborative learning. This study designed a…

  4. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  5. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  6. Automating Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob L.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-01-22

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  7. Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-06-06

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  8. miRBase Tracker: keeping track of microRNA annotation changes

    PubMed Central

    Van Peer, Gert; Lefever, Steve; Anckaert, Jasper; Beckers, Anneleen; Rihani, Ali; Van Goethem, Alan; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Zeka, Fjoralba; Ongenaert, Maté; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Since 2002, information on individual microRNAs (miRNAs), such as reference names and sequences, has been stored in miRBase, the reference database for miRNA annotation. As a result of progressive insights into the miRNome and its complexity, miRBase underwent addition and deletion of miRNA records, changes in annotated miRNA sequences and adoption of more complex naming schemes over time. Unfortunately, miRBase does not allow straightforward assessment of these ongoing miRNA annotation changes, which has resulted in substantial ambiguity regarding miRNA identity and sequence in public literature, in target prediction databases and in content on various commercially available analytical platforms. As a result, correct interpretation, comparison and integration of miRNA study results are compromised, which we demonstrate here by assessing the impact of ignoring sequence annotation changes. To address this problem, we developed miRBase Tracker (www.mirbasetracker.org), an easy-to-use online database that keeps track of all historical and current miRNA annotation present in the miRBase database. Three basic functionalities allow researchers to keep their miRNA annotation up-to-date, reannotate analytical miRNA platforms and link published results with outdated annotation to the latest miRBase release. We expect miRBase Tracker to increase the transparency and annotation accuracy in the field of miRNA research. Database URL: www.mirbasetracker.org PMID:25157074

  9. Annotation: The Savant Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Pamela; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Whilst interest has focused on the origin and nature of the savant syndrome for over a century, it is only within the past two decades that empirical group studies have been carried out. Methods: The following annotation briefly reviews relevant research and also attempts to address outstanding issues in this research area.…

  10. Collaborative Movie Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zad, Damon Daylamani; Agius, Harry

    In this paper, we focus on metadata for self-created movies like those found on YouTube and Google Video, the duration of which are increasing in line with falling upload restrictions. While simple tags may have been sufficient for most purposes for traditionally very short video footage that contains a relatively small amount of semantic content, this is not the case for movies of longer duration which embody more intricate semantics. Creating metadata is a time-consuming process that takes a great deal of individual effort; however, this effort can be greatly reduced by harnessing the power of Web 2.0 communities to create, update and maintain it. Consequently, we consider the annotation of movies within Web 2.0 environments, such that users create and share that metadata collaboratively and propose an architecture for collaborative movie annotation. This architecture arises from the results of an empirical experiment where metadata creation tools, YouTube and an MPEG-7 modelling tool, were used by users to create movie metadata. The next section discusses related work in the areas of collaborative retrieval and tagging. Then, we describe the experiments that were undertaken on a sample of 50 users. Next, the results are presented which provide some insight into how users interact with existing tools and systems for annotating movies. Based on these results, the paper then develops an architecture for collaborative movie annotation.

  11. Annotated Bibliography. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Norris G.

    An annotated bibliography which presents approximately 300 references from 1951 to 1973 on the education of severely/profoundly handicapped persons. Citations are grouped alphabetically by author's name within the following categories: characteristics and treatment, gross motor development, sensory and motor development, physical therapy for the…

  12. Ghostwriting: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Donald B.

    Drawn from communication journals, historical and news magazines, business and industrial magazines, political science and world affairs journals, general interest periodicals, and literary and political review magazines, the approximately 90 entries in this annotated bibliography discuss ghostwriting as practiced through the ages and reveal the…

  13. CART—a chemical annotation retrieval toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Deghou, Samy; Zeller, Georg; Iskar, Murat; Driessen, Marja; Castillo, Mercedes; van Noort, Vera; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Data on bioactivities of drug-like chemicals are rapidly accumulating in public repositories, creating new opportunities for research in computational systems pharmacology. However, integrative analysis of these data sets is difficult due to prevailing ambiguity between chemical names and identifiers and a lack of cross-references between databases. Results: To address this challenge, we have developed CART, a Chemical Annotation Retrieval Toolkit. As a key functionality, it matches an input list of chemical names into a comprehensive reference space to assign unambiguous chemical identifiers. In this unified space, bioactivity annotations can be easily retrieved from databases covering a wide variety of chemical effects on biological systems. Subsequently, CART can determine annotations enriched in the input set of chemicals and display these in tabular format and interactive network visualizations, thereby facilitating integrative analysis of chemical bioactivity data. Availability and Implementation: CART is available as a Galaxy web service (cart.embl.de). Source code and an easy-to-install command line tool can also be obtained from the web site. Contact: bork@embl.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27256313

  14. Nutrition & Adolescent Pregnancy: A Selected Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Agricultural Library (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This annotated bibliography on nutrition and adolescent pregnancy is intended to be a source of technical assistance for nurses, nutritionists, physicians, educators, social workers, and other personnel concerned with improving the health of teenage mothers and their babies. It is divided into two major sections. The first section lists selected…

  15. Automated analysis and annotation of basketball video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, Drew D.; Tan, Yap-Peng; Kulkarni, Sanjeev R.; Ramadge, Peter J.

    1997-01-01

    Automated analysis and annotation of video sequences are important for digital video libraries, content-based video browsing and data mining projects. A successful video annotation system should provide users with useful video content summary in a reasonable processing time. Given the wide variety of video genres available today, automatically extracting meaningful video content for annotation still remains hard by using current available techniques. However, a wide range video has inherent structure such that some prior knowledge about the video content can be exploited to improve our understanding of the high-level video semantic content. In this paper, we develop tools and techniques for analyzing structured video by using the low-level information available directly from MPEG compressed video. Being able to work directly in the video compressed domain can greatly reduce the processing time and enhance storage efficiency. As a testbed, we have developed a basketball annotation system which combines the low-level information extracted from MPEG stream with the prior knowledge of basketball video structure to provide high level content analysis, annotation and browsing for events such as wide- angle and close-up views, fast breaks, steals, potential shots, number of possessions and possession times. We expect our approach can also be extended to structured video in other domains.

  16. On the Dynamic RSS Feedbacks of Indoor Fingerprinting Databases for Localization Reliability Improvement.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaoyang; Tao, Wenyuan; Own, Chung-Ming; Pan, Zhenjiang

    2016-01-01

    Location data is one of the most widely used context data types in context-aware and ubiquitous computing applications. To support locating applications in indoor environments, numerous systems with different deployment costs and positioning accuracies have been developed over the past decade. One useful method, based on received signal strength (RSS), provides a set of signal transmission access points. However, compiling a remeasurement RSS database involves a high cost, which is impractical in dynamically changing environments, particularly in highly crowded areas. In this study, we propose a dynamic estimation resampling method for certain locations chosen from a set of remeasurement fingerprinting databases. Our proposed method adaptively applies different, newly updated and offline fingerprinting points according to the temporal and spatial strength of the location. To achieve accuracy within a simulated area, the proposed method requires approximately 3% of the feedback to attain a double correctness probability comparable to similar methods; in a real environment, our proposed method can obtain excellent 1 m accuracy errors in the positioning system. PMID:27537879

  17. COGNIZER: A Framework for Functional Annotation of Metagenomic Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Tungadri; Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Reddy, CVSK; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in an unprecedented increase in the number of metagenomes that are being sequenced world-wide. Given their volume, functional annotation of metagenomic sequence datasets requires specialized computational tools/techniques. In spite of having high accuracy, existing stand-alone functional annotation tools necessitate end-users to perform compute-intensive homology searches of metagenomic datasets against "multiple" databases prior to functional analysis. Although, web-based functional annotation servers address to some extent the problem of availability of compute resources, uploading and analyzing huge volumes of sequence data on a shared public web-service has its own set of limitations. In this study, we present COGNIZER, a comprehensive stand-alone annotation framework which enables end-users to functionally annotate sequences constituting metagenomic datasets. The COGNIZER framework provides multiple workflow options. A subset of these options employs a novel directed-search strategy which helps in reducing the overall compute requirements for end-users. The COGNIZER framework includes a cross-mapping database that enables end-users to simultaneously derive/infer KEGG, Pfam, GO, and SEED subsystem information from the COG annotations. Results Validation experiments performed with real-world metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, generated using diverse sequencing technologies, indicate that the novel directed-search strategy employed in COGNIZER helps in reducing the compute requirements without significant loss in annotation accuracy. A comparison of COGNIZER's results with pre-computed benchmark values indicate the reliability of the cross-mapping database employed in COGNIZER. Conclusion The COGNIZER framework is capable of comprehensively annotating any metagenomic or metatranscriptomic dataset from varied sequencing platforms in functional terms. Multiple search options in COGNIZER provide

  18. Apollo: a sequence annotation editor

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, SE; Searle, SMJ; Harris, N; Gibson, M; Iyer, V; Richter, J; Wiel, C; Bayraktaroglu, L; Birney, E; Crosby, MA; Kaminker, JS; Matthews, BB; Prochnik, SE; Smith, CD; Tupy, JL; Rubin, GM; Misra, S; Mungall, CJ; Clamp, ME

    2002-01-01

    The well-established inaccuracy of purely computational methods for annotating genome sequences necessitates an interactive tool to allow biological experts to refine these approximations by viewing and independently evaluating the data supporting each annotation. Apollo was developed to meet this need, enabling curators to inspect genome annotations closely and edit them. FlyBase biologists successfully used Apollo to annotate the Drosophila melanogaster genome and it is increasingly being used as a starting point for the development of customized annotation editing tools for other genome projects. PMID:12537571

  19. The MagIC Online Database: Improving the Archive Quality via a New Review System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.; Jarboe, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is committed to providing the paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and affiliated scientific communities on-line access to peer-reviewed, published, and raw data, and interpretations, along with online analytics and visualization tools. The MagIC Database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/) is growing rapidly with new rock and paleomagnetic datasets being uploaded daily. Users can upload contributions for private viewing in the context of published data in the MagIC Database and can elect to share an unpublished dataset with a small group of users (e.g. collaborators, journal reviewers, editors, etc.). Once the data are published, the contribution can be associated with a citable reference and made visible to the general public. Rock and paleomagnetic studies vary considerably in complexity and types of results. To accommodate these variable datasets, the MagIC Data Model has evolved into a large collection of tables with hundreds of fields available. Many of these are recommended for use, but not required, providing great flexibility to accommodate minimal information available from legacy datasets at the same time as detailed modern studies. These published and contributed results are priceless to the scientific community, but are not easily accessible for further use without appropriate metadata describing the methods employed in the study. MagIC has developed an internal review system to rapidly assess the accuracy and completeness of the metadata used and to ensure appropriate placement and descriptions of data in the contributions. Experts in the field have volunteered as MagIC editors and reviewers: they comment on the technicalities of archiving the data, (not their scientific merit which remains a task for the journal peer-review system), and provide feedback to the contributor. Successfully reviewed contributions are free of data entry errors and misunderstandings about the data model, and fully document the methods in the

  20. Fuzzy emotional semantic analysis and automated annotation of scene images.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianfang; Chen, Lichao

    2015-01-01

    With the advances in electronic and imaging techniques, the production of digital images has rapidly increased, and the extraction and automated annotation of emotional semantics implied by images have become issues that must be urgently addressed. To better simulate human subjectivity and ambiguity for understanding scene images, the current study proposes an emotional semantic annotation method for scene images based on fuzzy set theory. A fuzzy membership degree was calculated to describe the emotional degree of a scene image and was implemented using the Adaboost algorithm and a back-propagation (BP) neural network. The automated annotation method was trained and tested using scene images from the SUN Database. The annotation results were then compared with those based on artificial annotation. Our method showed an annotation accuracy rate of 91.2% for basic emotional values and 82.4% after extended emotional values were added, which correspond to increases of 5.5% and 8.9%, respectively, compared with the results from using a single BP neural network algorithm. Furthermore, the retrieval accuracy rate based on our method reached approximately 89%. This study attempts to lay a solid foundation for the automated emotional semantic annotation of more types of images and therefore is of practical significance. PMID:25838818

  1. Annotations of Mexican bullfighting videos for semantic index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya Obeso, Abraham; Oropesa Morales, Lester Arturo; Fernando Vázquez, Luis; Cocolán Almeda, Sara Ivonne; Stoian, Andrei; García Vázquez, Mireya Saraí; Zamudio Fuentes, Luis Miguel; Montiel Perez, Jesús Yalja; de la O Torres, Saul; Ramírez Acosta, Alejandro Alvaro

    2015-09-01

    The video annotation is important for web indexing and browsing systems. Indeed, in order to evaluate the performance of video query and mining techniques, databases with concept annotations are required. Therefore, it is necessary generate a database with a semantic indexing that represents the digital content of the Mexican bullfighting atmosphere. This paper proposes a scheme to make complex annotations in a video in the frame of multimedia search engine project. Each video is partitioned using our segmentation algorithm that creates shots of different length and different number of frames. In order to make complex annotations about the video, we use ELAN software. The annotations are done in two steps: First, we take note about the whole content in each shot. Second, we describe the actions as parameters of the camera like direction, position and deepness. As a consequence, we obtain a more complete descriptor of every action. In both cases we use the concepts of the TRECVid 2014 dataset. We also propose new concepts. This methodology allows to generate a database with the necessary information to create descriptors and algorithms capable to detect actions to automatically index and classify new bullfighting multimedia content.

  2. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  3. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    David J. States

    1998-08-01

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  4. Managing and Querying Image Annotation and Markup in XML

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fusheng; Pan, Tony; Sharma, Ashish; Saltz, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Proprietary approaches for representing annotations and image markup are serious barriers for researchers to share image data and knowledge. The Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project is developing a standard based information model for image annotation and markup in health care and clinical trial environments. The complex hierarchical structures of AIM data model pose new challenges for managing such data in terms of performance and support of complex queries. In this paper, we present our work on managing AIM data through a native XML approach, and supporting complex image and annotation queries through native extension of XQuery language. Through integration with xService, AIM databases can now be conveniently shared through caGrid. PMID:21218167

  5. Improving the analysis, storage and sharing of neuroimaging data using relational databases and distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Uri; Skipper, Jeremy I; Wilde, Michael J; Nusbaum, Howard C; Small, Steven L

    2008-01-15

    The increasingly complex research questions addressed by neuroimaging research impose substantial demands on computational infrastructures. These infrastructures need to support management of massive amounts of data in a way that affords rapid and precise data analysis, to allow collaborative research, and to achieve these aims securely and with minimum management overhead. Here we present an approach that overcomes many current limitations in data analysis and data sharing. This approach is based on open source database management systems that support complex data queries as an integral part of data analysis, flexible data sharing, and parallel and distributed data processing using cluster computing and Grid computing resources. We assess the strengths of these approaches as compared to current frameworks based on storage of binary or text files. We then describe in detail the implementation of such a system and provide a concrete description of how it was used to enable a complex analysis of fMRI time series data. PMID:17964812

  6. The OMA orthology database in 2015: function predictions, better plant support, synteny view and other improvements.

    PubMed

    Altenhoff, Adrian M; Škunca, Nives; Glover, Natasha; Train, Clément-Marie; Sueki, Anna; Piližota, Ivana; Gori, Kevin; Tomiczek, Bartlomiej; Müller, Steven; Redestig, Henning; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The Orthologous Matrix (OMA) project is a method and associated database inferring evolutionary relationships amongst currently 1706 complete proteomes (i.e. the protein sequence associated for every protein-coding gene in all genomes). In this update article, we present six major new developments in OMA: (i) a new web interface; (ii) Gene Ontology function predictions as part of the OMA pipeline; (iii) better support for plant genomes and in particular homeologs in the wheat genome; (iv) a new synteny viewer providing the genomic context of orthologs; (v) statically computed hierarchical orthologous groups subsets downloadable in OrthoXML format; and (vi) possibility to export parts of the all-against-all computations and to combine them with custom data for 'client-side' orthology prediction. OMA can be accessed through the OMA Browser and various programmatic interfaces at http://omabrowser.org. PMID:25399418

  7. Improving the Analysis, Storage and Sharing of Neuroimaging Data using Relational Databases and Distributed Computing

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Uri; Skipper, Jeremy I.; Wilde, Michael J.; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Small, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    The increasingly complex research questions addressed by neuroimaging research impose substantial demands on computational infrastructures. These infrastructures need to support management of massive amounts of data in a way that affords rapid and precise data analysis, to allow collaborative research, and to achieve these aims securely and with minimum management overhead. Here we present an approach that overcomes many current limitations in data analysis and data sharing. This approach is based on open source database management systems that support complex data queries as an integral part of data analysis, flexible data sharing, and parallel and distributed data processing using cluster computing and Grid computing resources. We assess the strengths of these approaches as compared to current frameworks based on storage of binary or text files. We then describe in detail the implementation of such a system and provide a concrete description of how it was used to enable a complex analysis of fMRI time series data. PMID:17964812

  8. The UCSC Genome Browser database: extensions and updates 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Laurence R.; Zweig, Ann S.; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M.; Wong, Matthew; Sloan, Cricket A.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Roe, Greg; Rhead, Brooke; Raney, Brian J.; Pohl, Andy; Malladi, Venkat S.; Li, Chin H.; Lee, Brian T.; Learned, Katrina; Kirkup, Vanessa; Hsu, Fan; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A.; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Goldman, Mary; Giardine, Belinda M.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Diekhans, Mark; Cline, Melissa S.; Clawson, Hiram; Barber, Galt P.; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2013-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) offers online public access to a growing database of genomic sequence and annotations for a wide variety of organisms. The Browser is an integrated tool set for visualizing, comparing, analysing and sharing both publicly available and user-generated genomic datasets. As of September 2012, genomic sequence and a basic set of annotation ‘tracks’ are provided for 63 organisms, including 26 mammals, 13 non-mammal vertebrates, 3 invertebrate deuterostomes, 13 insects, 6 worms, yeast and sea hare. In the past year 19 new genome assemblies have been added, and we anticipate releasing another 28 in early 2013. Further, a large number of annotation tracks have been either added, updated by contributors or remapped to the latest human reference genome. Among these are an updated UCSC Genes track for human and mouse assemblies. We have also introduced several features to improve usability, including new navigation menus. This article provides an update to the UCSC Genome Browser database, which has been previously featured in the Database issue of this journal. PMID:23155063

  9. Allele Frequencies Net Database: Improvements for storage of individual genotypes and analysis of existing data.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Eduardo Jose Melos; McCabe, Antony; Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2016-03-01

    The Allele Frequencies Net Database (AFND) is a freely accessible database which stores population frequencies for alleles or genes of the immune system in worldwide populations. Herein we introduce two new tools. We have defined new classifications of data (gold, silver and bronze) to assist users in identifying the most suitable populations for their tasks. The gold standard datasets are defined by allele frequencies summing to 1, sample sizes >50 and high resolution genotyping, while silver standard datasets do not meet gold standard genotyping resolution and/or sample size criteria. The bronze standard datasets are those that could not be classified under the silver or gold standards. The gold standard includes >500 datasets covering over 3 million individuals from >100 countries at one or more of the following loci: HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1 and -DRB1 - with all loci except DPA1 present in more than 220 datasets. Three out of 12 geographic regions have low representation (the majority of their countries having less than five datasets) and the Central Asia region has no representation. There are 18 countries that are not represented by any gold standard datasets but are represented by at least one dataset that is either silver or bronze standard. We also briefly summarize the data held by AFND for KIR genes, alleles and their ligands. Our second new component is a data submission tool to assist users in the collection of the genotypes of the individuals (raw data), facilitating submission of short population reports to Human Immunology, as well as simplifying the submission of population demographics and frequency data. PMID:26585775

  10. Detection of gene annotations and protein-protein interaction associated disorders through transitive relationships between integrated annotations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasingly high amounts of heterogeneous and valuable controlled biomolecular annotations are available, but far from exhaustive and scattered in many databases. Several annotation integration and prediction approaches have been proposed, but these issues are still unsolved. We previously created a Genomic and Proteomic Knowledge Base (GPKB) that efficiently integrates many distributed biomolecular annotation and interaction data of several organisms, including 32,956,102 gene annotations, 273,522,470 protein annotations and 277,095 protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Results By comprehensively leveraging transitive relationships defined by the numerous association data integrated in GPKB, we developed a software procedure that effectively detects and supplement consistent biomolecular annotations not present in the integrated sources. According to some defined logic rules, it does so only when the semantic type of data and of their relationships, as well as the cardinality of the relationships, allow identifying molecular biology compliant annotations. Thanks to controlled consistency and quality enforced on data integrated in GPKB, and to the procedures used to avoid error propagation during their automatic processing, we could reliably identify many annotations, which we integrated in GPKB. They comprise 3,144 gene to pathway and 21,942 gene to biological function annotations of many organisms, and 1,027 candidate associations between 317 genetic disorders and 782 human PPIs. Overall estimated recall and precision of our approach were 90.56 % and 96.61 %, respectively. Co-functional evaluation of genes with known function showed high functional similarity between genes with new detected and known annotation to the same pathway; considering also the new detected gene functional annotations enhanced such functional similarity, which resembled the one existing between genes known to be annotated to the same pathway. Strong evidence was also found in

  11. Effects of Annotations and Homework on Learning Achievement: An Empirical Study of Scratch Programming Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Addison Y. S.; Huang, Chester S. J.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Ding, T. J.; Hsieh, Y. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan elementary schools, Scratch programming has been taught for more than four years. Previous studies have shown that personal annotations is a useful learning method that improve learning performance. An annotation-based Scratch programming (ASP) system provides for the creation, share, and review of annotations and homework solutions in…

  12. MIPS: analysis and annotation of proteins from whole genomes.

    PubMed

    Mewes, H W; Amid, C; Arnold, R; Frishman, D; Güldener, U; Mannhaupt, G; Münsterkötter, M; Pagel, P; Strack, N; Stümpflen, V; Warfsmann, J; Ruepp, A

    2004-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF), Neuherberg, Germany, provides protein sequence-related information based on whole-genome analysis. The main focus of the work is directed toward the systematic organization of sequence-related attributes as gathered by a variety of algorithms, primary information from experimental data together with information compiled from the scientific literature. MIPS maintains automatically generated and manually annotated genome-specific databases, develops systematic classification schemes for the functional annotation of protein sequences and provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of protein sequences. This report updates the information on the yeast genome (CYGD), the Neurospora crassa genome (MNCDB), the database of complete cDNAs (German Human Genome Project, NGFN), the database of mammalian protein-protein interactions (MPPI), the database of FASTA homologies (SIMAP), and the interface for the fast retrieval of protein-associated information (QUIPOS). The Arabidopsis thaliana database, the rice database, the plant EST databases (MATDB, MOsDB, SPUTNIK), as well as the databases for the comprehensive set of genomes (PEDANT genomes) are described elsewhere in the 2003 and 2004 NAR database issues, respectively. All databases described, and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS web server (http://mips.gsf.de). PMID:14681354

  13. neXtA5: accelerating annotation of articles via automated approaches in neXtProt.

    PubMed

    Mottin, Luc; Gobeill, Julien; Pasche, Emilie; Michel, Pierre-André; Cusin, Isabelle; Gaudet, Pascale; Ruch, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of published articles poses a challenge for curated databases to remain up-to-date. To help the scientific community and database curators deal with this issue, we have developed an application, neXtA5, which prioritizes the literature for specific curation requirements. Our system, neXtA5, is a curation service composed of three main elements. The first component is a named-entity recognition module, which annotates MEDLINE over some predefined axes. This report focuses on three axes: Diseases, the Molecular Function and Biological Process sub-ontologies of the Gene Ontology (GO). The automatic annotations are then stored in a local database, BioMed, for each annotation axis. Additional entities such as species and chemical compounds are also identified. The second component is an existing search engine, which retrieves the most relevant MEDLINE records for any given query. The third component uses the content of BioMed to generate an axis-specific ranking, which takes into account the density of named-entities as stored in the Biomed database. The two ranked lists are ultimately merged using a linear combination, which has been specifically tuned to support the annotation of each axis. The fine-tuning of the coefficients is formally reported for each axis-driven search. Compared with PubMed, which is the system used by most curators, the improvement is the following: +231% for Diseases, +236% for Molecular Functions and +3153% for Biological Process when measuring the precision of the top-returned PMID (P0 or mean reciprocal rank). The current search methods significantly improve the search effectiveness of curators for three important curation axes. Further experiments are being performed to extend the curation types, in particular protein-protein interactions, which require specific relationship extraction capabilities. In parallel, user-friendly interfaces powered with a set of JSON web services are currently being

  14. neXtA5: accelerating annotation of articles via automated approaches in neXtProt

    PubMed Central

    Mottin, Luc; Gobeill, Julien; Pasche, Emilie; Michel, Pierre-André; Cusin, Isabelle; Gaudet, Pascale; Ruch, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of published articles poses a challenge for curated databases to remain up-to-date. To help the scientific community and database curators deal with this issue, we have developed an application, neXtA5, which prioritizes the literature for specific curation requirements. Our system, neXtA5, is a curation service composed of three main elements. The first component is a named-entity recognition module, which annotates MEDLINE over some predefined axes. This report focuses on three axes: Diseases, the Molecular Function and Biological Process sub-ontologies of the Gene Ontology (GO). The automatic annotations are then stored in a local database, BioMed, for each annotation axis. Additional entities such as species and chemical compounds are also identified. The second component is an existing search engine, which retrieves the most relevant MEDLINE records for any given query. The third component uses the content of BioMed to generate an axis-specific ranking, which takes into account the density of named-entities as stored in the Biomed database. The two ranked lists are ultimately merged using a linear combination, which has been specifically tuned to support the annotation of each axis. The fine-tuning of the coefficients is formally reported for each axis-driven search. Compared with PubMed, which is the system used by most curators, the improvement is the following: +231% for Diseases, +236% for Molecular Functions and +3153% for Biological Process when measuring the precision of the top-returned PMID (P0 or mean reciprocal rank). The current search methods significantly improve the search effectiveness of curators for three important curation axes. Further experiments are being performed to extend the curation types, in particular protein–protein interactions, which require specific relationship extraction capabilities. In parallel, user-friendly interfaces powered with a set of JSON web services are currently being

  15. IMPROVING EMISSIONS ESTIMATES WITH COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, DATABASE EXPANSION, AND COMPREHENSIVE VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an EPA investigation of techniques to improve methods for estimating volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from area sources. Using the automobile refinishing industry for a detailed area source case study, an emission estimation method is being developed...

  16. Automated Update, Revision, and Quality Control of the Maize Genome Annotations Using MAKER-P Improves the B73 RefGen_v3 Gene Models and Identifies New Genes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Law, MeiYee; Childs, Kevin L.; Campbell, Michael S.; Stein, Joshua C.; Olson, Andrew J.; Holt, Carson; Panchy, Nicholas; Lei, Jikai; Jiao, Dian; Andorf, Carson M.; Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Ware, Doreen; Shiu, Shin-Han; Sun, Yanni; Jiang, Ning; Yandell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The large size and relative complexity of many plant genomes make creation, quality control, and dissemination of high-quality gene structure annotations challenging. In response, we have developed MAKER-P, a fast and easy-to-use genome annotation engine for plants. Here, we report the use of MAKER-P to update and revise the maize (Zea mays) B73 RefGen_v3 annotation build (5b+) in less than 3 h using the iPlant Cyberinfrastructure. MAKER-P identified and annotated 4,466 additional, well-supported protein-coding genes not present in the 5b+ annotation build, added additional untranslated regions to 1,393 5b+ gene models, identified 2,647 5b+ gene models that lack any supporting evidence (despite the use of large and diverse evidence data sets), identified 104,215 pseudogene fragments, and created an additional 2,522 noncoding gene annotations. We also describe a method for de novo training of MAKER-P for the annotation of newly sequenced grass genomes. Collectively, these results lead to the 6a maize genome annotation and demonstrate the utility of MAKER-P for rapid annotation, management, and quality control of grasses and other difficult-to-annotate plant genomes. PMID:25384563

  17. NOAA's Integrated Tsunami Database: Data for improved forecasts, warnings, research, and risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, Kelly; Dunbar, Paula; Mungov, George; Sweeney, Aaron; McCullough, Heather; Carignan, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has primary responsibility in the United States for tsunami forecast, warning, research, and supports community resiliency. NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Service for Geophysics provide a unique collection of data enabling communities to ensure preparedness and resilience to tsunami hazards. Immediately following a damaging or fatal tsunami event there is a need for authoritative data and information. The NGDC Global Historical Tsunami Database (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/) includes all tsunami events, regardless of intensity, as well as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that caused fatalities, moderate damage, or generated a tsunami. The long-term data from these events, including photographs of damage, provide clues to what might happen in the future. NGDC catalogs the information on global historical tsunamis and uses these data to produce qualitative tsunami hazard assessments at regional levels. In addition to the socioeconomic effects of a tsunami, NGDC also obtains water level data from the coasts and the deep-ocean at stations operated by the NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, and the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and produces research-quality data to isolate seismic waves (in the case of the deep-ocean sites) and the tsunami signal. These water-level data provide evidence of sea-level fluctuation and possible inundation events. NGDC is also building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support real-time forecasts, implemented at 75 US coastal communities. After a damaging or fatal event NGDC begins to collect and integrate data and information from many organizations into the hazards databases. Sources of data include our NOAA partners, the U.S. Geological Survey, the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and International Tsunami Information Center

  18. CHIANTI—An Atomic Database for Emission Lines. XIII. Soft X-Ray Improvements and Other Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 Å wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  19. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XIII. SOFT X-RAY IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-15

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 A wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  20. Similarity landscapes: An improved method for scientific visualization of information from protein and DNA database searches

    SciTech Connect

    Dogget, N.; Myers, G.; Wills, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have used computer simulations and examination of a variety of databases to answer questions about a wide range of evolutionary questions. The authors have found that there is a clear distinction in the evolution of HIV-1 and HIV-2, with the former and more virulent virus evolving more rapidly at a functional level. The authors have discovered highly non-random patterns in the evolution of HIV-1 that can be attributed to a variety of selective pressures. In the course of examination of microsatellite DNA (short repeat regions) in microorganisms, the authors have found clear differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes in their distribution, differences that can be tied to different selective pressures. They have developed a new method (topiary pruning) for enhancing the phylogenetic information contained in DNA sequences. Most recently, the authors have discovered effects in complex rainforest ecosystems that indicate strong frequency-dependent interactions between host species and their parasites, leading to the maintenance of ecosystem variability.

  1. Annotating images by mining image search results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xirong; Ma, Wei-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search results. Some 2.4 million images with their surrounding text are collected from a few photo forums to support this approach. The entire process is formulated in a divide-and-conquer framework where a query keyword is provided along with the uncaptioned image to improve both the effectiveness and efficiency. This is helpful when the collected data set is not dense everywhere. In this sense, our approach contains three steps: 1) the search process to discover visually and semantically similar search results, 2) the mining process to identify salient terms from textual descriptions of the search results, and 3) the annotation rejection process to filter out noisy terms yielded by Step 2. To ensure real-time annotation, two key techniques are leveraged-one is to map the high-dimensional image visual features into hash codes, the other is to implement it as a distributed system, of which the search and mining processes are provided as Web services. As a typical result, the entire process finishes in less than 1 second. Since no training data set is required, our approach enables annotating with unlimited vocabulary and is highly scalable and robust to outliers. Experimental results on both real Web images and a benchmark image data set show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. It is also worth noting that, although the entire approach is illustrated within the divide-and conquer framework, a query keyword is not crucial to our current implementation. We provide experimental results to prove this. PMID:18787241

  2. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families.

    PubMed

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R; Jones, Thomas A; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F A; Wheeler, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  3. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families

    PubMed Central

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D.; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R.; Jones, Thomas A.; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F.A.; Wheeler, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  4. PomBase 2015: updates to the fission yeast database

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Mark D.; Harris, Midori A.; Lock, Antonia; Rutherford, Kim; Staines, Daniel M.; Bähler, Jürg; Kersey, Paul J.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Wood, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    PomBase (http://www.pombase.org) is the model organism database for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PomBase provides a central hub for the fission yeast community, supporting both exploratory and hypothesis-driven research. It provides users easy access to data ranging from the sequence level, to molecular and phenotypic annotations, through to the display of genome-wide high-throughput studies. Recent improvements to the site extend annotation specificity, improve usability and allow for monthly data updates. Both in-house curators and community researchers provide manually curated data to PomBase. The genome browser provides access to published high-throughput data sets and the genomes of three additional Schizosaccharomyces species (Schizosaccharomyces cryophilus, Schizosaccharomyces japonicus and Schizosaccharomyces octosporus). PMID:25361970

  5. Rfam 12.0: updates to the RNA families database.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Eric P; Burge, Sarah W; Bateman, Alex; Daub, Jennifer; Eberhardt, Ruth Y; Eddy, Sean R; Floden, Evan W; Gardner, Paul P; Jones, Thomas A; Tate, John; Finn, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The Rfam database (available at http://rfam.xfam.org) is a collection of non-coding RNA families represented by manually curated sequence alignments, consensus secondary structures and annotation gathered from corresponding Wikipedia, taxonomy and ontology resources. In this article, we detail updates and improvements to the Rfam data and website for the Rfam 12.0 release. We describe the upgrade of our search pipeline to use Infernal 1.1 and demonstrate its improved homology detection ability by comparison with the previous version. The new pipeline is easier for users to apply to their own data sets, and we illustrate its ability to annotate RNAs in genomic and metagenomic data sets of various sizes. Rfam has been expanded to include 260 new families, including the well-studied large subunit ribosomal RNA family, and for the first time includes information on short sequence- and structure-based RNA motifs present within families. PMID:25392425

  6. The Male Sex Role: A Selected and Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Kathleen E.; And Others

    This bibliography, containing more than 250 entries, presents research and theoretical perspectives into the male sex role. Articles were chosen for their usefulness to researchers, with emphasis on scientific and data-based research literature. All the annotations use a standard format including subjects, method, findings and comments. Articles…

  7. Researching Treaty Information: An Annotated Guide to Key Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gordon W.

    1985-01-01

    Designed for use with both individual researchers and library instruction classes, this 68-item selective annotated guide lists sources for guides and bibliographies; treatises, digests, citators; treaty texts and their indexes; dictionaries; atlases; style manuals; indexes and abstracts; journals; online databases; and abbreviations. Eleven…

  8. Improving the Mapping of Smith-Waterman Sequence Database Searches onto CUDA-Enabled GPUs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liang-Tsung; Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Li, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Sequence alignment lies at heart of the bioinformatics. The Smith-Waterman algorithm is one of the key sequence search algorithms and has gained popularity due to improved implementations and rapidly increasing compute power. Recently, the Smith-Waterman algorithm has been successfully mapped onto the emerging general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). In this paper, we focused on how to improve the mapping, especially for short query sequences, by better usage of shared memory. We performed and evaluated the proposed method on two different platforms (Tesla C1060 and Tesla K20) and compared it with two classic methods in CUDASW++. Further, the performance on different numbers of threads and blocks has been analyzed. The results showed that the proposed method significantly improves Smith-Waterman algorithm on CUDA-enabled GPUs in proper allocation of block and thread numbers. PMID:26339591

  9. Improving the Mapping of Smith-Waterman Sequence Database Searches onto CUDA-Enabled GPUs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang-Tsung; Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Li, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Sequence alignment lies at heart of the bioinformatics. The Smith-Waterman algorithm is one of the key sequence search algorithms and has gained popularity due to improved implementations and rapidly increasing compute power. Recently, the Smith-Waterman algorithm has been successfully mapped onto the emerging general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). In this paper, we focused on how to improve the mapping, especially for short query sequences, by better usage of shared memory. We performed and evaluated the proposed method on two different platforms (Tesla C1060 and Tesla K20) and compared it with two classic methods in CUDASW++. Further, the performance on different numbers of threads and blocks has been analyzed. The results showed that the proposed method significantly improves Smith-Waterman algorithm on CUDA-enabled GPUs in proper allocation of block and thread numbers. PMID:26339591

  10. Expressed sequence tags: analysis and annotation.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, John; Blaxter, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) present a special set of problems for bioinformatic analysis. They are partial and error-prone, and large datasets can have significant internal redundancy. To facilitate analysis of small EST datasets from in-house projects, we present an integrated "pipeline" of tools that take EST data from sequence trace to database submission. These tools also can be used to provide clustering of ESTs into putative genes and to annotate these genes with preliminary sequence similarity searches. The systems are written to use the public-domain LINUX environment and other openly available analytical tools. PMID:15153624

  11. The SWISS-PROT protein sequence database and its supplement TrEMBL in 2000

    PubMed Central

    Bairoch, Amos; Apweiler, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    SWISS-PROT is a curated protein sequence database which strives to provide a high level of annotation (such as the description of the function of a protein, its domains structure, post-translational modifications, variants, etc.), a minimal level of redundancy and high level of integration with other databases. Recent developments of the database include format and content enhancements, cross-references to additional databases, new documentation files and improvements to TrEMBL, a computer-annotated supplement to SWISS-PROT. TrEMBL consists of entries in SWISS-PROT-like format derived from the translation of all coding sequences (CDSs) in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database, except the CDSs already included in SWISS-PROT. We also describe the Human Proteomics Initiative (HPI), a major project to annotate all known human sequences according to the quality standards of SWISS-PROT. SWISS-PROT is available at: http://www.expasy.ch/sprot/ and http://www.ebi.ac.uk/swissprot/ PMID:10592178

  12. The SWISS-PROT protein sequence database and its supplement TrEMBL in 2000.

    PubMed

    Bairoch, A; Apweiler, R

    2000-01-01

    SWISS-PROT is a curated protein sequence database which strives to provide a high level of annotation (such as the description of the function of a protein, its domains structure, post-translational modifications, variants, etc.), a minimal level of redundancy and high level of integration with other databases. Recent developments of the database include format and content enhancements, cross-references to additional databases, new documentation files and improvements to TrEMBL, a computer-annotated supplement to SWISS-PROT. TrEMBL consists of entries in SWISS-PROT-like format derived from the translation of all coding sequences (CDSs) in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database, except the CDSs already included in SWISS-PROT. We also describe the Human Proteomics Initiative (HPI), a major project to annotate all known human sequences according to the quality standards of SWISS-PROT. SWISS-PROT is available at: http://www.expasy.ch/sprot/ and http://www.ebi.ac.uk/swissprot/ PMID:10592178

  13. MEPD: medaka expression pattern database, genes and more

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Barba, Juan I.; Rahman, Raza-Ur; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Mateo, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    The Medaka Expression Pattern Database (MEPD; http://mepd.cos.uni-heidelberg.de/) is designed as a repository of medaka expression data for the scientific community. In this update we present two main improvements. First, we have changed the previous clone-centric view for in situ data to a gene-centric view. This is possible because now we have linked all the data present in MEPD to the medaka gene annotation in ENSEMBL. In addition, we have also connected the medaka genes in MEPD to their corresponding orthologous gene in zebrafish, again using the ENSEMBL database. Based on this, we provide a link to the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN) to allow researches to compare expression data between these two fish model organisms. As a second major improvement, we have modified the design of the database to enable it to host regulatory elements, promoters or enhancers, expression patterns in addition to gene expression. The combination of gene expression, by traditional in situ, and regulatory element expression, typically by fluorescence reporter gene, within the same platform assures consistency in terms of annotation. In our opinion, this will allow researchers to uncover new insights between the expression domain of genes and their regulatory landscape. PMID:26450962

  14. A Conceptual Model for Describing Processes of Crop Improvement in Database Structures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising research costs, broadening research goals, intellectual property rights, and other concerns have increased the need for robust approaches to manage data from crop improvement. In developing the International Crop Information System (ICIS), a flexible data model was developed to allow any conc...

  15. AGeS: A Software System for Microbial Genome Sequence Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kamal; Desai, Valmik; Cheng, Li; Khitrov, Maxim; Grover, Deepak; Satya, Ravi Vijaya; Yu, Chenggang; Zavaljevski, Nela; Reifman, Jaques

    2011-01-01

    Background The annotation of genomes from next-generation sequencing platforms needs to be rapid, high-throughput, and fully integrated and automated. Although a few Web-based annotation services have recently become available, they may not be the best solution for researchers that need to annotate a large number of genomes, possibly including proprietary data, and store them locally for further analysis. To address this need, we developed a standalone software application, the Annotation of microbial Genome Sequences (AGeS) system, which incorporates publicly available and in-house-developed bioinformatics tools and databases, many of which are parallelized for high-throughput performance. Methodology The AGeS system supports three main capabilities. The first is the storage of input contig sequences and the resulting annotation data in a central, customized database. The second is the annotation of microbial genomes using an integrated software pipeline, which first analyzes contigs from high-throughput sequencing by locating genomic regions that code for proteins, RNA, and other genomic elements through the Do-It-Yourself Annotation (DIYA) framework. The identified protein-coding regions are then functionally annotated using the in-house-developed Pipeline for Protein Annotation (PIPA). The third capability is the visualization of annotated sequences using GBrowse. To date, we have implemented these capabilities for bacterial genomes. AGeS was evaluated by comparing its genome annotations with those provided by three other methods. Our results indicate that the software tools integrated into AGeS provide annotations that are in general agreement with those provided by the compared methods. This is demonstrated by a >94% overlap in the number of identified genes, a significant number of identical annotated features, and a >90% agreement in enzyme function predictions. PMID:21408217

  16. GIFtS: annotation landscape analysis with GeneCards

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Arye; Inger, Aron; Stelzer, Gil; Strichman-Almashanu, Liora; Dalah, Irina; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene annotation is a pivotal component in computational genomics, encompassing prediction of gene function, expression analysis, and sequence scrutiny. Hence, quantitative measures of the annotation landscape constitute a pertinent bioinformatics tool. GeneCards® is a gene-centric compendium of rich annotative information for over 50,000 human gene entries, building upon 68 data sources, including Gene Ontology (GO), pathways, interactions, phenotypes, publications and many more. Results We present the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score (GIFtS) which allows a quantitative assessment of a gene's annotation status, by exploiting the unique wealth and diversity of GeneCards information. The GIFtS tool, linked from the GeneCards home page, facilitates browsing the human genome by searching for the annotation level of a specified gene, retrieving a list of genes within a specified range of GIFtS value, obtaining random genes with a specific GIFtS value, and experimenting with the GIFtS weighting algorithm for a variety of annotation categories. The bimodal shape of the GIFtS distribution suggests a division of the human gene repertoire into two main groups: the high-GIFtS peak consists almost entirely of protein-coding genes; the low-GIFtS peak consists of genes from all of the categories. Cluster analysis of GIFtS annotation vectors provides the classification of gene groups by detailed positioning in the annotation arena. GIFtS also provide measures which enable the evaluation of the databases that serve as GeneCards sources. An inverse correlation is found (for GIFtS>25) between the number of genes annotated by each source, and the average GIFtS value of genes associated with that source. Three typical source prototypes are revealed by their GIFtS distribution: genome-wide sources, sources comprising mainly highly annotated genes, and sources comprising mainly poorly annotated genes. The degree of accumulated knowledge for a given gene measured by

  17. A Factor Graph Approach to Automated GO Annotation.

    PubMed

    Spetale, Flavio E; Tapia, Elizabeth; Krsticevic, Flavia; Roda, Fernando; Bulacio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    As volume of genomic data grows, computational methods become essential for providing a first glimpse onto gene annotations. Automated Gene Ontology (GO) annotation methods based on hierarchical ensemble classification techniques are particularly interesting when interpretability of annotation results is a main concern. In these methods, raw GO-term predictions computed by base binary classifiers are leveraged by checking the consistency of predefined GO relationships. Both formal leveraging strategies, with main focus on annotation precision, and heuristic alternatives, with main focus on scalability issues, have been described in literature. In this contribution, a factor graph approach to the hierarchical ensemble formulation of the automated GO annotation problem is presented. In this formal framework, a core factor graph is first built based on the GO structure and then enriched to take into account the noisy nature of GO-term predictions. Hence, starting from raw GO-term predictions, an iterative message passing algorithm between nodes of the factor graph is used to compute marginal probabilities of target GO-terms. Evaluations on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster protein sequences from the GO Molecular Function domain showed significant improvements over competing approaches, even when protein sequences were naively characterized by their physicochemical and secondary structure properties or when loose noisy annotation datasets were considered. Based on these promising results and using Arabidopsis thaliana annotation data, we extend our approach to the identification of most promising molecular function annotations for a set of proteins of unknown function in Solanum lycopersicum. PMID:26771463

  18. A Factor Graph Approach to Automated GO Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Spetale, Flavio E.; Tapia, Elizabeth; Krsticevic, Flavia; Roda, Fernando; Bulacio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    As volume of genomic data grows, computational methods become essential for providing a first glimpse onto gene annotations. Automated Gene Ontology (GO) annotation methods based on hierarchical ensemble classification techniques are particularly interesting when interpretability of annotation results is a main concern. In these methods, raw GO-term predictions computed by base binary classifiers are leveraged by checking the consistency of predefined GO relationships. Both formal leveraging strategies, with main focus on annotation precision, and heuristic alternatives, with main focus on scalability issues, have been described in literature. In this contribution, a factor graph approach to the hierarchical ensemble formulation of the automated GO annotation problem is presented. In this formal framework, a core factor graph is first built based on the GO structure and then enriched to take into account the noisy nature of GO-term predictions. Hence, starting from raw GO-term predictions, an iterative message passing algorithm between nodes of the factor graph is used to compute marginal probabilities of target GO-terms. Evaluations on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster protein sequences from the GO Molecular Function domain showed significant improvements over competing approaches, even when protein sequences were naively characterized by their physicochemical and secondary structure properties or when loose noisy annotation datasets were considered. Based on these promising results and using Arabidopsis thaliana annotation data, we extend our approach to the identification of most promising molecular function annotations for a set of proteins of unknown function in Solanum lycopersicum. PMID:26771463

  19. a Radiocarbon Database for Improved Understanding of Global Soil Carbon Dynamics: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S.; Torn, M. S.; Sierra, C. A.; Smith, L. J.; Nave, L. E.; Workshop Paritipants, R.

    2011-12-01

    We report results of a workshop to initiate a global database of radiocarbon measurements in soil and other ecosystem compartments. Radiocarbon provides critical information for understanding the rate of exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere and hydrosphere. For example, radiocarbon has been used to demonstrate the importance of short range order minerals in stabilizing organic carbon on millennial timescales in some soils. On decadal to centennial timescales, the infiltration of 'bomb' radiocarbon provides a measure of the amount and nature of soil carbon that responds on the timescale of most human impacts. The radiocarbon sigature of chemically or physically fractionated soil, or even in specific organic compounds, can yield clues as to controls on organic matter cycling on a range of timescales. Radiocarbon in microbial biomass or respiration can be a sensitive indicator of shifts in substrate use with vegetation, nutrient availability or temperature change. Taken toghether, such measurements can provide critical tests for models of soil carbon dynamics, while patterns in soil C dynamics with edaphic factors can be used to help parameterize models at spatial scales ranging from profile to landscape to global. The advent and proliferation of accelerator mass spectrometry since the early 1990s has vastly increased the number of radiocarbon analyses carried out in soils. However, these studies have usually been carried out by individual investigators within specific sites or regions, and to date the results have not been assembled, interpreted or compared at larger spatial scales. Given the expense of radiocarbon measurements, and the need for global synthesis products to evaluate and/or develop models of soil carbon response to climate and land use changes across a range of spatial scales, our goals are to: (1) bring together in one place existing radiocarbon measurements and provide a continuing common repository for new analyses; (2) supply ancillary

  20. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  1. The IMPROVE_A temperature protocol for thermal/optical carbon analysis: maintaining consistency with a long-term database.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Chen, L W Antony; Chang, M C Oliver; Robinson, Norman F; Trimble, Dana; Kohl, Steven

    2007-09-01

    Thermally derived carbon fractions including organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) have been reported for the U.S. Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network since 1987 and have been found useful in source apportionment studies and to evaluate quartz-fiber filter adsorption of organic vapors. The IMPROVE_A temperature protocol defines temperature plateaus for thermally derived carbon fractions of 140 degrees C for OC1, 280 degrees C for OC2, 480 degrees C for OC3, and 580 degrees C for OC4 in a helium (He) carrier gas and 580 degrees C for EC1, 740 degrees C for EC2, and 840 degrees C for EC3 in a 98% He/2% oxygen (O2) carrier gas. These temperatures differ from those used previously because new hardware used for the IMPROVE thermal/optical reflectance (IMPROVE_TOR) protocol better represents the sample temperature than did the old hardware. A newly developed temperature calibration method demonstrates that these temperatures better represent sample temperatures in the older units used to quantify IMPROVE carbon fractions from 1987 through 2004. Only the thermal fractions are affected by changes in temperature. The OC and EC by TOR are insensitive to the change in temperature protocol, and therefore the long-term consistency of the IMPROVE database is conserved. A method to detect small quantities of O2 in the pure He carrier gas shows that O2 levels above 100 ppmv also affect the comparability of thermal carbon fractions but have little effect on the IMPROVE_TOR split between OC and EC. PMID:17912920

  2. Re-Annotation Is an Essential Step in Systems Biology Modeling of Functional Genomics Data

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bart H. J.; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Lamont, Susan J.; Burgess, Shane C.

    2010-01-01

    One motivation of systems biology research is to understand gene functions and interactions from functional genomics data such as that derived from microarrays. Up-to-date structural and functional annotations of genes are an essential foundation of systems biology modeling. We propose that the first essential step in any systems biology modeling of functional genomics data, especially for species with recently sequenced genomes, is gene structural and functional re-annotation. To demonstrate the impact of such re-annotation, we structurally and functionally re-annotated a microarray developed, and previously used, as a tool for disease research. We quantified the impact of this re-annotation on the array based on the total numbers of structural- and functional-annotations, the Gene Annotation Quality (GAQ) score, and canonical pathway coverage. We next quantified the impact of re-annotation on systems biology modeling using a previously published experiment that used this microarray. We show that re-annotation improves the quantity and quality of structural- and functional-annotations, allows a more comprehensive Gene Ontology based modeling, and improves pathway coverage for both the whole array and a differentially expressed mRNA subset. Our results also demonstrate that re-annotation can result in a different knowledge outcome derived from previous published research findings. We propose that, because of this, re-annotation should be considered to be an essential first step for deriving value from functional genomics data. PMID:20498845

  3. iPathCons and iPathDB: an improved insect pathway construction tool and the database

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zan; Yin, Chuanlin; Liu, Ying; Jie, Wencai; Lei, Wenjie; Li, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Insects are one of the most successful animal groups on earth. Some insects, such as the silkworm and honeybee, are beneficial to humans, whereas others are notorious pests of crops. At present, the genomes of 38 insects have been sequenced and made publically available. In addition, the transcriptomes of dozens of insects have been sequenced. As gene data rapidly accumulate, constructing the pathway of molecular interactions becomes increasingly important for entomological research. Here, we developed an improved tool, iPathCons, for knowledge-based construction of pathways from the transcriptomes or the official gene sets of genomes. Considering the high evolution diversity in insects, iPathCons uses a voting system for Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology assignment. Both stand-alone software and a web server of iPathCons are provided. Using iPathCons, we constructed the pathways of molecular interactions of 52 insects, including 37 genome-sequenced and 15 transcriptome-sequenced ones. These pathways are available in the iPathDB, which provides searches, web server, data downloads, etc. This database will be highly useful for the insect research community. Database URL: http://ento.njau.edu.cn/ipath/ PMID:25388589

  4. GOblet: a platform for Gene Ontology annotation of anonymous sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Detlef; Lehrach, Hans; Hennig, Steffen

    2004-01-01

    GOblet is a comprehensive web server application providing the annotation of anonymous sequence data with Gene Ontology (GO) terms. It uses a variety of different protein databases (human, murines, invertebrates, plants, sp-trembl) and their respective GO mappings. The user selects the appropriate database and alignment threshold and thereafter submits single or multiple nucleotide or protein sequences. Results are shown in different ways, e.g. as survey statistics for the main GO categories for all sequences or as detailed results for each single sequence that has been submitted. In its newest version, GOblet allows the batch submission of sequences and provides an improved display of results with the aid of Java applets. All output data, together with the Java applet, are packed to a downloadable archive for local installation and analysis. GOblet can be accessed freely at http://goblet.molgen.mpg.de. PMID:15215401

  5. Dizeez: an online game for human gene-disease annotation.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, Salvatore; Good, Benjamin M; Su, Andrew I

    2013-01-01

    Structured gene annotations are a foundation upon which many bioinformatics and statistical analyses are built. However the structured annotations available in public databases are a sparse representation of biological knowledge as a whole. The rate of biomedical data generation is such that centralized biocuration efforts struggle to keep up. New models for gene annotation need to be explored that expand the pace at which we are able to structure biomedical knowledge. Recently, online games have emerged as an effective way to recruit, engage and organize large numbers of volunteers to help address difficult biological challenges. For example, games have been successfully developed for protein folding (Foldit), multiple sequence alignment (Phylo) and RNA structure design (EteRNA). Here we present Dizeez, a simple online game built with the purpose of structuring knowledge of gene-disease associations. Preliminary results from game play online and at scientific conferences suggest that Dizeez is producing valid gene-disease annotations not yet present in any public database. These early results provide a basic proof of principle that online games can be successfully applied to the challenge of gene annotation. Dizeez is available at http://genegames.org. PMID:23951102

  6. Dizeez: An Online Game for Human Gene-Disease Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Loguercio, Salvatore; Good, Benjamin M.; Su, Andrew I.

    2013-01-01

    Structured gene annotations are a foundation upon which many bioinformatics and statistical analyses are built. However the structured annotations available in public databases are a sparse representation of biological knowledge as a whole. The rate of biomedical data generation is such that centralized biocuration efforts struggle to keep up. New models for gene annotation need to be explored that expand the pace at which we are able to structure biomedical knowledge. Recently, online games have emerged as an effective way to recruit, engage and organize large numbers of volunteers to help address difficult biological challenges. For example, games have been successfully developed for protein folding (Foldit), multiple sequence alignment (Phylo) and RNA structure design (EteRNA). Here we present Dizeez, a simple online game built with the purpose of structuring knowledge of gene-disease associations. Preliminary results from game play online and at scientific conferences suggest that Dizeez is producing valid gene-disease annotations not yet present in any public database. These early results provide a basic proof of principle that online games can be successfully applied to the challenge of gene annotation. Dizeez is available at http://genegames.org. PMID:23951102

  7. Human object annotation for surveillance video forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraz, Muhammad; Zafar, Iffat; Tzanidou, Giounona; Edirisinghe, Eran A.; Sarfraz, Muhammad Saquib

    2013-10-01

    A system that can automatically annotate surveillance video in a manner useful for locating a person with a given description of clothing is presented. Each human is annotated based on two appearance features: primary colors of clothes and the presence of text/logos on clothes. The annotation occurs after a robust foreground extraction stage employing a modified Gaussian mixture model-based approach. The proposed pipeline consists of a preprocessing stage where color appearance of an image is improved using a color constancy algorithm. In order to annotate color information for human clothes, we use the color histogram feature in HSV space and find local maxima to extract dominant colors for different parts of a segmented human object. To detect text/logos on clothes, we begin with the extraction of connected components of enhanced horizontal, vertical, and diagonal edges in the frames. These candidate regions are classified as text or nontext on the basis of their local energy-based shape histogram features. Further, to detect humans, a novel technique has been proposed that uses contourlet transform-based local binary pattern (CLBP) features. In the proposed method, we extract the uniform direction invariant LBP feature descriptor for contourlet transformed high-pass subimages from vertical and diagonal directional bands. In the final stage, extracted CLBP descriptors are classified by a trained support vector machine. Experimental results illustrate the superiority of our method on large-scale surveillance video data.

  8. Widowed Persons Service: Selected Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressler, Dawn, Comp.; And Others

    This document presents an annotated bibliography of books and articles on topics relevant to widowhood. These annotations are included: (1) 21 annotations on the grief process; (2) 11 annotations on personal observations about widowhood; (3) 16 annotations on practical problems surrounding widowhood, including legal and financial problems and job…

  9. Effective function annotation through catalytic residue conservation.

    PubMed

    George, Richard A; Spriggs, Ruth V; Bartlett, Gail J; Gutteridge, Alex; MacArthur, Malcolm W; Porter, Craig T; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Thornton, Janet M; Swindells, Mark B

    2005-08-30

    Because of the extreme impact of genome sequencing projects, protein sequences without accompanying experimental data now dominate public databases. Homology searches, by providing an opportunity to transfer functional information between related proteins, have become the de facto way to address this. Although a single, well annotated, close relationship will often facilitate sufficient annotation, this situation is not always the case, particularly if mutations are present in important functional residues. When only distant relationships are available, the transfer of function information is more tenuous, and the likelihood of encountering several well annotated proteins with different functions is increased. The consequence for a researcher is a range of candidate functions with little way of knowing which, if any, are correct. Here, we address the problem directly by introducing a computational approach to accurately identify and segregate related proteins into those with a functional similarity and those where function differs. This approach should find a wide range of applications, including the interpretation of genomics/proteomics data and the prioritization of targets for high-throughput structure determination. The method is generic, but here we concentrate on enzymes and apply high-quality catalytic site data. In addition to providing a series of comprehensive benchmarks to show the overall performance of our approach, we illustrate its utility with specific examples that include the correct identification of haptoglobin as a nonenzymatic relative of trypsin, discrimination of acid-d-amino acid ligases from a much larger ligase pool, and the successful annotation of BioH, a structural genomics target. PMID:16037208

  10. An improved tropospheric ozone database retrieved from SCIAMACHY Limb-Nadir-Matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Rozanov, Alexei; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, Annette; Ebojie, Felix; Rahpoe, Nabiz; Bötel, Stefan; Burrows, John

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the most important green-house gases and the main component of photochemical smog. It is either transported from the stratosphere or photochemically produced during pollution events in the troposphere that threaten the respiratory system. To investigate sources, transport mechanisms of tropospheric ozone in a global view, limb nadir matching (LNM) technique applied with SCIAMACHY instrument is used to retrieve tropospheric ozone. With the fact that 90% ozone is located in the stratosphere and only about 10% can be observed in the troposphere, the usage of satellite data requires highly qualified nadir and limb data. In this study we show an improvement of SCIAMACHY limb data as well as its influence on tropospheric ozone results. The limb nadir matching technique is also refined to increase the quality of the tropospheric ozone. The results are validated with ozone sonde measurements.

  11. Hawaii bibliographic database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.; Takahashi, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Hawaii bibliographic database has been created to contain all of the literature, from 1779 to the present, pertinent to the volcanological history of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain. References are entered in a PC- and Macintosh-compatible EndNote Plus bibliographic database with keywords and abstracts or (if no abstract) with annotations as to content. Keywords emphasize location, discipline, process, identification of new chemical data or age determinations, and type of publication. The database is updated approximately three times a year and is available to upload from an ftp site. The bibliography contained 8460 references at the time this paper was submitted for publication. Use of the database greatly enhances the power and completeness of library searches for anyone interested in Hawaiian volcanism.

  12. Update for Users of the Methanol Database: Recent Improvements, Remaining Problems, and More Complicated Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Pearson, J. C.; Drouin, B. J.; Hougen, J. T.

    2009-06-01

    Last year, we published a new global fit for normal methanol covering the first three torsional states (v_t = 0, 1 and 2) for J values up to 30^{[a]}. The global fit of approximately 5600 frequency measurements and 19 000 Fourier transform far infrared (FTFIR) wavenumber measurements to 119 parameters reached the estimated experimental measurement accuracy for the FTFIR transitions, and about twice the estimated experimental measurement accuracy for the microwave, submillimeter-wave and terahertz transitions. Due to a number of complications in that data set, we designated the work as a "living document" and encouraged measurement laboratories represented in the data set to assess carefully how their data were treated, and to partition (if appropriate) their measurements into an optimum set (for which they specify their highest measurement precision) and a less good set (for which they specify a reduced measurement precision). Using the new JPL spectrometer and additional improved measurements, we have recently revisited a large number of transitions. Poor line shapes due either to power saturation or blending were carefully treated with a multi-line peakfinding procedure and assessed with more realistic uncertainties. Assignments were also extended to higher K and J. Several perturbed systems have been identified with complicated networks of interactions. The current data set now contains nearly 9500 frequency measured transitions. While we believe that this represents a substantial improvement on the quantum number coverage of our previous paper^{[a]}, we are also aware of continuing problems in our data fitting. Above all, we are facing challenges moving into a more complicated region with networks of interactions coupling different torsional states. Li-Hong Xu, J. Fisher, R.M. Lees, H.Y. Shi, J.T. Hougen, J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, G.A. Blake, R. Braakman, 2008, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 251, 305-313.

  13. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily: genomics and annotation.

    PubMed

    Mindnich, Rebekka D; Penning, Trevor M

    2009-07-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H)-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglandins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions). Although functionally diverse, AKRs form a protein superfamily based on their high sequence identity and common protein fold, the (alpha/beta) 8 -barrel structure. Well over 150 AKR enzymes, from diverse organisms, have been annotated so far and given systematic names according to a nomenclature that is based on multiple protein sequence alignment and degree of identity. Annotation of non-vertebrate AKRs at the National Center for Biotechnology Information or Vertebrate Genome Annotation (vega) database does not often include the systematic nomenclature name, so the most comprehensive overview of all annotated AKRs is found on the AKR website (http://www.med.upenn.edu/akr/). This site also hosts links to more detailed and specialised information (eg on crystal structures, gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). The protein-based AKR nomenclature allows unambiguous identification of a given enzyme but does not reflect the wealth of genomic and transcriptomic variation that exists in the various databases. In this context, identification of putative new AKRs and their distinction from pseudogenes are challenging. This review provides a short summary of the characteristic features of AKR biochemistry and structure that have been reviewed in great detail elsewhere, and focuses mainly on nomenclature and database entries of human AKRs that so far have not been subject to systematic annotation. Recent developments in the annotation of SNP and transcript variance in AKRs are also summarised. PMID:19706366

  14. A Preliminary Full Spectrum Magnetic Anomaly Database of the United States With Improved Long Wavelengths for Studying Continental Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravat, D.; Sabaka, T.; Elshayat, A.; Aref, A.; Elawadi, E.; Kucks, R.; Hill, P.; Phillips, J.; Finn, C.; Bouligand, C.; Blakely, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Under an initiative started by Thomas G. Hildenbrand of the U. S. Geological Survey, we have improved the long-wavelength (50-2500 km) content of the regional magnetic anomaly compilation for the conterminous United States by utilizing a nearly homogeneous set of National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) magnetic surveys flown from 1975 to 1981. The surveys were flown in quadrangles of 2° of longitude by 1° of latitude with E-W flight-lines spaced 4.8 to 9.6 km, N-S tie-lines variably spaced, and a nominal terrain clearance of 122 m. Many of the surveys used base-station magnetometers to remove external field variations. NURE surveys were originally processed with IGRF core-field models, which left behind non- uniform residual trends in the data and discontinuities at survey boundaries. In this study, in place of the IGRF/DGRF, we used a spatially and temporally continuous model of the magnetic field known as the Comprehensive Model (CM), which allowed us to avoid discontinuities at survey boundaries. The CM simultaneously models the core magnetic field and long-wavelength ionospheric and magnetospheric fields, along with their induced components in the earth. Because of the availability of base-stations for removing external fields, we removed only the core-derived geomagnetic field based on CM4 (spherical harmonic degree 13) for our compilation. The NURE data have short-wavelength (less than 30 km) noise due to cultural sources, base-station offsets, and residual external field effects. It is possible to reduce and even remove these defects by identifying and editing them and by applying leveling and micro-leveling. There are also many high resolution individual surveys over the U.S. which could be incorporated into the improved NURE database; however, this could take a few years. Therefore, we have created a preliminary full spectrum magnetic anomaly database by combining short-wavelength magnetic anomalies from the North American Magnetic Anomaly Map (NAMAM

  15. Fire-induced water-repellent soils, an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalendovsky, M.A.; Cannon, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The development and nature of water-repellent, or hydrophobic, soils are important issues in evaluating hillslope response to fire. The following annotated bibliography was compiled to consolidate existing published research on the topic. Emphasis was placed on the types, causes, effects and measurement techniques of water repellency, particularly with respect to wildfires and prescribed burns. Each annotation includes a general summary of the respective publication, as well as highlights of interest to this focus. Although some references on the development of water repellency without fires, the chemistry of hydrophobic substances, and remediation of water-repellent conditions are included, coverage of these topics is not intended to be comprehensive. To develop this database, the GeoRef, Agricola, and Water Resources Abstracts databases were searched for appropriate references, and the bibliographies of each reference were then reviewed for additional entries. Additional references will be added to this bibliography as they become available. The annotated bibliography can be accessed on the Web at http://geohazards.cr.usgs.gov/html_files/landslides/ofr97-720/biblio.html. A database consisting of the references and keywords is available through a link at the above address. This database was compiled using EndNote2 plus software by Niles and Associates, and is necessary to search the database.

  16. Automated update, revision, and quality control of the maize genome annotations using MAKER-P improves the B73 RefGen_v3 gene models and identifies new genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large size and relative complexity of many plant genomes make creation, quality control, and dissemination of high-quality gene structure annotations challenging. In response, we have developed MAKER-P, a fast and easy-to-use genome annotation engine for plants. Here, we report the use of MAKER-...

  17. BioDEAL: community generation of biological annotations

    PubMed Central

    Breimyer, Paul; Green, Nathan; Kumar, Vinay; Samatova, Nagiza F

    2009-01-01

    Background Publication databases in biomedicine (e.g., PubMed, MEDLINE) are growing rapidly in size every year, as are public databases of experimental biological data and annotations derived from the data. Publications often contain evidence that confirm or disprove annotations, such as putative protein functions, however, it is increasingly difficult for biologists to identify and process published evidence due to the volume of papers and the lack of a systematic approach to associate published evidence with experimental data and annotations. Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools can help address the growing divide by providing automatic high-throughput detection of simple terms in publication text. However, NLP tools are not mature enough to identify complex terms, relationships, or events. Results In this paper we present and extend BioDEAL, a community evidence annotation system that introduces a feedback loop into the database-publication cycle to allow scientists to connect data-driven biological concepts to publications. Conclusion BioDEAL may change the way biologists relate published evidence with experimental data. Instead of biologists or research groups searching and managing evidence independently, the community can collectively build and share this knowledge. PMID:19891799

  18. The volatile compound BinBase mass spectral database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Volatile compounds comprise diverse chemical groups with wide-ranging sources and functions. These compounds originate from major pathways of secondary metabolism in many organisms and play essential roles in chemical ecology in both plant and animal kingdoms. In past decades, sampling methods and instrumentation for the analysis of complex volatile mixtures have improved; however, design and implementation of database tools to process and store the complex datasets have lagged behind. Description The volatile compound BinBase (vocBinBase) is an automated peak annotation and database system developed for the analysis of GC-TOF-MS data derived from complex volatile mixtures. The vocBinBase DB is an extension of the previously reported metabolite BinBase software developed to track and identify derivatized metabolites. The BinBase algorithm uses deconvoluted spectra and peak metadata (retention index, unique ion, spectral similarity, peak signal-to-noise ratio, and peak purity) from the Leco ChromaTOF software, and annotates peaks using a multi-tiered filtering system with stringent thresholds. The vocBinBase algorithm assigns the identity of compounds existing in the database. Volatile compound assignments are supported by the Adams mass spectral-retention index library, which contains over 2,000 plant-derived volatile compounds. Novel molecules that are not found within vocBinBase are automatically added using strict mass spectral and experimental criteria. Users obtain fully annotated data sheets with quantitative information for all volatile compounds for studies that may consist of thousands of chromatograms. The vocBinBase database may also be queried across different studies, comprising currently 1,537 unique mass spectra generated from 1.7 million deconvoluted mass spectra of 3,435 samples (18 species). Mass spectra with retention indices and volatile profiles are available as free download under the CC-BY agreement (http

  19. Sma3s: A Three-Step Modular Annotator for Large Sequence Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Viguera, Enrique; Claros, M. Gonzalo; Trelles, Oswaldo; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J.

    2014-01-01

    Automatic sequence annotation is an essential component of modern ‘omics’ studies, which aim to extract information from large collections of sequence data. Most existing tools use sequence homology to establish evolutionary relationships and assign putative functions to sequences. However, it can be difficult to define a similarity threshold that achieves sufficient coverage without sacrificing annotation quality. Defining the correct configuration is critical and can be challenging for non-specialist users. Thus, the development of robust automatic annotation techniques that generate high-quality annotations without needing expert knowledge would be very valuable for the research community. We present Sma3s, a tool for automatically annotating very large collections of biological sequences from any kind of gene library or genome. Sma3s is composed of three modules that progressively annotate query sequences using either: (i) very similar homologues, (ii) orthologous sequences or (iii) terms enriched in groups of homologous sequences. We trained the system using several random sets of known sequences, demonstrating average sensitivity and specificity values of ∼85%. In conclusion, Sma3s is a versatile tool for high-throughput annotation of a wide variety of sequence datasets that outperforms the accuracy of other well-established annotation algorithms, and it can enrich existing database annotations and uncover previously hidden features. Importantly, Sma3s has already been used in the functional annotation of two published transcriptomes. PMID:24501397

  20. Sma3s: a three-step modular annotator for large sequence datasets.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Viguera, Enrique; Claros, M Gonzalo; Trelles, Oswaldo; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2014-08-01

    Automatic sequence annotation is an essential component of modern 'omics' studies, which aim to extract information from large collections of sequence data. Most existing tools use sequence homology to establish evolutionary relationships and assign putative functions to sequences. However, it can be difficult to define a similarity threshold that achieves sufficient coverage without sacrificing annotation quality. Defining the correct configuration is critical and can be challenging for non-specialist users. Thus, the development of robust automatic annotation techniques that generate high-quality annotations without needing expert knowledge would be very valuable for the research community. We present Sma3s, a tool for automatically annotating very large collections of biological sequences from any kind of gene library or genome. Sma3s is composed of three modules that progressively annotate query sequences using either: (i) very similar homologues, (ii) orthologous sequences or (iii) terms enriched in groups of homologous sequences. We trained the system using several random sets of known sequences, demonstrating average sensitivity and specificity values of ~85%. In conclusion, Sma3s is a versatile tool for high-throughput annotation of a wide variety of sequence datasets that outperforms the accuracy of other well-established annotation algorithms, and it can enrich existing database annotations and uncover previously hidden features. Importantly, Sma3s has already been used in the functional annotation of two published transcriptomes. PMID:24501397

  1. Cognition inspired framework for indoor scene annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhipeng; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Xianglong

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple yet effective scene annotation framework based on a combination of bag-of-visual words (BoVW), three-dimensional scene structure estimation, scene context, and cognitive theory. From a macroperspective, the proposed cognition-based hybrid motivation framework divides the annotation problem into empirical inference and real-time classification. Inspired by the inference ability of human beings, common objects of indoor scenes are defined for experience-based inference, while in the real-time classification stage, an improved BoVW-based multilayer abstract semantics labeling method is proposed by introducing abstract semantic hierarchies to narrow the semantic gap and improve the performance of object categorization. The proposed framework was evaluated on a variety of common data sets and experimental results proved its effectiveness.

  2. Communication and Gender: Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd-Mancillas, William R.; Krug, Linda

    Focusing on the similarities and differences in men's and women's verbal and nonverbal communication behavior, this 33-item annotated bibliography presents a sample of articles appearing in speech communication publications on the subject. Categories of the annotated bibliography are books, sexism and sexual harassment in academia, theoretic…

  3. Drug Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieson, Moira B.

    This bibliography consists of a total of 215 entries dealing with drug education, including curriculum guides, and drawn from documents in the ERIC system. There are two sections, the first containing 130 annotated citations of documents and journal articles, and the second containing 85 citations of journal articles without annotations, but with…

  4. Women in Communication: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Carol A.

    This annotated bibliography is designed to survey the field of women in communication. The bibliography is centered on a specific context: who are and who were the women who worked in the communication field, and specifically, what were their writings like? The 56 annotations date from 1949 through 1990 and deal mostly with books (especially…

  5. Genome Wide Re-Annotation of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus with New Insights into Genes Involved in Biomass Degradation and Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Nupoor; Selvaraj, Ashok; KrishnaKumaar, Lakshmi; Kumar, Gopal Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus has proven itself to be an excellent candidate for biological hydrogen (H2) production, but still it has major drawbacks like sensitivity to high osmotic pressure and low volumetric H2 productivity, which should be considered before it can be used industrially. A whole genome re-annotation work has been carried out as an attempt to update the incomplete genome information that causes gap in the knowledge especially in the area of metabolic engineering, to improve the H2 producing capabilities of C. saccharolyticus. Whole genome re-annotation was performed through manual means for 2,682 Coding Sequences (CDSs). Bioinformatics tools based on sequence similarity, motif search, phylogenetic analysis and fold recognition were employed for re-annotation. Our methodology could successfully add functions for 409 hypothetical proteins (HPs), 46 proteins previously annotated as putative and assigned more accurate functions for the known protein sequences. Homology based gene annotation has been used as a standard method for assigning function to novel proteins, but over the past few years many non-homology based methods such as genomic context approaches for protein function prediction have been developed. Using non-homology based functional prediction methods, we were able to assign cellular processes or physical complexes for 249 hypothetical sequences. Our re-annotation pipeline highlights the addition of 231 new CDSs generated from MicroScope Platform, to the original genome with functional prediction for 49 of them. The re-annotation of HPs and new CDSs is stored in the relational database that is available on the MicroScope web-based platform. In parallel, a comparative genome analyses were performed among the members of genus Caldicellulosiruptor to understand the function and evolutionary processes. Further, with results from integrated re-annotation studies (homology and genomic context approach), we strongly suggest that Csac

  6. Functional Annotation Analytics of Rhodopseudomonas palustris Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Shaneka S.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.; Brown, Shyretha D.; McAllister, Donee L.; Hall, Charnia C.; McDuffy, Wanaki M.; Medley, Tamara L.; Udensi, Udensi K.; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V.; Ayensu, Wellington K.; Cohly, Hari H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris, a nonsulphur purple photosynthetic bacteria, has been extensively investigated for its metabolic versatility including ability to produce hydrogen gas from sunlight and biomass. The availability of the finished genome sequences of six R. palustris strains (BisA53, BisB18, BisB5, CGA009, HaA2 and TIE-1) combined with online bioinformatics software for integrated analysis presents new opportunities to determine the genomic basis of metabolic versatility and ecological lifestyles of the bacteria species. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the functional annotations available for multiple R. palustris genomes to identify annotations that can be further investigated for strain-specific or uniquely shared phenotypic characteristics. A total of 2,355 protein family Pfam domain annotations were clustered based on presence or absence in the six genomes. The clustering process identified groups of functional annotations including those that could be verified as strain-specific or uniquely shared phenotypes. For example, genes encoding water/glycerol transport were present in the genome sequences of strains CGA009 and BisB5, but absent in strains BisA53, BisB18, HaA2 and TIE-1. Protein structural homology modeling predicted that the two orthologous 240 aa R. palustris aquaporins have water-specific transport function. Based on observations in other microbes, the presence of aquaporin in R. palustris strains may improve freeze tolerance in natural conditions of rapid freezing such as nitrogen fixation at low temperatures where access to liquid water is a limiting factor for nitrogenase activation. In the case of adaptive loss of aquaporin genes, strains may be better adapted to survive in conditions of high-sugar content such as fermentation of biomass for biohydrogen production. Finally, web-based resources were developed to allow for interactive, user-defined selection of the relationship between protein family annotations and the R

  7. MAKER: An easy-to-use annotation pipeline designed for emerging model organism genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cantarel, Brandi L.; Korf, Ian; Robb, Sofia M.C.; Parra, Genis; Ross, Eric; Moore, Barry; Holt, Carson; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro; Yandell, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a portable and easily configurable genome annotation pipeline called MAKER. Its purpose is to allow investigators to independently annotate eukaryotic genomes and create genome databases. MAKER identifies repeats, aligns ESTs and proteins to a genome, produces ab initio gene predictions, and automatically synthesizes these data into gene annotations having evidence-based quality indices. MAKER is also easily trainable: Outputs of preliminary runs are used to automatically retrain its gene-prediction algorithm, producing higher-quality gene-models on subsequent runs. MAKER’s inputs are minimal, and its outputs can be used to create a GMOD database. Its outputs can also be viewed in the Apollo Genome browser; this feature of MAKER provides an easy means to annotate, view, and edit individual contigs and BACs without the overhead of a database. As proof of principle, we have used MAKER to annotate the genome of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and to create a new genome database, SmedGD. We have also compared MAKER’s performance to other published annotation pipelines. Our results demonstrate that MAKER provides a simple and effective means to convert a genome sequence into a community-accessible genome database. MAKER should prove especially useful for emerging model organism genome projects for which extensive bioinformatics resources may not be readily available. PMID:18025269

  8. Reliability Of A Surgeon-Reported Morbidity And Mortality Database: A Comparison Of Short-Term Morbidity Between The Scoliosis Research Society And National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Databases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Gao, Yubo; Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Nathan J.; Cho, Samuel K.; Mendoza-Lattes, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background There exists a lack of comparison between large national healthcare databases reporting surgical morbidity and mortality. Prior authors have expressed concern that the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) membership may have underreported complications in spinal surgery. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to compare the incidence of morbidity between the SRS and National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) databases. Methods We reviewed patients enrolled between 2012 and 2013, with a total of 96,875 patients identified in the SRS dataset and 15,909 in the combined adult and pediatric NSQIP dataset. Patients were matched based on diagnostic category,and a univariate analysis was used to compare reported complication rates in the categories of perioperative infection, neurologic injury, and mortality. The SRS database only requires detailed demographic data reporting on patients that have had a complication event. We compared the demographics and comorbidities of this subgroup, and used this as a surrogate to assess the potential magnitude of confounders. Results Small differences existed between the SRS and NSQIP databases in terms of mortality (0.1% v. 0.2%), infection (1.2% v. 2%), and neurologic injury (0.8% v. 0.1%) (p<0.001 for each comparison). Infection rates were consistently lower across multiple diagnostic sub-categories in the SRS database, whereas neurologic injury rates were consistently lower in the NSQIP database. These differences reached statistical significance across several diagnostic subcategories, but the clinical magnitude of the differences was small. Amongst the patients with a complication, modest differences in comorbidities existed between the two cohorts. Conclusion Overall, the incidence of short-term morbidity and mortality was similar between the two databases. There were modest differences in comorbidities, which may explain the small differences observed in morbidity. Concerns regarding possible under

  9. Validating automatic semantic annotation of anatomy in DICOM CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Criminisi, Antonio; Shotton, Jamie; White, Steve; Robertson, Duncan; Sparks, Bobbi; Munasinghe, Indeera; Siddiqui, Khan

    2011-03-01

    In the current health-care environment, the time available for physicians to browse patients' scans is shrinking due to the rapid increase in the sheer number of images. This is further aggravated by mounting pressure to become more productive in the face of decreasing reimbursement. Hence, there is an urgent need to deliver technology which enables faster and effortless navigation through sub-volume image visualizations. Annotating image regions with semantic labels such as those derived from the RADLEX ontology can vastly enhance image navigation and sub-volume visualization. This paper uses random regression forests for efficient, automatic detection and localization of anatomical structures within DICOM 3D CT scans. A regression forest is a collection of decision trees which are trained to achieve direct mapping from voxels to organ location and size in a single pass. This paper focuses on comparing automated labeling with expert-annotated ground-truth results on a database of 50 highly variable CT scans. Initial investigations show that regression forest derived localization errors are smaller and more robust than those achieved by state-of-the-art global registration approaches. The simplicity of the algorithm's context-rich visual features yield typical runtimes of less than 10 seconds for a 5123 voxel DICOM CT series on a single-threaded, single-core machine running multiple trees; each tree taking less than a second. Furthermore, qualitative evaluation demonstrates that using the detected organs' locations as index into the image volume improves the efficiency of the navigational workflow in all the CT studies.

  10. Comparison of concept recognizers for building the Open Biomedical Annotator.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nigam H; Bhatia, Nipun; Jonquet, Clement; Rubin, Daniel; Chiang, Annie P; Musen, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) is developing a system for automated, ontology-based access to online biomedical resources (Shah NH, et al.: Ontology-driven indexing of public datasets for translational bioinformatics. BMC Bioinformatics 2009, 10(Suppl 2):S1). The system's indexing workflow processes the text metadata of diverse resources such as datasets from GEO and ArrayExpress to annotate and index them with concepts from appropriate ontologies. This indexing requires the use of a concept-recognition tool to identify ontology concepts in the resource's textual metadata. In this paper, we present a comparison of two concept recognizers - NLM's MetaMap and the University of Michigan's Mgrep. We utilize a number of data sources and dictionaries to evaluate the concept recognizers in terms of precision, recall, speed of execution, scalability and customizability. Our evaluations demonstrate that Mgrep has a clear edge over MetaMap for large-scale service oriented applications. Based on our analysis we also suggest areas of potential improvements for Mgrep. We have subsequently used Mgrep to build the Open Biomedical Annotator service. The Annotator service has access to a large dictionary of biomedical terms derived from the United Medical Language System (UMLS) and NCBO ontologies. The Annotator also leverages the hierarchical structure of the ontologies and their mappings to expand annotations. The Annotator service is available to the community as a REST Web service for creating ontology-based annotations of their data. PMID:19761568

  11. Unlimited Thirst for Genome Sequencing, Data Interpretation, and Database Usage in Genomic Era: The Road towards Fast-Track Crop Plant Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Mahalingam

    2015-01-01

    The number of sequenced crop genomes and associated genomic resources is growing rapidly with the advent of inexpensive next generation sequencing methods. Databases have become an integral part of all aspects of science research, including basic and applied plant and animal sciences. The importance of databases keeps increasing as the volume of datasets from direct and indirect genomics, as well as other omics approaches, keeps expanding in recent years. The databases and associated web portals provide at a minimum a uniform set of tools and automated analysis across a wide range of crop plant genomes. This paper reviews some basic terms and considerations in dealing with crop plant databases utilization in advancing genomic era. The utilization of databases for variation analysis with other comparative genomics tools, and data interpretation platforms are well described. The major focus of this review is to provide knowledge on platforms and databases for genome-based investigations of agriculturally important crop plants. The utilization of these databases in applied crop improvement program is still being achieved widely; otherwise, the end for sequencing is not far away. PMID:25874133

  12. The Porcine Immunology and Nutrition Resource Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse genomics-based databases have been developed to facilitate research with human and rodent models. Current porcine gene databases, however, lack the nutritional and immunological orientation and robust annotation to design effective molecular tools to study relevant pig models. To address t...

  13. Fast T Wave Detection Calibrated by Clinical Knowledge with Annotation of P and T Waves

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Eskofier, Bjoern; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited studies on the automatic detection of T waves in arrhythmic electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. This is perhaps because there is no available arrhythmia dataset with annotated T waves. There is a growing need to develop numerically-efficient algorithms that can accommodate the new trend of battery-driven ECG devices. Moreover, there is also a need to analyze long-term recorded signals in a reliable and time-efficient manner, therefore improving the diagnostic ability of mobile devices and point-of-care technologies. Methods Here, the T wave annotation of the well-known MIT-BIH arrhythmia database is discussed and provided. Moreover, a simple fast method for detecting T waves is introduced. A typical T wave detection method has been reduced to a basic approach consisting of two moving averages and dynamic thresholds. The dynamic thresholds were calibrated using four clinically known types of sinus node response to atrial premature depolarization (compensation, reset, interpolation, and reentry). Results The determination of T wave peaks is performed and the proposed algorithm is evaluated on two well-known databases, the QT and MIT-BIH Arrhythmia databases. The detector obtained a sensitivity of 97.14% and a positive predictivity of 99.29% over the first lead of the validation databases (total of 221,186 beats). Conclusions We present a simple yet very reliable T wave detection algorithm that can be potentially implemented on mobile battery-driven devices. In contrast to complex methods, it can be easily implemented in a digital filter design. PMID:26197321

  14. Image Annotation by Latent Community Detection and Multikernel Learning.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yun; Qian, Xueming; Li, Qing; Wang, Meng; Hong, Richang; Tian, Qi

    2015-11-01

    Automatic image annotation is an attractive service for users and administrators of online photo sharing websites. In this paper, we propose an image annotation approach that exploits latent semantic community of labels and multikernel learning (LCMKL). First, a concept graph is constructed for labels indicating the relationship between the concepts. Based on the concept graph, semantic communities are explored using an automatic community detection method. For an image to be annotated, a multikernel support vector machine is used to determine the image's latent community from its visual features. Then, a candidate label ranking based approach is determined by intracommunity and intercommunity ranking. Experiments on the NUS-WIDE database and IAPR TC-12 data set demonstrate that LCMKL outperforms some state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:26068319

  15. Functional annotation of hypothetical proteins – A review

    PubMed Central

    Sivashankari, Selvarajan; Shanmughavel, Piramanayagam

    2006-01-01

    The complete human genome sequences in the public database provide ways to understand the blue print of life. As of June 29, 2006, 27 archaeal, 326 bacterial and 21 eukaryotes is complete genomes are available and the sequencing for 316 bacterial, 24 archaeal, 126 eukaryotic genomes are in progress. The traditional biochemical/molecular experiments can assign accurate functions for genes in these genomes. However, the process is time-consuming and costly. Despite several efforts, only 50-60 % of genes have been annotated in most completely sequenced genomes. Automated genome sequence analysis and annotation may provide ways to understand genomes. Thus, determination of protein function is one of the challenging problems of the post-genome era. This demands bioinformatics to predict functions of un-annotated protein sequences by developing efficient tools. Here, we discuss some of the recent and popular approaches developed in Bioinformatics to predict functions for hypothetical proteins. PMID:17597916

  16. Scripps Genome ADVISER: Annotation and Distributed Variant Interpretation SERver

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phillip H.; Shipman, William J.; Erikson, Galina A.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Torkamani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of human genomes is a major challenge. We present the Scripps Genome ADVISER (SG-ADVISER) suite, which aims to fill the gap between data generation and genome interpretation by performing holistic, in-depth, annotations and functional predictions on all variant types and effects. The SG-ADVISER suite includes a de-identification tool, a variant annotation web-server, and a user interface for inheritance and annotation-based filtration. SG-ADVISER allows users with no bioinformatics expertise to manipulate large volumes of variant data with ease – without the need to download large reference databases, install software, or use a command line interface. SG-ADVISER is freely available at genomics.scripps.edu/ADVISER. PMID:25706643

  17. MaGe: a microbial genome annotation system supported by synteny results.

    PubMed

    Vallenet, David; Labarre, Laurent; Rouy, Zoé; Barbe, Valérie; Bocs, Stéphanie; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Lajus, Aurélie; Pascal, Géraldine; Scarpelli, Claude; Médigue, Claudine

    2006-01-01

    Magnifying Genomes (MaGe) is a microbial genome annotation system based on a relational database containing information on bacterial genomes, as well as a web interface to achieve genome annotation projects. Our system allows one to initiate the annotation of a genome at the early stage of the finishing phase. MaGe's main features are (i) integration of annotation data from bacterial genomes enhanced by a gene coding re-annotation process using accurate gene models, (ii) integration of results obtained with a wide range of bioinformatics methods, among which exploration of gene context by searching for conserved synteny and reconstruction of metabolic pathways, (iii) an advanced web interface allowing multiple users to refine the automatic assignment of gene product functions. MaGe is also linked to numerous well-known biological databases and systems. Our system has been thoroughly tested during the annotation of complete bacterial genomes (Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, Frankia alni) and is currently used in the context of several new microbial genome annotation projects. In addition, MaGe allows for annotation curation and exploration of already published genomes from various genera (e.g. Yersinia, Bacillus and Neisseria). MaGe can be accessed at http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/mage. PMID:16407324

  18. MaGe: a microbial genome annotation system supported by synteny results

    PubMed Central

    Vallenet, David; Labarre, Laurent; Rouy, Zoé; Barbe, Valérie; Bocs, Stéphanie; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Lajus, Aurélie; Pascal, Géraldine; Scarpelli, Claude; Médigue, Claudine

    2006-01-01

    Magnifying Genomes (MaGe) is a microbial genome annotation system based on a relational database containing information on bacterial genomes, as well as a web interface to achieve genome annotation projects. Our system allows one to initiate the annotation of a genome at the early stage of the finishing phase. MaGe's main features are (i) integration of annotation data from bacterial genomes enhanced by a gene coding re-annotation process using accurate gene models, (ii) integration of results obtained with a wide range of bioinformatics methods, among which exploration of gene context by searching for conserved synteny and reconstruction of metabolic pathways, (iii) an advanced web interface allowing multiple users to refine the automatic assignment of gene product functions. MaGe is also linked to numerous well-known biological databases and systems. Our system has been thoroughly tested during the annotation of complete bacterial genomes (Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, Frankia alni) and is currently used in the context of several new microbial genome annotation projects. In addition, MaGe allows for annotation curation and exploration of already published genomes from various genera (e.g. Yersinia, Bacillus and Neisseria). MaGe can be accessed at . PMID:16407324

  19. Databases Improve Technical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graube, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    In Lower Saxony, technology studies as part of preparing technical education teachers for primary and partly for secondary education can be studied only at two universities--the Technical University of Brunswick and the University of Oldenburg. Technology education is not available at the Gymnasium (a type of secondary school leading to the…

  20. Assembly and annotation of a non-model gastropod (Nerita melanotragus) transcriptome: a comparison of De novo assemblers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The sequencing, de novo assembly and annotation of transcriptome datasets generated with next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled biologists to answer genomic questions in non-model species with unprecedented ease. Reliable and accurate de novo assembly and annotation of transcriptomes, however, is a critically important step for transcriptome assemblies generated from short read sequences. Typical benchmarks for assembly and annotation reliability have been performed with model species. To address the reliability and accuracy of de novo transcriptome assembly in non-model species, we generated an RNAseq dataset for an intertidal gastropod mollusc species, Nerita melanotragus, and compared the assembly produced by four different de novo transcriptome assemblers; Velvet, Oases, Geneious and Trinity, for a number of quality metrics and redundancy. Results Transcriptome sequencing on the Ion Torrent PGM™ produced 1,883,624 raw reads with a mean length of 133 base pairs (bp). Both the Trinity and Oases de novo assemblers produced the best assemblies based on all quality metrics including fewer contigs, increased N50 and average contig length and contigs of greater length. Overall the BLAST and annotation success of our assemblies was not high with only 15-19% of contigs assigned a putative function. Conclusions We believe that any improvement in annotation success of gastropod species will require more gastropod genome sequences, but in particular an increase in mollusc protein sequences in public databases. Overall, this paper demonstrates that reliable and accurate de novo transcriptome assemblies can be generated from short read sequencers with the right assembly algorithms. PMID:25084827

  1. Animal Toxins: How is Complexity Represented in Databases?

    PubMed Central

    Jungo, Florence; Estreicher, Anne; Bairoch, Amos; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    Peptide toxins synthesized by venomous animals have been extensively studied in the last decades. To be useful to the scientific community, this knowledge has been stored, annotated and made easy to retrieve by several databases. The aim of this article is to present what type of information users can access from each database. ArachnoServer and ConoServer focus on spider toxins and cone snail toxins, respectively. UniProtKB, a generalist protein knowledgebase, has an animal toxin-dedicated annotation program that includes toxins from all venomous animals. Finally, the ATDB metadatabase compiles data and annotations from other databases and provides toxin ontology. PMID:22069583

  2. Animal Toxins: How is Complexity Represented in Databases?

    PubMed

    Jungo, Florence; Estreicher, Anne; Bairoch, Amos; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis

    2010-02-01

    Peptide toxins synthesized by venomous animals have been extensively studied in the last decades. To be useful to the scientific community, this knowledge has been stored, annotated and made easy to retrieve by several databases. The aim of this article is to present what type of information users can access from each database. ArachnoServer and ConoServer focus on spider toxins and cone snail toxins, respectively. UniProtKB, a generalist protein knowledgebase, has an animal toxin-dedicated annotation program that includes toxins from all venomous animals. Finally, the ATDB metadatabase compiles data and annotations from other databases and provides toxin ontology. PMID:22069583

  3. Enhanced Acylcarnitine Annotation in High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data: Fragmentation Analysis for the Classification and Annotation of Acylcarnitines

    PubMed Central

    van der Hooft, Justin J. J.; Ridder, Lars; Barrett, Michael P.; Burgess, Karl E. V.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite annotation and identification are primary challenges in untargeted metabolomics experiments. Rigorous workflows for reliable annotation of mass features with chemical structures or compound classes are needed to enhance the power of untargeted mass spectrometry. High-resolution mass spectrometry considerably improves the confidence in assigning elemental formulas to mass features in comparison to nominal mass spectrometry, and embedding of fragmentation methods enables more reliable metabolite annotations and facilitates metabolite classification. However, the analysis of mass fragmentation spectra can be a time-consuming step and requires expert knowledge. This study demonstrates how characteristic fragmentations, specific to compound classes, can be used to systematically analyze their presence in complex biological extracts like urine that have undergone untargeted mass spectrometry combined with data dependent or targeted fragmentation. Human urine extracts were analyzed using normal phase liquid chromatography (hydrophilic interaction chromatography) coupled to an Ion Trap-Orbitrap hybrid instrument. Subsequently, mass chromatograms and collision-induced dissociation and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragments were annotated using the freely available MAGMa software1. Acylcarnitines play a central role in energy metabolism by transporting fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix. By filtering on a combination of a mass fragment and neutral loss designed based on the MAGMa fragment annotations, we were able to classify and annotate 50 acylcarnitines in human urine extracts, based on high-resolution mass spectrometry HCD fragmentation spectra at different energies for all of them. Of these annotated acylcarnitines, 31 are not described in HMDB yet and for only 4 annotated acylcarnitines the fragmentation spectra could be matched to reference spectra. Therefore, we conclude that the use of mass fragmentation filters within the context

  4. Developing a biocuration workflow for AgBase, a non-model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Lakshmi; Chouvarine, Philippe; Tudor, Catalina O.; Schmidt, Carl J.; Vijay-Shanker, K.; McCarthy, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    AgBase provides annotation for agricultural gene products using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Plant Ontology, as appropriate. Unlike model organism species, agricultural species have a body of literature that does not just focus on gene function; to improve efficiency, we use text mining to identify literature for curation. The first component of our annotation interface is the gene prioritization interface that ranks gene products for annotation. Biocurators select the top-ranked gene and mark annotation for these genes as ‘in progress’ or ‘completed’; links enable biocurators to move directly to our biocuration interface (BI). Our BI includes all current GO annotation for gene products and is the main interface to add/modify AgBase curation data. The BI also displays Extracting Genic Information from Text (eGIFT) results for each gene product. eGIFT is a web-based, text-mining tool that associates ranked, informative terms (iTerms) and the articles and sentences containing them, with genes. Moreover, iTerms are linked to GO terms, where they match either a GO term name or a synonym. This enables AgBase biocurators to rapidly identify literature for further curation based on possible GO terms. Because most agricultural species do not have standardized literature, eGIFT searches all gene names and synonyms to associate articles with genes. As many of the gene names can be ambiguous, eGIFT applies a disambiguation step to remove matches that do not correspond to this gene, and filtering is applied to remove abstracts that mention a gene in passing. The BI is linked to our Journal Database (JDB) where corresponding journal citations are stored. Just as importantly, biocurators also add to the JDB citations that have no GO annotation. The AgBase BI also supports bulk annotation upload to facilitate our Inferred from electronic annotation of agricultural gene products. All annotations must pass standard GO Consortium quality checking before release in Ag

  5. APPRIS: annotation of principal and alternative splice isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Maietta, Paolo; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Lopez, Gonzalo; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present APPRIS (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es), a database that houses annotations of human splice isoforms. APPRIS has been designed to provide value to manual annotations of the human genome by adding reliable protein structural and functional data and information from cross-species conservation. The visual representation of the annotations provided by APPRIS for each gene allows annotators and researchers alike to easily identify functional changes brought about by splicing events. In addition to collecting, integrating and analyzing reliable predictions of the effect of splicing events, APPRIS also selects a single reference sequence for each gene, here termed the principal isoform, based on the annotations of structure, function and conservation for each transcript. APPRIS identifies a principal isoform for 85% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE 7 release for ENSEMBL. Analysis of the APPRIS data shows that at least 70% of the alternative (non-principal) variants would lose important functional or structural information relative to the principal isoform. PMID:23161672

  6. Enriching a biomedical event corpus with meta-knowledge annotation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    part of the search criteria. This can assist in a number of important tasks, e.g., finding new experimental knowledge to facilitate database curation, enabling textual inference to detect entailments and contradictions, etc. To our knowledge, our scheme is unique within the field with regards to the diversity of meta-knowledge aspects annotated for each event. PMID:21985429

  7. ProteoAnnotator--open source proteogenomics annotation software supporting PSI standards.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Fawaz; Krishna, Ritesh; Perkins, Simon; Collins, Andrew; Xia, Dong; Wastling, Jonathan; Jones, Andrew R

    2014-12-01

    The recent massive increase in capability for sequencing genomes is producing enormous advances in our understanding of biological systems. However, there is a bottleneck in genome annotation--determining the structure of all transcribed genes. Experimental data from MS studies can play a major role in confirming and correcting gene structure--proteogenomics. However, there are some technical and practical challenges to overcome, since proteogenomics requires pipelines comprising a complex set of interconnected modules as well as bespoke routines, for example in protein inference and statistics. We are introducing a complete, open source pipeline for proteogenomics, called ProteoAnnotator, which incorporates a graphical user interface and implements the Proteomics Standards Initiative mzIdentML standard for each analysis stage. All steps are included as standalone modules with the mzIdentML library, allowing other groups to re-use the whole pipeline or constituent parts within other tools. We have developed new modules for pre-processing and combining multiple search databases, for performing peptide-level statistics on mzIdentML files, for scoring grouped protein identifications matched to a given genomic locus to validate that updates to the official gene models are statistically sound and for mapping end results back onto the genome. ProteoAnnotator is available from http://www.proteoannotator.org/. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001042 and PXD001390 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001042; http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001390). PMID:25297486

  8. Comparative Omics-Driven Genome Annotation Refinement: Application across Yersiniae

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Jones, Marcus B.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Purvine, Samuel O.; Sanford, James; Monroe, Matthew E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Ansong, Charles; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Motin, Vladimir L.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-03-27

    Genome sequencing continues to be a rapidly evolving technology, yet most downstream aspects of genome annotation pipelines remain relatively stable or are even being abandoned. To date, the perceived value of manual curation for genome annotations is not offset by the real cost and time associated with the process. In order to balance the large number of sequences generated, the annotation process is now performed almost exclusively in an automated fashion for most genome sequencing projects. One possible way to reduce errors inherent to automated computational annotations is to apply data from 'omics' measurements (i.e. transcriptional and proteomic) to the un-annotated genome with a proteogenomic-based approach. This approach does require additional experimental and bioinformatics methods to include omics technologies; however, the approach is readily automatable and can benefit from rapid developments occurring in those research domains as well. The annotation process can be improved by experimental validation of transcription and translation and aid in the discovery of annotation errors. Here the concept of annotation refinement has been extended to include a comparative assessment of genomes across closely related species, as is becoming common in sequencing efforts. Transcriptomic and proteomic data derived from three highly similar pathogenic Yersiniae (Y. pestis CO92, Y. pestis pestoides F, and Y. pseudotuberculosis PB1/+) was used to demonstrate a comprehensive comparative omic-based annotation methodology. Peptide and oligo measurements experimentally validated the expression of nearly 40% of each strain's predicted proteome and revealed the identification of 28 novel and 68 previously incorrect protein-coding sequences (e.g., observed frameshifts, extended start sites, and translated pseudogenes) within the three current Yersinia genome annotations. Gene loss is presumed to play a major role in Y. pestis acquiring its niche as a virulent pathogen, thus

  9. Investigating heterogeneous protein annotations toward cross-corpora utilization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    the entities of interest, the distribution of annotated entities, and the ratio of overlap between annotated entities. We further suggest that almost all of the incompatibilities can be prevented by properly considering the four aspects aforementioned. Conclusion Our analysis covers the key similarities and dissimilarities that exist among the diverse gene/protein corpora. This paper serves to improve our understanding of the differences in the three studied corpora, which can then lead to a better understanding of the performance of protein recognizers that are based on the corpora. PMID:19995463

  10. Patient Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jeannette

    Topics included in this annotated bibliography on patient education are (1) background on development of patient education programs, (2) patient education interventions, (3) references for health professionals, and (4) research and evaluation in patient education. (TA)

  11. Caliper Context Annotation Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-09-30

    To understand the performance of parallel programs, developers need to be able to relate performance measurement data with context information, such as the call path / line numbers or iteration numbers where measurements were taken. Caliper provides a generic way to specify and collect multi-dimensional context information across the software stack, and provide ti to third-party measurement tools or write it into a file or database in the form of context streams.

  12. NCBI prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline.

    PubMed

    Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Badretdin, Azat; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Nawrocki, Eric P; Zaslavsky, Leonid; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Pruitt, Kim D; Borodovsky, Mark; Ostell, James

    2016-08-19

    Recent technological advances have opened unprecedented opportunities for large-scale sequencing and analysis of populations of pathogenic species in disease outbreaks, as well as for large-scale diversity studies aimed at expanding our knowledge across the whole domain of prokaryotes. To meet the challenge of timely interpretation of structure, function and meaning of this vast genetic information, a comprehensive approach to automatic genome annotation is critically needed. In collaboration with Georgia Tech, NCBI has developed a new approach to genome annotation that combines alignment based methods with methods of predicting protein-coding and RNA genes and other functional elements directly from sequence. A new gene finding tool, GeneMarkS+, uses the combined evidence of protein and RNA placement by homology as an initial map of annotation to generate and modify ab initio gene predictions across the whole genome. Thus, the new NCBI's Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) relies more on sequence similarity when confident comparative data are available, while it relies more on statistical predictions in the absence of external evidence. The pipeline provides a framework for generation and analysis of annotation on the full breadth of prokaryotic taxonomy. For additional information on PGAP see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/annotation_prok/ and the NCBI Handbook, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK174280/. PMID:27342282

  13. eID: A System for Exploration of Image Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stan, Daniela; Sethi, Ishwar K.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an exploration system for large image databases. The system, which consists of three stages, allows user to interpret and annotate an image in the context in which that image appears, dramatically reducing the time taken to annotate a large collection of images. Includes 25 figures and two tables. (AEF)

  14. MaizeGDB, the maize model organism database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the maize research community's database for maize genetic and genomic information. In this seminar I will outline our current endeavors including a full website redesign, the status of maize genome assembly and annotation projects, and work toward genome functional annotation. Mechanis...

  15. Informatics in radiology: improving clinical work flow through an AIM database: a sample web-based lesion tracking application.

    PubMed

    Abajian, Aaron C; Levy, Mia; Rubin, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative assessments on images are crucial to clinical decision making, especially in cancer patients, in whom measurements of lesions are tracked over time. However, the potential value of quantitative approaches to imaging is impeded by the difficulty and time-intensive nature of compiling this information from prior studies and reporting corresponding information on current studies. The authors believe that the quantitative imaging work flow can be automated by making temporal data computationally accessible. In this article, they demonstrate the utility of the Annotation and Image Markup standard in a World Wide Web-based application that was developed to automatically summarize prior and current quantitative imaging measurements. The system calculates the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors metric, along with several alternative indicators of cancer treatment response, by using the data stored in the annotation files. The application also allows the user to overlay the recorded metrics on the original images for visual inspection. Clinical evaluation of the system demonstrates its potential utility in accelerating the standard radiology work flow and in providing a means to evaluate alternative response metrics that are difficult to compute by hand. The system, which illustrates the utility of capturing quantitative information in a standard format and linking it to the image from which it was derived, could enhance quantitative imaging in clinical practice without adversely affecting the current work flow. PMID:22745220

  16. The Aerospace Database data element dictionary with issues and recommendations from the meetings of July 24-25, August 13-14, and September 24-25, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume contains descriptions of the individual fields (data elements) which comprise the bibliographic records of the Aerospace Database. Indexes by field name and field mnemonic are provided. In addition, the issues and recommendations defined by the NASA STI Database Upgrade Working Group are included as annotations to the individual field descriptions and are listed at the end of the volume. The activities of the Working Group were initiated by the NASA STI Program Coordinating Council as part of an effort to improve overall database quality.

  17. A Human-Curated Annotation of the Candida albicans Genome

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Burkhard R; van het Hoog, Marco; d'Enfert, Christophe; Martchenko, Mikhail; Dungan, Jan; Kuo, Alan; Inglis, Diane O; Uhl, M. Andrew; Hogues, Hervé; Berriman, Matthew; Lorenz, Michael; Levitin, Anastasia; Oberholzer, Ursula; Bachewich, Catherine; Harcus, Doreen; Marcil, Anne; Dignard, Daniel; Iouk, Tatiana; Zito, Rosa; Frangeul, Lionel; Tekaia, Fredj; Rutherford, Kim; Wang, Edwin; Munro, Carol A; Bates, Steve; Gow, Neil A; Hoyer, Lois L; Köhler, Gerwald; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Newport, George; Znaidi, Sadri; Raymond, Martine; Turcotte, Bernard; Sherlock, Gavin; Costanzo, Maria; Ihmels, Jan; Berman, Judith; Sanglard, Dominique; Agabian, Nina; Mitchell, Aaron P; Johnson, Alexander D; Whiteway, Malcolm; Nantel, André

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing and assembly of the genome for the fungal pathogen Candida albicans used simple automated procedures for the identification of putative genes. We have reviewed the entire assembly, both by hand and with additional bioinformatic resources, to accurately map and describe 6,354 genes and to identify 246 genes whose original database entries contained sequencing errors (or possibly mutations) that affect their reading frame. Comparison with other fungal genomes permitted the identification of numerous fungus-specific genes that might be targeted for antifungal therapy. We also observed that, compared to other fungi, the protein-coding sequences in the C. albicans genome are especially rich in short sequence repeats. Finally, our improved annotation permitted a detailed analysis of several multigene families, and comparative genomic studies showed that C. albicans has a far greater catabolic range, encoding respiratory Complex 1, several novel oxidoreductases and ketone body degrading enzymes, malonyl-CoA and enoyl-CoA carriers, several novel amino acid degrading enzymes, a variety of secreted catabolic lipases and proteases, and numerous transporters to assimilate the resulting nutrients. The results of these efforts will ensure that the Candida research community has uniform and comprehensive genomic information for medical research as well as for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:16103911

  18. PAZAR: a framework for collection and dissemination of cis-regulatory sequence annotation

    PubMed Central

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Kirov, Stefan; Lim, Jonathan; Lithwick, Stuart; Swanson, Magdalena I; Ticoll, Amy; Snoddy, Jay; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2007-01-01

    PAZAR is an open-access and open-source database of transcription factor and regulatory sequence annotation with associated web interface and programming tools for data submission and extraction. Curated boutique data collections can be maintained and disseminated through the unified schema of the mall-like PAZAR repository. The Pleiades Promoter Project collection of brain-linked regulatory sequences is introduced to demonstrate the depth of annotation possible within PAZAR. PAZAR, located at , is open for business. PMID:17916232

  19. Smooth statistical torsion angle potential derived from a large conformational database via adaptive kernel density estimation improves the quality of NMR protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2012-01-01

    Statistical potentials that embody torsion angle probability densities in databases of high-quality X-ray protein structures supplement the incomplete structural information of experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) datasets. By biasing the conformational search during the course of structure calculation toward highly populated regions in the database, the resulting protein structures display better validation criteria and accuracy. Here, a new statistical torsion angle potential is developed using adaptive kernel density estimation to extract probability densities from a large database of more than 106 quality-filtered amino acid residues. Incorporated into the Xplor-NIH software package, the new implementation clearly outperforms an older potential, widely used in NMR structure elucidation, in that it exhibits simultaneously smoother and sharper energy surfaces, and results in protein structures with improved conformation, nonbonded atomic interactions, and accuracy. PMID:23011872

  20. Macromolecular Structure Database. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Gary L.

    2003-09-23

    The central activity of the PDB continues to be the collection, archiving and distribution of high quality structural data to the scientific community on a timely basis. In support of these activities NIST has continued its roles in developing the physical archive, in developing data uniformity, in dealing with NMR issues and in the distribution of PDB data through CD-ROMs. The physical archive holdings have been organized, inventoried, and a database has been created to facilitate their use. Data from individual PDB entries have been annotated to produce uniform values improving tremendously the accuracy of results of queries. Working with the NMR community we have established data items specific for NMR that will be included in new entries and facilitate data deposition. The PDB CD-ROM production has continued on a quarterly basis, and new products are being distributed.

  1. VitisExpDB: A Database Resource for Grape Functional Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VitisExpDB is an online MySQL-PHP driven relational database that houses annotated EST and gene expression data for Vitis vinifera and non-vinifera grape varieties. Currently, the database stores ~320,000 EST sequences derived from 8 species/hybrids, their annotation details and gene ontology based...

  2. HPIDB 2.0: a curated database for host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Mais G.; Gresham, Cathy R.; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Identification and analysis of host–pathogen interactions (HPI) is essential to study infectious diseases. However, HPI data are sparse in existing molecular interaction databases, especially for agricultural host–pathogen systems. Therefore, resources that annotate, predict and display the HPI that underpin infectious diseases are critical for developing novel intervention strategies. HPIDB 2.0 (http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/hpi/main.html) is a resource for HPI data, and contains 45, 238 manually curated entries in the current release. Since the first description of the database in 2010, multiple enhancements to HPIDB data and interface services were made that are described here. Notably, HPIDB 2.0 now provides targeted biocuration of molecular interaction data. As a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium, annotations provided by HPIDB 2.0 curators meet community standards to provide detailed contextual experimental information and facilitate data sharing. Moreover, HPIDB 2.0 provides access to rapidly available community annotations that capture minimum molecular interaction information to address immediate researcher needs for HPI network analysis. In addition to curation, HPIDB 2.0 integrates HPI from existing external sources and contains tools to infer additional HPI where annotated data are scarce. Compared to other interaction databases, our data collection approach ensures HPIDB 2.0 users access the most comprehensive HPI data from a wide range of pathogens and their hosts (594 pathogen and 70 host species, as of February 2016). Improvements also include enhanced search capacity, addition of Gene Ontology functional information, and implementation of network visualization. The changes made to HPIDB 2.0 content and interface ensure that users, especially agricultural researchers, are able to easily access and analyse high quality, comprehensive HPI data. All HPIDB 2.0 data are updated regularly, are publically available for direct

  3. HPIDB 2.0: a curated database for host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Ammari, Mais G; Gresham, Cathy R; McCarthy, Fiona M; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Identification and analysis of host-pathogen interactions (HPI) is essential to study infectious diseases. However, HPI data are sparse in existing molecular interaction databases, especially for agricultural host-pathogen systems. Therefore, resources that annotate, predict and display the HPI that underpin infectious diseases are critical for developing novel intervention strategies. HPIDB 2.0 (http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/hpi/main.html) is a resource for HPI data, and contains 45, 238 manually curated entries in the current release. Since the first description of the database in 2010, multiple enhancements to HPIDB data and interface services were made that are described here. Notably, HPIDB 2.0 now provides targeted biocuration of molecular interaction data. As a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium, annotations provided by HPIDB 2.0 curators meet community standards to provide detailed contextual experimental information and facilitate data sharing. Moreover, HPIDB 2.0 provides access to rapidly available community annotations that capture minimum molecular interaction information to address immediate researcher needs for HPI network analysis. In addition to curation, HPIDB 2.0 integrates HPI from existing external sources and contains tools to infer additional HPI where annotated data are scarce. Compared to other interaction databases, our data collection approach ensures HPIDB 2.0 users access the most comprehensive HPI data from a wide range of pathogens and their hosts (594 pathogen and 70 host species, as of February 2016). Improvements also include enhanced search capacity, addition of Gene Ontology functional information, and implementation of network visualization. The changes made to HPIDB 2.0 content and interface ensure that users, especially agricultural researchers, are able to easily access and analyse high quality, comprehensive HPI data. All HPIDB 2.0 data are updated regularly, are publically available for direct

  4. Modelling of the reactive transport for rock salt-brine in geological repository systems based on improved thermodynamic database (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, W.; Alkan, H.; Xie, M.; Moog, H.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    The release and migration of toxic contaminants from the disposed wastes is one of the main issues in long-term safety assessment of geological repositories. In the engineered and geological barriers around the nuclear waste emplacements chemical interactions between the components of the system may affect the isolation properties considerably. As the chemical issues change the transport properties in the near and far field of a nuclear repository, modelling of the transport should also take the chemistry into account. The reactive transport modelling consists of two main components: a code that combines the possible chemical reactions with thermo-hydrogeological processes interactively and a thermodynamic databank supporting the required parameters for the calculation of the chemical reactions. In the last decade many thermo-hydrogeological codes were upgraded to include the modelling of the chemical processes. TOUGHREACT is one of these codes. This is an extension of the well known simulator TOUGH2 for modelling geoprocesses. The code is developed by LBNL (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Univ. of California) for the simulation of the multi-phase transport of gas and liquid in porous media including heat transfer. After the release of its first version in 1998, this code has been applied and improved many times in conjunction with considerations for nuclear waste emplacement. A recent version has been extended to calculate ion activities in concentrated salt solutions applying the Pitzer model. In TOUGHREACT, the incorporated equation of state module ECO2N is applied as the EOS module for non-isothermal multiphase flow in a fluid system of H2O-NaCl-CO2. The partitioning of H2O and CO2 between liquid and gas phases is modelled as a function of temperature, pressure, and salinity. This module is applicable for waste repositories being expected to generate or having originally CO2 in the fluid system. The enhanced TOUGHREACT uses an EQ3/6-formatted database

  5. Collective dynamics of social annotation

    PubMed Central

    Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain; Baldassarri, Andrea; Schehr, Gregory; Loreto, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    The enormous increase of popularity and use of the worldwide web has led in the recent years to important changes in the ways people communicate. An interesting example of this fact is provided by the now very popular social annotation systems, through which users annotate resources (such as web pages or digital photographs) with keywords known as “tags.” Understanding the rich emergent structures resulting from the uncoordinated actions of users calls for an interdisciplinary effort. In particular concepts borrowed from statistical physics, such as random walks (RWs), and complex networks theory, can effectively contribute to the mathematical modeling of social annotation systems. Here, we show that the process of social annotation can be seen as a collective but uncoordinated exploration of an underlying semantic space, pictured as a graph, through a series of RWs. This modeling framework reproduces several aspects, thus far unexplained, of social annotation, among which are the peculiar growth of the size of the vocabulary used by the community and its complex network structure that represents an externalization of semantic structures grounded in cognition and that are typically hard to access. PMID:19506244

  6. Collective dynamics of social annotation.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain; Baldassarri, Andrea; Schehr, Gregory; Loreto, Vittorio

    2009-06-30

    The enormous increase of popularity and use of the worldwide web has led in the recent years to important changes in the ways people communicate. An interesting example of this fact is provided by the now very popular social annotation systems, through which users annotate resources (such as web pages or digital photographs) with keywords known as "tags." Understanding the rich emergent structures resulting from the uncoordinated actions of users calls for an interdisciplinary effort. In particular concepts borrowed from statistical physics, such as random walks (RWs), and complex networks theory, can effectively contribute to the mathematical modeling of social annotation systems. Here, we show that the process of social annotation can be seen as a collective but uncoordinated exploration of an underlying semantic space, pictured as a graph, through a series of RWs. This modeling framework reproduces several aspects, thus far unexplained, of social annotation, among which are the peculiar growth of the size of the vocabulary used by the community and its complex network structure that represents an externalization of semantic structures grounded in cognition and that are typically hard to access. PMID:19506244

  7. A method for increasing expressivity of Gene Ontology annotations using a compositional approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Gene Ontology project integrates data about the function of gene products across a diverse range of organisms, allowing the transfer of knowledge from model organisms to humans, and enabling computational analyses for interpretation of high-throughput experimental and clinical data. The core data structure is the annotation, an association between a gene product and a term from one of the three ontologies comprising the GO. Historically, it has not been possible to provide additional information about the context of a GO term, such as the target gene or the location of a molecular function. This has limited the specificity of knowledge that can be expressed by GO annotations. Results The GO Consortium has introduced annotation extensions that enable manually curated GO annotations to capture additional contextual details. Extensions represent effector–target relationships such as localization dependencies, substrates of protein modifiers and regulation targets of signaling pathways and transcription factors as well as spatial and temporal aspects of processes such as cell or tissue type or developmental stage. We describe the content and structure of annotation extensions, provide examples, and summarize the current usage of annotation extensions. Conclusions The additional contextual information captured by annotation extensions improves the utility of functional annotation by representing dependencies between annotations to terms in the different ontologies of GO, external ontologies, or an organism’s gene products. These enhanced annotations can also support sophisticated queries and reasoning, and will provide curated, directional links between many gene products to support pathway and network reconstruction. PMID:24885854

  8. Determining similarity of scientific entities in annotation datasets.

    PubMed

    Palma, Guillermo; Vidal, Maria-Esther; Haag, Eric; Raschid, Louiqa; Thor, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Linked Open Data initiatives have made available a diversity of scientific collections where scientists have annotated entities in the datasets with controlled vocabulary terms from ontologies. Annotations encode scientific knowledge, which is captured in annotation datasets. Determining relatedness between annotated entities becomes a building block for pattern mining, e.g. identifying drug-drug relationships may depend on the similarity of the targets that interact with each drug. A diversity of similarity measures has been proposed in the literature to compute relatedness between a pair of entities. Each measure exploits some knowledge including the name, function, relationships with other entities, taxonomic neighborhood and semantic knowledge. We propose a novel general-purpose annotation similarity measure called 'AnnSim' that measures the relatedness between two entities based on the similarity of their annotations. We model AnnSim as a 1-1 maximum weight bipartite match and exploit properties of existing solvers to provide an efficient solution. We empirically study the performance of AnnSim on real-world datasets of drugs and disease associations from clinical trials and relationships between drugs and (genomic) targets. Using baselines that include a variety of measures, we identify where AnnSim can provide a deeper understanding of the semantics underlying the relatedness of a pair of entities or where it could lead to predicting new links or identifying potential novel patterns. Although AnnSim does not exploit knowledge or properties of a particular domain, its performance compares well with a variety of state-of-the-art domain-specific measures. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:25725057

  9. Determining similarity of scientific entities in annotation datasets

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Guillermo; Vidal, Maria-Esther; Haag, Eric; Raschid, Louiqa; Thor, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Linked Open Data initiatives have made available a diversity of scientific collections where scientists have annotated entities in the datasets with controlled vocabulary terms from ontologies. Annotations encode scientific knowledge, which is captured in annotation datasets. Determining relatedness between annotated entities becomes a building block for pattern mining, e.g. identifying drug–drug relationships may depend on the similarity of the targets that interact with each drug. A diversity of similarity measures has been proposed in the literature to compute relatedness between a pair of entities. Each measure exploits some knowledge including the name, function, relationships with other entities, taxonomic neighborhood and semantic knowledge. We propose a novel general-purpose annotation similarity measure called ‘AnnSim’ that measures the relatedness between two entities based on the similarity of their annotations. We model AnnSim as a 1–1 maximum weight bipartite match and exploit properties of existing solvers to provide an efficient solution. We empirically study the performance of AnnSim on real-world datasets of drugs and disease associations from clinical trials and relationships between drugs and (genomic) targets. Using baselines that include a variety of measures, we identify where AnnSim can provide a deeper understanding of the semantics underlying the relatedness of a pair of entities or where it could lead to predicting new links or identifying potential novel patterns. Although AnnSim does not exploit knowledge or properties of a particular domain, its performance compares well with a variety of state-of-the-art domain-specific measures. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:25725057

  10. VariOtator, a Software Tool for Variation Annotation with the Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Gerard C P; Vihinen, Mauno

    2016-04-01

    The Variation Ontology (VariO) is used for describing and annotating types, effects, consequences, and mechanisms of variations. To facilitate easy and consistent annotations, the online application VariOtator was developed. For variation type annotations, VariOtator is fully automated, accepting variant descriptions in Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) format, and generating VariO terms, either with or without full lineage, that is, all parent terms. When a coding DNA variant description with a reference sequence is provided, VariOtator checks the description first with Mutalyzer and then generates the predicted RNA and protein descriptions with their respective VariO annotations. For the other sublevels, function, structure, and property, annotations cannot be automated, and VariOtator generates annotation based on provided details. For VariO terms relating to structure and property, one can use attribute terms as modifiers and evidence code terms for annotating experimental evidence. There is an online batch version, and stand-alone batch versions to be used with a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) download file. A SOAP Web service allows client programs to access VariOtator programmatically. Thus, systematic variation effect and type annotations can be efficiently generated to allow easy use and integration of variations and their consequences. PMID:26773573

  11. Whiplash: a selective annotated bibliography

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brad MT; Adams, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on whiplash injury including an overview, collision mechanics, pathophysiology, neurobehavioral, imaging, treatment/management, prognosis, outcomes, and litigation. Design: An annotated bibliography. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE from 1987 to 1995 and CHIROLARS from 1900 to 1996, with emphasis on the last ten years, was performed. Conference proceedings and the personal files of the authors were searched for relevant citations. Key words utilized in the search were whiplash injury, acceleration/deceleration injury, neck pain, head pain, cognitive impairment, treatment, imaging, prognosis and litigation. Results: This annotated bibliography identifies key studies and potential models for future research. Conclusions: There is currently a lack of clinical consensus both in practice and in the literature regarding the evaluation and management of an episode of whiplash injury. This annotated bibliography has been developed in an attempt to provide an overview of the literature regarding various issues surrounding an episode of whiplash injury.

  12. MORPHOLOGICAL ANNOTATIONS FOR GROUPS IN THE FIRST DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, D. D.

    2011-06-01

    The morphology of selected groups of sources in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) survey and catalog is examined. Sources in the FIRST catalog (2003 April release, 811,117 entries) were sorted into singles, doubles, triples, and groups of higher-count membership based on a proximity criteria. The 7106 groups with four or more components were examined individually for bent types including, but not limited to, wide-angle tail and narrow-angle tail types. In the process of this examination, ring, double-double, X-shaped, hybrid morphology, giant radio sources, and the herein described W-shaped and tri-axial morphology systems were also identified. For the convenience of the reader separate tables for distinctive types were generated. A few curiosities were found. For the 16,950 three-component groups and 74,788 two-component groups, catalogs with probability estimates for bent classification, as determined by pattern recognition techniques, are presented.

  13. Annotated EST database of Heliothis virescens hemocytic immune system transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic and proteomic approaches were applied to characterize the immunoproteome of Heliothis virescens. Larval hemocytic responses to bacterial and baculoviral infection were surveyed using expressed sequence tags (ESTs). 5349 ESTs formed 429 contigs, 258 singlets and 1104 singletons, totalling 1...

  14. An Annotated Guide and Interactive Database for Solo Horn Repertoire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schouten, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Given the horn's lengthy history, it is not surprising that many scholars have examined the evolution of the instrument from the natural horn to the modern horn and its expansive repertoire. Numerous dissertations, theses, and treatises illuminate specific elements of the horn's solo repertoire; however, no scholar has produced a…

  15. Vcfanno: fast, flexible annotation of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Brent S; Layer, Ryan M; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    The integration of genome annotations is critical to the identification of genetic variants that are relevant to studies of disease or other traits. However, comprehensive variant annotation with diverse file formats is difficult with existing methods. Here we describe vcfanno, which flexibly extracts and summarizes attributes from multiple annotation files and integrates the annotations within the INFO column of the original VCF file. By leveraging a parallel "chromosome sweeping" algorithm, we demonstrate substantial performance gains by annotating ~85,000 variants per second with 50 attributes from 17 commonly used genome annotation resources. Vcfanno is available at https://github.com/brentp/vcfanno under the MIT license. PMID:27250555

  16. The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR): year 10 update.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook; Ficklin, Stephen P; Lee, Taein; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Blenda, Anna; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jing; Bombarely, Aureliano; Cho, Ilhyung; Ru, Sushan; Evans, Kate; Peace, Cameron; Abbott, Albert G; Mueller, Lukas A; Olmstead, Mercy A; Main, Dorrie

    2014-01-01

    The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR, http:/www.rosaceae.org), the long-standing central repository and data mining resource for Rosaceae research, has been enhanced with new genomic, genetic and breeding data, and improved functionality. Whole genome sequences of apple, peach and strawberry are available to browse or download with a range of annotations, including gene model predictions, aligned transcripts, repetitive elements, polymorphisms, mapped genetic markers, mapped NCBI Rosaceae genes, gene homologs and association of InterPro protein domains, GO terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway terms. Annotated sequences can be queried using search interfaces and visualized using GBrowse. New expressed sequence tag unigene sets are available for major genera, and Pathway data are available through FragariaCyc, AppleCyc and PeachCyc databases. Synteny among the three sequenced genomes can be viewed using GBrowse_Syn. New markers, genetic maps and extensively curated qualitative/Mendelian and quantitative trait loci are available. Phenotype and genotype data from breeding projects and genetic diversity projects are also included. Improved search pages are available for marker, trait locus, genetic diversity and publication data. New search tools for breeders enable selection comparison and assistance with breeding decision making. PMID:24225320

  17. The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR): year 10 update

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sook; Ficklin, Stephen P.; Lee, Taein; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Blenda, Anna; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jing; Bombarely, Aureliano; Cho, Ilhyung; Ru, Sushan; Evans, Kate; Peace, Cameron; Abbott, Albert G.; Mueller, Lukas A.; Olmstead, Mercy A.; Main, Dorrie

    2014-01-01

    The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR, http:/www.rosaceae.org), the long-standing central repository and data mining resource for Rosaceae research, has been enhanced with new genomic, genetic and breeding data, and improved functionality. Whole genome sequences of apple, peach and strawberry are available to browse or download with a range of annotations, including gene model predictions, aligned transcripts, repetitive elements, polymorphisms, mapped genetic markers, mapped NCBI Rosaceae genes, gene homologs and association of InterPro protein domains, GO terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway terms. Annotated sequences can be queried using search interfaces and visualized using GBrowse. New expressed sequence tag unigene sets are available for major genera, and Pathway data are available through FragariaCyc, AppleCyc and PeachCyc databases. Synteny among the three sequenced genomes can be viewed using GBrowse_Syn. New markers, genetic maps and extensively curated qualitative/Mendelian and quantitative trait loci are available. Phenotype and genotype data from breeding projects and genetic diversity projects are also included. Improved search pages are available for marker, trait locus, genetic diversity and publication data. New search tools for breeders enable selection comparison and assistance with breeding decision making. PMID:24225320

  18. Protein Model Database

    SciTech Connect

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  19. A Decade’s Experience With Quality Improvement in Cardiac Surgery Using the Veterans Affairs and Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Databases

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Frederick L.; Shroyer, A. Laurie W.; Hammermeister, Karl; Edwards, Fred H.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Dziuban, Stanley W.; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Clark, Richard E.; McDonald, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Objective To review the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) national databases over the past 10 years to evaluate their relative similarities and differences, to appraise their use as quality improvement tools, and to assess their potential to facilitate improvements in quality of cardiac surgical care. Summary Background Data The VA developed a mandatory risk-adjusted database in 1987 to monitor outcomes of cardiac surgery at all VA medical centers. In 1989 the STS developed a voluntary risk-adjusted database to help members assess quality and outcomes in their individual programs and to facilitate improvements in quality of care. Methods A short data form on every veteran operated on at each VA medical center is completed and transmitted electronically for analysis of unadjusted and risk-adjusted death and complications, as well as length of stay. Masked, confidential semiannual reports are then distributed to each program’s clinical team and the associated administrator. These reports are also reviewed by a national quality oversight committee. Thus, VA data are used both locally for quality improvement and at the national level with quality surveillance. The STS dataset (217 core fields and 255 extended fields) is transmitted for each patient semiannually to the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) for warehousing, analysis, and distribution. Site-specific reports are produced with regional and national aggregate comparisons for unadjusted and adjusted surgical deaths and complications, as well as length of stay for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valvular procedures, and valvular/CABG procedures. Both databases use the logistic regression modeling approach. Data for key processes of care are also captured in both databases. Research projects are frequently carried out using each database. Results More than 74,000 and 1.6 million cardiac surgical patients have been entered into the VA and STS databases

  20. Alignment-Annotator web server: rendering and annotating sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Christoph; Fähling, Michael; Weyand, Birgit; Wieland, Thomas; Gille, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Alignment-Annotator is a novel web service designed to generate interactive views of annotated nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments (i) de novo and (ii) embedded in other software. All computations are performed at server side. Interactivity is implemented in HTML5, a language native to web browsers. The alignment is initially displayed using default settings and can be modified with the graphical user interfaces. For example, individual sequences can be reordered or deleted using drag and drop, amino acid color code schemes can be applied and annotations can be added. Annotations can be made manually or imported (BioDAS servers, the UniProt, the Catalytic Site Atlas and the PDB). Some edits take immediate effect while others require server interaction and may take a few seconds to execute. The final alignment document can be downloaded as a zip-archive containing the HTML files. Because of the use of HTML the resulting interactive alignment can be viewed on any platform including Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Android and iOS in any standard web browser. Importantly, no plugins nor Java are required and therefore Alignment-Anotator represents the first interactive browser-based alignment visualization. Availability: http://www.bioinformatics.org/strap/aa/ and http://strap.charite.de/aa/. PMID:24813445

  1. MEGAnnotator: a user-friendly pipeline for microbial genomes assembly and annotation.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Genome annotation is one of the key actions that must be undertaken in order to decipher the genetic blueprint of organisms. Thus, a correct and reliable annotation is essential in rendering genomic data valuable. Here, we describe a bioinformatics pipeline based on freely available software programs coordinated by a multithreaded script named MEGAnnotator (Multithreaded Enhanced prokaryotic Genome Annotator). This pipeline allows the generation of multiple annotated formats fulfilling the NCBI guidelines for assembled microbial genome submission, based on DNA shotgun sequencing reads, and minimizes manual intervention, while also reducing waiting times between software program executions and improving final quality of both assembly and annotation outputs. MEGAnnotator provides an efficient way to pre-arrange the assembly and annotation work required to process NGS genome sequence data. The script improves the final quality of microbial genome annotation by reducing ambiguous annotations. Moreover, the MEGAnnotator platform allows the user to perform a partial annotation of pre-assembled genomes and includes an option to accomplish metagenomic data set assemblies. MEGAnnotator platform will be useful for microbiologists interested in genome analyses of bacteria as well as those investigating the complexity of microbial communities that do not possess the necessary skills to prepare their own bioinformatics pipeline. PMID:26936607

  2. Nutrient database improvement project: Separable components and proximate composition of retail cuts from the beef loin and round

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef nutrition research has become increasingly important domestically and internationally for the beef industry and its consumers. The objective of this study was to analyze the nutrient composition of ten beef loin and round cuts to update the nutrient data in the USDA National Nutrient Database f...

  3. Improvement of the Cramer classification for oral exposure using the database TTC RepDose - A strategy description

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present report describes a strategy to refine the current Cramer classification of the TTC concept using a broad database (DB) termed TTC RepDose. Cramer classes 1-3 overlap to some extent, indicating a need for a better separation of structural classes likely to be toxic, mo...

  4. LeishCyc: a biochemical pathways database for Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Maria A; MacRae, James I; De Souza, David P; Saunders, Eleanor C; McConville, Malcolm J; Likić, Vladimir A

    2009-01-01

    Background Leishmania spp. are sandfly transmitted protozoan parasites that cause a spectrum of diseases in more than 12 million people worldwide. Much research is now focusing on how these parasites adapt to the distinct nutrient environments they encounter in the digestive tract of the sandfly vector and the phagolysosome compartment of mammalian macrophages. While data mining and annotation of the genomes of three Leishmania species has provided an initial inventory of predicted metabolic components and associated pathways, resources for integrating this information into metabolic networks and incorporating data from transcript, protein, and metabolite profiling studies is currently lacking. The development of a reliable, expertly curated, and widely available model of Leishmania metabolic networks is required to facilitate systems analysis, as well as discovery and prioritization of new drug targets for this important human pathogen. Description The LeishCyc database was initially built from the genome sequence of Leishmania major (v5.2), based on the annotation published by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. LeishCyc was manually curated to remove errors, correct automated predictions, and add information from the literature. The ongoing curation is based on public sources, literature searches, and our own experimental and bioinformatics studies. In a number of instances we have improved on the original genome annotation, and, in some ambiguous cases, collected relevant information from the literature in order to help clarify gene or protein annotation in the future. All genes in LeishCyc are linked to the corresponding entry in GeneDB (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute). Conclusion The LeishCyc database describes Leishmania major genes, gene products, metabolites, their relationships and biochemical organization into metabolic pathways. LeishCyc provides a systematic approach to organizing the evolving information about Leishmania biochemical networks and is

  5. Extension to distributed annotation system: Summary and summaryplot commands.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, Charalambos; Brookes, Anthony J

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the development of high-throughput sequencing technologies provided an effective way to generate data from entire genomes and test variants from thousands of individuals. The information acquired from analysing the data generated from high-throughput sequencing technologies provided useful insights into applications like whole-exome sequencing and targeted sequencing to discover the genetic cause of complex diseases and drug responses. The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) is one of the proposed solution developed to share and unify biological data from multiple local and remote DAS annotation servers. The researchers can use DAS to request data from federated or centralised databases and integrate them into a unified view. Furthermore, with the use of Reference DAS servers, structural and sequence data can be used to accompany annotation data, for the pursue of new knowledge for a particular feature or region. In this paper, two additional commands, summary and summary-plot commands, to the existing DAS protocol are proposed and implemented. The proposed commands were created in order to give the users the capabilities to request a summary of features for a particular region of interest. The summary command was created in order to extend the capabilities of the current DAS protocol, while the summaryplot command was created to provide a more user-friendly alternative to standard XML DAS responses. Finally, three examples are presented based on the GENCODE annotation data. PMID:26738065

  6. Variobox: automatic detection and annotation of human genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paulo; Lopes, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Santos, Rosário; Dalgleish, Raymond; Oliveira, José Luís

    2014-02-01

    Triggered by the sequencing of the human genome, personalized medicine has been one of the fastest growing research areas in the last decade. Multiple software and hardware technologies have been developed by several projects, culminating in the exponential growth of genetic data. Considering the technological developments in this field, it is now fairly easy and inexpensive to obtain genetic profiles for unique individuals, such as those performed by several genetic analysis companies. The availability of computational tools that simplify genetic data analysis and the disclosure of biomedical evidences are of utmost importance. We present Variobox, a desktop tool to annotate, analyze, and compare human genes. Variobox obtains variant annotation data from WAVe, protein metadata annotations from Protein Data Bank, and sequences are obtained from Locus Reference Genomic or RefSeq databases. To explore the data, Variobox provides an advanced sequence visualization that enables agile navigation through genetic regions. DNA sequencing data can be compared with reference sequences retrieved from LRG or RefSeq records, identifying and automatically annotating new potential variants. These features and data, ranging from patient sequences to HGVS-compliant variant descriptions, are combined in an intuitive interface to analyze genes and variants. Variobox is a Java application, available at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/variobox. PMID:24186831

  7. Supervised learning of semantic classes for image annotation and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Gustavo; Chan, Antoni B; Moreno, Pedro J; Vasconcelos, Nuno

    2007-03-01

    A probabilistic formulation for semantic image annotation and retrieval is proposed. Annotation and retrieval are posed as classification problems where each class is defined as the group of database images labeled with a common semantic label. It is shown that, by establishing this one-to-one correspondence between semantic labels and semantic classes, a minimum probability of error annotation and retrieval are feasible with algorithms that are 1) conceptually simple, 2) computationally efficient, and 3) do not require prior semantic segmentation of training images. In particular, images are represented as bags of localized feature vectors, a mixture density estimated for each image, and the mixtures associated with all images annotated with a common semantic label pooled into a density estimate for the corresponding semantic class. This pooling is justified by a multiple instance learning argument and performed efficiently with a hierarchical extension of expectation-maximization. The benefits of the supervised formulation over the more complex, and currently popular, joint modeling of semantic label and visual feature distributions are illustrated through theoretical arguments and extensive experiments. The supervised formulation is shown to achieve higher accuracy than various previously published methods at a fraction of their computational cost. Finally, the proposed method is shown to be fairly robust to parameter tuning. PMID:17224611

  8. A Semantic Image Annotation Model to Enable Integrative Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Channin, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Integrating and relating images with clinical and molecular data is a crucial activity in translational research, but challenging because the information in images is not explicit in standard computer-accessible formats. We have developed an ontology-based representation of the semantic contents of radiology images called AIM (Annotation and Image Markup). AIM specifies the quantitative and qualitative content that researchers extract from images. The AIM ontology enables semantic image annotation and markup, specifying the entities and relations necessary to describe images. AIM annotations, represented as instances in the ontology, enable key use cases for images in translational research such as disease status assessment, query, and inter-observer variation analysis. AIM will enable ontology-based query and mining of images, and integration of images with data in other ontology-annotated bioinformatics databases. Our ultimate goal is to enable researchers to link images with related scientific data so they can learn the biological and physiological significance of the image content. PMID:21347180

  9. The Annotator's Assistant: an expert system for direct submission of genetic sequence data.

    PubMed

    Bossinger, J A

    1988-03-01

    As DNA sequencing technology improves and more rapid techniques become routine in molecular biology labs, researchers need to expedite the incorporation of information into genetic sequence databases, such as GenBank, by directly submitting sequence data. The Annotator's Assistant is an expert system that runs on an IBM PC and helps the molecular biologist, who may have little knowledge of the structure or content of a GenBank entry, to construct a complete and valid sequence submission file. This expert system uses a simple molecular biology knowledge base and a selection of customized screen entry forms to guide the user through the entry and annotation of a sequence and its biological features. The system compiles information about the contributor, journal references, physical and functional characteristics of the nucleic acid, source organism and features, and checks it to eliminate incomplete answers and simple errors. Users supply input by answering direct and multiple-choice questions, selecting menu items and completing entry forms; on-line help is available. Users may also enter new or unusual information using generic forms. Several modules of the expert system were converted into Prolog programs and compiled, decreasing the running time significantly. The expert system rules and the data entry forms are easy to modify, update and customize for specific sequence classes. PMID:3382995

  10. ProbMetab: an R package for Bayesian probabilistic annotation of LC–MS-based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ricardo R.; Jourdan, Fabien; Salvanha, Diego M.; Letisse, Fabien; Jamin, Emilien L.; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos A.; Vêncio, Ricardo Z. N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: We present ProbMetab, an R package that promotes substantial improvement in automatic probabilistic liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry-based metabolome annotation. The inference engine core is based on a Bayesian model implemented to (i) allow diverse source of experimental data and metadata to be systematically incorporated into the model with alternative ways to calculate the likelihood function and (ii) allow sensitive selection of biologically meaningful biochemical reaction databases as Dirichlet-categorical prior distribution. Additionally, to ensure result interpretation by system biologists, we display the annotation in a network where observed mass peaks are connected if their candidate metabolites are substrate/product of known biochemical reactions. This graph can be overlaid with other graph-based analysis, such as partial correlation networks, in a visualization scheme exported to Cytoscape, with web and stand-alone versions. Availability and implementation: ProbMetab was implemented in a modular manner to fit together with established upstream (xcms, CAMERA, AStream, mzMatch.R, etc) and downstream R package tools (GeneNet, RCytoscape, DiffCorr, etc). ProbMetab, along with extensive documentation and case studies, is freely available under GNU license at: http://labpib.fmrp.usp.br/methods/probmetab/. Contact: rvencio@usp.br Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24443383

  11. Genome-Wide Functional Annotation of Human Protein-Coding Splice Variants Using Multiple Instance Learning.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bharat; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Li, Hong-Dong; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of human multiexon genes undergo alternative splicing and produce a variety of splice variant transcripts and proteins, which can perform different functions. These protein-coding splice variants (PCSVs) greatly increase the functional diversity of proteins. Most functional annotation algorithms have been developed at the gene level; the lack of isoform-level gold standards is an important intellectual limitation for currently available machine learning algorithms. The accumulation of a large amount of RNA-seq data in the public domain greatly increases our ability to examine the functional annotation of genes at isoform level. In the present study, we used a multiple instance learning (MIL)-based approach for predicting the function of PCSVs. We used transcript-level expression values and gene-level functional associations from the Gene Ontology database. A support vector machine (SVM)-based 5-fold cross-validation technique was applied. Comparatively, genes with multiple PCSVs performed better than single PCSV genes, and performance also improved when more examples were available to train the models. We demonstrated our predictions using literature evidence of ADAM15, LMNA/C, and DMXL2 genes. All predictions have been implemented in a web resource called "IsoFunc", which is freely available for the global scientific community through http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isofunc . PMID:27142340

  12. Structure and functional annotation of hypothetical proteins having putative Rubisco activase function from Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Rubisco is a very large, complex and one of the most abundant proteins in the world and comprises up to 50% of all soluble protein in plants. The activity of Rubisco, the enzyme that catalyzes CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis, is regulated by Rubisco activase (Rca). In the present study, we searched for hypothetical protein of Vitis vinifera which has putative Rubisco activase function. The Arabidopsis and tobacco Rubisco activase protein sequences were used as seed sequences to search against Vitis vinifera in UniprotKB database. The selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera were subjected to sequence, structural and functional annotation. Subcellular localization predictions suggested it to be cytoplasmic protein. Homology modelling was used to define the three-dimensional (3D) structure of selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera. Template search revealed that all the hypothetical proteins share more than 80% sequence identity with structure of green-type Rubisco activase from tobacco, indicating proteins are evolutionary conserved. The homology modelling was generated using SWISS-MODEL. Several quality assessment and validation parameters computed indicated that homology models are reliable. Further, functional annotation through PFAM, CATH, SUPERFAMILY, CDART suggested that selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera contain ATPase family associated with various cellular activities (AAA) and belong to the AAA+ super family of ring-shaped P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases. This study will lead to research in the optimization of the functionality of Rubisco which has large implication in the improvement of plant productivity and resource use efficiency. PMID:25780274

  13. Systems Theory and Communication. Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, William G., Jr.

    This annotated bibliography presents annotations of 31 books and journal articles dealing with systems theory and its relation to organizational communication, marketing, information theory, and cybernetics. Materials were published between 1963 and 1992 and are listed alphabetically by author. (RS)

  14. Music Analysis: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Michael

    One hundred and forty citations comprise this annotated bibliography of books, articles, and selected dissertations that encompass trends in music theory and k-16 music education since the late 19th century. Special emphasis is upon writings since the 1950's. During earlier development, music analysts concentrated upon the elements of music (i.e.,…

  15. Teacher Aides; An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin County Public Schools, Corte Madera, CA.

    This annotated bibliography lists 40 items, published between 1966 and 1971, that have to do with teacher aides. The listing is arranged alphabetically by author. In addition to the abstract and standard bibliographic information, addresses where the material can be purchased are often included. The items cited include handbooks, research studies,…

  16. Staff Differentiation. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin County Superintendent of Schools, Corte Madera, CA.

    This annotated bibliography reviews selected literature focusing on the concept of staff differentiation. Included are 62 items (dated 1966-1970), along with a list of mailing addresses where copies of individual items can be obtained. Also a list of 31 staff differentiation projects receiving financial assistance from the U.S. Office of Education…

  17. Infant Feeding: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowhurst, Christine Marie, Comp.; Kumer, Bonnie Lee, Comp.

    Intended for parents, health professionals and allied health workers, and others involved in caring for infants and young children, this annotated bibliography brings together in one selective listing a review of over 700 current publications related to infant feeding. Reflecting current knowledge in infant feeding, the bibliography has as its…

  18. English Language Learners: Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hector-Mason, Anestine; Bardack, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This annotated bibliography represents a first step toward compiling a comprehensive overview of current research on issues related to English language learners (ELLs). It is intended to be a resource for researchers, policymakers, administrators, and educators who are engaged in efforts to bridge the divide between research, policy, and practice…

  19. Vietnamese Amerasians: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark C.; And Others

    This annotated bibliography on Vietnamese Amerasians includes primary and secondary sources as well as reviews of three documentary films. Sources were selected in order to provide an overview of the historical and political context of Amerasian resettlement and a review of the scant available research on coping and adaptation with this…

  20. Radiocarbon Dating: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortine, Suellen

    This selective annotated bibliography covers various sources of information on the radiocarbon dating method, including journal articles, conference proceedings, and reports, reflecting the most important and useful sources of the last 25 years. The bibliography is divided into five parts--general background on radiocarbon, radiocarbon dating,…

  1. Instructional Materials Centers; Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Rosario, Comp.

    An annotated bibliography lists 74 articles and reports on instructional materials centers (IMC) which appeared from 1967-70. The articles deal with such topics as the purposes of an IMC, guidelines for setting up an IMC, and the relationship of an IMC to technology. Most articles deal with use of an IMC on an elementary or secondary level, but…

  2. BIBLIOTHERAPY--AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RIGGS, CORINNE W.

    THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON BIBLIOTHERAPY IS COMPOSED OF 138 CITATIONS RANGING IN DATE FROM 1936 TO 1967. IT IS DESIGNED TO AID TEACHERS AND LIBRARIANS IN MODIFYING THE ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOR OF BOYS AND GIRLS. ITS LISTINGS ARE ARRANGED ALPHABETICALLY ACCORDING TO AUTHOR UNDER THE GENERAL DIVISIONS OF BOOKS, PERIODICALS, AND UNPUBLISHED…

  3. MSDAC Resource Library Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cristel; And Others

    This annotated bibliography lists books, films, filmstrips, recordings, and booklets on sex equity. Entries are arranged according to the following topics: career resources, curriculum resources, management, sex equity, sex roles, women's studies, student activities, and sex-fair fiction. Included in each entry are name of author, editor or…

  4. Teacher Evaluation: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Bernard H.; And Others

    In his introduction to the 86-item annotated bibliography by Mueller and Poliakoff, McKenna discusses his views on teacher evaluation and his impressions of the documents cited. He observes, in part, that the current concern is with the process of evaluation and that most researchers continue to believe that student achievement is the most…

  5. Workforce Reductions. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Thomas A.; Hickok, Thomas A.

    This report, which is based on a review of practitioner-oriented sources and scholarly journals, uses a three-part framework to organize annotated bibliographies that, together, list a total of 104 sources that provide the following three perspectives on work force reduction issues: organizational, organizational-individual relationship, and…

  6. Annotated Bibliography, Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Dept. of Education, Boston. Bureau of Nutrition Education and School Food Services.

    This annotated bibliography on nutrition is for the use of teachers at the elementary grade level. It contains a list of books suitable for reading about nutrition and foods for pupils from kindergarten through the sixth grade. Films and audiovisual presentations for classroom use are also listed. The names and addresses from which these materials…

  7. Appalachian Women. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Mary Margo

    This bibliography compiles annotations of 178 books, journal articles, ERIC documents, and dissertations on Appalachian women and their social, cultural, and economic environment. Entries were published 1966-93 and are listed in the following categories: (1) authors and literary criticism; (2) bibliographies and resource guides; (3) economics,…

  8. ChiTaRS 2.1--an improved database of the chimeric transcripts and RNA-seq data with novel sense-antisense chimeric RNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Gorohovski, Alessandro; Vucenovic, Dunja; Maestre, Lorena; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric RNAs that comprise two or more different transcripts have been identified in many cancers and among the Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) isolated from different organisms; they might represent functional proteins and produce different disease phenotypes. The ChiTaRS 2.1 database of chimeric transcripts and RNA-Seq data (http://chitars.bioinfo.cnio.es/) is the second version of the ChiTaRS database and includes improvements in content and functionality. Chimeras from eight organisms have been collated including novel sense-antisense (SAS) chimeras resulting from the slippage of the sense and anti-sense intragenic regions. The new database version collects more than 29,000 chimeric transcripts and indicates the expression and tissue specificity for 333 entries confirmed by RNA-seq reads mapping the chimeric junction sites. User interface allows for rapid and easy analysis of evolutionary conservation of fusions, literature references and experimental data supporting fusions in different organisms. More than 1428 cancer breakpoints have been automatically collected from public databases and manually verified to identify their correct cross-references, genomic sequences and junction sites. As a result, the ChiTaRS 2.1 collection of chimeras from eight organisms and human cancer breakpoints extends our understanding of the evolution of chimeric transcripts in eukaryotes as well as their functional role in carcinogenic processes. PMID:25414346

  9. The RNA WikiProject: community annotation of RNA families.

    PubMed

    Daub, Jennifer; Gardner, Paul P; Tate, John; Ramsköld, Daniel; Manske, Magnus; Scott, William G; Weinberg, Zasha; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Bateman, Alex

    2008-12-01

    The online encyclopedia Wikipedia has become one of the most important online references in the world and has a substantial and growing scientific content. A search of Google with many RNA-related keywords identifies a Wikipedia article as the top hit. We believe that the RNA community has an important and timely opportunity to maximize the content and quality of RNA information in Wikipedia. To this end, we have formed the RNA WikiProject (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_RNA) as part of the larger Molecular and Cellular Biology WikiProject. We have created over 600 new Wikipedia articles describing families of noncoding RNAs based on the Rfam database, and invite the community to update, edit, and correct these articles. The Rfam database now redistributes this Wikipedia content as the primary textual annotation of its RNA families. Users can, therefore, for the first time, directly edit the content of one of the major RNA databases. We believe that this Wikipedia/Rfam link acts as a functioning model for incorporating community annotation into molecular biology databases. PMID:18945806

  10. BioC viewer: a web-based tool for displaying and merging annotations in BioC

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Kim, Sun; Wilbur, W. John; Kwon, Dongseop

    2016-01-01

    BioC is an XML-based format designed to provide interoperability for text mining tools and manual curation results. A challenge of BioC as a standard format is to align annotations from multiple systems. Ideally, this should not be a major problem if users follow guidelines given by BioC key files. Nevertheless, the misalignment between text and annotations happens quite often because different systems tend to use different software development environments, e.g. ASCII vs. Unicode. We first implemented the BioC Viewer to assist BioGRID curators as a part of the BioCreative V BioC track (Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task). For the BioC track, the BioC Viewer helped curate protein-protein interaction and genetic interaction pairs appearing in full-text articles. Here, we describe the BioC Viewer itself as well as improvements made to the BioC Viewer since the BioCreative V Workshop to address the misalignment issue of BioC annotations. While uploading BioC files, a BioC merge process is offered when there are files from the same full-text article. If there is a mismatch between an annotated offset and text, the BioC Viewer adjusts the offset to correctly align with the text. The BioC Viewer has a user-friendly interface, where most operations can be performed within a few mouse clicks. The feedback from BioGRID curators has been positive for the web interface, particularly for its usability and learnability. Database URL: http://viewer.bioqrator.org PMID:27515823

  11. BioC viewer: a web-based tool for displaying and merging annotations in BioC.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Kim, Sun; Wilbur, W John; Kwon, Dongseop

    2016-01-01

    BioC is an XML-based format designed to provide interoperability for text mining tools and manual curation results. A challenge of BioC as a standard format is to align annotations from multiple systems. Ideally, this should not be a major problem if users follow guidelines given by BioC key files. Nevertheless, the misalignment between text and annotations happens quite often because different systems tend to use different software development environments, e.g. ASCII vs. Unicode. We first implemented the BioC Viewer to assist BioGRID curators as a part of the BioCreative V BioC track (Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task). For the BioC track, the BioC Viewer helped curate protein-protein interaction and genetic interaction pairs appearing in full-text articles. Here, we describe the BioC Viewer itself as well as improvements made to the BioC Viewer since the BioCreative V Workshop to address the misalignment issue of BioC annotations. While uploading BioC files, a BioC merge process is offered when there are files from the same full-text article. If there is a mismatch between an annotated offset and text, the BioC Viewer adjusts the offset to correctly align with the text. The BioC Viewer has a user-friendly interface, where most operations can be performed within a few mouse clicks. The feedback from BioGRID curators has been positive for the web interface, particularly for its usability and learnability.Database URL: http://viewer.bioqrator.org. PMID:27515823

  12. Video annotations of Mexican nature in a collaborative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oropesa Morales, Lester Arturo; Montoya Obeso, Abraham; Hernández García, Rosaura; Cocolán Almeda, Sara Ivonne; García Vázquez, Mireya Saraí; Benois-Pineau, Jenny; Zamudio Fuentes, Luis Miguel; Martinez Nuño, Jesús A.; Ramírez Acosta, Alejandro Alvaro

    2015-09-01

    Multimedia content production and storage in repositories are now an increasingly widespread practice. Indexing concepts for search in multimedia libraries are very useful for users of the repositories. However the search tools of content-based retrieval and automatic video tagging, still do not have great consistency. Regardless of how these systems are implemented, it is of vital importance to possess lots of videos that have concepts tagged with ground truth (training and testing sets). This paper describes a novel methodology to make complex annotations on video resources through ELAN software. The concepts are annotated and related to Mexican nature in a High Level Features (HLF) from development set of TRECVID 2014 in a collaborative environment. Based on this set, each nature concept observed is tagged on each video shot using concepts of the TRECVid 2014 dataset. We also propose new concepts, -like tropical settings, urban scenes, actions, events, weather, places for name a few. We also propose specific concepts that best describe video content of Mexican culture. We have been careful to get the database tagged with concepts of nature and ground truth. It is evident that a collaborative environment is more suitable for annotation of concepts related to ground truth and nature. As a result a Mexican nature database was built. It also is the basis for testing and training sets to automatically classify new multimedia content of Mexican nature.

  13. Use of Annotations for Component and Framework Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, O.; Lloyd, W.; Carlson, J.; Leavesley, G. H.; Geter, F.

    2009-12-01

    The popular programming languages Java and C# provide annotations, a form of meta-data construct. Software frameworks for web integration, web services, database access, and unit testing now take advantage of annotations to reduce the complexity of APIs and the quantity of integration code between the application and framework infrastructure. Adopting annotation features in frameworks has been observed to lead to cleaner and leaner application code. The USDA Object Modeling System (OMS) version 3.0 fully embraces the annotation approach and additionally defines a meta-data standard for components and models. In version 3.0 framework/model integration previously accomplished using API calls is now achieved using descriptive annotations. This enables the framework to provide additional functionality non-invasively such as implicit multithreading, and auto-documenting capabilities while achieving a significant reduction in the size of the model source code. Using a non-invasive methodology leads to models and modeling components with only minimal dependencies on the modeling framework. Since models and modeling components are not directly bound to framework by the use of specific APIs and/or data types they can more easily be reused both within the framework as well as outside of it. To study the effectiveness of an annotation based framework approach with other modeling frameworks, a framework-invasiveness study was conducted to evaluate the effects of framework design on model code quality. A monthly water balance model was implemented across several modeling frameworks and several software metrics were collected. The metrics selected were measures of non-invasive design methods for modeling frameworks from a software engineering perspective. It appears that the use of annotations positively impacts several software quality measures. In a next step, the PRMS model was implemented in OMS 3.0 and is currently being implemented for water supply forecasting in the

  14. Stackfile Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deVarvalho, Robert; Desai, Shailen D.; Haines, Bruce J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gilmer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This software provides storage retrieval and analysis functionality for managing satellite altimetry data. It improves the efficiency and analysis capabilities of existing database software with improved flexibility and documentation. It offers flexibility in the type of data that can be stored. There is efficient retrieval either across the spatial domain or the time domain. Built-in analysis tools are provided for frequently performed altimetry tasks. This software package is used for storing and manipulating satellite measurement data. It was developed with a focus on handling the requirements of repeat-track altimetry missions such as Topex and Jason. It was, however, designed to work with a wide variety of satellite measurement data [e.g., Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment -- GRACE). The software consists of several command-line tools for importing, retrieving, and analyzing satellite measurement data.

  15. Enabling Ontology Based Semantic Queries in Biomedical Database Systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuai; Wang, Fusheng; Lu, James; Saltz, Joel

    2012-01-01

    While current biomedical ontology repositories offer primitive query capabilities, it is difficult or cumbersome to support ontology based semantic queries directly in semantically annotated biomedical databases. The problem may be largely attributed to the mismatch between the models of the ontologies and the databases, and the mismatch between the query interfaces of the two systems. To fully realize semantic query capabilities based on ontologies, we develop a system DBOntoLink to provide unified semantic query interfaces by extending database query languages. With DBOntoLink, semantic queries can be directly and naturally specified as extended functions of the database query languages without any programming needed. DBOntoLink is adaptable to different ontologies through customizations and supports major biomedical ontologies hosted at the NCBO BioPortal. We demonstrate the use of DBOntoLink in a real world biomedical database with semantically annotated medical image annotations. PMID:23404054

  16. EXProt: a database for proteins with an experimentally verified function.

    PubMed

    Ursing, Björn M; van Enckevort, Frank H J; Leunissen, Jack A M; Siezen, Roland J

    2002-01-01

    EXProt is a non-redundant protein database containing a selection of entries from genome annotation projects and public databases, aimed at including only proteins with an experimentally verified function. In EXProt release 2.0 we have collected entries from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa community annotation project (PseudoCAP), the Escherichia coli genome and proteome database (GenProtEC) and the translated coding sequences from the Prokaryotes division of EMBL nucleotide sequence database, which are described as having an experimentally verified function. Each entry in EXProt has a unique ID number and contains information about the species, amino acid sequence, functional annotation and, in most cases, links to references in MEDLINE/PubMed and to the entry in the original database. EXProt is indexed in SRS at CMBI (http://www.cmbi.kun.nl/srs/) and can be searched with BLAST and FASTA through the EXProt web page (http://www.cmbi.kun.nl/EXProt/). PMID:11752251

  17. Annotation and Classification of Argumentative Writing Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the annotation and classification of students' revision behaviors in argumentative writing. A sentence-level revision schema is proposed to capture why and how students make revisions. Based on the proposed schema, a small corpus of student essays and revisions was annotated. Studies show that manual annotation is reliable with…

  18. Alcohol Education Materials; An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Gail Gleason

    This 873-item annotated bibliography cites books, pamphlets, leaflets, and other materials produced for education about alcohol from 1950 to May 1973. The major part of each annotation is a brief summary of the contents. The annotation also contains a statement of orientation or type of presentation and evaluative comments. Each item is classified…

  19. ParsEval: parallel comparison and analysis of gene structure annotations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate gene structure annotation is a fundamental but somewhat elusive goal of genome projects, as witnessed by the fact that (model) genomes typically undergo several cycles of re-annotation. In many cases, it is not only different versions of annotations that need to be compared but also different sources of annotation of the same genome, derived from distinct gene prediction workflows. Such comparisons are of interest to annotation providers, prediction software developers, and end-users, who all need to assess what is common and what is different among distinct annotation sources. We developed ParsEval, a software application for pairwise comparison of sets of gene structure annotations. ParsEval calculates several statistics that highlight the similarities and differences between the two sets of annotations provided. These statistics are presented in an aggregate summary report, with additional details provided as individual reports specific to non-overlapping, gene-model-centric genomic loci. Genome browser styled graphics embedded in these reports help visualize the genomic context of the annotations. Output from ParsEval is both easily read and parsed, enabling systematic identification of problematic gene models for subsequent focused analysis. Results ParsEval is capable of analyzing annotations for large eukaryotic genomes on typical desktop or laptop hardware. In comparison to existing methods, ParsEval exhibits a considerable performance improvement, both in terms of runtime and memory consumption. Reports from ParsEval can provide relevant biological insights into the gene structure annotations being compared. Conclusions Implemented in C, ParsEval provides the quickest and most feature-rich solution for genome annotation comparison to date. The source code is freely available (under an ISC license) at http://parseval.sourceforge.net/. PMID:22852583

  20. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do. PMID:26566288

  1. An Assessment of Reliability of Dialogue-Annotation Instructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, William C.; And Others

    This report is part of ongoing research engaged in transforming knowledge of how human communication works into improvements in man-machine communication of existing and planned computer systems. The methodology includes having a trained "Observer" annotate transcripts of human communication in a prescribed manner. One of the issues, therefore, in…

  2. Effects of Teaching Strategies in Annotated Bibliography Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan-de Ramos, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The study examines the effect of teaching strategies to improved writing of students in the tertiary level. Specifically, three teaching approaches--the use of modelling, grammar-based, and information element-focused--were tested on their effect on the writing of annotated bibliography in three research classes at a university in Manila.…

  3. Effective Schools for Culturally Diverse Students: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denbo, Sheryl, Comp.

    This 354-item annotated bibliography is intended to help teachers improve the educational experiences of diverse student bodies. Research reports, journal articles, books, and audiovisual materials are briefly described that focus on effective teaching methods for use with minority group students, special needs students, and females. The following…

  4. Design and Evaluation of Data Annotation Workflows for CAVE-like Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Pick, Sebastian; Weyers, Benjamin; Hentschel, Bernd; Kuhlen, Torsten W

    2016-04-01

    Data annotation finds increasing use in Virtual Reality applications with the goal to support the data analysis process, such as architectural reviews. In this context, a variety of different annotation systems for application to immersive virtual environments have been presented. While many interesting interaction designs for the data annotation workflow have emerged from them, important details and evaluations are often omitted. In particular, we observe that the process of handling metadata to interactively create and manage complex annotations is often not covered in detail. In this paper, we strive to improve this situation by focusing on the design of data annotation workflows and their evaluation. We propose a workflow design that facilitates the most important annotation operations, i.e., annotation creation, review, and modification. Our workflow design is easily extensible in terms of supported annotation and metadata types as well as interaction techniques, which makes it suitable for a variety of application scenarios. To evaluate it, we have conducted a user study in a CAVE-like virtual environment in which we compared our design to two alternatives in terms of a realistic annotation creation task. Our design obtained good results in terms of task performance and user experience. PMID:26780799

  5. IMG ER: A System for Microbial Genome Annotation Expert Review and Curation

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-05-25

    A rapidly increasing number of microbial genomes are sequenced by organizations worldwide and are eventually included into various public genome data resources. The quality of the annotations depends largely on the original dataset providers, with erroneous or incomplete annotations often carried over into the public resources and difficult to correct. We have developed an Expert Review (ER) version of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, with the goal of supporting systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotations. IMG ER provides tools for the review and curation of annotations of both new and publicly available microbial genomes within IMG's rich integrated genome framework. New genome datasets are included into IMG ER prior to their public release either with their native annotations or with annotations generated by IMG ER's annotation pipeline. IMG ER tools allow addressing annotation problems detected with IMG's comparative analysis tools, such as genes missed by gene prediction pipelines or genes without an associated function. Over the past year, IMG ER was used for improving the annotations of about 150 microbial genomes.

  6. AMASS: a database for investigating protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Clinton J.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Dinu, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Modern techniques have produced many sequence annotation databases and protein structure portals, but these Web resources are rarely integrated in ways that permit straightforward exploration of protein functional residues and their co-localization. Results: We have created the AMASS database, which maps 1D sequence annotation databases to 3D protein structures with an intuitive visualization interface. Our platform also provides an analysis service that screens mass spectrometry sequence data for post-translational modifications that reside in functionally relevant locations within protein structures. The system is built on the premise that functional residues such as active sites, cancer mutations and post-translational modifications within proteins may co-localize and share common functions. Availability and implementation: AMASS database is implemented with Biopython and Apache as a freely available Web server at amass-db.org. Contact: clinton.mielke@gmail.com PMID:24497503

  7. SABER: The Searchable Annotated Bibliography of Education Research in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, David; Bailey, Janelle M.; Brissenden, Gina

    Starting a new research project can be a challenge, but especially so in education research because the literature is scattered throughout many journals. Relevant astronomy education research may be in psychology journals, science education journals, physics education journals, or even in science journals. Tracking the vast realm of literature is difficult, especially because libraries frequently do not subscribe to many of the relevant journals and abstracting services. The Searchable Annotated Bibliography of Education Research (SABER) is an online resource that was started to service the needs of the astronomy education community, specifically to reduce this "scatter" by compiling an annotated bibliography of education research articles in one electronic location. Although SABER started in 2001, the database has a new URL—http://astronom- y.uwp.edu/saber/—and has recently undergone a major update.

  8. Is protein classification necessary? Towards alternative approaches to function annotation

    PubMed Central

    Petrey, Donald; Honig, Barry

    2009-01-01

    The current non-redundant protein sequence database contains over seven million entries and the number of individual functional domains is significantly larger than this value. The vast quantity of data associated with these proteins poses enormous challenges to any attempt at function annotation. Classification of proteins into sequence and structural groups has been widely used as an approach to simplifying the problem. In this article we question such strategies. We describe how the multi-functionality and structural diversity of even closely related proteins confounds efforts to assign function based on overall sequence or structural similarity. Rather, we suggest that strategies that avoid classification may offer a more robust approach to protein function annotation. PMID:19269161

  9. Automatic annotation of organellar genomes with DOGMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, Stacia; Jansen, Robert K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-06-01

    Dual Organellar GenoMe Annotator (DOGMA) automates the annotation of extra-nuclear organellar (chloroplast and animal mitochondrial) genomes. It is a web-based package that allows the use of comparative BLAST searches to identify and annotate genes in a genome. DOGMA presents a list of putative genes to the user in a graphical format for viewing and editing. Annotations are stored on our password-protected server. Complete annotations can be extracted for direct submission to GenBank. Furthermore, intergenic regions of specified length can be extracted, as well the nucleotide sequences and amino acid sequences of the genes.

  10. VCF-Miner: GUI-based application for mining variants and annotations stored in VCF files.

    PubMed

    Hart, Steven N; Duffy, Patrick; Quest, Daniel J; Hossain, Asif; Meiners, Mike A; Kocher, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing platforms are widely used to discover variants associated with disease. The processing of sequencing data involves read alignment, variant calling, variant annotation and variant filtering. The standard file format to hold variant calls is the variant call format (VCF) file. According to the format specifications, any arbitrary annotation can be added to the VCF file for downstream processing. However, most downstream analysis programs disregard annotations already present in the VCF and re-annotate variants using the annotation provided by that particular program. This precludes investigators who have collected information on variants from literature or other sources from including these annotations in the filtering and mining of variants. We have developed VCF-Miner, a graphical user interface-based stand-alone tool, to mine variants and annotation stored in the VCF. Powered by a MongoDB database engine, VCF-Miner enables the stepwise trimming of non-relevant variants. The grouping feature implemented in VCF-Miner can be used to identify somatic variants by contrasting variants in tumor and in normal samples or to identify recessive/dominant variants in family studies. It is not limited to human data, but can also be extended to include non-diploid organisms. It also supports copy number or any other variant type supported by the VCF specification. VCF-Miner can be used on a personal computer or large institutional servers and is freely available for download from http://bioinformaticstools.mayo.edu/research/vcf-miner/. PMID:26210358

  11. VCF-Miner: GUI-based application for mining variants and annotations stored in VCF files

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Steven N.; Duffy, Patrick; Quest, Daniel J.; Hossain, Asif; Meiners, Mike A

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing platforms are widely used to discover variants associated with disease. The processing of sequencing data involves read alignment, variant calling, variant annotation and variant filtering. The standard file format to hold variant calls is the variant call format (VCF) file. According to the format specifications, any arbitrary annotation can be added to the VCF file for downstream processing. However, most downstream analysis programs disregard annotations already present in the VCF and re-annotate variants using the annotation provided by that particular program. This precludes investigators who have collected information on variants from literature or other sources from including these annotations in the filtering and mining of variants. We have developed VCF-Miner, a graphical user interface-based stand-alone tool, to mine variants and annotation stored in the VCF. Powered by a MongoDB database engine, VCF-Miner enables the stepwise trimming of non-relevant variants. The grouping feature implemented in VCF-Miner can be used to identify somatic variants by contrasting variants in tumor and in normal samples or to identify recessive/dominant variants in family studies. It is not limited to human data, but can also be extended to include non-diploid organisms. It also supports copy number or any other variant type supported by the VCF specification. VCF-Miner can be used on a personal computer or large institutional servers and is freely available for download from http://bioinformaticstools.mayo.edu/research/vcf-miner/. PMID:26210358

  12. Comparative Analysis of Functional Metagenomic Annotation and the Mappability of Short Reads

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rogan; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-01-01

    To assess the functional capacities of microbial communities, including those inhabiting the human body, shotgun metagenomic reads are often aligned to a database of known genes. Such homology-based annotation practices critically rely on the assumption that short reads can map to orthologous genes of similar function. This assumption, however, and the various factors that impact short read annotation, have not been systematically evaluated. To address this challenge, we generated an extremely large database of simulated reads (totaling 15.9 Gb), spanning over 500,000 microbial genes and 170 curated genomes and including, for many genomes, every possible read of a given length. We annotated each read using common metagenomic protocols, fully characterizing the effect of read length, sequencing error, phylogeny, database coverage, and mapping parameters. We additionally rigorously quantified gene-, genome-, and protocol-specific annotation biases. Overall, our findings provide a first comprehensive evaluation of the capabilities and limitations of functional metagenomic annotation, providing crucial goal-specific best-practice guidelines to inform future metagenomic research. PMID:25148512

  13. The standard operating procedure of the DOE-JGI Metagenome Annotation Pipeline (MAP v.4).

    PubMed

    Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tripp, H James; Paez-Espino, David; Tennessen, Kristin; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Szeto, Ernest; Pillay, Manoj; Chen, I-Min A; Pati, Amrita; Nielsen, Torben; Markowitz, Victor M; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    The DOE-JGI Metagenome Annotation Pipeline (MAP v.4) performs structural and functional annotation for metagenomic sequences that are submitted to the Integrated Microbial Genomes with Microbiomes (IMG/M) system for comparative analysis. The pipeline runs on nucleotide sequences provided via the IMG submission site. Users must first define their analysis projects in GOLD and then submit the associated sequence datasets consisting of scaffolds/contigs with optional coverage information and/or unassembled reads in fasta and fastq file formats. The MAP processing consists of feature prediction including identification of protein-coding genes, non-coding RNAs and regulatory RNAs, as well as CRISPR elements. Structural annotation is followed by functional annotation including assignment of protein product names and connection to various protein family databases. PMID:26918089

  14. An agent-based system for re-annotation of genomes.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Leonardo Vianna do; Bazzan, Ana L C

    2005-01-01

    Genome annotation projects can produce incorrect results if they are based on obsolete data or inappropriate models. We have developed an automatic re-annotation system that uses agents to perform repetitive tasks and reports the results to the user. These tasks involve BLAST searches on biological databases (GenBank) and the use of detection tools (Genemark and Glimmer) to identify new open reading frames. Several agents execute these tools and combine their results to produce a list of open reading frames that is sent back to the user. Our goal was to reduce the manual work, executing most tasks automatically by computational tools. A prototype was implemented and validated using Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae original annotated genomes. The results reported by the system identify most of new features present in the re-annotated versions of these genomes. PMID:16342042

  15. Improving quality of breast cancer surgery through development of a national breast cancer surgical outcomes (BRCASO) research database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Common measures of surgical quality are 30-day morbidity and mortality, which poorly describe breast cancer surgical quality with extremely low morbidity and mortality rates. Several national quality programs have collected additional surgical quality measures; however, program participation is voluntary and results may not be generalizable to all surgeons. We developed the Breast Cancer Surgical Outcomes (BRCASO) database to capture meaningful breast cancer surgical quality measures among a non-voluntary sample, and study variation in these measures across providers, facilities, and health plans. This paper describes our study protocol, data collection methods, and summarizes the strengths and limitations of these data. Methods We included 4524 women ≥18 years diagnosed with breast cancer between 2003-2008. All women with initial breast cancer surgery performed by a surgeon employed at the University of Vermont or three Cancer Research Network (CRN) health plans were eligible for inclusion. From the CRN institutions, we collected electronic administrative data including tumor registry information, Current Procedure Terminology codes for breast cancer surgeries, surgeons, surgical facilities, and patient demographics. We supplemented electronic data with medical record abstraction to collect additional pathology and surgery detail. All data were manually abstracted at the University of Vermont. Results The CRN institutions pre-filled 30% (22 out of 72) of elements using electronic data. The remaining elements, including detailed pathology margin status and breast and lymph node surgeries, required chart abstraction. The mean age was 61 years (range 20-98 years); 70% of women were diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma, 20% with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 10% with invasive lobular carcinoma. Conclusions The BRCASO database is one of the largest, multi-site research resources of meaningful breast cancer surgical quality data in the United States

  16. A new Holocene sea-level database for the US Gulf Coast: Improving constraints for past and future sea levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijma, M.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Hu, P.; Gonzalez, J.; Hill, D. F.; Horton, B. P.; Engelhart, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    The interpretation of present-day sea-level change, as well as the prediction of future relative sea-level (RSL) rise and its spatial variability, depend increasingly on the ability of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models to reveal non-eustatic components of RSL change. GIA results from the redistribution of mass due to the growth and decay of ice sheets. As a consequence, formerly ice-covered areas are still rebounding and currently experience RSL fall, while in other areas the rate of RSL rise is enhanced due to glacial forebulge collapse. The development of GIA models relies to a large extent on the availability of quality-controlled Holocene RSL data. There is thus an urgent need for systematically compiled and publicly available databases of geological RSL data that can be used not only for the purposes mentioned above, but also can serve to underpin coastal management and policy decisions. We have focused our efforts to develop a Holocene sea-level database for the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US. Many of the research problems that can be addressed with this sea-level database revolve around the identification of crustal motions due to glacial forebulge collapse that affects the entire region and likely extends beyond South Florida. For the east coast, GIA-related subsidence rates have been calculated with unprecedented precision: <0.8 mm a-1 in Maine, increasing to rates of 1.7 mm a-1 in Delaware, and a return to rates <0.9 mm a-1 in the Carolinas. Here, we first define our methodology to reconstruct RSL, with particular reference to the quantification of age and elevation errors. Many sea-level indicators are related to a specific tide level (e.g., peat that formed between highest astronomical tide and mean high water level). We use paleotidal modeling to account for any changes during the Holocene. We furthermore highlight a number of errors associated with 14C dating that have rarely, if ever, been considered in previous studies of this nature

  17. Computational annotation of genes differentially expressed along olive fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Galla, Giulio; Barcaccia, Gianni; Ramina, Angelo; Collani, Silvio; Alagna, Fiammetta; Baldoni, Luciana; Cultrera, Nicolò GM; Martinelli, Federico; Sebastiani, Luca; Tonutti, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Background Olea europaea L. is a traditional tree crop of the Mediterranean basin with a worldwide economical high impact. Differently from other fruit tree species, little is known about the physiological and molecular basis of the olive fruit development and a few sequences of genes and gene products are available for olive in public databases. This study deals with the identification of large sets of differentially expressed genes in developing olive fruits and the subsequent computational annotation by means of different software. Results mRNA from fruits of the cv. Leccino sampled at three different stages [i.e., initial fruit set (stage 1), completed pit hardening (stage 2) and veraison (stage 3)] was used for the identification of differentially expressed genes putatively involved in main processes along fruit development. Four subtractive hybridization libraries were constructed: forward and reverse between stage 1 and 2 (libraries A and B), and 2 and 3 (libraries C and D). All sequenced clones (1,132 in total) were analyzed through BlastX against non-redundant NCBI databases and about 60% of them showed similarity to known proteins. A total of 89 out of 642 differentially expressed unique sequences was further investigated by Real-Time PCR, showing a validation of the SSH results as high as 69%. Library-specific cDNA repertories were annotated according to the three main vocabularies of the gene ontology (GO): cellular component, biological process and molecular function. BlastX analysis, GO terms mapping and annotation analysis were performed using the Blast2GO software, a research tool designed with the main purpose of enabling GO based data mining on sequence sets for which no GO annotation is yet available. Bioinformatic analysis pointed out a significantly different distribution of the annotated sequences for each GO category, when comparing the three fruit developmental stages. The olive fruit-specific transcriptome dataset was used to query all

  18. Vocational Education & Training Research Database, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Sarah, Comp.; MacKenzie, Jeanne, Comp.; Adams, Heather, Comp.; Harris, Lee-ann, Comp.

    1998-01-01

    This document contains four issues of a quarterly annotated bibliography of documents and projects in progress from Australia's VOCED database that are available through Australia's National Vocational Education and Training Clearinghouse Information Network. Introductory materials include the following: national, state, territory, and polytechnic…

  19. Descartes' fly: the geometry of genomic annotation.

    PubMed

    Kim, J

    2001-03-01

    The completion of the Drosophila melanogaster genome marks another significant milestone in the growth of sequence information. But it also contributes to the ever-widening gap between sequence information and biological knowledge. One important approach to reducing this gap is theoretical inference through computational technologies. Many computer programs have been designed to annotate genomic sequence information with biologically relevant information. Here, I suggest that all of these methods have a common structure in which the sequence fragments are "coordinated" by some method of description such as Hidden Markov models. The key to the algorithms lies in constructing the most efficient set of coordinates that allow extrapolation and interpolation from existing knowledge. Efficient extrapolation and interpolation are produced if the sequence fragments acquire a natural geometrical structure in the coordinated description. Finding such a coordinate frame is an inductive problem with no algorithmic solution. The greater part of the problem of genomic annotation lies in biological modeling of the data rather than in algorithmic improvements. PMID:11793243

  20. VHLdb: A database of von Hippel-Lindau protein interactors and mutations.

    PubMed

    Tabaro, Francesco; Minervini, Giovanni; Sundus, Faiza; Quaglia, Federica; Leonardi, Emanuela; Piovesan, Damiano; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) predispose to develop tumors affecting specific target organs, such as the retina, epididymis, adrenal glands, pancreas and kidneys. Currently, more than 400 pVHL interacting proteins are either described in the literature or predicted in public databases. This data is scattered among several different sources, slowing down the comprehension of pVHL's biological role. Here we present VHLdb, a novel database collecting available interaction and mutation data on pVHL to provide novel integrated annotations. In VHLdb, pVHL interactors are organized according to two annotation levels, manual and automatic. Mutation data are easily accessible and a novel visualization tool has been implemented. A user-friendly feedback function to improve database content through community-driven curation is also provided. VHLdb presently contains 478 interactors, of which 117 have been manually curated, and 1,074 mutations. This makes it the largest available database for pVHL-related information. VHLdb is available from URL: http://vhldb.bio.unipd.it/. PMID:27511743

  1. VHLdb: A database of von Hippel-Lindau protein interactors and mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tabaro, Francesco; Minervini, Giovanni; Sundus, Faiza; Quaglia, Federica; Leonardi, Emanuela; Piovesan, Damiano; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) predispose to develop tumors affecting specific target organs, such as the retina, epididymis, adrenal glands, pancreas and kidneys. Currently, more than 400 pVHL interacting proteins are either described in the literature or predicted in public databases. This data is scattered among several different sources, slowing down the comprehension of pVHL’s biological role. Here we present VHLdb, a novel database collecting available interaction and mutation data on pVHL to provide novel integrated annotations. In VHLdb, pVHL interactors are organized according to two annotation levels, manual and automatic. Mutation data are easily accessible and a novel visualization tool has been implemented. A user-friendly feedback function to improve database content through community-driven curation is also provided. VHLdb presently contains 478 interactors, of which 117 have been manually curated, and 1,074 mutations. This makes it the largest available database for pVHL-related information. VHLdb is available from URL: http://vhldb.bio.unipd.it/. PMID:27511743

  2. Cancer markers: integratively annotated classification.

    PubMed

    Orsini, M; Travaglione, A; Capobianco, E

    2013-11-10

    Translational cancer genomics research aims to ensure that experimental knowledge is subject to computational analysis, and integrated with a variety of records from omics and clinical sources. The data retrieval from such sources is not trivial, due to their redundancy and heterogeneity, and the presence of false evidence. In silico marker identification, therefore, remains a complex task that is mainly motivated by the impact that target identification from the elucidation of gene co-expression dynamics and regulation mechanisms, combined with the discovery of genotype-phenotype associations, may have for clinical validation. Based on the reuse of publicly available gene expression data, our aim is to propose cancer marker classification by integrating the prediction power of multiple annotation sources. In particular, with reference to the functional annotation for colorectal markers, we indicate a classification of markers into diagnostic and prognostic classes combined with susceptibility and risk factors. PMID:23928109

  3. mycoCLAP, the database for characterized lignocellulose-active proteins of fungal origin: resource and text mining curation support

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Kimchi; McDonnell, Erin; Nyaga, Carol; Wu, Min; Wu, Sherry; Almeida, Hayda; Meurs, Marie-Jean; Kosseim, Leila; Powlowski, Justin; Butler, Greg; Tsang, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes active on components of lignocellulosic biomass are used for industrial applications ranging from food processing to biofuels production. These include a diverse array of glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, polysaccharide lyases and oxidoreductases. Fungi are prolific producers of these enzymes, spurring fungal genome sequencing efforts to identify and catalogue the genes that encode them. To facilitate the functional annotation of these genes, biochemical data on over 800 fungal lignocellulose-degrading enzymes have been collected from the literature and organized into the searchable database, mycoCLAP (http://mycoclap.fungalgenomics.ca). First implemented in 2011, and updated as described here, mycoCLAP is capable of ranking search results according to closest biochemically characterized homologues: this improves the quality of the annotation, and significantly decreases the time required to annotate novel sequences. The database is freely available to the scientific community, as are the open source applications based on natural language processing developed to support the manual curation of mycoCLAP. Database URL: http://mycoclap.fungalgenomics.ca PMID:25754864

  4. Gene Coexpression